Page 1

ISSUE 1// DECEMBER 2013// £3.50 JAROSALV WIECZORKIEWICZ

SIOBHAN DORAN

GARRY SMITH

SUSANA SILVA

RYAN BISH


V&A Students Winter 2013

inside LDN. REGULARS 4 STAFF CONTRIBUTIONS 5 LETTER FROM THE EDITOR

PEOPLE 8 LIFE AFTER POP IDOL

Why one woman left everything behind to become a London busker

13 FAIRWELL TO A TRUE EASTENDER Paying tribute to Garry Smith

14 MAPPING LONDON A unique look at what the city means to its inhabitants

DECEMBER 2013

19 TRANSFORMATION TO IMAGERY renowned photographer Siobhan Doran talks the Savoy

PLACES 24 BILLINGSGATE FISH MARKET Fish guts at four am

30 CIRQUE LE SOIR

Behind the black front door of London’s most exclusive nightclub

34 FOUND IN CAMDEN

The quirkiest things in London’s most famous and popular market

Paying homage to Gil Elvgren, page 42

38 VALE ANTIQUES A dusty, cluttered and rough diamond

ARTS AND CULTURE 42 CRÈME DE LE CRÈME

What do you get when you cross a camera, the 1950’s, some naked models and a lot of milk?

50 PAYING HOMAGE TO LONDON

We take you through the streets of London to show you it’s evolutionary life cycle

44 Y OH Y?

We review the ultimate App for Londoners

“I was probably the only unknown name, so I was very honoured” “TRANSFORMATION TO IMAGERY”, PAGE 19

FOLLOW US

Facebook.co.uk/LDNmagazine Twitter.co.uk/LDNmagazine Instagram: LDNmagazine 3


V&A Students Winter 2013

inside LDN. REGULARS 4 STAFF CONTRIBUTIONS 5 LETTER FROM THE EDITOR

PEOPLE 8 LIFE AFTER POP IDOL

Why one woman left everything behind to become a London busker

13 FAIRWELL TO A TRUE EASTENDER Paying tribute to Garry Smith

14 MAPPING LONDON A unique look at what the city means to its inhabitants

DECEMBER 2013

19 TRANSFORMATION TO IMAGERY renowned photographer Siobhan Doran talks the Savoy

PLACES 24 BILLINGSGATE FISH MARKET Fish guts at four am

30 CIRQUE LE SOIR

Behind the black front door of London’s most exclusive nightclub

34 FOUND IN CAMDEN

The quirkiest things in London’s most famous and popular market

Paying homage to Gil Elvgren, page 42

38 VALE ANTIQUES A dusty, cluttered and rough diamond

ARTS AND CULTURE 42 CRÈME DE LE CRÈME

What do you get when you cross a camera, the 1950’s, some naked models and a lot of milk?

50 PAYING HOMAGE TO LONDON

We take you through the streets of London to show you it’s evolutionary life cycle

44 Y OH Y?

We review the ultimate App for Londoners

“I was probably the only unknown name, so I was very honoured” “TRANSFORMATION TO IMAGERY”, PAGE 19

FOLLOW US

Facebook.co.uk/LDNmagazine Twitter.co.uk/LDNmagazine Instagram: LDNmagazine 3


LETTER FROM THE EDITOR Hello, fellow Londoners! Ben Collier Managing Editor @BenColliier_

Ascene Constable - Polson Reviews Editor @MuggiDee

Frances Dumlao Culture Editor @francesdumlao

My favourite place in London is Dragon Bar in Shoreditch. Located on the high street, Dragon bar plays loud vinyl music and serves my favourite beer on tap. There’s nothing more I enjoy than spending my Friday night getting a little loose with my pals drinking pints of Blue Moon Beer with slices of Orange, and “shotting” flavoured vodka. Cheers!

My favourite place in London is the ‘The Sun’ pub in Barnes. It’s just gorgeous. I live in Hammersmith, so on a dry Sunday, I take a nice 25-minute stroll with my two dogs down the River Thames pathway to the pub. It’s a really family oriented environment, and being practically on the river, when it’s a nice day the dogs can go for a swim while we have a pint and a Sunday roast.

My favourite place in London is a pub called the Arc. That was my local when I first moved into London two years ago. We went to there every Thursday without fail. Every week we would stumble into the bar for the 2-for-1 cocktails and live music. The band would always cover Wonderwall and Amy Winehouse’s Valerie – it was my life soundtrack of spring 2012.

Welcome to the first publication ever of LDN. magazine! We’re just as excited as you are –if not more- by the fact that you’re holding this in your hands. Congratulations on purchasing a quality product! Long months of hard work have gone into making this magazine, but I’m sure you’ve heard all of this before. To state the blatantly obvious, London is a city like no other. The smells, the black cabs, and the buildings are things that make this a different place. Sure, we all know about Big Ben and the London Eye, but what we want to show you in LDN. is what you wouldn’t normally see around the city: the people, the places, and the culture. There irony that six broke journalism students can show you the real London baffles us, too. Making this first edition of LDN. magazine has been a wonderful and educational experience. Our aim is to bring you quality material every month, allowing you to learn about the less publicized places that London has to offer. Whether you’re a Londoner yourself or are simply interested in this wonderful city, the content provided in this magazine won’t disappoint.

Richard Holmes Features Editor @IAmRichHolmes My favourite place in London is Brixton, because it has the best mixture in culture, the most diverse and fun night out and, most importantly, the tastiest chicken shops in the whole of the city. Once, I went to this place called Hootenanny, I met the coolest rastafarian man, he was truely the happiest man I’d ever met, and was at complete peace with the world around him.

Jenny Lambert Artistic Director @catlady1494 My favourite place in London is the natural history museum. It’s rich in culture and I learn something new everytime I go there. I particularly like the museum in winter when the time of year draws nearer to Christmas. I love the ice-skating rink and the lights. I love Christmas, and there’s not an evening more fun than spending it on the ice with the people you love.

LDN. contributors

4

We travelled from Southbank to Brick Lane to bring you the most interesting people and places possible. This led us to an exclusive circus inspired nightclub and a photographer that uses milk as clothing –yes, you read that right. We have an interview with Siobhan Doran, who photographed the renovation of the Savoy Hotel, and a very peculiar map of London that has a greater history than you can imagine. We have buskers galore and a very quaint fish market that is a London staple, as well as the quirkiness that defines Camden and lots more. Throughout the magazine you will notice a series of portraits, our ‘magazine signature’ if you will, which are meant to show you a little glimpse into the people that make up London. We hope you enjoy LDN. and feel inspired to explore London or any other city that you find yourself in. Sincerely,

Samantha Granes Bezic. @funnysamy

4


LETTER FROM THE EDITOR Hello, fellow Londoners! Ben Collier Managing Editor @BenColliier_

Ascene Constable - Polson Reviews Editor @MuggiDee

Frances Dumlao Culture Editor @francesdumlao

My favourite place in London is Dragon Bar in Shoreditch. Located on the high street, Dragon bar plays loud vinyl music and serves my favourite beer on tap. There’s nothing more I enjoy than spending my Friday night getting a little loose with my pals drinking pints of Blue Moon Beer with slices of Orange, and “shotting” flavoured vodka. Cheers!

My favourite place in London is the ‘The Sun’ pub in Barnes. It’s just gorgeous. I live in Hammersmith, so on a dry Sunday, I take a nice 25-minute stroll with my two dogs down the River Thames pathway to the pub. It’s a really family oriented environment, and being practically on the river, when it’s a nice day the dogs can go for a swim while we have a pint and a Sunday roast.

My favourite place in London is a pub called the Arc. That was my local when I first moved into London two years ago. We went to there every Thursday without fail. Every week we would stumble into the bar for the 2-for-1 cocktails and live music. The band would always cover Wonderwall and Amy Winehouse’s Valerie – it was my life soundtrack of spring 2012.

Welcome to the first publication ever of LDN. magazine! We’re just as excited as you are –if not more- by the fact that you’re holding this in your hands. Congratulations on purchasing a quality product! Long months of hard work have gone into making this magazine, but I’m sure you’ve heard all of this before. To state the blatantly obvious, London is a city like no other. The smells, the black cabs, and the buildings are things that make this a different place. Sure, we all know about Big Ben and the London Eye, but what we want to show you in LDN. is what you wouldn’t normally see around the city: the people, the places, and the culture. There irony that six broke journalism students can show you the real London baffles us, too. Making this first edition of LDN. magazine has been a wonderful and educational experience. Our aim is to bring you quality material every month, allowing you to learn about the less publicized places that London has to offer. Whether you’re a Londoner yourself or are simply interested in this wonderful city, the content provided in this magazine won’t disappoint.

Richard Holmes Features Editor @IAmRichHolmes My favourite place in London is Brixton, because it has the best mixture in culture, the most diverse and fun night out and, most importantly, the tastiest chicken shops in the whole of the city. Once, I went to this place called Hootenanny, I met the coolest rastafarian man, he was truely the happiest man I’d ever met, and was at complete peace with the world around him.

Jenny Lambert Artistic Director @catlady1494 My favourite place in London is the natural history museum. It’s rich in culture and I learn something new everytime I go there. I particularly like the museum in winter when the time of year draws nearer to Christmas. I love the ice-skating rink and the lights. I love Christmas, and there’s not an evening more fun than spending it on the ice with the people you love.

LDN. contributors

4

We travelled from Southbank to Brick Lane to bring you the most interesting people and places possible. This led us to an exclusive circus inspired nightclub and a photographer that uses milk as clothing –yes, you read that right. We have an interview with Siobhan Doran, who photographed the renovation of the Savoy Hotel, and a very peculiar map of London that has a greater history than you can imagine. We have buskers galore and a very quaint fish market that is a London staple, as well as the quirkiness that defines Camden and lots more. Throughout the magazine you will notice a series of portraits, our ‘magazine signature’ if you will, which are meant to show you a little glimpse into the people that make up London. We hope you enjoy LDN. and feel inspired to explore London or any other city that you find yourself in. Sincerely,

Samantha Granes Bezic. @funnysamy

4


tower of london

leicester square

“I have to study for a final. It’s hard.” What class is it for? “Sex, Gender, and the City. It’s a weird class. We watched a man squeeze pearls out of an anus. We were talking about performance art. It was about how the man’s body can be penetrated. My professor said that it was hard to find in England. But he had brought his own copy. There was this one girl in class that really didn’t like it – she did not approve at all. I’ve seen worst things. I watched two girls one cup. Performance art tends to be weird.” F.D ¢ 6

Where I come from, you don’t really see people sitting on benches in the middle of the afternoon just reading a book –particularly not young people. “I’m 22 years old and I’m the editor of a self-published magazine called ‘Da Thirst’.” What’s your biggest struggle right now?

“Getting the magazine out there, getting people interested in it.” What’s the magazine about? “You’ll have to buy it to find out.” Fair enough. If you could give one piece of advice to a large group of people, what would it be?

“Read at least one good book in your life. It’s amazing how it can impact your life and make you see things differently.” Unfortunately, she left before I could ask her what she was reading. Maybe we’ll meet again and I’ll get the name of that book. S.G.B ¢ 7


tower of london

leicester square

“I have to study for a final. It’s hard.” What class is it for? “Sex, Gender, and the City. It’s a weird class. We watched a man squeeze pearls out of an anus. We were talking about performance art. It was about how the man’s body can be penetrated. My professor said that it was hard to find in England. But he had brought his own copy. There was this one girl in class that really didn’t like it – she did not approve at all. I’ve seen worst things. I watched two girls one cup. Performance art tends to be weird.” F.D ¢ 6

Where I come from, you don’t really see people sitting on benches in the middle of the afternoon just reading a book –particularly not young people. “I’m 22 years old and I’m the editor of a self-published magazine called ‘Da Thirst’.” What’s your biggest struggle right now?

“Getting the magazine out there, getting people interested in it.” What’s the magazine about? “You’ll have to buy it to find out.” Fair enough. If you could give one piece of advice to a large group of people, what would it be?

“Read at least one good book in your life. It’s amazing how it can impact your life and make you see things differently.” Unfortunately, she left before I could ask her what she was reading. Maybe we’ll meet again and I’ll get the name of that book. S.G.B ¢ 7


PEOPLE

Life after Pop Idol Susana Silva left her friends, family, and studies in Portugal five years ago. She had had enough of a city that didn’t have more to offer her, so she packed her bags, moved to Europe’s “magical city” of London, and became a busker

“ i was homeless for two

weeks ... That’s when I found Southbank

Words by Samantha Granes Bezic.

