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PIERCE

vol. 2 no. 1 2009

ALUMNI MAGAZINE

James F. Birge shares his vision.

“Walk Across Europe” celebrating 40 years of magic Doctor of Physical Therapy inaugural program in Goodyear, Ariz.

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EDITOR Patricia Garrity ALUMNI RELATIONS DIRECTOR Shirley English-Whitman CONTRIBUTING WRITERS Doug DeBiase, Patricia Garrity, Cherryl Jensen, Randy Kennedy ‘85, Michelle Marrone, Caitlin Soha, Brian Stuart, Abbie Tumbleson ‘10 PHOTOGRAPHY Douglas Challenger, Sara Gray, Ryan E. Hulse ‘09, Ann Lafond, Gil Talbot, Jim VanCampen, Marilyn Weir, David White DESIGN Ryan E. Hulse Productions CHANGE OF ADDRESS Contact Alumni Relations Phone: 877.372.2586 e-mail: alumni@franklinpierce.edu

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COMMENTS Address all comments to: Pierce Radius Editor Marketing and Communications Franklin Pierce University 40 University Drive Rindge, NH 03461

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From the President

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Celebrating 40 years of “Walk� magic

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President Birge shares his vision

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Dresses that Heal

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Faculty Profile: Molly Haas

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D.P.T. in Goodyear, Ariz.

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Hard to miss Howdy

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Raven Athletics

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In the news

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Congratulations Class of 2009

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Class Notes

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In Memoriam

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Alumni in Action

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From the President of the Alumni Association

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Message from James F. Birge, President

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t is with great pleasure that I address the Franklin Pierce community of alumni, students, parents, faculty and staff. Since my arrival on campus just four months ago, I have met many wonderful people who live the University’s mission of developing ‘leaders of conscience’ everyday.

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Franklin Pierce University places a high value on educating students not only for professional expertise and competence, but also for understanding the call to be responsible members of their communities and to apply the skills they have to improve the lives of others. This focus on the purpose of education resonates deeply with my own values and is characteristic of the places where I want to be. These attributes are reflected in our faculty, such as Molly Haas and her dedicated work teaching writing and the first-year seminar to entering students, alums such as Rachael Rivard in her commitment to help breast cancer victims and in our DPT students who are enrolled in our first University program to be offered in Goodyear, Ariz. Among one of the most transforming, life-changing and unique Pierce offerings that has truly impressed me is The Walk in Europe which is celebrating its 40th anniversary this year. Since 1969, hundreds of Franklin Pierce students have traveled across Europe in this journey of self discovery. Read about these travels and be inspired as I have. Alums from the 70’s and 80’s will reminisce about the days when Howdy was a welcoming slogan on campus. Read about our former athletes who have continued

to excel; one as a soccer coach and another who was honored with induction into the New England Basketball Hall of Fame. At the 44th Commencement Exercises last May, I watched the newest class of Franklin Pierce University graduates take their first steps into the world as Alumni. Their enthusiasm and skills are what the world needs most at this moment in time, and I am grateful to have been there to see their excitement. It is a humbling experience to be the fourth President of this fine University and I look forward to sharing with you our greatest moments of accomplishment as well as our challenges as a University community. I also want you to deepen your relationship with us by participating in the many events we offer throughout the year, by visiting us on your travels through Rindge, and by remembering us in your philanthropy. In order to offer the kinds of activities that make us a learning community, we rely upon our friends and benefactors to support us. Now, more than ever, Franklin Pierce University needs your support. You will find an Annual Fund envelope attached to the inside back cover of this magazine as is the case with every issue. Please seriously consider a donation so that Franklin Pierce can continue to offer life-changing educational opportunities to our students. Warmly, James F. Birge President

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Eye opening. Transforming. Life changing.

W Celebrating 40 years of “Walk” magic - Randy Kennedy, ‘85

hile these terms are frequently referenced in college view books, they are offered up by real students every year to describe a very special program offered by Franklin Pierce since 1969 known simply as The Walk. As The Walk across Europe program celebrates 40 years, a handful of participants in the annual trek—the only program of its kind offered by any U.S. college or university—reflect on what makes it so special. Most agree that it’s all about the journey: walking, thinking and gaining new lessons from within while traveling 1500 miles across Old World landscapes. As Douglas Challenger, sociology professor and member of The Walk faculty, explained in a 2005 article “Europe on 15 Miles a Day” in The New York Times: “Hardly at any point in your life are you going to have this much time to just reflect on your life.” Each year, from July to November, 25-40 Franklin Pierce students travel with backpacks, camping gear and a 30’x 30’ tent. An advance team of three students drives ahead by van to map out the best route for walking. The revolving “van team” locates food, water, sanitary facilities and a good place to camp for the night. According to Professor Challenger, home for The Walkers each night could be a farmer’s field or a kind person’s front lawn. “Asking the Question” is often cited by participants in The Walk as one of the more obvious transformational moments. It represents an opportunity to obtain a campsite for your fellow students, many of them weary from the day’s travels, by asking a total stranger permission to camp on their property. Everyone has to do it—at least once. For most Walkers, it is also a crucial moment to gain the trust and acceptance of a local resident, or bear their rejection. “It happens,” Challenger explains, “but most Europeans respond favorably to the request and are charmed by the students and the sincerity of the whole Walk project.” The van team carries a letter from the college in the local language, explaining who the students are and what they need. Members of the team are expected to engage in a basic conversation with the potential host in their own language, pledging their group’s respect for the property. This forces students into an interaction with the locals in a way that is very personal and very different from any conventional study abroad experience.

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Matt Soule, ’06, recalls making his first request while walking t h r o u g h the French countryside in 2004, at the height of a heated war of words between politicians in the U.S. and Europe over the conflict in Iraq. “They were very gracious,” Soule recalls. He offered his thoughts to Lisa Leigh Connors for her 2005 story “No Hostility, Just Hospitality” in The Christian Science Monitor: “We’d ask a farmer if we could sleep on his land, he’d say yes, tell us where to find water, then never come check on us again.” Of the Europeans the group encountered, Soule explained that “they were open, warm and welcoming.” He says the group encountered few if any problems securing lodging for the night. “We weren’t sure what to expect given [the political climate] at the time, but the response was overwhelmingly positive.” The trek follows a different route through Europe each year. But it begins every summer on campus in Rindge, where participants gather prior to their July departure for a foreign-language class and a travel-philosophy seminar. The Walkers take part in practice-walk sessions and camping exercises. They then travel to the heart of Europe—where they walk for the remainder of the summer and most of the fall semester. The Walk was started at Franklin Pierce by Taylor Morris, a celebrated author and professor of English. Morris, who retired in 1992, explained to his students one day in 1968 that his regular 15 mile-walk from his home to campus allowed him to experience some great thoughts along the way. A group of faculty colleagues agreed with his assessment of the benefits of learning from walking—and in 1969 the first official Walk was born. Initially, The Walk took place every two years. Interest quickly grew, and the program became an annual event, with two groups of Franklin Pierce students hiking two different routes each fall. In addition to the two summer courses that precede the trip to Europe,

all students work on an independent project within their major during The Walk. The program, which is a pass/fail course, presents challenges not typically experienced on a college campus. They include the obvious physical demands of walking a total of 1500 miles in 100 days as well as learning to embrace the experience both as an individual and as a member of a team. “There are countless study abroad programs where the focus is on learning things about the places and people you are visiting,” Doug Challenger points out, “and there are many outdoor education programs where the point is to break out of your comfort zone and build self-confidence through confronting challenging tasks.” While The Walk has aspects of both of these, he maintains, it is really unlike either approach: “Instead the primary focus is on the self’s ‘awakening to the wonder of being,’ as the Romantic poets and writers like Wordsworth, Thoreau and Whitman put it, and on helping [participants] discover a deeper connection to themselves, others and the world.” The anecdotes of life along the way are enlightening, and seem as numerous as each mile walked over the years. Several participants from a 2004 Walk segment across Ireland recall meeting a local bus driver who let the group camp in his yard, offered food and drink and explained that he had to go back to work. “He left the front door open and encouraged everyone to ‘make themselves at home’ to wash up, shower and stay warm in his house,” recalled Stephen Coyle, who graduated in 2006 with a degree in psychology. He explained upon his return from the program that he had heard positive things about The Walk from upperclassmen when he was a freshman. “Everything they said was true,” he said. “The Walk was a wonderful and enlightening experience, and I have never met so many kind, welcoming and helpful people in my life.” While the act of walking remains the program’s keystone,

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Professor Challenger explained a few years ago in the feature “A Long Journey into the Self” in The Chronicle of Higher Education that oral presentations on various topics in European history and culture have become a bigger part of the pre-walk seminar. After nearly four months of walking and learning, the students return just prior to Thanksgiving break; they focus on family, friends, and on completing their independent projects and writing a long reflective essay on what The Walk has meant to them at home in the remaining weeks of the semester. Some visit campus to touch base with classmates before enjoying the holidays with their families. Walkers from previous years also help them recalibrate to American society and to the pace of campus life. Matt Soule’s readjustment also included embracing a rewarding new career path. Matt now lives in Boston, where he works as a videographer for a busy production company. “Before going on The Walk, I knew that I wanted to work in media, but didn’t really know which role I wanted to pursue,” he recalls. “I brought a video camera on The Walk with very little idea of what I was going to do with it,” he says. “Once I started taping, it became clear to me how unique everyone’s story was.” He says the interviews provided him with a new perspective on his own future. “While editing the twenty-six hours of walk footage, I realized that I really enjoyed the storytelling aspect of media,” he says. “Since then, I’ve continued refining my story telling skills, and working toward my goals to be a successful producer.” Steve Coyle now lives in Miami, where he earned a Master’s degree in psychology after graduating from Franklin Pierce. He serves as a school psychologist intern for Miami-Dade County Public Schools while working toward becoming a school psychologist. “This has really worked out for me,” he says, “but I often wonder if I would have been able to take some big chances, like making a jump from New England for South Florida, had I not gained so much

confidence from The Walk.” He adds: “I believe The Walk is a great experience because it is so unconventional. I even learned how to cook for a big group of hungry people when my cooking knowledge up to that point in time did not extend past knowing how to microwave a hot pocket. Most of all, I think I learned you have to be open to new experiences, because it gives you the opportunity to get so much back in return.” Richard Connell, the University’s Walk in Europe Liaison, explains that those returning from Europe often cite better physical and mental energy and a focus that is attributed to what is known as “Walk Magic” by participants. “The transformation is different from person to person, and depends upon what that individual takes away from their experiences,” he observes. “The Walkers transcend being merely individuals, and are actually part of a unique and cohesive unit where each person pulls his or her own weight in order to help the group thrive.” Connell’s observations are echoed by many former participants, including Courtney Garrity, a 2009 graduate and member of the 2006 Walk. “During The Walk I learned more about myself than I ever thought possible,” she says. “I learned how powerful and strong my body truly is to carry me 15 miles every day,” she notes. “When I came back from The Walk I [not only] felt as though I could do anything imaginable, I actually knew that I truly could do anything, and this is one of the best feelings in the world.” Students share their Walk experiences in Professor Douglas Challenger’s video on our Web site, www.franklinpierce.edu.

