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SaltyFlorida.com

Franklin County features some of the finest fishing in the country all year long. Here’s a month-by-month look at what’s biting.

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o matter when you visit Franklin County there's always something biting. The big question is: “Where?” Naturally the best way to have fishing success is to hire a local guide who will know not only "Where?" but also "When?" and "On What?" Plus they will know the local waters which can be tricky. If you go on your own be sure to use a good chart and GO SLOW. Oyster bars teach harsh lessons. But if you can find an oyster bar on purpose then you have found a fish magnet and a great ingredient for success when fishing shallow waters (that is, not offshore). Oyster bars are one of what we call the Five Fish Magnets: oyster bars, beaches, grass beds, deep water and rivers/ creeks. We'll highlight these potential hot spots as we move through the shallow-water fishing year here on the Forgotten Coast. (A note about offshore fishing: Franklin County features a superb offshore fishery. Hiring a guide is the best way to safely enjoy this high-energy fishing experience, and there are many good guides in Franklin County. Experienced deep-water anglers know that

marinas are eager to share current information.)

January The cold start of the year finds resident fish in deep water such as Bob Sikes Cut at the far west end of St. George Island and the passes between islands.

Redfish will be the most common target - sometimes huge redfish. They are found on the bottom, most likely at a tide change or shortly thereafter. A large number of resident fish seek shelter in the rivers and creeks and, again, they are usually attracted to deeper spots like turns in the river bed and points where creeks/rivers meet. Redfish are likely to be in this number but also expect trout, whiting, and

flounder. The further up the rivers you go the more likely you are to find striped bass in the deeper holes (like around the railroad trestles up the Apalachicola River.)

February The colder this month is, the more like January it is. But things have been getting warmer earlier here lately and some time this month fish will start venturing out of rivers and creeks and the first place they will be found is around the closest shallow-water oyster bars. Shallow oyster bars and deep tidal currents make fishing on the east end of St. Vincent Island, called Dry Bar and St. Vincent Bar, a good bet that will only get better as the surface water continues to warm. This is the time of year to catch monster speckled trout on top of oyster bars very early in the Continued on page 32

Franklin County has a superb offshore fishery. Hiring a guide is the best way to safely enjoy this highenergy fishing experience.

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Franklin County, Florida Visitor Guide  

2014 Guide to Apalachicola, Alligator Point, Carrabelle, Eastpoint and St. George Island

Franklin County, Florida Visitor Guide  

2014 Guide to Apalachicola, Alligator Point, Carrabelle, Eastpoint and St. George Island