I

t’s quite a windy Sunday morning, when I head off to Southbank to meet with Susana Da Silva. All I know is that she’s a busker at Southbank, that she’s Portuguese, and that she has one hell of a voice. I arrive a little early, just to make sure that I don’t get lost. I head to the established spot and in a matter of minutes I hear a distant “hello!” and 8

a smiling figure begins to approach me. We make a little small talk about the weather while she sets up. As she’s setting up, she takes off her wedding ring and says “I’m not married anymore.” She later explains that people seem to connect more and are less judgemental if you’re not married. Susana starts to sing and it takes no time before a crowd starts to gather

around her to watch her perform and listen to her soulful covers. Much to my surprise, the tips that she starts to get are not 20 or 50p coins, it’s not the spare change that you have at the bottom of your purse, it’s five and 10 pound notes. This girl isn’t good, she’s great. Five songs later, she packs her gear back up and we head to a café

of her choice, not too far from her ‘stage’. “The people that work in this café have a heart that you don’t find in many places.” She goes on to tell me that when she first started to perform in Southbank, she didn’t have much money. “It was cold and rainy and I just went in and asked for a cup of coffee. I didn’t have the money to pay them, but they still gave it to me.” She came in

the next day, after she had earned a few pounds and tried to pay them for her coffee but they refused. “Since that day, they don’t let me pay unless it’s more than one thing that I’m buying; which is my way of repaying them.” I start to get a little insight into who she is. Susana is now 28 years old, happily married, and busking for a living. Like most people, she didn’t

think of music as a real option in her life. Before she came to London, she was a web design student in Portugal. In the meantime, she was working in the fish department of a local supermarket. Little did she know that her boss, who had heard her singing during work, had signed her up for ‘Portugal Idol’. Her raw talent and desire to get back at her boss for signing her up for the † 9


PEOPLE

Life after Pop Idol Susana Silva left her friends, family, and studies in Portugal five years ago. She had had enough of a city that didn’t have more to offer her, so she packed her bags, moved to Europe’s “magical city” of London, and became a busker

“ i was homeless for two

weeks ... That’s when I found Southbank

Words by Samantha Granes Bezic.

I

t’s quite a windy Sunday morning, when I head off to Southbank to meet with Susana Da Silva. All I know is that she’s a busker at Southbank, that she’s Portuguese, and that she has one hell of a voice. I arrive a little early, just to make sure that I don’t get lost. I head to the established spot and in a matter of minutes I hear a distant “hello!” and 8

a smiling figure begins to approach me. We make a little small talk about the weather while she sets up. As she’s setting up, she takes off her wedding ring and says “I’m not married anymore.” She later explains that people seem to connect more and are less judgemental if you’re not married. Susana starts to sing and it takes no time before a crowd starts to gather

around her to watch her perform and listen to her soulful covers. Much to my surprise, the tips that she starts to get are not 20 or 50p coins, it’s not the spare change that you have at the bottom of your purse, it’s five and 10 pound notes. This girl isn’t good, she’s great. Five songs later, she packs her gear back up and we head to a café

of her choice, not too far from her ‘stage’. “The people that work in this café have a heart that you don’t find in many places.” She goes on to tell me that when she first started to perform in Southbank, she didn’t have much money. “It was cold and rainy and I just went in and asked for a cup of coffee. I didn’t have the money to pay them, but they still gave it to me.” She came in

the next day, after she had earned a few pounds and tried to pay them for her coffee but they refused. “Since that day, they don’t let me pay unless it’s more than one thing that I’m buying; which is my way of repaying them.” I start to get a little insight into who she is. Susana is now 28 years old, happily married, and busking for a living. Like most people, she didn’t

think of music as a real option in her life. Before she came to London, she was a web design student in Portugal. In the meantime, she was working in the fish department of a local supermarket. Little did she know that her boss, who had heard her singing during work, had signed her up for ‘Portugal Idol’. Her raw talent and desire to get back at her boss for signing her up for the † 9


Books of power

Susana has a book that she takes out whenever she performs at Southbank that she calls the “book of power”. The idea started from people approaching her during her sets to compliment her, so Susana thought that it would be a good idea to have these powerful thoughts documented for whenever she’s feeling under the weather.

“I have already got six of these books completely filled out at home.” She goes on to show me a few drawings and encouraging comments written by passerbys. “This is one of my favourites.” She shows me a scribbling that is clearly done by a child. “Two little girls came up to me and wrote on that.”

fb: /susanasilva tw: @susanasmusic susanasilvamusic.com

10

program, led her to be a part of the top 10 finalists of the show. When her time in Portugal Idol came to an end, Susana had to go back to reality: studying and working. After that chapter of her life ended, she felt like Portugal had nothing left to offer her, reason why she packed up and moved to London. I asked her why London and not Berlin or New York, and she said that for Europe, London is the “magical city”. She moved to London and started working at a small coffee house that had a second floor, which she used as her apartment. After a few months, she asked her employer – who was also her landlord- permission to go back home for a few weeks because she missed her family, this had been the longest she had been away from home. He agreed to that and she left, but once she came back her house and her employee were both gone. She tried to contact the police, but they could never find her. “I was homeless for about two weeks.” She could have asked her family for money or help, but she felt like it would not be fair to put them in that position. “My parents have given me so much, I didn’t want to push them to give me even more.” She pauses to light up and take a drag from her cigarette. “In my head I thought: ‘I’m going to make it work’ and that’s when I found Southbank.” While she was trying to make ends meet, Susana met a fellow busker on the streets who gave her one of the most valuable presents she would ever receive – a guitar. “It was a bit scary, you know? (laughs). Some random man coming up to you and ‘giving you a gift’? Scary. I was sitting there stomping my feet and singing and he came up to me and gave me a broken guitar with only two strings left.” He appreciated her hard work and the fact that she wasn’t begging for money, like some do. He became a

sort of mentor for Susana. She spent the first few pounds she made at McDonald’s. “I remember he told me to take that money and go away from central London and buy a big bowl of soup, which is better than McDonald’s.” He also advised her to set aside a few pounds and go to a computer café and use the money to learn how to play the guitar from the Internet. So, she did. “I started to learn how to play guitar with just the two strings.” After a while and multiple random jobs, Susana found enough money to get an amplifier, a microphone, and a real guitar with 6 strings. “The hardest thing right now is having to deal with the business side of music.” Susana hasn’t had the best experiences with managers and producers because, as you would suspect, the industry is driven through money and appearances. “Which is why I’m doing everything on my own now. I’m my own manager, my own producer, my own publicist.” “I don’t need the fame, I just want to make people smile and feel like they can relate to my music.” Susana is currently working in both London and Portugal to produce her new EP: Foundations. ¢


Books of power

Susana has a book that she takes out whenever she performs at Southbank that she calls the “book of power”. The idea started from people approaching her during her sets to compliment her, so Susana thought that it would be a good idea to have these powerful thoughts documented for whenever she’s feeling under the weather.

“I have already got six of these books completely filled out at home.” She goes on to show me a few drawings and encouraging comments written by passerbys. “This is one of my favourites.” She shows me a scribbling that is clearly done by a child. “Two little girls came up to me and wrote on that.”

fb: /susanasilva tw: @susanasmusic susanasilvamusic.com

10

program, led her to be a part of the top 10 finalists of the show. When her time in Portugal Idol came to an end, Susana had to go back to reality: studying and working. After that chapter of her life ended, she felt like Portugal had nothing left to offer her, reason why she packed up and moved to London. I asked her why London and not Berlin or New York, and she said that for Europe, London is the “magical city”. She moved to London and started working at a small coffee house that had a second floor, which she used as her apartment. After a few months, she asked her employer – who was also her landlord- permission to go back home for a few weeks because she missed her family, this had been the longest she had been away from home. He agreed to that and she left, but once she came back her house and her employee were both gone. She tried to contact the police, but they could never find her. “I was homeless for about two weeks.” She could have asked her family for money or help, but she felt like it would not be fair to put them in that position. “My parents have given me so much, I didn’t want to push them to give me even more.” She pauses to light up and take a drag from her cigarette. “In my head I thought: ‘I’m going to make it work’ and that’s when I found Southbank.” While she was trying to make ends meet, Susana met a fellow busker on the streets who gave her one of the most valuable presents she would ever receive – a guitar. “It was a bit scary, you know? (laughs). Some random man coming up to you and ‘giving you a gift’? Scary. I was sitting there stomping my feet and singing and he came up to me and gave me a broken guitar with only two strings left.” He appreciated her hard work and the fact that she wasn’t begging for money, like some do. He became a

sort of mentor for Susana. She spent the first few pounds she made at McDonald’s. “I remember he told me to take that money and go away from central London and buy a big bowl of soup, which is better than McDonald’s.” He also advised her to set aside a few pounds and go to a computer café and use the money to learn how to play the guitar from the Internet. So, she did. “I started to learn how to play guitar with just the two strings.” After a while and multiple random jobs, Susana found enough money to get an amplifier, a microphone, and a real guitar with 6 strings. “The hardest thing right now is having to deal with the business side of music.” Susana hasn’t had the best experiences with managers and producers because, as you would suspect, the industry is driven through money and appearances. “Which is why I’m doing everything on my own now. I’m my own manager, my own producer, my own publicist.” “I don’t need the fame, I just want to make people smile and feel like they can relate to my music.” Susana is currently working in both London and Portugal to produce her new EP: Foundations. ¢


PEOPLE

Farewell to a true Eastender

baker street

On a cold November evening, 150 cars turned out to pay tribute to the dearly departed Garry Smith of Bethnal Green. A father first, a husband second and a true petrol head third. His legacy lives on in the shape of his teenage daughter and beloved car that his wife has vowed never to sell The time is 10pm on a Saturday night in London’s Leicester Square. The buzz and excitement of people preparing for a night listening to loud music, laughing with friends, taking embarrassing pictures for future publication on Facebook and the need to consume vast amounts of alcohol is atmospheric. Nearly everybody is underdressed for the harsh November night chill, but nobody seems bothered. They know that when they get into their chosen venue for the night, the hot and sweaty atmosphere dictates that the thinnest clothes

Garry’s beloved Ford Serria Cosworth bought brand new in 1987

We had gone to Baker Street to take a friend from out of town to see some touristy things around London. We were both huge Sherlock fans. On our way to 221B we passed by this fellow. Dressed from head to toe in the iconic cape, trapper hat, and pipe, this man was clearly the great English detective Sherlock Holmes. He was not all that happy to see us. The Sherlock impersonator hid between columns of the adjacent building, taking his call (which we all hoped would be his partner in crime, Dr. John Watson). I did have a chance to sneak in a picture. F.D ¢ 12

12

are the best. There are pockets of people all over the square; People from all over inner and outer London. Some people have travelled from elsewhere in the country to celebrate an array of occasions ranging from birthday’s to emigration – some are just celebrating yet another date on their forever busy social calendar. Forty two miles to the east of Leicester Square there is an entirely different atmosphere in full swing. Southend-on-Sea is playing host to an organized car meet. 150 cars are parked diagonally in vertical parking bays, with their owners either embracing the warmth of their interiors or next to their cars bracing the harsh cold breeze from the sea behind them. The atmosphere is strangely calming. Some people would say that this is a scene from the Fast and Furious series of films. Except it isn’t. In the middle of the row of beautifully maintained performance cars are five 1980’s Ford Sierra Cosworths parked side by side. The distinction of these cars from the rest is clear. All of their owners are standing in a group of 20 or more people laughing at a story being told. They all glance around occasionally when a new car arrives-some wave, some nod and some simply return their attention to the conversation. The owners of these five cars

are easy to pick out. They are all heavily built white men, with baldheads wearing boots and bomber jackets. All look intimidating because of their size but all have warm grins on their faces. The five cars all carry a message on the rear window in big white letters. At a glance, you could be mistaken for assuming, it is a bigger emblem than the ones that some of the other cars don showing their affiliation with car clubs. On the contrary it is a much more humbling message that read

“R.I.P Garry ‘Gazza’ Smith. Biggest Petrol-Head in East London with the Biggest Heart. 11.03.67 – 12.09.13. Never Forgotten.” This was a memorial car meet for a sadly departed father and friend. The message was sobering, and the sentiment of the message duplicated was heart-warming. Garry died after a 2-year battle with bowel cancer; aged 46. Born and raised in East London’s Bethnal Green, he was a true east ender. He was said to have an overwhelming passion for just 3 things-in this order: -“His Daughter, His Missus and His Cosworth.”