- Randy Kennedy, ’85 is president of Academy Communications, a higher education consulting group, and has helped the University secure feature coverage for The Walk in The New York Times, Chronicle of Higher Education, National Public Radio, Christian Science Monitor and other major news outlets.

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President James Birge shares his vision - Patricia Garrity

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r. James F. Birge was appointed the fourth President of Franklin Pierce University on April 7, 2009 and officially began his tenure on June 15, 2009. He most recently served as the Executive Vice President - Chief Operating Officer at Wheeling Jesuit University in Wheeling, W. Va, where he also served as Interim President from 2006 to 2007. In addition to overseeing academic affairs, Dr. Birge managed the strategic planning process, implemented an enrollment management model for stabilizing and growing enrollment, and implemented the restructuring of the university’s long-term debt. Dr. Birge holds a Ph.D. in Leadership Studies from Gonzaga University, an M.Ed. in Guidance and Counseling from Plymouth State University in New Hampshire and a B.S. in Elementary Education from Westfield State College in Massachusetts. His dissertation topic was “Academic Presidents as Public Leaders.” Soon after his arrival on campus this summer, Dr. Birge sat down with the Pierce Radius to share his vision for the University.

Pierce Radius: Tell us about your childhood. Dr. Birge: I grew up in Western Massachusetts, primarily in the town of Lee in Berkshire County. I have two sisters, Mary Kate is my older sister and Elizabeth (Liz) is my twin. My mother was a teacher, and my father, although he too studied to be a teacher, worked for the Social Security Administration. My parents placed a significant emphasis on education and the importance of being well-read and knowledgeable. These values appear to have influenced their children—among the three of us, we hold nine academic degrees.

Radius: Of all these lessons that you have learned in your life, which ones would you most like to pass on to your own children and to the students here at Franklin Pierce? Dr. Birge: I think my parents had it right—that education leads to an elevated life. Whether one wants to apply academic/professional skills to a career, or to know how to interpret poetry, or to engage in discourse on politics, or to examine national policies, or explore abstract art, or to do all of these things, an education

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serves as the foundation for how we understand the world and how to develop and strengthen our value systems. The world today is changing so rapidly with the development of technology and new learning systems that the speed with which one can acquire knowledge is fascinating and overwhelming. Understanding how to use these data and this knowledge effectively, not just efficiently, is framed by one’s ability to organize data, apply knowledge, test ideas and measure results. In other words, education is the foundation upon which we advance individually and collectively. Although getting and expanding upon an education was certainly an important value in my family, it was the greater value of possessing an intellectual curiosity that characterized my parents and that has served me well. My parents taught and demonstrated that learning does not end when one receives a degree—finishing college, to them and for my sisters and me, was merely the beginning of a life-long ethic of learning. I hope my children and our students will embrace that ethic.

Radius: What keeps you going when times get tough? Dr. Birge: My wife! Lisa and I met at Plymouth State when we were studying for our masters degrees. From an early stage in our relationship, she has been a source of inspiration for me. She always helps me focus on the big picture and helps me to think strategically when I am stymied. Lisa is one of those people who can put things into a context that is manageable and help me work through challenges. She is also tremendously fun to be around and knows how to share her joy for life with others.

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Radius: What are you most proud of? Dr. Birge: My kids. Lisa and I have three daughters: Caitlin (18), Margaret (14) and Siobhan (12). It is important to us that “the girls” have a well-rounded appreciation for learning. As such, they have learned to focus on academic performance. They are very athletic. They have participated in band, orchestra, or chorus and they spent many years performing Irish Step Dance.

Radius: How would you address potential students and families on the value of a private liberal arts education at Franklin Pierce both financially and academically? Dr. Birge: Students and their families have so many options today when making a college choice. And in today’s economic climate, many families decide on the least expensive option. This places extraordinary pressure on independent, liberal arts institutions to differentiate ourselves from the crowded landscape of higher education institutions. At Franklin Pierce, we can legitimately make the case for providing an environment where students are mentored by faculty who are committed to the mission of the institution—to educate leaders of conscience; where students will be exposed to peers from around the nation and the world and not just from their home state; where there is an emphasis upon preparing students for life not just providing them with a credential for their first job, and, most importantly; providing students with the skills for critical thinking, excellent writing, informed discourse and professional competence. All of these elements of a Franklin Pierce education distinguish us as an institution that provides an outstanding liberal arts education for the 21st century.

Radius: What were your first impressions of the Franklin Pierce community, Rindge and the greater Monadnock region when you first came to campus? Dr. Birge: When I first arrived on campus, it was the beauty of the area that was most impressive to me. I am hard pressed to describe with any accuracy the view of campus out of my office window. It would take a skilled poet to adequately describe what I see. What was most striking and compelling for me about my visit to campus as a

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candidate, and since I have arrived, is the resonance between what I heard students say about the University and what I read about it in the materials. Students described a place where they felt supported by faculty to stretch their intellect. They also described how the campus had a family feeling to it that allowed them to be comfortable here as a student.

Radius: Will you make your home in the Rindge area and will you be involved in campus life? Dr. Birge: We will live in Rindge. For most of my professional life, I have lived in the communities where I have worked and I see no reason to change that practice. We are excited to be residents here and look forward to meeting neighbors and friends in the community. Lisa, the girls, and I have always been active on campuses where I have worked. We enjoy watching performing arts programs, attending lectures and cheering on athletic teams. We are looking forward to participating in campus life!

Radius: What will be your biggest challenge? Dr. Birge: We have some serious challenges as a small, liberal arts University but we also have many opportunities. As the economy has contracted, students and their families have become much more discerning about their college choices. This is a real opportunity for us to ask ourselves how we portray the University to our prospective students. How do we differentiate ourselves from other small, private institutions and from less expensive public institutions? What do we offer prospective students and their families that others do not? How do we articulate the things that our current students experience so that prospective students choose us? The financial markets also effect our long term debt and the endowment. This, too, presents an opportunity for us to position the University as the “non-profit of choice� for alumni, friends and benefactors to support with their limited resources. I have already met with the Alumni Association leadership to learn about their experiences as students and to challenge them to be partners with the University in our efforts to recruit students and to improve upon the giving rate of our alumni. These are wonderful people who have a real love for their alma mater. I know they will serve us well with their work on our behalf. We have a growing College of Graduate and Professional Studies. With this growth comes some organizational issues that are unfamiliar to us and challenge us to stay integrated and respectful of each others cultures. As a University, we have the opportunity to highlight the teaching excellence, research and service of our faculty and of our students and to appreciate the differences in teaching styles, educational delivery systems and new pedagogy.

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Dresses that Heal - Caitlin Soha

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lass of 1999 graduate Rachael Rivard’s dedication to helping others, especially in such difficult economic times, is nothing short of remarkable. In 2004, while working as a bridal consultant in Madison, Wis. she met a bride in her twenties who was in remission from breast cancer. At one point, the young bride was not sure she would live to see her wedding day, and finding her perfect wedding dress filled her with mixed emotions. After that very powerful moment, Rivard says, “I felt like I had to do something.”

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And do something she did. Rivard teamed up with the Breast Cancer Recovery Foundation (BCRF) to form “Dresses That Heal.” Rivard says she chose the BCRF because its work to “free people from mental, emotional and spiritual aspect of cancer,” as well as the physical aspects. The BCRF organizes retreats for women recovering from cancer to regain their spiritual strength and learn to live again. Through “Dresses That Heal,” gowns donated by designers are auctioned off to raise money for the BRCF. Rivard credits Franklin Pierce University with instilling a sense of community in her. During her freshman year at Pierce, she volunteered as a candy striper at a hospital in Gardner. Working in several different departments on campus, from facilities to catering, she was able to play a part in every aspect of life at Franklin Pierce. “That’s one of the things I was really grateful of at Pierce was the accessibility to people you needed.” It was on the softball team at Franklin Pierce that Rivard met Kara Hofsaes ’98, who was “instrumental in getting “’Dresses That Heal’ to where it is today.” Hofsaes, who lives in New York, is an “amazingly talented individual, who went a long way from taking things from a thought

to an actual organization” Rivard says. Hofsaes designed the organization’s original website, and has designed or had a hand in designing all the graphic materials used at “Dresses That Heal” events. She also serves as Rivard’s energy source, cheerleader, and sounding board. “Kara has spent countless hours on the phone with me sorting out logistics to carry out the mission,” Rivard says. Though she is dedicated to her work, Rivard admits that there are obstacles when it comes to “Dresses That Heal.” When asked what the biggest challenge is, she doesn’t hesitate with her answer, “Time.” Both Rivard and Hofsaes work hard to balance their own lives, while still bettering the lives of others. “She and I have many conversations about that balance,” Rivard says. But she says the remarkable interaction she gets with people is reward enough for her work. “A bride came in whose mom had died of breast cancer a year earlier and wouldn’t be at her wedding. She tried on a dress and said ‘she’s here’,” Rivard recalls, “Seeing those moments makes the stress worth it.” Rivard says that “Dresses That Heal” is still a “project of passion” and she has high hopes for the future of the organization. One of those hopes is the idea for a reality television show, where women who have been touched by cancer can be made over and have the wedding of their dreams. “Sort of like an Extreme Makeover: Home Edition meets Project Runway,” she says. Rivard feels that a television show would help “Dresses That Heal” reach people on a national level. Until that dream is realized, people across the nation can support “Dresses that Heal” by shopping for their bridal needs in the Compassion Collection at www.dressesthatheal.org.

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Professor Molly Haas has found her calling

- Cherryl Jensen

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r. Mary “Molly” Haas is exactly where she wants to be, doing exactly what she wants to do.

As an assistant professor at Franklin Pierce University, she teaches writing and the first-year seminar to entering students. The courses are part of Franklin Pierce’s nationallyrecognized Individual and Community Integrated Curriculum, a sequence of classes with a common theme that students take throughout their undergraduate studies at the University. Though Haas had been teaching college English for more than 30 years prior to coming to Franklin Pierce in 2003, this is her first full-time teaching position. She earned her Ph.D. in English from Purdue University when she was in her 50s, after her six children had all left home. Along the way, she worked in a variety of jobs – manager of human resources, training coordinator for a computer software company and more. “Most of my jobs had a teaching component,” she says, “but I really wanted to teach all day.” Haas encourages her students to think of themselves as writers in control of their own work. “What I enjoyed about her (Haas’) class assignments,” says Tiffany Reeves, a Franklin Pierce junior majoring in psychology, “was the fact that they were all useful…. She gave us freedom with subject matter that really made me enjoy what I was doing and feel proud of my accomplishments.” Reeves also enjoyed the way Haas critiques and grades student papers. It is not the conventional method of taking papers home, writing comments on them and returning them to the students. “I do all my grading in 15-minute conferences with my students,” Haas says, “which means I meet at least five times a semester with each student. I used to take the papers home and write lots of comments on them. I know this works for many of my colleagues, but I found that many students would only look at the grades.” Now, the students sit at the computer with Haas beside them as they work together on an electronic draft of the paper. She urges students to be actively involved in the process, writing the comments and eventually the grade on the paper themselves. “It’s a dialogue rather than one-way,” Haas says. “That’s very compelling for a writer . . .and for a teacher.”

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Inaugural class begins Doctor of Physical Therapy program in Goodyear, Ariz. - Michelle Marrone & Brian Stuart

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wenty students from across the country began their studies in Franklin Pierce University’s inaugural Doctor of Physical Therapy (D.P.T.) class in Goodyear, Ariz. this summer, marking a milestone in the University’s partnership with the City of Goodyear to increase educational opportunities in the region through a collaborative higher education system. “This accomplishment is significant in many ways,” said Andrea Brode, Director of Franklin Pierce University’s Goodyear Campus. “First, we are extending our nationally-accredited D.P.T. program from New Hampshire to Arizona in order to provide more options to more students and to meet a growing need for physical therapists. Second, this is our first University program to be offered in Goodyear, and third, it serves as a major step in our ongoing commitment to this region.”

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Physical Therapy classes are conducted in a newly renovated facility that includes state-of-the-art technology equipped classrooms, a computer lab and two clinical labs where students learn physical therapy diagnostic and treatment skills using the latest equipment available: interactive software programs, hospital and clinical supplies, a mock hospital room, exercise equipment, mannequins and computerized simulation mannequins. Unique in physical therapy education, these simulation mannequins offer students practice in clinical decision-making in a realistic, yet safe manner. In addition to the physical therapy program, an associate degree in nursing program is in development for the Goodyear campus. The close proximity of the two programs will create opportunities for students in each discipline to learn more about multidisciplinary patient care. The University’s long-term vision is to work with city leaders to create an innovative higher education consortium of colleges and universities that offers students a wide variety of options at a single site. The full-time physical therapy faculty on the Goodyear campus includes Dr. Kristinn Heinrichs, Associate Director of the program; Mr. Stephen Dillon, Assistant Professor and Academic Coordinator of Clinical Education; and Dr. Jodi Young, Assistant Professor. In addition to the full-time faculty, Dr. Mark Preul, Director of Neurosurgery Research at Barrow Neurological Institute in Phoenix, Ariz. and Dr. Karl Krout of the Biology Department at Glendale Community College comprise the basic science faculty.

(Left to Right) D.P.T. Associate Director, Dr. Kristinn Heinrichs with students James Hadley and Nicole Harvey.

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“It has been exciting to welcome this first group of students to this new expansion program,” said Heinrichs. “We’ll have the honor of helping them develop the knowledge, flexibility and skills they’ll need to become excellent clinicians who will contribute to the health and well-being of their patients. We look forward to educating these future physical therapists who will understand and work with the massive changes facing both consumers and providers of health care.” Students hail from across the United States and were attracted to Franklin Pierce University’s Arizona campus because of the small class size, location and the opportunity to develop close relationships with the faculty. Jenna Sligar, of Tempe, Ariz., noted, “I chose Franklin Pierce because I was excited about the small class size that would allow us to interact with our professors on a more personal basis and because I already knew one of the faculty.” The program is designed to be completed in three academic years, with new student cohorts beginning each June. Coursework is derived from an established theoretical and scientific base that equips graduates to apply their skills in such settings as hospitals, skilled nursing and assisted living facilities, outpatient clinics, wellness and sports facilities and private homes. The curriculum includes 32 weeks of full-time clinical placement which can be completed at sites throughout the country. Clinical partnerships have been formed with Banner system of hospitals, the Cleveland Indians, Athletes Performance, HealthSouth Rehabilitation Hospitals, Physiotherapy Associates, Arizona Orthopedic Physical Therapy and Luke Air Force Base.

Meet the Goodyear, Arizona D.P.T. Faculty Kristinn I. Heinrichs, Ph.D., P.T., S.C.S., A.T.C., C.S.C.S. Associate Director of Physical Therapy Program, Associate Professor Ph.D., University of Virginia M.Ed., University of Virginia B.S.P.T., Marquette University Dr. Heinrichs brings more than 29 years experience in orthopedics and sports medicine to the program. She is boardcertified in sports physical therapy, a certified athletic trainer and is a highlyrespected international author and educator with ongoing clinical research collaboration with several universities. Her international sports medicine experience includes providing care to athletes ranging from Division I athletics to international venues, including several world championships and Olympic Games. She maintains a clinical practice with White Tanks Physical Therapy in Goodyear, where she specializes in performance analysis in golf and the performing arts.

Stephen Dillon, P.T., M.S.P.T., M.B.A. Assistant Professor, Academic Coordinator of Clinical Education M.S.P.T., Va. Commonwealth University M.B.A., Thunderbird University B.B.A., University of Georgia Mr. Dillon specializes in the management of orthopedic conditions with a special emphasis on manual therapy. He maintains part-time orthopedic and occupational 13 health physical therapy practice in Arizona. Dillon draws upon his extensive experience in outpatient, skilled nursing and home health therapy in his teaching.

Jodi Young, D.P.T. Assistant Professor

Dr. Young’s experience is in outpatient orthopedics. She maintains part-time orthopedic and occupational health physical therapy practice with Mr. Dillon. Young plans to pursue a Ph.D. in the near future with an emphasis on Rehabilitation Sciences.

Dr. Heinrichs’ years of international sport rehabilitation experience and collaboration with the Institute for Sport Science and the International Master’s degree program at Otto von Guericke University in Magdeburg, Germany may provide students with opportunities for international study, as well. “What is unique about our program is that it incorporates the University’s mission to produce leaders of conscience,” said Dr. James Birge, President of Franklin Pierce University. “Graduates of all of our programs – from our undergraduate degrees through our doctoral programs – are both highly-skilled professionals and compassionate, service-oriented practitioners who exhibit social and ethical responsibility in their personal lives and vocations.”

D.P.T., University of North Dakota B.A., Concordia College

For more information on the Doctor of Physical Therapy program go to: franklinpierce.edu/dpt

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Hard to miss

Howdy - Abbie Tumbleson ‘10

was an entity of Franklin Pierce that took on many forms in the late 1970s into the 1980s. It was printed across T-shirts, the theme for first-year orientation and a greeting used to welcome new students.

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The preceding slogan to “Howdy” was “I Am Your Leader,” which was slightly intimidating to some. William N. Chappell ’76 and his peers suggested this new slogan to then Dean Dan Leary. Chappell remembered Dean Leary’s face lighting up at the suggestion. It was voted on and received positive feedback, hence the birth of “Howdy.” First year students would drive up to four corners, the intersection between Digregorio, to receive their Howdy T-shirts. “Howdy” went beyond a simple greeting and stuck with people. Provost Kim Mooney ’83 said, “Something about that word [howdy] that has represented unconditional friendship, which is the feeling I had about the campus and student body at that time.” She was a Residential Advisor (RA) during the 1981 academic year. Don Schriefer and his wife Judy were in charge of the new students when they came to Franklin Pierce. They helped develop the freshmen orientation program every incoming student still goes through. Schriefer worked at the college from 1977 to 1998. Schriefer recalled all the students and peer groups gathering on the manor lawn. Schriefer would tell the students, “If you have a question, look for a Howdy.” In 1986, Howdy peer groups built an adventure course in the woods. Obstacles included getting over ten foot walls, and trust falls with their peer leaders and faculty advisors, according to Schriefer.

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All elements of the orientation focused on trust, bonding and leadership development. “Don Schriefer got us out in front of the library and we had to get ready. Brian Lessard ‘83 led this chant. He would swing his arms and the chant would get louder. There was a lot of bonding among the orientation group itself,” said Mooney. In returning years, alumni would come back to the University during alumni weekend and wear their Howdy T-shirts, according to Schriefer. “It [Howdy] was a goal to make wpeople feel comfortable. Howdy equaled a friendly gesture and stuck w w . f r a n k l i n p i e r c e . e d u with everybody,” he said. Lessard saw his tour guide wearing a “Howdy” shirt while searching for colleges. He saw that shirt again the next Fall when he was “bombarded by what seemed like 50 or so people wearing them” when they helped him move into his dorm. Lessard knew he was in the right place. “Franklin Pierce shaped me to be a better person, a better husband, a better father and a better friend. For that I will always be grateful,” he said. Vice President and Athletic Director Bruce Kirsh ’71 has seen Franklin Pierce through many transitions. “I’ve seen the university evolve from a young, aspiring institution growing dramatically over the last 40 years. There has always been a sense of community, family. We try to make students and families feel like this is a second home. It’s been real. People who have come here get that sense. Whether faculty, staff or alums, I think it’s been passed on over the course of time.” Howdy has stuck with Franklin Pierce as well as the community aspect it portrayed. “I can’t even tell you how long I used that greeting after college. I still use it sometimes. It’s so friendly,” said Mooney.

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ATHLETICS Former Women’s Soccer Standout Pauliina Miettinen Named Head Coach of Sky Blue FC in the WPS Helped lead Franklin Pierce to four NCAA titles; three as player, one as assistant coach - Doug DeBiase

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ormer Franklin Pierce University women’s soccer standout Pauliina Miettinen ’99 was recently named the head coach of Sky Blue FC in the Women’s Professional Soccer League. The announcement was made at the team’s headquarters in Somerset, N.J. Sky Blue are the defending champions in the WPS, having won the title in 2009.