There are people sharing stories about their encounters with him, either at as customers in his garage or as friends or acquaintances. They told of times Garry would ark back to east-end traditions of looking out for neighbours – treating all whom he met like family. His garage where he fixed Ford cars, was frequented by deliquent youths from the area; that he would give paid work placements to, to keep them out of trouble. The car cruise scene is dying in London. Zero tolerance attitudes enforced by The Metropolitan and neighbouring police forces – due to rising pressures from road safety campaigners and residents – prevent large numbers of modified cars congregating in one place - at one time. However, on this cold November night an exception was made; Garry Smith was honoured in the way that meant the most to him. One hundred and fifty cars with upwards of 300 people in them, turned out to say their last fairwell to one of Bethanl Green’s most beloved residents. A.C.P ¢ “Garry was always smiling. No matter the weather, no matter the situation he was always smiling. I will always remember that smile” Daniel, Whitechapel

Garry and his wife Shiela at their wedding in 1992

13


PEOPLE

Farewell to a true Eastender

baker street

On a cold November evening, 150 cars turned out to pay tribute to the dearly departed Garry Smith of Bethnal Green. A father first, a husband second and a true petrol head third. His legacy lives on in the shape of his teenage daughter and beloved car that his wife has vowed never to sell The time is 10pm on a Saturday night in London’s Leicester Square. The buzz and excitement of people preparing for a night listening to loud music, laughing with friends, taking embarrassing pictures for future publication on Facebook and the need to consume vast amounts of alcohol is atmospheric. Nearly everybody is underdressed for the harsh November night chill, but nobody seems bothered. They know that when they get into their chosen venue for the night, the hot and sweaty atmosphere dictates that the thinnest clothes

Garry’s beloved Ford Serria Cosworth bought brand new in 1987

We had gone to Baker Street to take a friend from out of town to see some touristy things around London. We were both huge Sherlock fans. On our way to 221B we passed by this fellow. Dressed from head to toe in the iconic cape, trapper hat, and pipe, this man was clearly the great English detective Sherlock Holmes. He was not all that happy to see us. The Sherlock impersonator hid between columns of the adjacent building, taking his call (which we all hoped would be his partner in crime, Dr. John Watson). I did have a chance to sneak in a picture. F.D ¢ 12

12

are the best. There are pockets of people all over the square; People from all over inner and outer London. Some people have travelled from elsewhere in the country to celebrate an array of occasions ranging from birthday’s to emigration – some are just celebrating yet another date on their forever busy social calendar. Forty two miles to the east of Leicester Square there is an entirely different atmosphere in full swing. Southend-on-Sea is playing host to an organized car meet. 150 cars are parked diagonally in vertical parking bays, with their owners either embracing the warmth of their interiors or next to their cars bracing the harsh cold breeze from the sea behind them. The atmosphere is strangely calming. Some people would say that this is a scene from the Fast and Furious series of films. Except it isn’t. In the middle of the row of beautifully maintained performance cars are five 1980’s Ford Sierra Cosworths parked side by side. The distinction of these cars from the rest is clear. All of their owners are standing in a group of 20 or more people laughing at a story being told. They all glance around occasionally when a new car arrives-some wave, some nod and some simply return their attention to the conversation. The owners of these five cars

are easy to pick out. They are all heavily built white men, with baldheads wearing boots and bomber jackets. All look intimidating because of their size but all have warm grins on their faces. The five cars all carry a message on the rear window in big white letters. At a glance, you could be mistaken for assuming, it is a bigger emblem than the ones that some of the other cars don showing their affiliation with car clubs. On the contrary it is a much more humbling message that read

“R.I.P Garry ‘Gazza’ Smith. Biggest Petrol-Head in East London with the Biggest Heart. 11.03.67 – 12.09.13. Never Forgotten.” This was a memorial car meet for a sadly departed father and friend. The message was sobering, and the sentiment of the message duplicated was heart-warming. Garry died after a 2-year battle with bowel cancer; aged 46. Born and raised in East London’s Bethnal Green, he was a true east ender. He was said to have an overwhelming passion for just 3 things-in this order: -“His Daughter, His Missus and His Cosworth.”

There are people sharing stories about their encounters with him, either at as customers in his garage or as friends or acquaintances. They told of times Garry would ark back to east-end traditions of looking out for neighbours – treating all whom he met like family. His garage where he fixed Ford cars, was frequented by deliquent youths from the area; that he would give paid work placements to, to keep them out of trouble. The car cruise scene is dying in London. Zero tolerance attitudes enforced by The Metropolitan and neighbouring police forces – due to rising pressures from road safety campaigners and residents – prevent large numbers of modified cars congregating in one place - at one time. However, on this cold November night an exception was made; Garry Smith was honoured in the way that meant the most to him. One hundred and fifty cars with upwards of 300 people in them, turned out to say their last fairwell to one of Bethanl Green’s most beloved residents. A.C.P ¢ “Garry was always smiling. No matter the weather, no matter the situation he was always smiling. I will always remember that smile” Daniel, Whitechapel

Garry and his wife Shiela at their wedding in 1992

13


PEOPLE

Mapping London

Tales of early mornings at the Prêt à Manger, dreams of an inner city farm and unbelieveable sights of St. Pauls hundreds of memories hand drawn by Londoners.

Words by Frances Dumlao There is more than one way to map the city of London. The most common way is geographically, measured in precise distances with street names and key sights and landmarks. That’s what we’re used to seeing. I wanted to try it a different way. I started this project to see what Londoners had to say about their city. Venturing to the city carrying an 84mm x 59.4mm white poster, I asked Londoners to contribute to this map. A handful were born and raised in London. Others lived here for a few years originating from various parts of the world -- India, Poland, Ireland, Denmark, Pakistan, United States, Italy. Some have only been in the city for a few months. I handed them a pencil and gave them simple directions: Draw one place in London that is personal to you. I listened to 50 different stories of London, resulting in over 100 raw illustrations. I’ve listened to tales of unspeakable nights at the Drunken Monkey, fandom moments meeting the world’s fastest runner, Usain Bolt, childhood memories at the British Museum, late shifts at the St. Thomas Hospital, and foodgasms in Chinatown. Illustration highlights include the Welsh dragon, Lambeth Pub, the Olympic Stadium, two Big Bens, two BT Towers and two London Zoos. Here are several of the most interesting stories.

Map your world Fancy a scavenger hunt? Dive into the world of cartography to discover more secret places. I recommend these tools to dig up more hidden stories around your neck of the woods. Time Out’s Secret London Map timeout.com/london/things-to-do/ londons-secret-spots-mapped Time Out tried its hand in something notso-touristy. Drawing on the expertise on London’s best bloggers, it has created a map of underground restuarants and cafes.

14

Mapping London Blog mappinglondon.co.uk From Murder maps to actually geographically accurate tube maps, you’ll find all kinds of interesting, quirky representations of London here. History Pin historypin.com If you’re more of a history buff, try History Pin where you’ll travel back in time through old photos pinned on the map. The photos are crowd sourced, so you can add your own photos and stories.

Mapping Manhattan: A Love (and Sometimes Hate) Story by Becky Cooper Mapping Manhattan is a collection of maps by 75 New Yorkers that confess their stories through their interpretations of Manhattan. On her journey distributing the maps, the author met people from all walks of life, from icecream van drivers to homeless people to fashion models to Wall Street bankers. †

15


PEOPLE

Mapping London

Tales of early mornings at the Prêt à Manger, dreams of an inner city farm and unbelieveable sights of St. Pauls hundreds of memories hand drawn by Londoners.

Words by Frances Dumlao There is more than one way to map the city of London. The most common way is geographically, measured in precise distances with street names and key sights and landmarks. That’s what we’re used to seeing. I wanted to try it a different way. I started this project to see what Londoners had to say about their city. Venturing to the city carrying an 84mm x 59.4mm white poster, I asked Londoners to contribute to this map. A handful were born and raised in London. Others lived here for a few years originating from various parts of the world -- India, Poland, Ireland, Denmark, Pakistan, United States, Italy. Some have only been in the city for a few months. I handed them a pencil and gave them simple directions: Draw one place in London that is personal to you. I listened to 50 different stories of London, resulting in over 100 raw illustrations. I’ve listened to tales of unspeakable nights at the Drunken Monkey, fandom moments meeting the world’s fastest runner, Usain Bolt, childhood memories at the British Museum, late shifts at the St. Thomas Hospital, and foodgasms in Chinatown. Illustration highlights include the Welsh dragon, Lambeth Pub, the Olympic Stadium, two Big Bens, two BT Towers and two London Zoos. Here are several of the most interesting stories.

Map your world Fancy a scavenger hunt? Dive into the world of cartography to discover more secret places. I recommend these tools to dig up more hidden stories around your neck of the woods. Time Out’s Secret London Map timeout.com/london/things-to-do/ londons-secret-spots-mapped Time Out tried its hand in something notso-touristy. Drawing on the expertise on London’s best bloggers, it has created a map of underground restuarants and cafes.

14

Mapping London Blog mappinglondon.co.uk From Murder maps to actually geographically accurate tube maps, you’ll find all kinds of interesting, quirky representations of London here. History Pin historypin.com If you’re more of a history buff, try History Pin where you’ll travel back in time through old photos pinned on the map. The photos are crowd sourced, so you can add your own photos and stories.

Mapping Manhattan: A Love (and Sometimes Hate) Story by Becky Cooper Mapping Manhattan is a collection of maps by 75 New Yorkers that confess their stories through their interpretations of Manhattan. On her journey distributing the maps, the author met people from all walks of life, from icecream van drivers to homeless people to fashion models to Wall Street bankers. †

15


PEOPLE

The parishioner Most people want to draw a famous London landmark like the London Eye or Big Ben. I usually have to encourage participants to choose something more personal, no matter how trivial. This man jumped in and asked if he could draw Prêt à Manger. “You must have a lot great memories there.” “Yeah, there is a Prêt à Manger where we go to before church. My church is near Covent Garden. Basically we just sit, read the bible and meet new people.” He carefully sketched the tables at Prêt. I watched him imagining his Sunday mornings there to get the tables just right.

The Runner The runner First she drew the tall pointy Shard. She then drew a tiny house right next to it. She labeled it: Daisy’s house. “I drew the Shard. It’s the first thing I see when I get out of my flat. It’s quite obnoxious.” Looking for Tower Bridge she explains, “Usually I cross it when I jog,” I followed her hand along the north side of the Thames. “I keep going, then I cross Millennium Bridge,” I watch her finger go southbound. “When I see the Shard, I know that I’m getting close. Wherever I am in London and I’m lost, I just look up, find the Shard, and I know where home is.” The Shard is her North Star.

The lovers

"

I approached these two while having lunch in cafe. They looked like friends. The man agreed to help me with project while the women sat quietly. I figured that she was shy. “Is Regent’s Park here?” He drew a tree with a heart in the middle. “Are you a couple?” To my surprise, the quiet woman answered, “Yes. Regent’s Park is a very nice place to lay down and relax.” I looked at them, imagining sunny spring days with the two of them enjoying a picnic under this tree.

The dreamer When I was working on this map, I knew that people would exaggerate their illustrations to reflect their personal experiences with the place. This guy decided London needed something. When I explained my project to him, he asked if he could add something that didn’t exist. “Does this have to be relative to what’s on the page?” he asked. “What do you mean?” “Well, I think that London should have another inner city farm. You know, a place where you can have a farm in the middle of an urban area. It transforms cities. They have it many cities in England like Bristol. It transforms a bad area. Yeah, they should have it around destroyed grounds and let people come in and share the land.” He drew his barn house in East London.

16

“I've lived here for more than three years and I didn’t even know that view existed.”

The local This woman was disappointed when she found that St. Paul’s Cathedral and the Globe had already been sketched. She then lit up, drawing a little box to the right of the Globe, labeling it Nando’s. “My friend visited me on holiday and we went to the Globe. Afterwards we went to Nando’s. It was sooo good.” She tiptoed her fingers, moving from Nando’s to Millennium Bridge. “Afterward we saw the best view of St. Paul’s. I've lived here for three years and I didn’t even know that view existed,” she laughed. “My friend read about it somewhere in her travel guidebook.” It’s strangely ironic that tourists sometimes know more about our home city than we do.

The Londoner’s map It may look like a bunch of children’s doodles on a white poster board. It’s completely inaccurate. It’s silly. But looking at the metropolis through Londoners' eyes uncovers a different kind of London. They mapped their jogging escapades, sacred Sunday mornings, love stories, epiphanies and hopes. The map is deeply personal - probably one of the best storytelling maps of the city. Try making a map of your space. It can be as vast as a country or as small as your desk. Draw what you see and jot down some notes on your experiences and memories with each section or object. Discover the treasures that were right there all along. ¢

17


PEOPLE

The parishioner Most people want to draw a famous London landmark like the London Eye or Big Ben. I usually have to encourage participants to choose something more personal, no matter how trivial. This man jumped in and asked if he could draw Prêt à Manger. “You must have a lot great memories there.” “Yeah, there is a Prêt à Manger where we go to before church. My church is near Covent Garden. Basically we just sit, read the bible and meet new people.” He carefully sketched the tables at Prêt. I watched him imagining his Sunday mornings there to get the tables just right.

The Runner The runner First she drew the tall pointy Shard. She then drew a tiny house right next to it. She labeled it: Daisy’s house. “I drew the Shard. It’s the first thing I see when I get out of my flat. It’s quite obnoxious.” Looking for Tower Bridge she explains, “Usually I cross it when I jog,” I followed her hand along the north side of the Thames. “I keep going, then I cross Millennium Bridge,” I watch her finger go southbound. “When I see the Shard, I know that I’m getting close. Wherever I am in London and I’m lost, I just look up, find the Shard, and I know where home is.” The Shard is her North Star.

The lovers

"

I approached these two while having lunch in cafe. They looked like friends. The man agreed to help me with project while the women sat quietly. I figured that she was shy. “Is Regent’s Park here?” He drew a tree with a heart in the middle. “Are you a couple?” To my surprise, the quiet woman answered, “Yes. Regent’s Park is a very nice place to lay down and relax.” I looked at them, imagining sunny spring days with the two of them enjoying a picnic under this tree.

The dreamer When I was working on this map, I knew that people would exaggerate their illustrations to reflect their personal experiences with the place. This guy decided London needed something. When I explained my project to him, he asked if he could add something that didn’t exist. “Does this have to be relative to what’s on the page?” he asked. “What do you mean?” “Well, I think that London should have another inner city farm. You know, a place where you can have a farm in the middle of an urban area. It transforms cities. They have it many cities in England like Bristol. It transforms a bad area. Yeah, they should have it around destroyed grounds and let people come in and share the land.” He drew his barn house in East London.

16

“I've lived here for more than three years and I didn’t even know that view existed.”

The local This woman was disappointed when she found that St. Paul’s Cathedral and the Globe had already been sketched. She then lit up, drawing a little box to the right of the Globe, labeling it Nando’s. “My friend visited me on holiday and we went to the Globe. Afterwards we went to Nando’s. It was sooo good.” She tiptoed her fingers, moving from Nando’s to Millennium Bridge. “Afterward we saw the best view of St. Paul’s. I've lived here for three years and I didn’t even know that view existed,” she laughed. “My friend read about it somewhere in her travel guidebook.” It’s strangely ironic that tourists sometimes know more about our home city than we do.

The Londoner’s map It may look like a bunch of children’s doodles on a white poster board. It’s completely inaccurate. It’s silly. But looking at the metropolis through Londoners' eyes uncovers a different kind of London. They mapped their jogging escapades, sacred Sunday mornings, love stories, epiphanies and hopes. The map is deeply personal - probably one of the best storytelling maps of the city. Try making a map of your space. It can be as vast as a country or as small as your desk. Draw what you see and jot down some notes on your experiences and memories with each section or object. Discover the treasures that were right there all along. ¢

17


PEOPLE

Transformation to Imagery Famous for her photography of the restoration of the Savoy Hotel, Siobhan Doran talks about Bologna, Southbank and the importance of doing what you love

Words by Richard Holmes 19


PEOPLE

Transformation to Imagery Famous for her photography of the restoration of the Savoy Hotel, Siobhan Doran talks about Bologna, Southbank and the importance of doing what you love

Words by Richard Holmes 19


There were some days when I came back with very little, some days with loads, and others where I had only one and it was probably one of the best shots

PEOPLE

Shots from Restoration, Savoy (Siobhan Doran) Dewi Lewis Publishing ISBN: 978-1-907893-14-8 £40 + P&P Available from 02.11.11

L

eaving your full-time job and shooting the restoration of one of the world’s most prestigious hotels in the same week would be enough to throw anyone off balance. For Siobhan Doran, it was all part of the process in an inspired dedication to photography. I arrived at the famous Savoy Hotel – post restoration - to a busy reception, full of businessmen and proud older women sipping on champagne. Having never visited the Savoy before, I felt that its reputation and ego was well justified. I examined the intricate detailing, which had contained me in a room of gold, mahogany, wealth, and prowess. Nestled in the location that kick-started her career, I had a chance to talk to Siobhan Doran – responsible for documenting the restoration - three years after her brave decision to take on the photo industry. Noticing my appreciation for the detail above us she explained, “It was put there to celebrate the Queen’s jubilee.” I immediately got the impression that she knew almost every inch of this 250-room building. We avoided the pretentiously high prices of the Savoy coffee for a down market and affordable cup of tea in a café on Strand. As she began to speak about the career she risked everything to chase, her clouds parted and I was exposed to her passion for the industry she loves. “I always loved photography,” she said. “I was still working four days a week in architecture. At the end of August 2007, I had set myself up for a one year break to see if I could get my photography going because I couldn’t do both and I certainly couldn’t start a photography career one day a week.” Doran’s story is one with a message we should all think about: leaving her career behind to pursue her passion. Saying goodbye to the stability of the job she had trained for. The Republic of Ireland native was offered a morsel of an opportunity – which she took without hesitation. “By pure coincidence, the same week I finished work, a friend of mine who told me the Savoy was closing knew a representative for the project. She set up a meeting for me with this man and he liked

my previous work,” Doran says before pausing to take a sip from her espresso. “He introduced me to the Managing Director of the Savoy and I proposed my ideas for the project.” Doran’s original proposal to shoot the Savoy’s restoration was initially rejected due to the fact that managers didn’t want press sniffing around when work was underway. This, however, was not a response that Doran accepted. Showing her true grit and determination to break into the professional world of photography she wrote the managers. “I was angry. I addressed them as gentlemen with my views, and they allowed me access,” she says with a well-earned smirk. Having fought for the opportunity she awaited for, it was now time to show what this previous recreational photographer could produce on a professional stage. Visiting the restoration over 100 times, she invested her whole focus on a project that truly signified her headfirst leap into a new career. “It made me feel like I had a job, to be honest. It gave me a structure. It was something that I liked – and I don’t enjoy working on my own. I used to go in and meet everybody and say ‘hello’ and it was a wonderful job. There were some days when I came back with very little, some days when with loads, and others where I had only one and it was probably one of the best shots.” To most, the idea of being alone in a huge London property, stripped of its furnisher and décor with nothing but a dim light to keep you company would be unsettling. But Doran explains to me how these moments helped her see the true beauty of what she was photographing – developing a book which is so convincing as a beaux art restoration project. She looked past me and into her memory. I saw her get carried away in a previous haven she had found as she said: “Late at night, at this time of year especially, you should see the views from the windows looking over Southbank,” she brought herself back to the café and explained this haven to me. “There were times when I would stand in those rooms when all the workers had gone and think this is a beautiful place and not everybody out there

Street photography and architecture are excellent and my day-to-day work is shooting interiors and it’s fantastic here. Ironically, it’s a good place to shoot landscape, even though it’s a city

20

21


There were some days when I came back with very little, some days with loads, and others where I had only one and it was probably one of the best shots

PEOPLE

Shots from Restoration, Savoy (Siobhan Doran) Dewi Lewis Publishing ISBN: 978-1-907893-14-8 £40 + P&P Available from 02.11.11

L

eaving your full-time job and shooting the restoration of one of the world’s most prestigious hotels in the same week would be enough to throw anyone off balance. For Siobhan Doran, it was all part of the process in an inspired dedication to photography. I arrived at the famous Savoy Hotel – post restoration - to a busy reception, full of businessmen and proud older women sipping on champagne. Having never visited the Savoy before, I felt that its reputation and ego was well justified. I examined the intricate detailing, which had contained me in a room of gold, mahogany, wealth, and prowess. Nestled in the location that kick-started her career, I had a chance to talk to Siobhan Doran – responsible for documenting the restoration - three years after her brave decision to take on the photo industry. Noticing my appreciation for the detail above us she explained, “It was put there to celebrate the Queen’s jubilee.” I immediately got the impression that she knew almost every inch of this 250-room building. We avoided the pretentiously high prices of the Savoy coffee for a down market and affordable cup of tea in a café on Strand. As she began to speak about the career she risked everything to chase, her clouds parted and I was exposed to her passion for the industry she loves. “I always loved photography,” she said. “I was still working four days a week in architecture. At the end of August 2007, I had set myself up for a one year break to see if I could get my photography going because I couldn’t do both and I certainly couldn’t start a photography career one day a week.” Doran’s story is one with a message we should all think about: leaving her career behind to pursue her passion. Saying goodbye to the stability of the job she had trained for. The Republic of Ireland native was offered a morsel of an opportunity – which she took without hesitation. “By pure coincidence, the same week I finished work, a friend of mine who told me the Savoy was closing knew a representative for the project. She set up a meeting for me with this man and he liked

my previous work,” Doran says before pausing to take a sip from her espresso. “He introduced me to the Managing Director of the Savoy and I proposed my ideas for the project.” Doran’s original proposal to shoot the Savoy’s restoration was initially rejected due to the fact that managers didn’t want press sniffing around when work was underway. This, however, was not a response that Doran accepted. Showing her true grit and determination to break into the professional world of photography she wrote the managers. “I was angry. I addressed them as gentlemen with my views, and they allowed me access,” she says with a well-earned smirk. Having fought for the opportunity she awaited for, it was now time to show what this previous recreational photographer could produce on a professional stage. Visiting the restoration over 100 times, she invested her whole focus on a project that truly signified her headfirst leap into a new career. “It made me feel like I had a job, to be honest. It gave me a structure. It was something that I liked – and I don’t enjoy working on my own. I used to go in and meet everybody and say ‘hello’ and it was a wonderful job. There were some days when I came back with very little, some days when with loads, and others where I had only one and it was probably one of the best shots.” To most, the idea of being alone in a huge London property, stripped of its furnisher and décor with nothing but a dim light to keep you company would be unsettling. But Doran explains to me how these moments helped her see the true beauty of what she was photographing – developing a book which is so convincing as a beaux art restoration project. She looked past me and into her memory. I saw her get carried away in a previous haven she had found as she said: “Late at night, at this time of year especially, you should see the views from the windows looking over Southbank,” she brought herself back to the café and explained this haven to me. “There were times when I would stand in those rooms when all the workers had gone and think this is a beautiful place and not everybody out there

Street photography and architecture are excellent and my day-to-day work is shooting interiors and it’s fantastic here. Ironically, it’s a good place to shoot landscape, even though it’s a city

20

21


PEOPLE

I was probably the only unknown name, so I was very honoured

can see it. It is an absolutely gorgeous spot. If I were staying there I would just turn all the lights off and stare out the window.” The restoration book has been showcased at the Leonard Street gallery with pieces in the Royal Academy London Summer Show 2012 in a project that has taken Doran around the world. Most recently the book was chosen by François Hébel to take part in the Foto Industria Bologna in October of this year. Doran saw her work exhibited alongside works of Brian Griffin, Jacqueline Hassink, Harry Gruyaert, Gabriele Basilico, David Goldblatt, Massimo Siragusa, Mark Power, and Henri Cartier Bresson in what she modestly played off by saying: “I was probably the only unknown name, so I was very honoured.” Having shot in London many times since

22

the release of her first book, Doran explores the idea of the capital as a growing city with architecture to compete at the top. “You look at the skyline at the moment and there are a lot of cranes, a lot of new buildings. Its not a high city but it has stunning features,” the clouds have truly parted now as she pours her feelings out into my Dictaphone. “Street photography and architecture are excellent and my day-to-day work is shooting interiors and it’s fantastic here. Ironically, it’s a good place to shoot landscape, even though it’s a city. More often than not, I go somewhere and I think I could live here. Last year I shot Charles Dickens museum and I loved Brunswick square. As we leave the café I ask her what she is working on at the moment. With a subdued smile the photographer, influenced by