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“I am very excited to be involved with the Sky Blue FC family and the professional atmosphere of the team,” Miettinen said in a press release on the team’s official Web site. “After I visited New Jersey and the Sky Blue FC organization, there was no doubt in my mind that I wanted to be a part of this family. I am looking forward to coaching these dynamic athletes, and to working hard to prepare for the 2010 season and ensure the success of this team in the world’s most competitive women’s soccer league.” Miettinen has had a fabulous career as both a player and a coach. As a player, Miettinen capped nine times for the Finnish National Team as a goalkeeper before heading to Franklin Pierce. Upon arriving in Rindge, she was switched to forward and began the process of rewriting the NCAA record books. A three-year captain for the Ravens, Miettinen received All-America accolades on three occasions while recording an NCAA-record 309 points on 122 goals and 65 assists. She helped guide Franklin Pierce to three Division II national titles during her time at the school. Miettinen also played seven seasons in the Finnish Premier League, where she helped direct HAK Helsinki to four national championships, four Finnish Cup titles and a UEFA Champions League semifinal berth. She graduated from Franklin Pierce in 1999 with her Bachelor of Science degree in secondary education and psychology. Miettinen continued playing and continued to switch positions following her exceptional career at Franklin Pierce. She switched to

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defender and capped 17 more times for the Finnish National Team, becoming one of the only players in modern day soccer to play both on the field and in goal at the international level. “I think it happened because of my love for soccer and sports,” Miettinen said in the press release. “You have to see your dream, and believe in that dream.” Miettinen has top-level coaching experience in both her native Finland and the United States. Her coaching career began a little more than 10 years ago at her alma mater. In 1999, Miettinen served as an assistant coach at Franklin Pierce, and helped guide the Ravens to their fourth national title in five years. She then moved on to Barry University in Miami Shores, Fla., in 2001, and assisted that program in making three-straight NSCAA Top-11 finishes. Miettinen also spent time at Florida State in 2005 and helped lead the Seminoles to the NCAA College Cup Semifinals that year. She is currently the head coach for PK-35 in Helsinki, Finland, which is tied for first place in the Finnish Premier League. Before joining PK-35, Miettinen spent two years at FC Kontu in Helsinki. “We decided our goal was to have a female coach since we are a female team in a female league,” Sky Blue FC General Manager Gerry Marrone said in the press release. “Pauliina is an experienced player at the highest level. Her successful versatility as a player is matched by her ability as a coach, having had success at both the American collegiate level and internationally in Finland.” Miettinen’s new players are also excited that she is joining the organization. “I am excited to have Pauliina Miettinen as our new head coach,” team captain Christie Rampone said in the release. “She is a wonderful person and comes highly recommended from many successful people in the women’s game.” Created in 2007, the WPS recently completed its inaugural season of competition in 2009. Sky Blue FC defeated the Los Angeles Sol, 1-0, back on Aug. 22 in the league’s inaugural championship match. The league is comprised of nine teams across the country, and its regular season runs from early-April to early-August. - For more information on Franklin Pierce women’s soccer, please visit the team’s page at http://athletics.franklinpierce.edu.

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Former Men’s Basketball Star Larry Leach Inducted Into New England Basketball Hall of Fame Ranks among the top-10 in school history in six categories - Doug DeBiase

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ormer Franklin Pierce University men’s basketball standout Larry Leach was part of the 2009 class inducted into the New England Basketball Hall of Fame on Oct. 9, 2009 at Mohegan Sun.

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Leach ranks among the top-10 in program history in six categories. He ranks first in career scoring (2,226 points), first in career steals (430), first in singleseason field goal percentage (.702), first in single-season steals (117), fourth in career rebounds (791) and ninth in career assists (291). His uniform number of 00 was retired in 1982 and he was inducted into the Franklin Pierce University Sports Hall of Fame in 1988. “It’s a great honor for me and it’s a great honor for the University,” said Leach, who is the third all-time leading scorer in New Hampshire college basketball history.” As usual, nothing can be accomplished without having great teammates. I was lucky to have great teammates who wanted to win and be the best.” Leach helped guide Franklin Pierce to three Mayflower Conference championships and helped the school capture three NAIA District V titles. He was a member of the 1980-81 team, which posted a school-record 31 wins (31-4), and downed Southern Maine, 90-65, in the NAIA Division V championship game. “I’m very proud of Larry Leach and honored to have coached him,” Vice President/Director of Athletics Bruce Kirsh said. “His career at Franklin Pierce was remarkable and he helped shape the program in the way we believed it could be.”

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Athletics Online Store Is Now Open

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enior midfielder Gabriela Demoner is having one fantastic 2009 season for Franklin Pierce. The following statistics speak for themselves. As of the NCAA’s most recent statistical report on Sept. 27, Demoner leads the NCAA (Division I, II and III) in goals (20), goals per game (2.22), points per game (4.89), and is tied for first in points (44). She is the first player nationally to reach 20 goals scored this season and is the only athlete in the nation to average at least two goals per game. Demoner is one of just two players in all three divisions to average at least 4.0 points per game.

ans wishing to buy Ravens gear now have the opportunity to do so through the athletic department’s Web site, athletics.franklinpierce. edu. The department officially launched its online store on Thursday, Oct. 1, and features several products from top name brands (Adidas, Champion etc). The range of clothing available in the store includes: polo shirts (men’s & women’s), hooded sweatshirts, wind breakers and hats. “We are very excited about the new online store,” Franklin Pierce Vice President/Director of Athletics Bruce Kirsh said. “The store features several different items for different times of the year. The Franklin Pierce logo is prominently displayed on the clothing, so fans can wear the products with pride and let everyone know who they are rooting for.” Fans wishing to purchase from the online store can do so by visiting the athletics Web site and click on the online store button on the right-hand side of the home page.

Raven Student-Athletes To Take Part In Breast Cancer Walk

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ranklin Pierce student-athletes took part in several community events this year, including the Making Strides Against Breast Cancer Walk, Oct. 18, in Peterborough, N.H. This is the third-consecutive year Raven student-athletes walked for the cause and a record number of teams will be taking part in the event this year.

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Baseball

Men’s Lacrosse

Golf

The Ravens opened the season with a combined no-hitter at Dowling on Feb. 21 and never looked back, as they racked up a 37-18 record, including a 24-6 Northeast-10 Conference mark which earned the club its third conference regular season title in the last four years. After dropping the first game of the Northeast-10 Conference Championship to New Haven, Franklin Pierce rattled off four consecutive wins and defeated Assumption twice on May 10, 25-6 and 6-1, to pick up its third consecutive conference championship, as well as the fourth in the last five years. The Ravens hosted an NCAA Division II Championship Regional at Dr. Arthur and Martha Pappas Field for the fifth consecutive season. Tom Cote, Mike Dowd, Rob Nicholas and Kyle Vazquez all received AllAmerica honors from various outlets at the conclusion of the season and were among nine Ravens to earn All-Northeast-10 Conference honors. Dowd earned East Region Rookie of the Year honors in addition to Northeast-10 Co-Freshman of the Year accolades, while Vazquez was selected as Northeast-10 Pitcher of the Year. Over the summer, Vazquez was selected by the San Francisco Giants in the 15th round (447 overall) of the Major League Baseball First-Year Player Draft.

Franklin Pierce was led on the men’s lacrosse field by Jack Scanlan, who piled up 22 points on 14 goals and eight assists. Meanwhile, Jason Flanigan tallied 15 points on 14 goals and one assist and Ryan Boller reached double digits as well, with seven goals and five assists for 12 points. Off the field, the Ravens saw success in the classroom, as Jon Priest and his 3.31 grade-point average were named to the Northeast-10 Conference AllAcademic Team. The Ravens will be under new leadership in 2010, as Rick Senatore takes over head coaching duties after three successful seasons at fellow Northeast-10 institution Saint Anselm.

After finishing 11th at the Northeast-10 Conference Championship in the fall, the golf team picked up a win in the spring portion of the season, as it finished first out of seven teams at the Elms College Invitational. Brian Fleckles shot a 74 at the par-71 Chicopee Country Club to take home medalist honors. In addition, Fleckles and Bobby Greggerson earned trimedalist honors to lead the Ravens to a third-place finish at the Franklin Pierce Spring Invitational. Owen Houghton retired as Head Coach after 22 years with the program at the conclusion of the season, but remains on-board as Assistant Coach under first-year Head Coach Greg Scerbinski in 2009-10.

Softball Franklin Pierce was led by Courtney Jacobs who posted a 2.76 earned-run average over 137 innings in the circle in her senior season. Jacobs graduated from Franklin Pierce as the program’s all-time leader in games pitched (85) and strikeouts (454). She also ranked in the top-10 in program annals in wins, earned-run average, innings pitched and complete games. Offensively, the Ravens were led by Stephanie Howard, who hit .257 with six doubles, two home runs and 15 runs batted in.

Women’s Lacrosse Women’s Lacrosse rattled off a 4-6 Northeast-10 Conference record in 2009, which earned the program its first berth in the Northeast-10 Conference Championship since 2003. The Ravens were led by Lauren Stille, who piled up 77 points on 64 goals and 13 assists, to place second in program history in single-season totals for all three categories, behind only her own totals from the 2008 campaign. Through just her sophomore season, Stille is only nine points behind the school’s all-time career scoring record and 14 goals behind the goalscoring record. She already is the program’s all-time leader in assists. Stille was an All-Northeast-10 Conference First Team selection at the end of the season, while goalkeeper Jillian Bolduc was named to the conference’s All-Rookie Team. In addition, Kimberly Jaksina was selected to the All-Rookie Team at womenslacrosse.com.

Men’s Tennis

Helder Noguiera led the way for Franklin Pierce in the 2008-09 season, as he put together a 3-6 record at first singles. Ryo Miyazaki posted a 3-4 record as he saw time at fourth, fifth and sixth singles. In doubles play, the team of Noguiera and Adit Phataraprasit posted a 2-3 record in first doubles for Franklin Pierce. The Ravens are under new leadership in 2009-10, as John Losordo takes over head coaching duties.

Women’s Tennis The Ravens were led in 2008-09 by Suzana Deronjic, who posted a 4-7 record in singles play, as she saw time at first, second and third singles. In addition, Drew Alexander (2-11), Kaitlin Krolikowski (2-10) and Lauren Smilovich (2-10) each picked up a pair of singles wins for Franklin Pierce. In doubles play, Alexander and Smilovich teamed up to post a 2-6 record at second singles, while Smilovich also posted a 2-2 record in four appearances at third singles with Bianca LaPointe. The Ravens are under new leadership in 2009-10, as John Losordo takes over head coaching duties.