Mark Power, revealed a recent interview for another big project. “It would be a really interesting and good project for me, but I don’t want to jinx it so I can’t say anymore than that. A customer left my Savoy book in their room, it was taken to the manager and they got in contact with me. They wouldn’t have known about me if it wasn’t for that mystery person.” With another big, prosperous project falling into her hands, you can’t help but get the sense that Doran has found the path she was supposed to take. With such modesty she takes on a rich and successful career in photography. She mentioned that a life spent doing something you love rather than something to pay the bills is one worth living. ¢

23


PEOPLE

I was probably the only unknown name, so I was very honoured

can see it. It is an absolutely gorgeous spot. If I were staying there I would just turn all the lights off and stare out the window.” The restoration book has been showcased at the Leonard Street gallery with pieces in the Royal Academy London Summer Show 2012 in a project that has taken Doran around the world. Most recently the book was chosen by François Hébel to take part in the Foto Industria Bologna in October of this year. Doran saw her work exhibited alongside works of Brian Griffin, Jacqueline Hassink, Harry Gruyaert, Gabriele Basilico, David Goldblatt, Massimo Siragusa, Mark Power, and Henri Cartier Bresson in what she modestly played off by saying: “I was probably the only unknown name, so I was very honoured.” Having shot in London many times since

22

the release of her first book, Doran explores the idea of the capital as a growing city with architecture to compete at the top. “You look at the skyline at the moment and there are a lot of cranes, a lot of new buildings. Its not a high city but it has stunning features,” the clouds have truly parted now as she pours her feelings out into my Dictaphone. “Street photography and architecture are excellent and my day-to-day work is shooting interiors and it’s fantastic here. Ironically, it’s a good place to shoot landscape, even though it’s a city. More often than not, I go somewhere and I think I could live here. Last year I shot Charles Dickens museum and I loved Brunswick square. As we leave the café I ask her what she is working on at the moment. With a subdued smile the photographer, influenced by

Mark Power, revealed a recent interview for another big project. “It would be a really interesting and good project for me, but I don’t want to jinx it so I can’t say anymore than that. A customer left my Savoy book in their room, it was taken to the manager and they got in contact with me. They wouldn’t have known about me if it wasn’t for that mystery person.” With another big, prosperous project falling into her hands, you can’t help but get the sense that Doran has found the path she was supposed to take. With such modesty she takes on a rich and successful career in photography. She mentioned that a life spent doing something you love rather than something to pay the bills is one worth living. ¢

23


PLACES

Billingsgate fish market

O

verwhelmed by the coarse of the early morning, I briskly scuttled to the relief of the shelter of the market. My jeans hung stiff from my body. Cold wet gusts of wind rattled my ribs and chilled my body down through to my lungs. For nearly four hundred years, men of the market have taken the brunt of the elements. I can barely imagine the piercing wind that penetrated the naked faces of 16th century porters. 24

Upon entering the hollowed brick warehouse I pass men with fat bellies waddling around the car park waiting eagerly for fish like the seagulls that inhabit the markets surrounding docks. I breezed through columns of boggle-eyed fish to the depths and refuge of the market. A contrast of natter and business chat met sounds of machinery and industrious clanks from pallet trucks and box dollies. A humming of trade muffled my ears as I treaded deeper and deeper into the vast commerce.

Shuddering in crisp polyester boxes, fish dusted in ice lay in wait ready to be slung to the buyers that chirp around their vans as they waited for porters to bring them the early morning catch. As fish were sold, numbers and figures were riddled inside cockney chat as “fellas” spat words to one another. Frilly sodden sheets of “wedge” flapped through the air as the notes were inattentively tossed between the men. Traditional standards of trading such as the use of hard cash and sparse

Once I’d gotten over the fact that I woud be spending the morning squelching around in fish guts, I embraced this glossy place and got stuck in...

numbers of women – if any – meant that this market, while thriving in culture and diverse species of fish still hushed an element of old-fashioned England trade. Market workers wear weathered, blood and gut stained tie-dyed bibs, almost paying homage to the tradition of the original attire that porters wore years ago when the market was first established. Buried next to the financial hub of Canary Warf, lays our countries largest in-land fish market, Billingsgate. Formally

established in the 19thcentury as the biggest fish market in the world, it’s said that the market has functioned from as early as 1600’s. Arguably the heart of London culture, Billingsgate market respires during the dark hours of the cities bleak night. A place that has seen struggle in recent years from new by-laws abolishing the role of porter, Billingsgate remains the market of generations, tradition and hard graft – yet embraces the new world, seeing larger quantities of fish

species and embraces culture from all over the world. B.C ¢ Opening Times: Monday: Closed Tuesday: 4:00–9:30 am Wednesday: 4:00–9:30 am Thursday: 4:00–9:30 am Friday: 4:00–9:30 am Saturday: 4:00–9:30 am Sunday: Closed

25


PLACES

Billingsgate fish market

O

verwhelmed by the coarse of the early morning, I briskly scuttled to the relief of the shelter of the market. My jeans hung stiff from my body. Cold wet gusts of wind rattled my ribs and chilled my body down through to my lungs. For nearly four hundred years, men of the market have taken the brunt of the elements. I can barely imagine the piercing wind that penetrated the naked faces of 16th century porters. 24

Upon entering the hollowed brick warehouse I pass men with fat bellies waddling around the car park waiting eagerly for fish like the seagulls that inhabit the markets surrounding docks. I breezed through columns of boggle-eyed fish to the depths and refuge of the market. A contrast of natter and business chat met sounds of machinery and industrious clanks from pallet trucks and box dollies. A humming of trade muffled my ears as I treaded deeper and deeper into the vast commerce.

Shuddering in crisp polyester boxes, fish dusted in ice lay in wait ready to be slung to the buyers that chirp around their vans as they waited for porters to bring them the early morning catch. As fish were sold, numbers and figures were riddled inside cockney chat as “fellas” spat words to one another. Frilly sodden sheets of “wedge” flapped through the air as the notes were inattentively tossed between the men. Traditional standards of trading such as the use of hard cash and sparse

Once I’d gotten over the fact that I woud be spending the morning squelching around in fish guts, I embraced this glossy place and got stuck in...

numbers of women – if any – meant that this market, while thriving in culture and diverse species of fish still hushed an element of old-fashioned England trade. Market workers wear weathered, blood and gut stained tie-dyed bibs, almost paying homage to the tradition of the original attire that porters wore years ago when the market was first established. Buried next to the financial hub of Canary Warf, lays our countries largest in-land fish market, Billingsgate. Formally

established in the 19thcentury as the biggest fish market in the world, it’s said that the market has functioned from as early as 1600’s. Arguably the heart of London culture, Billingsgate market respires during the dark hours of the cities bleak night. A place that has seen struggle in recent years from new by-laws abolishing the role of porter, Billingsgate remains the market of generations, tradition and hard graft – yet embraces the new world, seeing larger quantities of fish

species and embraces culture from all over the world. B.C ¢ Opening Times: Monday: Closed Tuesday: 4:00–9:30 am Wednesday: 4:00–9:30 am Thursday: 4:00–9:30 am Friday: 4:00–9:30 am Saturday: 4:00–9:30 am Sunday: Closed

25


Following the sorry death of Nelson Mandela on the 5th December, people in their millions mourned and celebrated the life of the anti apartheid revolutionary. Taking to brick lane after the day of the former South African presidents death was the street artist Paul Don Smith.

Smith who’s produced many works of art on the brick lane of The Who, Margaret Thatcher and Jimi Hendrix produced his pieces by layering spray paint. Mandela, one of many key role players in the dismantling of apartheid, served as South African President from the years 1994 – 1999.

Known as Mabida to some, the Nobel Peace Prize winner spent 27 years in prison before his release by public campaign. Nelson Mandela died at the age of 95 from a lung infection; though he is not here in a physical sense his legacy will be left through the merged culture of tomorrow.

microfashion

B.C ¢

b R I C K

London is home to the most fashionable and best dressed children I have ever seen. You see four year olds wearing designer outfits and leather jackets. It is quite surprising, and alarming, to know that an infant has a better wardrobe than I will ever have. What do you want to be when you grow up? “A fireman.” Why do you want to be a fireman? “Because they get on the big red truck.” S.G.B ¢

L A N E

26

6

27


Following the sorry death of Nelson Mandela on the 5th December, people in their millions mourned and celebrated the life of the anti apartheid revolutionary. Taking to brick lane after the day of the former South African presidents death was the street artist Paul Don Smith.

Smith who’s produced many works of art on the brick lane of The Who, Margaret Thatcher and Jimi Hendrix produced his pieces by layering spray paint. Mandela, one of many key role players in the dismantling of apartheid, served as South African President from the years 1994 – 1999.

Known as Mabida to some, the Nobel Peace Prize winner spent 27 years in prison before his release by public campaign. Nelson Mandela died at the age of 95 from a lung infection; though he is not here in a physical sense his legacy will be left through the merged culture of tomorrow.

microfashion

B.C ¢

b R I C K

London is home to the most fashionable and best dressed children I have ever seen. You see four year olds wearing designer outfits and leather jackets. It is quite surprising, and alarming, to know that an infant has a better wardrobe than I will ever have. What do you want to be when you grow up? “A fireman.” Why do you want to be a fireman? “Because they get on the big red truck.” S.G.B ¢

L A N E

26

6

27


PLACES

BRICK LANE

IF YOU DON’T KNOW DON’T ASK Anderson, a carpenter from London remains true to his roots by spreading the love. Before approaching Anderson I watched him shake hands, converse and compliment a stranger dressed in traditional French artistic attire. Anderson was “helping a friend out” by constructing some wooden joints to hold in place a decaying second hand store.

30

Why did you shake that mans hand? “He seemed like a real person, and people that give off that kinda vibe need reminding because they’re doing a good thing” What did you like about that man? “The way he was dressed was real, he looked like an artistic man so I just told him to share the music, there’s nothing more real than sharing the love”

I have stopped to speak to you because at LDN. we try to bring to light the real people of London who make it the wonderful city that it is. “You should go up the road, there’s plenty of fantastic people up towards Hoxton Square, I love the place.”

Behind a black front door, off London’s fashionable Carnaby Street lies the most magical freak show on earth. They won’t let £100,000 a week footballers over their threshold and can relieve you of £150,000 for a single bottle of champagne. This is London’s finest nightclub. Welcome to the circus...

Words by Ascene Constable-Polson

B.C ¢

31


PLACES

BRICK LANE

IF YOU DON’T KNOW DON’T ASK Anderson, a carpenter from London remains true to his roots by spreading the love. Before approaching Anderson I watched him shake hands, converse and compliment a stranger dressed in traditional French artistic attire. Anderson was “helping a friend out” by constructing some wooden joints to hold in place a decaying second hand store.

30

Why did you shake that mans hand? “He seemed like a real person, and people that give off that kinda vibe need reminding because they’re doing a good thing” What did you like about that man? “The way he was dressed was real, he looked like an artistic man so I just told him to share the music, there’s nothing more real than sharing the love”

I have stopped to speak to you because at LDN. we try to bring to light the real people of London who make it the wonderful city that it is. “You should go up the road, there’s plenty of fantastic people up towards Hoxton Square, I love the place.”

Behind a black front door, off London’s fashionable Carnaby Street lies the most magical freak show on earth. They won’t let £100,000 a week footballers over their threshold and can relieve you of £150,000 for a single bottle of champagne. This is London’s finest nightclub. Welcome to the circus...

Words by Ascene Constable-Polson

B.C ¢

31


PLACES

Opulence in ganton street Standing inside the dressing room of Mayfair’s most exclusive nightclub is a bizarre experience. To my left there are midgets getting their make up done, to my right there is a clown getting into a suit that is far too large for him, and straight in front is an extraordinarily pretty woman petting an incredibly large snake. Behind me is a contortionist warming up and a

fire-dancer that is talking to a young lady who is casually inserting a nail into her nose. To use the word weird would be a complete understatement. Opened in 2009, Cirque Le Soir is a one-of-a-kind, kind of venue. The tag line ‘If You Don’t Know, Don’t Worry’ is truly apt.