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In

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Franklin Pierce University Installs New Wood Pellet Boilers on Rindge Campus Franklin Pierce University installed the school’s new wood pellet thermal heating systems in October, bringing the University another step closer to establishing itself as one of the first educational institutions to heat its buildings with clean burning wood pellets. The fully integrated alternative heating system provided by Inter-

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national WoodFuels (www.iwoodfuels.com) of Portland, Maine, will reduce the University’s annual fuel costs, while decreasing the school’s yearly consumption of fossil fuels by approximately 50,000 gallons of heating oil and 109,000 gallons of propane, which is a win-win for the educational community and the environment.

The state-of-the-art biomass thermal heating units, which are completely self contained in garage sized housing structures, will fulfill goals set forth by the University’s Commitment to Climate Neutrality Initiative by cutting

“We are very pleased to see the installation of the wood

annual carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions by approximately

pellet heating systems at both the West Side Residence

1100 metric tons, or 13 percent of the school’s current

Halls and the North Field Activity Center,” said Dr. James

CO2 output. The WoodFuels system is completely auto-

Birge, President of Franklin Pierce University. “This is a

mated and is monitored in real time by WoodFuels tech-

clear and highly visible example of the University’s com-

nicians and Franklin Pierce maintenance staff, allowing

mitment to continuing our efforts to become more

for maximum efficiency during operation. Unique to the

green and sustainable. Having this initiative move for-

WoodFuels program, the University is not required to

ward is a testament to the good work being done by

pre-buy pellets, but rather pays monthly for the BTU’s

the Sustainability Council at Franklin Pierce.” University

that the system consumes, and the company delivers

Vice President and Athletic Director Bruce Kirsh said that

locally sourced pellet fuel as needed. Both the thermal

the University will move forward with converting other

heating units and storage silos are currently in place and

campus buildings to more-efficient and environmentally-

are being attached to the buildings existing piping and

friendly heating sources as capital budgets and technol-

heating loops. The systems will be operational beginning

ogy permits.

November 2009.

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Scholarship Fund Recognizes Achievements of Motorsports Journalist Mike Harris

years of covering motorsports. “Honestly those of you who are in this room, who I know and have been around for so many years, I’m going to miss all of you,” said Harris.

Photo: NHMS

On his last day covering racing for the Associated Press, Mike Harris was honored by New Hampshire Motor Speedway and Franklin Pierce University with a scholarship recognizing his accomplishments in journalism.

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Dr. James Birge, president of Franklin Pierce University, and Dr. Kristen Nevious, director of the school’s Fitzwater Center, were on hand for the scholarship dedication ceremony. “We’re grateful for your work and all the good things you’ve done for sports journalism,” Dr. Birge said, presenting Harris with an endorsed copy of former Press Secretary Marlin Fitzwater’s book Call The Briefing!: Bush and Reagan. “This is an incredible honor,” said Harris. “It’s going to be a pleasure to be involved in this.” The Michael Harris Sports Journalism Scholarship Fund will go into effect starting this fall semester. It is awarded to a junior or senior majoring in Mass Communications who has achieved a grade point average of 3.0 or better and has a proven financial need. The student will have demonstrated active participation and leadership in the Fitzwater Center’s Pierce Media Group Sports Center. The scholarship recipient will be selected by Dr. Nevious. “The Fitzwater Center and Franklin Pierce University are honored to be part of this tribute to a legend in sports journalism,” said Dr. Nevious. “We know that this will help worthy, young students pursue their dream careers.” Franklin Pierce University’s Marlin Fitzwater Center for Communication houses the University’s Mass Communications department, one of only two colleges in New Hampshire with Associated Press accreditation. The Center is named for Marlin Fitzwater, who served as press secretary to presidents Ronald Reagan and George H.W. Bush. Harris is retiring from AP reporting after 41

The speedway also presented Harris with a racing helmet signed by the entire field of NASCAR Sprint Cup Series drivers in the LENOX Industrial Tools 301. A separate helmet signed by the field will be auctioned off, with proceeds going to the scholarship fund. Sunday, June 28, news/551042.html

2009,

http://www.nhms.com/media/

Franklin Pierce University participates in new Yellow Ribbon Program Franklin Pierce University is proud to announce participation in the new GI Bill’s Yellow Ribbon Program. This program benefits military veterans who have served since the Sept. 11, 2001 terrorist attacks. It provides each eligible veteran with tuition, housing, books and supplies stipends of up to $4,986 for undergraduates and up to $1,000 for graduates each year starting Aug. 1, 2009. The student must continue to maintain satisfactory progress, conduct and attendance to remain eligible. Returning veterans with six years of service may assign their educational benefits to their children if they choose not to participate in the program themselves. Matching Yellow Ribbon funds will be awarded to 100 eligible individuals who apply to the Yellow Ribbon Program on a first-come, first-served basis, regardless if the individual will be attending classes full- or part-time. This agreement covers Franklin Pierce University’s College at Rindge and the College of Graduate and Professional Studies campuses including locations in Concord, Lebanon, Manchester and Portsmouth, N.H., as well as our online programs. “We felt that it was essential for Franklin Pierce to participate in the Yellow Ribbon Program,” said Kenneth Ferreira, Executive Director of Student Financial Services at Franklin Pierce University. “This new source of financial assistance for qualified veterans or the children of qualified veterans will help students gain access to higher education at any one of our New Hampshire and online

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locations. Our University is committed to this program, and we’re proud to have been accepted by the VA as a participating institution.” The Yellow Ribbon Program is a provision of the Post9/11 Veterans Educational Assistance Act of 2008. This program allows colleges and universities in the United States to voluntarily enter into an agreement with the VA to fund tuition expenses that exceed the highest public in-state undergraduate tuition rate. The institution can contribute up to half of those expenses and VA will match the amount. Franklin Pierce University is offering the maximum allowable scholarship for New Hampshire in an effort to provide important higher education access to our Post-9/11 veterans. Interested applicants should apply directly through the United States Department of Veterans Affairs Web site at www.GIBILL.VA.gov.

University celebrated 44th commencement Franklin Pierce University celebrated its fourty-fourth commencement on Saturday, May 16 at 10:30 a.m. on the Rindge, N.H. campus. A total of 573 students graduated, with 44 students receiving doctoral degrees, 69 students receiving master’s degrees, 427 students receiving bachelor’s degrees and 33 students earning associate degrees. This will be the first time the University graduated students from its Bachelor of Science in Nursing program. The ceremonies included the presentation of three honorary degrees. Honorary degree recipients were New Hampshire State Senator Lou D’Allesandro, currently serving in his 6th term of office representing District 20; John Daido Loori, the abbot of Zen Mountain Monastery in Mount Tremper, N.Y., founder of the Mountains and Rivers Order and CEO of Dharma Communications; and legendary polar explorer and global warming expert Will Steger.

D’Allesandro served as chairman of the New England Board of Higher Education, is a member of the board of directors of the Manchester Community Health Center and vice chairman of the Federal Home Loan Bank of Boston’s board of directors as well as a volunteer at the National Council on Alcoholism. In 2000, he received the Caroline Gross Fellowship recognition, which honors people in public service. Loori began his formal Zen practice in 1971, after having served in the U.S. Navy and studying photography. He became a Zen Priest in 1983 and was given shiho (Dharma transmission) in 1986. Since then, he has gone on to publish works as a professional nature photographer, such as his book “Hearing with the Eye: Photographs from Point Lobos.” His company, Dharma Communications, publishes a Buddhist quarterly called “The Mountain Record” as well as audiovisual materials and several books by Loori. Steger has explored the Arctic Region for over 45 years. He has been invited to testify before the United States Congress and is considered a world leader in advocating for environmental protection of Antarctica. Established in 2006, the Will Steger Foundation promotes change through education and advocacy, and promotes international leadership and cooperation through environmental policy. He is also the founder of a winter school and innovative wilderness program in Ely, Minn., as well as the Global Center for Environmental Education at Hamline University in St. Paul, Minn., and the World School for Adventure Learning at the University of St. Thomas. The University community is saddened to hear of the passing of Zen Master John Daido Loori on Oct. 9, 2009.

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c l a s s . n o t e s 1966

John T. Burke continues to conduct private investigations for law firms, corporations and individuals in the Boston metropolitan area.

1967

Joseph Barison is an entrepreneur and has been building and selling retail businesses throughout the New York City area. He is also a wholesaler and exporter of clothing to the Caribbean and South America. For the past 30 years, he has been a manufacturer of advertising specialties for Fortune 500 companies throughout the U.S. Since October 2006, he has been living and involved in real estate in the Dominican Republic.

1968

Melvyn Sacks has a 5-year-old daughter named Annie. He has had a career in economics with the United States government including the Executive Office of the President under President Jimmy Carter. John Wolfe has recently retired and is enjoying life in the country. He has a wonderful grandson and loves spending time with him. Lonnie Zimmerman retired from Lucent Technologies in 2001, after spending 25 years with the Bell System. Lonnie is married with two daughters and lives happily on the Jersey Shore enjoying golf, cruising and traveling.

1969

Anthony Abatino and his wife, Rosemarie, celebrated their 40th wedding anniversary in July 2009. They are happy parents and grandparents. Lloyd and Helen (Ament) Astmann became grandparents on Oct. 4, 2008 when William Leon Astmann was born to their son, Neil, and daughter-in-law, Laura. Randall Burr is working in the Solid Waste Industry at OSHA Safety/DOT Compliance. He is an empty nester with five grandchildren who live close by in Westchester, N.Y.

Les Cohen has been married 35 years with two daughters and one granddaughter.

Arnold Roseman moved from Staten Island, N.Y. to New Jersey and then South Florida. He raised three children. One is an elementary school teacher, another a M.S. qualified computer tech. The youngest is still “finding himself.” The past 37 years have flown by but the foundation started with Franklin Pierce and is not forgotten.

Ron Wallingstein’s daughter, Juliette, graduated from high school and reported to West Point on June 29. She will be swimming for the the Black Knights. PS: Does anyone know what happened to our dear friend Dick Cuggini ‘69?

Richard Schwartz and his wife Randee Reyna have two daughters, Darian Serena, a stock brocker, and Jylian Kiel. Randee is a fifth grade teacher in Yonkers, N.Y.

1970

Kenneth Anschutz retired from the Southwest Bell engineering department. He recently purchased a 120-acre farm and is creating a hunting and wildlife refuge. Kenneth works in prison ministry one day a week at the Tucker Arkansas Department of Corrections and volunteers at the food pantry at the church. He is the treasurer of the Arkansas Gun and Cartridge Collectors Club.