32

Somebody whispers that I am truly lucky to be standing here, watching the beginning of the strange, but ultimately fabulous experience that is this nightclub. There are people that are in the financial hierarchy of the world, that wouldn’t even meet the entry requirements for the front door- English footballers being just some of them. Next on the banned list are Reality

TV stars, and anybody that is from the Soap Opera world should also find another venue to spend the evening at. The term ‘Riff Raff ’ has an entirely different meaning when you include footballers that earn upwards of £100,000 a week. Exclusivity is the name of the game. “Reality and Soap TV stars just don’t have it. Whereas English footballers just have horrible entourages – It’s not that they cant afford it, it’s just that we don’t want them here”; says 33 year old Ryan Bish founder and co-owner of this tantalizing venue that straddles the fine line between horribly seedy and epically glamorous. As a man wafted past me clutching a plethora of swords – which I later learned were due to go down his throat – I wondered out loud where the idea for a venue that is such an extreme assault on the senses came from. “A love of the circus” Ryan beams back at me. “From a young age I just wanted the circus! Not to run away with, mind you – I just wanted to own it. I even wanted to collect dwarfs at one point”, he adds.

In fact, slick haired and smooth talking ‘Mr. Bish’ kind of has just that: “I have an Iranian rapper, a black gay one, a Chinese one who’s really shy, and I have an English cockney builder. I’m always open to adding to the collection!” Causing offence and riding the motif of being crass is something Ryan Bish simply doesn’t apologize for. Indeed, he has no need to. Earlier this year, Cirque Le Soir gained global notoriety for other reasons than the freak show that adorns Ganton Street five nights a week. Justin Bieber was due to hold his 19th Birthday at the club. However, he was shown the door when management realized that he was partying with Jayden Smith (Will Smith’s son-aged 14) and several others – that were also in their early teens. They also took into consideration the fact that several members of his entourage smelt heavily of weed. Justin promptly took to Twitter to describe Cirque as a “weak ass club”. The ejection of Twitter’s second most followed celebrity did nothing to dent the clubs revenue, which rakes in £65,000 on a slow night. In fact, in the weeks following “the Bieber issue”, as Ryan describes it, the club played host to Princesses Beatrice and Eugenie, pop star Katy Perry, and actor Jonathan Rhys Meyers, of BBC2 series The Tudors. Miley Cyrus was also snapped here kissing a dwarf who was wearing a nappy and a baby mask. The incident, inevitably, served only to increase Cirque Le Soir’s aura of exclusivity. The exclusivity of economic apartheid starts at the front door. A door known to spot reporters from the back of the queue and turn away people who simply don’t fit the bill when they get to the front. Uncompromising Door Supervisors (you can’t call them bouncers anymore) turn away roughly 50% of revelers that arrive hoping to get a peek of the magical freak show that is Cirque.

PLACES PLACES

If however you are lucky enough to have booked a table, your dress code doesn’t appear to matter. Although at this point, it is mindful to be aware that a table costs upwards of £2,000. More than the average Britons monthly wage is a lot of money to many – but positively poultry when you see the table menu. A wine list doesn’t exist-its only champagne. The cheapest bottle of which, is a standard bottle of Dom Perignon costing £350 and that’s where the ‘cheap’ champagne stops. Louis Roederer Cristal costs £1,500, a Jeroboam of Krug, Various Methuselahs - each six litres - range from £10,000 to £40,000. That’s equivalent to more than £800 for every single glass. However if your pockets are really deep, and tactless spending is a favored hobby then there is only one option. At the end of the ‘wine list’ is a Magnum sized 30-litre, gold-plated Midas of Ace Of Spades champagne, made by high-end producer Armand de Brignac. Price? A truly eye popping £150,000… I have been sworn to not reveal the truly amazing stage shows of the Soho hangout that is located in a basement, behind an inconspicuous black door, down an alley way off, of, über fashionable Carnaby Street. “The ‘If You Don’t Know Don’t Worry’ tagline means just that”, Ryan tells me.

What I can tell you however is that if you are one of the lucky people that gains access to the London hangout that has parted its velvet ropes for the likes of Leonardo DiCaprio, Scarlett Johansson, Stephen Fry, Bradley Cooper, Jason Statham and Benedict Cumberbatch, and singers such as Willi-am, Rhianna and Kanye West, then you absolutely will never forget it. This is how the ‘other half ’ live. It’s a fascinating concept, within an atmosphere of certain exclusivity and vulgar showing off. The sheer opulence is shocking in these economic times, but it really is a rather special experience. Cirque Le Soir truly is, spectacular.

Name: Francois Rose (above, left) Age: 27 Hometown: Cannes (France) Time at Cirque: 4 years Best Moment In Cirque: Christmas 2011 Why: Epic Night, Dwarfs Dressed as Father Christmas Favorite Song: Robin Thickle-‘Blurred Lines’

Name: James De Gale (above, right) Age: 32 Hometown: Stockholm (Sweden) Time at Cirque: 2 years Best Moment In Cirque: Every Thursday Night Why: Great Atmosphere, Great Music Favorite Song: Pharrell Williams-‘Happy’ ¢

ê

33


PLACES

Opulence in ganton street Standing inside the dressing room of Mayfair’s most exclusive nightclub is a bizarre experience. To my left there are midgets getting their make up done, to my right there is a clown getting into a suit that is far too large for him, and straight in front is an extraordinarily pretty woman petting an incredibly large snake. Behind me is a contortionist warming up and a

fire-dancer that is talking to a young lady who is casually inserting a nail into her nose. To use the word weird would be a complete understatement. Opened in 2009, Cirque Le Soir is a one-of-a-kind, kind of venue. The tag line ‘If You Don’t Know, Don’t Worry’ is truly apt.

32

Somebody whispers that I am truly lucky to be standing here, watching the beginning of the strange, but ultimately fabulous experience that is this nightclub. There are people that are in the financial hierarchy of the world, that wouldn’t even meet the entry requirements for the front door- English footballers being just some of them. Next on the banned list are Reality

TV stars, and anybody that is from the Soap Opera world should also find another venue to spend the evening at. The term ‘Riff Raff ’ has an entirely different meaning when you include footballers that earn upwards of £100,000 a week. Exclusivity is the name of the game. “Reality and Soap TV stars just don’t have it. Whereas English footballers just have horrible entourages – It’s not that they cant afford it, it’s just that we don’t want them here”; says 33 year old Ryan Bish founder and co-owner of this tantalizing venue that straddles the fine line between horribly seedy and epically glamorous. As a man wafted past me clutching a plethora of swords – which I later learned were due to go down his throat – I wondered out loud where the idea for a venue that is such an extreme assault on the senses came from. “A love of the circus” Ryan beams back at me. “From a young age I just wanted the circus! Not to run away with, mind you – I just wanted to own it. I even wanted to collect dwarfs at one point”, he adds.

In fact, slick haired and smooth talking ‘Mr. Bish’ kind of has just that: “I have an Iranian rapper, a black gay one, a Chinese one who’s really shy, and I have an English cockney builder. I’m always open to adding to the collection!” Causing offence and riding the motif of being crass is something Ryan Bish simply doesn’t apologize for. Indeed, he has no need to. Earlier this year, Cirque Le Soir gained global notoriety for other reasons than the freak show that adorns Ganton Street five nights a week. Justin Bieber was due to hold his 19th Birthday at the club. However, he was shown the door when management realized that he was partying with Jayden Smith (Will Smith’s son-aged 14) and several others – that were also in their early teens. They also took into consideration the fact that several members of his entourage smelt heavily of weed. Justin promptly took to Twitter to describe Cirque as a “weak ass club”. The ejection of Twitter’s second most followed celebrity did nothing to dent the clubs revenue, which rakes in £65,000 on a slow night. In fact, in the weeks following “the Bieber issue”, as Ryan describes it, the club played host to Princesses Beatrice and Eugenie, pop star Katy Perry, and actor Jonathan Rhys Meyers, of BBC2 series The Tudors. Miley Cyrus was also snapped here kissing a dwarf who was wearing a nappy and a baby mask. The incident, inevitably, served only to increase Cirque Le Soir’s aura of exclusivity. The exclusivity of economic apartheid starts at the front door. A door known to spot reporters from the back of the queue and turn away people who simply don’t fit the bill when they get to the front. Uncompromising Door Supervisors (you can’t call them bouncers anymore) turn away roughly 50% of revelers that arrive hoping to get a peek of the magical freak show that is Cirque.

PLACES PLACES

If however you are lucky enough to have booked a table, your dress code doesn’t appear to matter. Although at this point, it is mindful to be aware that a table costs upwards of £2,000. More than the average Britons monthly wage is a lot of money to many – but positively poultry when you see the table menu. A wine list doesn’t exist-its only champagne. The cheapest bottle of which, is a standard bottle of Dom Perignon costing £350 and that’s where the ‘cheap’ champagne stops. Louis Roederer Cristal costs £1,500, a Jeroboam of Krug, Various Methuselahs - each six litres - range from £10,000 to £40,000. That’s equivalent to more than £800 for every single glass. However if your pockets are really deep, and tactless spending is a favored hobby then there is only one option. At the end of the ‘wine list’ is a Magnum sized 30-litre, gold-plated Midas of Ace Of Spades champagne, made by high-end producer Armand de Brignac. Price? A truly eye popping £150,000… I have been sworn to not reveal the truly amazing stage shows of the Soho hangout that is located in a basement, behind an inconspicuous black door, down an alley way off, of, über fashionable Carnaby Street. “The ‘If You Don’t Know Don’t Worry’ tagline means just that”, Ryan tells me.

What I can tell you however is that if you are one of the lucky people that gains access to the London hangout that has parted its velvet ropes for the likes of Leonardo DiCaprio, Scarlett Johansson, Stephen Fry, Bradley Cooper, Jason Statham and Benedict Cumberbatch, and singers such as Willi-am, Rhianna and Kanye West, then you absolutely will never forget it. This is how the ‘other half ’ live. It’s a fascinating concept, within an atmosphere of certain exclusivity and vulgar showing off. The sheer opulence is shocking in these economic times, but it really is a rather special experience. Cirque Le Soir truly is, spectacular.

Name: Francois Rose (above, left) Age: 27 Hometown: Cannes (France) Time at Cirque: 4 years Best Moment In Cirque: Christmas 2011 Why: Epic Night, Dwarfs Dressed as Father Christmas Favorite Song: Robin Thickle-‘Blurred Lines’

Name: James De Gale (above, right) Age: 32 Hometown: Stockholm (Sweden) Time at Cirque: 2 years Best Moment In Cirque: Every Thursday Night Why: Great Atmosphere, Great Music Favorite Song: Pharrell Williams-‘Happy’ ¢

ê

33


PLACES

It’s not booze

Multifunction umbrella

Imagine bringing a champagne bottle candle to a house warming party. This is probably one of the most disappointing gifts anybody could ever receive. Picture your mate's disappointment when realizing it’s not booze. Pair it with the wine carrier to really fuck with somebody. It may look like a good purchase at the time, but don’t do it. It’s a really cool candle, I admit. But if you’re going to bring something that looks like booze, you better bring real booze. To find this doodad, head upstairs at the Camden Stables Market.

Found in an Asian inspired stall, these provocative umbrellas were on sale for £10. My friend and I had a double take when looking at these umbrellas. Removing the handle from the plastic sleeve, we confirmed that they were indeed umbrellas. In the inside, the umbrella patterns matched the design on the outside. There were ones that looked like alcoholic bottles, Asian girls in kimonos, and even conspicuous pink rose (in the back of the image). If you ever wanted to shock your mates, this umbrella will definitely do the trick.

Hand painted tanks While strolling through the Camden Stables Market, you’ll notice a handful of these stalls where artists are selling their work. Often they’ll be designing something on the spot. Dressed in all black, the t-shirt artist at this stall was adamantly working on her next design, paying little attention to the window shoppers. It was a great show. Rarely can shoppers actually witness their clothing being designed. All the t-shirts are machine washable, the artist explained. Wash them with other colours in a cold wash.

Credit: Alessandro Stefano Guerrato

Orgasmic hot chocolate When looking for a good cup of fairtrade hot chocolate, only trust guys with dreads. At Coffee Circus, they have that plus a wide selection of fresh roasted, local coffee. This isn’t just chocolate powder in milk. It’s 2/3 pure chocolaty richness and 1/3 cool milk dusted with chocolate powder. Best of all it’s a perfect warm temperature that won’t leave you with a burnt tongue. To find it, follow the smell of coffee to the depths of the Camden Lock market. Occupy one of the two tables at this adorable coffee shack or sit along the river while watching the street performers.

34

Found in CamdeN A scout for the most quirky, weird, awesome things seen in one of London’s street markets. This month’s location: Camden.

It’s a tourist trap. I took the bait anyway. Literal street art It’s a tourist trap. I took the bait anyway. While on Camden High Street, my friend and I ran into a portrait of Marilyn Monroe on the pavement. The black and white pastel profile of Miss Monroe was excruciatingly detailed with its use of shadows.The artist comes here every day to recreate the portrait for tourists to gawk at, in the hope that some of them will donate a few coins for his labour. I was no exception. As soon as I took a few snapshots of the image, the artist approached me asking for some change. In admiration for his work, I was more than willing to do so. F.D¢

35


PLACES

It’s not booze

Multifunction umbrella

Imagine bringing a champagne bottle candle to a house warming party. This is probably one of the most disappointing gifts anybody could ever receive. Picture your mate's disappointment when realizing it’s not booze. Pair it with the wine carrier to really fuck with somebody. It may look like a good purchase at the time, but don’t do it. It’s a really cool candle, I admit. But if you’re going to bring something that looks like booze, you better bring real booze. To find this doodad, head upstairs at the Camden Stables Market.

Found in an Asian inspired stall, these provocative umbrellas were on sale for £10. My friend and I had a double take when looking at these umbrellas. Removing the handle from the plastic sleeve, we confirmed that they were indeed umbrellas. In the inside, the umbrella patterns matched the design on the outside. There were ones that looked like alcoholic bottles, Asian girls in kimonos, and even conspicuous pink rose (in the back of the image). If you ever wanted to shock your mates, this umbrella will definitely do the trick.

Hand painted tanks While strolling through the Camden Stables Market, you’ll notice a handful of these stalls where artists are selling their work. Often they’ll be designing something on the spot. Dressed in all black, the t-shirt artist at this stall was adamantly working on her next design, paying little attention to the window shoppers. It was a great show. Rarely can shoppers actually witness their clothing being designed. All the t-shirts are machine washable, the artist explained. Wash them with other colours in a cold wash.

Credit: Alessandro Stefano Guerrato

Orgasmic hot chocolate When looking for a good cup of fairtrade hot chocolate, only trust guys with dreads. At Coffee Circus, they have that plus a wide selection of fresh roasted, local coffee. This isn’t just chocolate powder in milk. It’s 2/3 pure chocolaty richness and 1/3 cool milk dusted with chocolate powder. Best of all it’s a perfect warm temperature that won’t leave you with a burnt tongue. To find it, follow the smell of coffee to the depths of the Camden Lock market. Occupy one of the two tables at this adorable coffee shack or sit along the river while watching the street performers.

34

Found in CamdeN A scout for the most quirky, weird, awesome things seen in one of London’s street markets. This month’s location: Camden.

It’s a tourist trap. I took the bait anyway. Literal street art It’s a tourist trap. I took the bait anyway. While on Camden High Street, my friend and I ran into a portrait of Marilyn Monroe on the pavement. The black and white pastel profile of Miss Monroe was excruciatingly detailed with its use of shadows.The artist comes here every day to recreate the portrait for tourists to gawk at, in the hope that some of them will donate a few coins for his labour. I was no exception. As soon as I took a few snapshots of the image, the artist approached me asking for some change. In admiration for his work, I was more than willing to do so. F.D¢

35


carnaby street

Buskers are a staple of London. They’re in tube stations, they’re on the streets, they’re next to your door at home. Some people find them annoying; I find them very interesting. “I’m from Spain. I came to London a few years ago to learn the language, there’s no better way to learn how to speak a foreign language than to move to that place. And I also wanted to try a career in music.” Is this your only income? “No, this city is too expensive to just live out of busking. I work at a restaurant and play in other places.” If you could give one piece of advice to a large group of people, what would it be? “I would tell them to stop. Take a moment and look around. You might realize you don’t notice some things around you.” S.G.B ¢ 37


carnaby street

Buskers are a staple of London. They’re in tube stations, they’re on the streets, they’re next to your door at home. Some people find them annoying; I find them very interesting. “I’m from Spain. I came to London a few years ago to learn the language, there’s no better way to learn how to speak a foreign language than to move to that place. And I also wanted to try a career in music.” Is this your only income? “No, this city is too expensive to just live out of busking. I work at a restaurant and play in other places.” If you could give one piece of advice to a large group of people, what would it be? “I would tell them to stop. Take a moment and look around. You might realize you don’t notice some things around you.” S.G.B ¢ 37


“You’ve caught me in a good mood... I buried my mother last week”

ADusty,Cluttered,andRoughDiamond Nestled deep within the heart of Maida Vale lies an intriguing ‘curiosity shop’ with an owner more interesting than his hoard of products. We stepped inside in an experience like no other

O

n my walk down into the steps of Maida Vale tube station, I noticed a something new in the corner of my eye. I wondered why I had never noticed this little building before - with its doors open to visitors, but lacking the alluring nature of a shop. Was it new? Can I enter? Looking through the tarnished windows I saw all the things people avoid at car boot sales in ‘sorted’ into mounds as high as the ceiling. I must have walked past the nest of used goods without any notice many times before. My newfound interests led me to

investigate this intriguing new discovery. Walking into the dimly light room, a punching stench of dust and stale smoke hit my nostrils. I allowed my eyes to adjust to the light, slowly exposing huge piles of used belongings. From typewriters to picture frames, old clocks to binoculars, each mound as intriguing as the next. Mountains of, what you and I would consider, junk dominated the room (even more than the smell hanging in the air.) And in the distance could make out a faint figure, camouflaged within the rubble, armed with a

I’m still moving in.” The thickness of the dust suggested his move in day was long ago – it also pointed towards a shortage in customers. Despite this, he maintained upbeat and chatty as I asked where he found all his products he replied: “I steal it from old ladies.” I approached the closest heap to me. Fishing around I found an old architecture drawing kit, half empty and painted in rust. I struggled to see what worth this man had found in such objects. His Canadian accent provided an explanation “that was from a West London architect named Frank Howard

Snr.” My presumption was that this was a fairy-tale dreamt up to make the kit appeal to a buying customer. As I explored this jungle of junk, each piece I picked up came with a detailed description from this Canadian tour guide, true or not; I became lost within his imagination. Before he gave a shocking confession that brought be back to earth. “You have caught me in a good mood,” said the fascinating storyteller “I buried my mother just last week.”I gave my condolences and, without hesitation, he continued “She

brought me to this country when I was a little boy, she was a beautiful lady.” And with that, without knowing my name, this man had opened up to me. Rummaging around his shop had led me into this man’s head and heart. He embraced me within his store and I found myself there for a further 20 minutes. So, If you’re ever in West London, make sure you head to the curiosity shop opposite Maida Vale station. You are sure to leave with a smile on your face, and who knows, maybe even an old postcard.

cigarette and a welcoming smile. “Heeeeeey,” His Canadian accent threw me off indefinitely. “How are you doing today Sir?” The honest answer was confused, unsure and a little concerned but I replied with an uncomfortable smile. “Welcome Wto my curiosity shop,” his tone relaxed my recent inhibitions as hospitality seemed to come like second nature to this shop owner. Forgetting the sea of intriguing debris around me, my focus maintained on this friendly shop owner. “Oh, I haven’t been here long at all,” he jested. “Can’t you tell?

W

38

39


“You’ve caught me in a good mood... I buried my mother last week”

ADusty,Cluttered,andRoughDiamond Nestled deep within the heart of Maida Vale lies an intriguing ‘curiosity shop’ with an owner more interesting than his hoard of products. We stepped inside in an experience like no other

O

n my walk down into the steps of Maida Vale tube station, I noticed a something new in the corner of my eye. I wondered why I had never noticed this little building before - with its doors open to visitors, but lacking the alluring nature of a shop. Was it new? Can I enter? Looking through the tarnished windows I saw all the things people avoid at car boot sales in ‘sorted’ into mounds as high as the ceiling. I must have walked past the nest of used goods without any notice many times before. My newfound interests led me to

investigate this intriguing new discovery. Walking into the dimly light room, a punching stench of dust and stale smoke hit my nostrils. I allowed my eyes to adjust to the light, slowly exposing huge piles of used belongings. From typewriters to picture frames, old clocks to binoculars, each mound as intriguing as the next. Mountains of, what you and I would consider, junk dominated the room (even more than the smell hanging in the air.) And in the distance could make out a faint figure, camouflaged within the rubble, armed with a

I’m still moving in.” The thickness of the dust suggested his move in day was long ago – it also pointed towards a shortage in customers. Despite this, he maintained upbeat and chatty as I asked where he found all his products he replied: “I steal it from old ladies.” I approached the closest heap to me. Fishing around I found an old architecture drawing kit, half empty and painted in rust. I struggled to see what worth this man had found in such objects. His Canadian accent provided an explanation “that was from a West London architect named Frank Howard

Snr.” My presumption was that this was a fairy-tale dreamt up to make the kit appeal to a buying customer. As I explored this jungle of junk, each piece I picked up came with a detailed description from this Canadian tour guide, true or not; I became lost within his imagination. Before he gave a shocking confession that brought be back to earth. “You have caught me in a good mood,” said the fascinating storyteller “I buried my mother just last week.”I gave my condolences and, without hesitation, he continued “She

brought me to this country when I was a little boy, she was a beautiful lady.” And with that, without knowing my name, this man had opened up to me. Rummaging around his shop had led me into this man’s head and heart. He embraced me within his store and I found myself there for a further 20 minutes. So, If you’re ever in West London, make sure you head to the curiosity shop opposite Maida Vale station. You are sure to leave with a smile on your face, and who knows, maybe even an old postcard.

cigarette and a welcoming smile. “Heeeeeey,” His Canadian accent threw me off indefinitely. “How are you doing today Sir?” The honest answer was confused, unsure and a little concerned but I replied with an uncomfortable smile. “Welcome Wto my curiosity shop,” his tone relaxed my recent inhibitions as hospitality seemed to come like second nature to this shop owner. Forgetting the sea of intriguing debris around me, my focus maintained on this friendly shop owner. “Oh, I haven’t been here long at all,” he jested. “Can’t you tell?

W

38

39


carnaby street

I venture into a shop occupying a small space in the epicenter of London’s shopping scene, expecting the standard vintage clothing store dissorganisation. I, however, was taken back on two accounts. The first being the way in which the store had shrunk from a not so big size to begin with, into that of a matchbox – a sort of reverse Tardis effect.

The second being the organization that so many vintage stores choose to ignore - probably a necessity due to the size of the room. Speaking to the sales assistant he revealed why I had been so surprised. “this is no vintage store, this is a traditional shop.” Noticing the European accent of my accomplice in this 20th century time capsule, my attention turned

from the shop to the man. “I am here improving my English before going back to rome to study English Literature,” he said. “I love London, there are so many cool places to go out at night.” If you fancy a break from the hussle and bussle of carnaby street, head into ‘The Face’ where you can help a young Italian with his English. R.H ¢ 41


carnaby street

I venture into a shop occupying a small space in the epicenter of London’s shopping scene, expecting the standard vintage clothing store dissorganisation. I, however, was taken back on two accounts. The first being the way in which the store had shrunk from a not so big size to begin with, into that of a matchbox – a sort of reverse Tardis effect.

The second being the organization that so many vintage stores choose to ignore - probably a necessity due to the size of the room. Speaking to the sales assistant he revealed why I had been so surprised. “this is no vintage store, this is a traditional shop.” Noticing the European accent of my accomplice in this 20th century time capsule, my attention turned

from the shop to the man. “I am here improving my English before going back to rome to study English Literature,” he said. “I love London, there are so many cool places to go out at night.” If you fancy a break from the hussle and bussle of carnaby street, head into ‘The Face’ where you can help a young Italian with his English. R.H ¢ 41


ARTS AND CULTURE

crème de

La crème What do you get when you cross the 1950’s, some naked models and a whole lot of milk? Probably not what you’re picturing...

Words by Jennifer Lambert

42

43


ARTS AND CULTURE

crème de

La crème What do you get when you cross the 1950’s, some naked models and a whole lot of milk? Probably not what you’re picturing...