Gerald Scott has been employed by the Commonwealth of Massachusetts since 1987 responsible for Diversity Policies for three different agencies. He is coordinator and founder of the Urban Youth Collaborative Program for the Massachusetts Department of Mental Retardation (DMR). J. Henry Whitbeck is an adjunct at SUNY Cobleskill, teaching surveying and GIS.

James Hendsey was married in 1979. He and his wife have two children, Colin, 25 and Maura, 23. Colin is a grad of University of Scranton and Maura is a grad of Muhlenberg College.

1971

James Bronstein is enjoying the good life.

Bruce Barrett is married to Judi with nine children and five grandchildren. He is currently a freelance writer as well as cashier. Bruce recently won the New England Press Association Award for a story about the Zabuli School near Kabul, Afghanistan. Mark Goodman is a psychopharmacologist and has an advanced degree (FPPR) from the Prescribing Psychologist’s Register. Carole (Langer) Greenfield has been married since 1976 and has two children and two grandchildren. She supervises a staff of 25 in an assisted/independent living retirement facility in the dietary department. Carole stays in contact with a few of her Franklin Pierce roommates and looks forward to attending a future homecoming reunion. She sends regards to the Class of ‘71. Martin Kane is currently pursuing a Masters in Education.

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1972

Joseph Paul Cavazzoni lives in Reading, Mass. with his wife. They were married later in life and have two boys, ages 12 and 8. He wants to say hello to Mike Hickey and Vinny R. Lucrezi.

1974

Neil Epstein attended Highline College in Kent, Wash. after graduating from Franklin Pierce. He subsequently worked as a mixed gas diver offshore in locations such as Scotland, Greece, Malta, Venezuela, as well as in the U.S. doing oilfield and marine installation inspections. Gary Shusta is looking forward to seeing everyone at the 35th class reunion in 2009.

1975

Larry Abramson’s oldest daughter, Emily, got married last November. She will graduate from Thomas Jefferson Medical College in May. Daughter Kate

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received her Masters in Social Work from Penn State and is a social worker in Washington D.C. Son Marc is a junior at Clark University. Larry is poorer but still quite happy with Patti after 31 years. Marietta Stone Anastas has been working as a Paralegal in the area of Common Interest Community Law for the past 20 years. Her son, Rob, is striving to be an actor. Marietta and her husband John have been married for close to five years. Marietta has five beautiful daughters through marriage along with their respective and significant others, plus two wonderful grandchildren. Franklin Pierce seems so far away sometimes, but I am very proud to see how it has grown into an excellent University.

1976

Fredrick Berger has worked 28 years with the State of New Jersey with over 21 of those years with the Department of Banking and Insurance. Fred was named to the Strathmore Worldwide Who’s Who in 2007.

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Deborah Goldhaft attended Franklin Pierce from 1972 to 1975 then transferred to UMass. She lived in the Pacific Northwest for 23 years and has a grown son in Seattle. She is currently running an architectural art glass giftware studio, Fire & Ice Studio in Pawtucket, R.I. If you are interested in seeing what I’m doing or contacting me, go to www.fireiceglass.com.

1977

Mary (Stoops) Ober is currently working on her Ph.D. in historical musicology at the University of Pittsburgh, with an emphasis on French metrics; the setting of French text in the songs of Gabriel Faure (1845-1924). She is employed as a music teacher in Ohio, currently teaching 5th - 8th grade strings. She and her husband love to travel. Michael and Betsy Cuccinello met at Pierce and got married in 1980. They have two children, a daughter, 21 and a son, 17. Betsy has been writing computer programs for Nielson and Bainbridge for 20 years. Mike is VP of Sales and Operations with Bilco Wire Rope and President of their sling division. He has been with his company for 25 years.

1979

Ronald Martel retired (20 years) from

the United States Air Force in 1974 and graduated from the Concord Center of Franklin Pierce. He is currently married and has twin boys. Ronald worked in the credit and financial area as vice president of accounting. Joseph Piccardi has established a business which deals with distressed and unfinished projects both residential and light commercial. He has worked in all six New England states with primary focus in Rhode Island and Massachusetts.

1980

Nancy Bolton-Kadra has been busy working with autistic children and the mentally handicapped, for an airline and most recently in film and video working on features, mini-series and in television. She worked at WHDH in Boston as an ENG technician and at WBZ-TV as a news editor. She is now a content housewife on Cape Cod working on her own documentaries. “Franklin Pierce was great!” She would love to hear from Wendy Fog, Marriane Hagerty or other classmates. Chris Derkas has two children, Tim, 11 years old, and Samantha, 9 years old. Bob Harris is currently working as a paramedic in Dayton Beach, still living on the water and would love to hear from his old classmates. Paul Hoagland transferred from Franklin Pierce after two years. He earned his B.A. from UMass-Amherst in 1980, magna cum laude. He then attended Columbia University in New York City where he earned his Master’s degree in 1982. He values the friends he made at Franklin Pierce during his freshman and sophomore years.

1981

Christine A. King has four kids, Brian, Patrick, Garret and Annie ranging in ages from 23 to 17. All of the boys are in college and Annie is a senior in high school. Christine is a volunteer at the Root Cellar, a Christian Community Center on Munjoy Hill in Portland, Maine. She and Drew have been married for over 25 years. Bruce Laine was elected the 75th (in the history of the organization) Commander of 125th Wisconsin Department Encampment of the Sons of Union Veterans of the Civil War. Clint Pierce sold his company, Pierce Promotions to Omnicom Group (NYSE -OMC) in 2007. He is retired and living

in Lakewood Ranch, Fla. and Stone Harbor, N.J. with his wife, Sue, and four children - Matt - 16, Kevin - 13, Tommy - 10 and Katie - 9. Clint is working on an entrepreneurial self help book which he hopes will be published soon.

1982

Lisa Bailey is a Massachusetts bar attorney currently working in Newport, R.I. Paulette Robinett was recently appointed to position of chairlady of the Santa Familia Village Water Board in Belize. Jayne M. Vogler recently opened a law office for the practice of Family Law. Her practice serves clients in Ocean and Monmouth Counties, N.J. Tracy Youngs is a proud owner of 11 acres in Jaffrey with a fanastic view of Mt. Monadnock. She will break ground on a vacation home in 2010.

1983

Mark “Mad Dog” Devoe has served almost 20 years in the Air Force as a Hospital Administrator on eight combat deployments and almost three years remotely attached to Special Operations Command in Korea. He is winding down his military career and hopes that as his traveling slows down he can reconnect with classmates. “Maybe some of you will come out to Utah to visit.” David Masse is currently working at American Power Conversion as a Senior Project Manager in the Information Technology department of Schnieder Electric. John F. Washington Jr. was recognized with the President’s Award for 30 years of dedicated service to collegiate EMS with Franklin Pierce University and the University of Pennsylvania at the annual National Collegiate EMS Foundation conference in Washington, D.C.

1984

Marilyn Batchelor is so proud of the progress that Franklin Pierce has made. A student at Pierce from 1980 to 1981, Marilyn transferred to Syracuse University to earn a degree in journalism. “I am still proud of having attended such a great school.” She owns an entertainment marketing firm, TBG Marketing. Former head of strategic

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marketing at the Universal Music Group, she did the brand marketing for acts such as: Patti LaBelle; Gladys Knight; Ashlee Simpson; Gwen Stefani; Mary J. Blige and more. She earned numerous awards in business and as a journalist. Ann Harrington has been working at Boeing on the Chinook Helicopter Program as a Business Analyst. Ann is planning a vacation to the Grand Canyon in October. “I have not been to New Hampshire in many years but would like to come to visit sometime.” Jerome A.M. Jackson is currently serving as the AFRICOM LNO (Liason Officer) to the Kofi Annan International Peacekeeping Center in Accra Ghana where he instructs on strategic planning and logistics courses.

1985

Justine Caudill made the move from beautiful south/central Texas to the beautiful but snowy Adirondack park town of Saranac Lake. Wow, what a shift after all these years! My sweet lovely dog is here and trying to adjust. The horses arrived at the end of March, talk about a shock. Would love to hear from old friends since I am new in the neighborhood in the East again. Bill Karkheck has been with Dead River Company for 16 years working as a Branch Manager/New Business Development. Bill has been married for almost 15 years and lives in Bridgewater, N.H.near Newfound Lake with son Matthew and daughter Lily. “Hope all my Franklin Pierce friends are doing well. I would love to hear from you!” Leonard Parisian retired from the postal service in March 2008.

are best friends residing in Brooklyn and collectively have seven children. William Oaks is retired and living the good life. John Soule has been working for Boeing for 23 years. For most of his career, he has been employed in either Southern California or Las Vegas, Nev. He is married and has two stepchildren and two grandchildren. Jean (Wasilewski) Warner is working as the Campus Recruiting Manager for PricewatershouseCoopers in Hartford, Conn.

1987

Loralyn (Decosta) Hynes was married in 1992. Daughter Allie was born in 1996 and Loralyn and her husband adopted son Austin in 2006 (he was born 1999). She is currently a stay at home parent. She says “Hi to all former housemates at Anderson House!”

1988

Philip Krajewski has been with the Social Security Administration for just over 15 years serving in various positions both in field offices and at the regional office. He has settled closer to home in the Portsmouth (N.H.) Field Office as a technical expert providing support to field office employees Amy (Brigham) Melvin married Michael Melvin on Sept. 27, 2008. Amy works as a massage therapist in her own business, Art of Massage. Michael is a computer technical trainer for the Community Renewal Team (CRT) in Hartford, Conn. The couple lives in West Hartford, Conn. and are very grateful for the great Franklin Pierce turnout at their wedding.

1986

John Birkett and Sam (Muniak) Birkett have been married for 21 years and live on Chebeague Island in Casco Bay, Maine. They have two sons, 17 and 19, and a daughter, 6. Philip Erlichman is currently living in Rochester, N.H. Neale and Karen (Mondesir) Johnson married 20 years after graduation and have one son together, Neale Maurice Johnson Jr. born March 2007. Neale Sr. is a minister of non-denomination at Changing Lives Christian Center. He teaches high school English, algebra and global studies in a 15:1 special education class. Karen is a stay at home mom. They

Dr. Charles Underwood is currently a Florida Supreme Court Certified County and Family Mediator. He is also an Adjunct Professor of Psychology and Counseling at Belhaven College.

1989

Debra (Hamlin) Aberizk recently graduated from San Jose State

University’s School of Library and Information Science with a master’s degree in Library and Information Science. Debra has been working full-time at the Coronado Public Library while pursuing her degree. In August, all three daughters will be attending universities in the Bay Area. Twin daughters, Diana and Michelle, were present (4 mos. old) at Debra’s graduation from Franklin Pierce. Professional engineer husband, Dave, owns a small business working with the Federal Government as a private contractor on a number of military contracts. The Aberizk family has been living in Coronado, Calif. for eight years. Greg Konigsbauer and his wife Angela will be celebrating their 10th anniversary in October 2009. They have two children, Jack ,who is four and Charlotte, who turned one on Dec. 21, 2008.

1990

Catherine (Bennett) Fusco married Anthony Fusco Jr on May 20, 2006. A year later in June 2007, they retired early from the State of Maryland after 15 years of service. Anthony and Catherine recently returned from a 30-day cross country tour. They continue to travel and explore this beautiful country.

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Ellen (Fredericks) Valcourt was named teacher of the year for 2009 at Flat Rock Elementary.

1991

Beth (Dooley )Hallet is thrilled to be working on the Rindge Campus of Franklin Pierce in the Career Planning & Placement office. Best wishes to former classmates. Scott Kathan and his wife Emily welcomed a baby girl, Oona, last August. Her older brother Gus is four. James Mazzarelli married Kelly Sagar in 1998. They have three children, Jacob,9, Brooke, 8, and Katherine, 6. He is President of Torrington Distributors. They are enjoying life and say hello to the Class of ‘91, Scooch, Patio, Lippy, Devine, Drock, Gino, Finer, Billy, Guppy, Bertha, Lara, V, Big Momma, Muskie, Sandy, Angela, Stevie, Doober, Flaxy, Eric, Swartzy, Lenna, Fish and the rest of the crew. “Hope all is well with each and everyone of you.” Ronald Pervere retired from Raytheon as quality engineer. He is working part time doing income returns for a CPA in Virginia. Ronald has three children and

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four grandchildren. He had heart bypass surgery in 2004. He likes to hike, camp and workout at the YMCA.

Manager at a playground manufacturer to a Lean Manufacturing manager in the auto industry.

1992

Julie (Walthouse) Serafini has three children - ages 10 years, 8 years and 9 months.

Andrew Gallaher is married to a wonderful woman, Lisa and has moved to Florida. Abby Gordon-Tolan is currently taking time off from teaching to be home with her 18-month old boys, Alec and Owen. Kate (Herman) Kennedy says “Happy New Year to my fellow Pierce family members!” Kate and her husband, David, have been living on the Massachusetts South Shore for 10 years and have two children, Olivia, 6, and Jack, almost 4. She has been working in the client relationship capacity in the financial service industry for over 14 years and presently leads the client service effort for the Retirement Plans Group at The Hartford in Boston. Brian Molusis has two sons, Zachary, 6, and Adam, 4.

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Heidi (Hyotte) Skowronski has been married to Dave Skowronski since August 2004 and currently lives in Connecticut. They have a beautiful daughter that was born in May of 2007. Heidi is working part time as a massage therapist and as a full time Mom for her daughter. Alaine Williams has been working for the Prison Fellowship (a national nonprofit company) for 10 years and recently received an award with the company for significant contributions to PFM’s vision and mission, while upholding the organization’s core values.

1993

Douglas Armstrong is teaching high school culinary in Portland, Maine and teaching classes on weekends at his home. Life is good. Mark Brousseau states that he began attending Franklin Pierce - Keene Campus - in 1986 while already into his professional career managing a computer department at New Hampshire Ball Bearing in Peterborough, N.H. The educational foundation he received at Franklin Pierce gave him many of the tools he needed for a successful career lasting more than 29 years. Mark says that he really couldn’t be happier with his life. Mark Essig has made a career change in the last year transitioning from a Quality

Julie (Sommovigo) Viapiano has been married for 13 years and just had her fourth child. Their ages are 11 years, 8 years, 4 years and 7 weeks (Three boys and one girl).

1994

Craig Bourque has been employed by Charity Wines of Winchendon to manage their retail business units including brick and mortar and online sales, warehouse management operations and over all business operations. In addition to Charity Wines, Craig has introduced two additional business units for the company including Custom Grapes and Grapesurfer. Craig would love to hear from classmates at craig@charitywines.com. Joe Gonzalez has changed careers and now heads up his own consulting company, Dark Green Joe. His company works with home owners and businesses to help them choose eco-friendly products and energy efficient systems. Holly (Adams) Karolkowski became the Scotch Brand Gifted Wrapper in 2004, winning a national gift wrapping contest. It landed Holly on the Today Show and the Ellen Show. Her tips were also published in Better Homes and Gardens, Women’s World, Nick Jr., and several newpapers. Holly’s artwork was published in November 2008 in a national book on mixed media art, called “Exhibition 36.” The book is available at all the major bookstores.

1995

Jill Astmann is currently in New York and doing make-up on films and television shows such as “I am Legend”, “Life on Mars”, “Gossip Girl”, “Law and Order SVU”, “Kings” and “Cupid.” She is doing what she loves and is having fun as well. Charlotte (Lowe) Bateman was divorced in May 2005 and took back her maiden name. Charlotte enjoys living in “warm” North Carolina. She would love to hear from other alumni.

Jill Meister got married on Nov. 1, 2008 to Sean McKernan. She is living in Easthampton, Mass. and working at a private school. Doug Paradore was promoted to Coordinating Operator in August 2008. Donna (Smith) Riley got married in September 2008 to Darryl Riley. Donna has been working at Mark Richey Woodworking since August 2003 as an accounting assistant. The company has doubled in size since that time and has gone “green.” The shop is heated by a BioMass furnace that is fueled by scraps from the woodworking shop. A wind turbine has been erected on the property and will be generating electricity soon. Clark Whitley is married to Susanne Whitley. They have two children, Jackson and Emma.

1996

Vicky Gauthier’s son is a sergeant in the Marines and currently stationed with his wife at the Marine Corp Air Station in Miramar in San Diego, Calif. They are expecting their first child (Vicky’s first grandchild) in August 2009. Heather (Blackstock) Huff was married August 4, 2007 to Stephen Huff in New Hampshire, then moved to North Carolina the same month. Heather taught third grade for a year, then had a baby girl, Hadley Abigail, on Aug. 28, 2008. After moving to Jacksonville, Chris Munson became the play-by-play analyst for University of North Florida broadcasts of men’s and women’s soccer; women’s volleyball and women’s basketball. Chris was recently named the Director of Communications for the United States Basketball Association (USBA). Holly (Dejnak) Smith stated that in 1996 that she graduated with an Associate’s as Holly Dejnak. In 2007, Holly graduated with her Bachelor’s as Holly Smith. Meredith Stanley is the Head Administrator of a small private Episcopal School in Nassau Bay, Texas. Andrew Wortman is living the bachelor life again at the age of 40. He moved to North Scituate, R.I. and joined Volunteer Fire Department Company 20. He is still busy as a union stagehand for local offbroadway theatres and local union movie making companies. “Keep in touch. I’m on Facebook.”

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1997

Sarah Magee Baumgratz is a new grandmother. Sarah was stationed in Iraq in 2004-2005. Martin Cusick and his wife Amy welcomed their first child, Taylor Jean Cusik, on April 14, 2009. Ruth (Doherty) Hamilton received her NH Real Estate Salespersons License in April 2004 and has been an independent contractor with Coldwell Banker Realtors since then. Ruth works out of the Littleton, N.H. office and covers Grafton and Coos Counties in the North Country. Rachel Davis married Jeff Sautter on Aug. 30, 2008 on a little mountain top in Amherst, Mass. They had a small wedding of 35 guests.

1998

Scott Beausoleil is happy to be back with the Justice Department and looking to upgrade his home with a new purchase. Joshua Berube was married in 1997 to Dale Carignan. They have three boys, Timothy, Craig and Lucas. Ron Fox is looking for a small group of investors interested in becoming involved in the real estate market. His first career was as an instructor for Pan Am/Sim Com International Flight Training Academy. He taught pilots at a variety of levels up to Airline Transport Pilot. He was also designated by the Federal Aviation Administration as a “Training Center Evaluator” assessing the quality of the training given by the center. Michael Lee has been living in Atlanta since 2001 working for Siemens, approaching nine years in various management positions. He wishes he lived closer to his best friends from Pierce, Jason and Jen Leavitt. Jamie (Rollins) Theroux and her husband Todd, welcomed their first child, Ella, on Dec. 11, 2008. The couple lives in Longmeadow, Mass.

1999

Wendy Bergeron recently completed her master’s degree in Museum Studies and is currently enrolled in a graduate certificate program in Historic Preservation at Plymouth State University. She is teaching high school Social Studies at Winnacunnet High School and is curator at the American Independence Museum in Exeter, N.H.

Jaime (Ouellette) Girouard married Scott Girouard in May 2007. In February 2008, her son Jameson was born a couple weeks early, but healthy. Jaime is also blessed with two step-kids, Austin, age 11 and Grace, age 8. Jaime and Scott own a home in Manchester, Conn. Bethany (Selino) and Rahsaan A. Potillo were married on Friday, March 27, 2009 on the 50-yard line at White Plains High School in White Plains, N.Y. The Mayor of White Plains, the bride’s cousin, performed the ceremony. Dawn Macellaro, the bride’s cousin, a Franklin Pierce alum was in attendance. Bethany and Rahsaan are both employed by the White Plains Public Schools and Rahsaan played football for White Plains and is currently the varsity football coach. The couple resides in Mamaroneck, N.Y.

2000

Nicholas Caruso received his Master Certificate in Web Design and Graphic Design at Clarke University. Although, he currently has a job, he is still looking for a job opportunity in graphic design. Keep Nicholas in mind! Jason & Jennifer (Teixeira) Leavitt were married in August 2005 in Old Saybrook, CT. In October 2008 they welcomed their first son, Cole Elliott. Terry Cutter purchased Cutter Flooring & Furnishings in May 2007. His wife is a seventh grade teacher at the Antrim Great Brook School. Terry’s daughter, Chelsea, is a freshman at UNH and his son, Tucker, is a Junior at HDHS. Since graduation, Laurie (Teachout) Emerson has divorced, remarried, and divorced again. Laurie has a 2-year-old grandson and has worked for the State of New Hampshire since December 2000. “I have moved too many times, however, I am feeling settled at the moment...enough to think about finishing my Masters.”

2001

Jason GaNun and his wife, Jessalynn, are pleased to announce the birth of their third son, Gavin Everett. He was born on May 19 at 6lbs 10oz. and 20 inches. The whole family is doing great and enjoying the new addition. Amanda Baker and Matthew Lodge of Norwood, Mass. were married on Oct.

25, 2009. The bridegroom made stained glass maple leaves for favors.

Peter Kelly is currently attending law school at the Massachusetts School of Law in Andover. Kylie (Krom) Kosiorek had her second daughter on Oct. 24, 2008, Anastazja. Richard Kreissle is currently teaching full time as an Assistant Professor of Business Studies at Landmark College.

2002

Chad Boivin graduated in November 2008 with his Master’s in Information Technology and was promoted to Payments Support Team Lead (help desk manager) at Bottomline Technologies shortly after graduating from Franklin Pierce’s Portsmouth N.H. center. Shelley (Cotron) Drake is married with two children. Kristina (Taranto) Mentzer is currently earning her Web Design Diploma from the Art Institute of Pittsburgh.

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Wendy (Roth) O’Donohue is currently a broker with Intracoastal Realty in Oak Island, N.C. She relocated to Southport, N.C. in 2003 and began her second career in real estate. Living near the beach is wonderful. Southport is very much like Newburyport, Mass. without the cold and snowy winters. She’d love to hear from former friends and classmates. “Also, anyone looking to relocate to the beautiful beaches of N.C., call me”. Jenifer (Pearson) Redmond married Scott in August 2007. They own an electrical contracting business. Deborah (Womham) Theall celebrated the birth of her third grandchild, Allyson Jane Theall, born on June 1, 2008. She joined her big sister Phoebe and her cousin Meghan. Her family and the girls enjoyed the summer at their home on Swan’s Island, Maine.

2003

Kristina Cohen purchased a house in November 2005 and rescued two cats,

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Hope in 2005 and kitten Milo in October 2008. Evan McGee has been promoted to Director of Performance Analytics at Shenkman Capital Management, Inc.

2004

Jillian (Sawicki) Bates is currently a stay at home mom to her 15-month-old little boy. She works part time at night so she doesn’t have to put her son in daycare. Her husband is in the Marine Corp and they are currently living in North Carolina. In spring of 2009, Veron Browne started a doctorate program in biochemistry at Seton Hall University. Jonathan Butler was appointed to become Town Administrator in Adams, Mass. on June 1, 2009. Jen (Metcalf) and Bryce Cooke were married in 2004. Bryce joined the Army shortly after graduating Franklin Pierce. Bryce has served two tours with the 101st Airborne Division in Iraq. Jen just finished her Master’s Degree in Education and is currently a teacher. Jen and Bryce are living in Tennessee.

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Joshua Degregorio is living in Boston and has been working part-time at UUWorld magazine, the national quarterly print magazine for Unitarian Universalists. He also works part-time for Dartmouth Publishing, Inc. preparing medical illustrations and photos for book publication. “Hi all. Love my jobs and eager to see what my classmates are up to. All my best, - Josh” Cassandra (DeChau) deCharme was married on April 25, 2009 in Scituate, R.I. to Russell duCharme of Foster, R.I. George Gardei is currently employed by God’s Bible School and College in the information technology department. George’s responsibilities include managing, supporting and customizing the ERP system (TRS CAMS). He also provides IT consulting services focusing on home and small business clients in Cincinnati and Northern Kentucky. “Working at GBS has allowed me to develop the skills I learned at Franklin Pierce and to make meaningful and lifelong relationships with the staff, students and families on campus.” Jeff Joslyn was recently engaged to Lindsey Ketchen ‘04.

2005

Maria Clifford graduated from Salem State College with a Master of Arts

in Teaching English in May 2009. She purchased a home in Peabody, Mass. in April 2009. Maria became engaged to her boyfriend in their new home on the day they passed papers in April 2009.

State University. She has been employed as a 3rd grade special education teacher in Connecticut since August 2008.

Remi Francoeur and Kristen Costa ‘05 bought their first home in Somerset, Mass. at the end of March 2009. They were engaged on April 4, 2009 and are planning a winter 2010 wedding.

Shawn Bodi will be teaching a 100% online course for Franklin Pierce this spring.

Vicky Rank graduated in May 2009 with a M.B.A. in Human Resource Management. Tom (Sgt. Campus Safety until 2008) and Marion Stone ‘05 bought “Your Country Store” in Hollis Center, Maine in November 2008. The Web site is www. yourcountrystorehollis.com.

2006

Michelle Ardzinski was married to Andrzej in July 2008. Andrzej works as a Laboratory Associate II at Vertex Pharmaceutical Inc. in Cambridge, Mass. In September 2007, Michelle earned her Master’s degree in Medical Sciences at Boston University. Michelle is currently studying to be a dentist at Boston University School of Dental Medicine. She will graduate with a D.M.D. degree in the Spring of 2011.

2008

Jessie Gagnon is designing the Web site for Mexicali Blues, a company that imports fun products and cultural arts and hand-made crafts from all around the world. She also does product and location photography, videography and ethnographic writing about the countries of the world from which Mexicali Blues imports. “It is a fantastic career that I hope will allow me to travel to many countries across the globe and effectively put my anthropology degree to great use,” she says.

2009

R. Andrew Parker has recently completed all coursework towards his B.A. in History from Franklin Pierce and his B.S. in Business Administration/ Organizational Leadership from Southern New Hampshire University and has accepted a position as District Financial Analyst for the East Windsor (Conn.) Public Schools.

J. Stuart Bryan is working with court ordered clients. Joshua Goodrich started working for Micro Systems last April. He travels around the country providing implementation service to independent hotels that purchase proprietary property management equipment. He states that he feels very privileged to have this position especially considering the current economic drought. The education he received at Franklin Pierce helped prepare him for this challenging and exciting career. He wishes all the best to fellow alumni and current students.

2007

Sean Gelinas completed his first year of employment at ESPN in April in Bristol, Conn. as a member of the Creative Services Department. Kenneth Merrifield, M.B.A. was elected Mayor of Franklin, N.H. Amanda Pietraszuk and Ramo Lupi became engaged this past December. Megan E. Wakely completed a Master of Science Degree in Special Education in July 2008 at Southern Connecticut

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Alumni in Action Alumni Directory in Progress

needs you! Let us know about your achievements, life’s adventures, and what you’ve been doing since graduation. Please keep the following guidelines in mind when submitting news:

Franklin Pierce University is working with Harris Connect to produce an alumni directory scheduled for publication in May 2010. Over the next several months, you may receive postcards, e-mails or phone calls from Harris Connect asking for updated contact information. We would appreciate your cooperation in updating your contact information. All updates are returned to the school so that our database remains current. Harris Connect is only collecting information for purposes of the directory. Your information will not be released to any third parties. You can decide whether or not your personal information is published in the directory. Make your wishes clear to the representative when you speak to them. It is a great way to stay connected to the Franklin Pierce alumni community!

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• News should be of reasonable length and not more than 50 words. Please do not send entire letters, articles or press releases as they will not be reprinted. • A class note must be submitted by the alum who is the subject of the note. If a class note is submitted by someone other than the subject of the note, the subject of the note will be contacted for his/ her permission before the information is printed. • When submitting wedding photos, please identify people first and last names and class year. We check their class year but do not ask for permission to publish from each alum. • Engagement news, birth announcements and photos will be printed. News of impending weddings and/or births are not published. • E-mail addresses and Web sites will be printed as long as it is not promotional in nature.

News from the former Director of Alumni Relations: Peter Brodie recently accepted the additional responsibility of Legislative Liaison for Emporia State University. In this task, he will be representing the accomplishments and needs of the University in partnership with sister universities in Kansas to the Kansas Legislature. He will also be coordinating legislative activities encouraging alumni to participate and support their alma mater.

Submit your class notes at franklinpierce. edu/alumni, click “Update yor Information.”

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Dear Fellow Alum,

Message from the Alumni Association President

While there are many challenges ahead, these are very exciting times for Franklin Pierce and the Alumni Association. To begin, please join me in welcoming our new president, Dr. James Birge, to the Franklin Pierce family. Alumni had an opportunity to spend some time with him during the Alumni Association Retreat in July. I know that he is a good fit for Franklin Pierce and I believe that he will lead us through these challenging times. As I mentioned, the Alumni Association Board of Directors and volunteers completed a successful retreat in July. In collaboration with the Alumni Relations office, we set program goals and objectives for the upcoming year. A few initiatives we have planned and/or will continue work on in the coming year are: Facebook In mid-July, we launched the Official Franklin Pierce University Alumni Association Facebook page. Subscribe to this page and you will see information about alumni events being hosted in your area, read news about the alumni association and your alma mater, post discussion topics on a discussion board, post comments on our wall and view photos from alumni events and other activities. Pierce Alumni Career Education (PACE) Program The goal of PACE is to pair alumni with students in mentoring, internship and job shadowing relationships. The program began in early 2008 and has been very successful in matching alumni volunteers with current students. However, we continue to look for alumni willing to participate. If you are interested, contact Shirley English-Whitman in the Alumni Relations office. The CGPS Alumni Engagement Initiative

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The goal of this initiative is to work with our College of Graduate & Professional Studies (CGPS) centers to come up with ways in which we can engage and encourage CGPS Alumni to become more involved in the Alumni Association. The Alumni Student Referral Program Who knows Franklin Pierce University better than you do? Referrals from alumni are the best endorsement for prospective students. In collaboration with the Admissions office, Alumni Relations will offer an application fee waiver to any accepted student that is referred by an alumna/e. Finally, too often alumni believe that the school is only looking for them to donate money. While financial gifts are important to and necessary for the continued success and growth of the University, there are many ways in which you can give back. By becoming a volunteer board member or PACE mentor, participating in chapter events or referring someone who you know would thrive as a student at Franklin Pierce, you are giving back. For more information on how to become more active in the Alumni Association, please go to our Web site, www.franklinpierce.edu/alumni. I am very excited about the coming year. There are many engaged alumni volunteers and together with the Alumni Association Board of Directors, they are eager to serve the University in whatever capacity necessary. Much has been accomplished but there is still much to do. Won’t you join us in giving back? Sincerely,

Joe Davis ‘89

Alumni Association Board of Directors President

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You

make the difference for our students.

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A

lumni gifts to the Franklin Pierce Annual Fund make up the greatest source of support for the things that matter most. Your gift immediately helps provide scholarships and financial aid, new technologies, great teaching and the environment to develop each student’s unique potential. For more information, or to make a gift, contact Ahmad Boura 40 University Drive, Rindge, NH 03461 603.899.4031 or donate online at http://www.franklinpierce.edu/giving/index.htm

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FRANKLIN PIERCE UNIVERSITY 40 UNIVERSITY DRIVE RINDGE, NEW HAMPSHIRE 03461

NON-PROFIT US POSTAGE PAID FRANKLIN PIERCE UNIVERSITY

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Pierce Radius - Fall 2009