Words by Jennifer Lambert

42

43


ARTS AND CULTURE

T

he average britton consumes around three pints of milk per week. Around five billion litres are sold in Britain every year while an additional six million litres are used in the making of dairy products such as cheese and yoghurt. That’s a total consumption of around 4,500 Olympic swimming pools. Jaroslav Wieczorkiewicz gets through a gallon in just under an hour. That’s a lot of milk. Jaroslav’s latest endeavour - and the one that bought his attention to us here at LDN. – as you may have wondered, but would probably never have guessed, involves naked women, a high-speed camera, some 40’s nostalgia and a lot of milk. Having worked with the concept of milk and other liquids in order to produce his artwork, Jaroslav “thought it would be cool to approach the liquid theme in a more relaxed and funny way”. Born and raised in Poland, now based in London, Jaroslav has a background in Fine Arts and mixed Media, as well as a degree in Architecture. He founded the AurumLight studio in 2009, specialising in conceptual photography, a series of limited calendars, commercial advertising and personal projects to name a few. Jaroslav and his team, whom of which he founded AurumLight with, use a combination of photography, videography, 3D visualisation and graphical postproduction, along with their own particular styling and casting of models in order to create unconventional artwork, of which is fast gaining them notoriety across the globe. By adding colour to his usually black and white images, Jaroslav was inspired by the illustrations of Gil Elvgren, one of – if not, the most poignant pin-up and 40’s glamour artists of the 20th century. The project aimed to recreate several of Elvgren’s most famous paintings, and although it began as a personal tribute, the response to the images released so far have caused Jaroslav to confirm that they “very much look like an upcoming 2014 calendar” on his blog.

PRICE: $650 AUD (£358 GBP) covers both days working with the AurumLight team, two models, MakeUp Artist, RAW photo materials and instruction. AGENDA: DAY 1: 8hours Session: > Open with an overview presentation, covering “know how”, tools, lighting, approach and a deconstruction of the previous images, > Demonstration shoot, showing how to get the results, working with the models and assistants, > Working in pairs. Shoot your own milk source shots Full-Hands-On (one shoots, one throws, and swap half way through), with assistance from the AurumLight Team. DAY 2: 8hours Session: > Work through the post-production of the previous days shoots. > Although intense in places, the pace is set based on the group, so no-one is left behind! > Attendees will get to know recipes, tips and techniques for bringing the whole shoot together! FAQ: Who should attend? > Anyone interested in having a hugely fun time, creating amazing images. Words by blog.aurumlight.com

U

pon first glance it is easy to instantly appreciate the images for they are vibrant, elegant and just that little bit cheeky. When you read however, that Jaroslav claims to have used

no form of CGI, Photoshop or illustration, it is easy to let your scepticism get the better of your initial awe, and discard them as just another adobe-manufactured product. As inconceivable as it may seem though, Jaroslav in fact uses only milk and a camera

fun, positive energy and in order to create the satisfaction makes it well stunning portraits. the effort. I love Armed with pints of Projects like this worth it and that is why I do milk, some extremely willing models and a Nikon are both fun and photography”, said Jaroslav. Despite the originality D800, Jaroslav creates exhausting for of his work, Jaroslav is no the images by layering hundreds of images taken everybody but it’s keeper of secrets when it comes to his technique, in using a method known as worth the effort. fact the artist is more than burst shooting. He also employs a complex lighting This is why I love happy to teach others how to replicate his methods system made with an photography. for themselves. Currently, Einstein E640 bounced off the AurumLight team are a silver parabolic umbrella in Australia, having spent for key, and another E640 the year touring London, shooting through a stripItaly and the rest of Europe, light for kick, allowing on a sold out tour of their ‘Milk Seminar’. him to capture even the tiniest droplets From 9:00 am until 5:00pm across two and forming a realistic image; untraceable days, Jaroslav and the team, accompanied for any form of editing. “Projects like this by stylists and models, instruct a creative are time consuming and very exhausting workshop allowing anyone with a camera, for everyone involved. But the amount of

44

access to Photoshop (for image layering purposes only) and $650 AUD (£362.50 GBP) to come and have a go: access all areas. With hopes of touring the US in 2014 and the Milky Pin Ups calendar available for preorder at the end of the month, I’m expecting big things from Jaroslav Wieczorkiewicz; let’s just hope all this work isn’t putting him off his cereal. For more, visit the website: www. aurumlight.com To pre-order the Milky Pin Ups calendar visit: www.blog.aurumlight.com/milk-calendar Follow Jaroslav and the AurumLight team on Facebook: www.facebook.com/AurumLight Twitter: www.twitter.com/AurumLight

Credit to: AurumLight.com and www. huffingtonpostuk for quotes. ¢

45


ARTS AND CULTURE

T

he average britton consumes around three pints of milk per week. Around five billion litres are sold in Britain every year while an additional six million litres are used in the making of dairy products such as cheese and yoghurt. That’s a total consumption of around 4,500 Olympic swimming pools. Jaroslav Wieczorkiewicz gets through a gallon in just under an hour. That’s a lot of milk. Jaroslav’s latest endeavour - and the one that bought his attention to us here at LDN. – as you may have wondered, but would probably never have guessed, involves naked women, a high-speed camera, some 40’s nostalgia and a lot of milk. Having worked with the concept of milk and other liquids in order to produce his artwork, Jaroslav “thought it would be cool to approach the liquid theme in a more relaxed and funny way”. Born and raised in Poland, now based in London, Jaroslav has a background in Fine Arts and mixed Media, as well as a degree in Architecture. He founded the AurumLight studio in 2009, specialising in conceptual photography, a series of limited calendars, commercial advertising and personal projects to name a few. Jaroslav and his team, whom of which he founded AurumLight with, use a combination of photography, videography, 3D visualisation and graphical postproduction, along with their own particular styling and casting of models in order to create unconventional artwork, of which is fast gaining them notoriety across the globe. By adding colour to his usually black and white images, Jaroslav was inspired by the illustrations of Gil Elvgren, one of – if not, the most poignant pin-up and 40’s glamour artists of the 20th century. The project aimed to recreate several of Elvgren’s most famous paintings, and although it began as a personal tribute, the response to the images released so far have caused Jaroslav to confirm that they “very much look like an upcoming 2014 calendar” on his blog.

PRICE: $650 AUD (£358 GBP) covers both days working with the AurumLight team, two models, MakeUp Artist, RAW photo materials and instruction. AGENDA: DAY 1: 8hours Session: > Open with an overview presentation, covering “know how”, tools, lighting, approach and a deconstruction of the previous images, > Demonstration shoot, showing how to get the results, working with the models and assistants, > Working in pairs. Shoot your own milk source shots Full-Hands-On (one shoots, one throws, and swap half way through), with assistance from the AurumLight Team. DAY 2: 8hours Session: > Work through the post-production of the previous days shoots. > Although intense in places, the pace is set based on the group, so no-one is left behind! > Attendees will get to know recipes, tips and techniques for bringing the whole shoot together! FAQ: Who should attend? > Anyone interested in having a hugely fun time, creating amazing images. Words by blog.aurumlight.com

U

pon first glance it is easy to instantly appreciate the images for they are vibrant, elegant and just that little bit cheeky. When you read however, that Jaroslav claims to have used

no form of CGI, Photoshop or illustration, it is easy to let your scepticism get the better of your initial awe, and discard them as just another adobe-manufactured product. As inconceivable as it may seem though, Jaroslav in fact uses only milk and a camera

fun, positive energy and in order to create the satisfaction makes it well stunning portraits. the effort. I love Armed with pints of Projects like this worth it and that is why I do milk, some extremely willing models and a Nikon are both fun and photography”, said Jaroslav. Despite the originality D800, Jaroslav creates exhausting for of his work, Jaroslav is no the images by layering hundreds of images taken everybody but it’s keeper of secrets when it comes to his technique, in using a method known as worth the effort. fact the artist is more than burst shooting. He also employs a complex lighting This is why I love happy to teach others how to replicate his methods system made with an photography. for themselves. Currently, Einstein E640 bounced off the AurumLight team are a silver parabolic umbrella in Australia, having spent for key, and another E640 the year touring London, shooting through a stripItaly and the rest of Europe, light for kick, allowing on a sold out tour of their ‘Milk Seminar’. him to capture even the tiniest droplets From 9:00 am until 5:00pm across two and forming a realistic image; untraceable days, Jaroslav and the team, accompanied for any form of editing. “Projects like this by stylists and models, instruct a creative are time consuming and very exhausting workshop allowing anyone with a camera, for everyone involved. But the amount of

44

access to Photoshop (for image layering purposes only) and $650 AUD (£362.50 GBP) to come and have a go: access all areas. With hopes of touring the US in 2014 and the Milky Pin Ups calendar available for preorder at the end of the month, I’m expecting big things from Jaroslav Wieczorkiewicz; let’s just hope all this work isn’t putting him off his cereal. For more, visit the website: www. aurumlight.com To pre-order the Milky Pin Ups calendar visit: www.blog.aurumlight.com/milk-calendar Follow Jaroslav and the AurumLight team on Facebook: www.facebook.com/AurumLight Twitter: www.twitter.com/AurumLight

Credit to: AurumLight.com and www. huffingtonpostuk for quotes. ¢

45


ARTS AND CULTURE

The number of people living with HIV and AIDS is falling, but discrimination of the virus sadly is not. ‘Getting to Zero’ is the aim

I

n 2012, it was estimated that there were about 98,400 people living with the HIV virus. Of that number 48% of people living with the virus contracted it through heterosexual sexual contact compared to 43% who transmitted the virus through same sex sexual contact. Since 1988, the first of December every year, is Worlds Aids Day. Observed globally, WAD is designed to raise funds for treatment of the estimated 35 million people that live with HIV and AIDS worldwide. In the modern day however, with the number of people infected with HIV actually decreasing, the day is now more commonly being used to also raise awareness of the virus and ultimately stop stereotyping and discrimination of those of all ages living with the disease. “Discrimination of people living with HIV or AIDS is still rife. A lot of the misconceptions and stereotypes from the 1980’s still bounce around today. We need to challenge and address the stigma to make the fight truly more effective”; Steven Inman, Charity Director at the Make a Difference Trust explains. “Here at MAD Trust, our mission and ethos is to use people within the British entertainment community and their audiences to raise that awareness.” Inman, who has been involved in HIV and AIDS charities since 1997 – and was awarded the Humanitarian Peace Award in Kenya, twiceis passionate about the charity’s methods. In the society we live in today, the idea of using entertainers and celebrities to raise this crucial awareness is something of a fantastic one. During the year, the MAD Trust work with a plethora of dance, theatre, music, film and TV companies and institutions to raise money and awareness. World AIDS Campaign’s ‘Global Steering Committee’, every year decides on a yearly

MakE a Difference

theme of WAD. From 2011 to 2015 the theme is simple: ‘Getting to Zero.’ Zero Deaths, Zero Discrimination and Zero New Cases. The theme is simple but the message powerful. “It is also key to note that currently in the UK most people living with HIV transmitted it through heterosexual contact, not by same sex and most people assume. This is one of the biggest stigmas of the disease, vitally it means that many heterosexuals are not testing for the virus and therefore spreading it unknowingly” Steven explains. HIV medication is currently so effective that with early diagnosis and treatment, levels of the virus can be brought so low that it becomes undetectable. This advancement of medicines mean that positive/negative status relationships are more common, and mother fetus infection is far more rare. The important thing is to get yourself tested – regardless of sexual orientation – get your friends tested and get educated on the facts. The more we know about HIV and AIDS the better, and the earlier you are diagnosed, the it easier it can be treated and managed. A.C.P ¢

You can see a list of all entertainment events and donate to the MAD Trust via their website. Website: madtrust.org.uk TW: @MADTrust FB: The-Make-a-Difference-Trust

LIVERPOOL STREET

10 Worldwide Goals for 2015 1. Sexual transmission of HIV reduced by half, including among young people, men who have sex with men and transmission in the context of sex work 2. Vertical transmission of HIV eliminated and AIDS-related maternal deaths reduced by half 3. All new HIV infections prevented among people who use drugs 4. Universal access to antiretroviral therapy for people living with HIV who are eligible for treatment 5. TB deaths among people living with HIV reduced by half 6. All people living with HIV and households affected by HIV are addressed in all national social protection strategies and have access to essential care and support 7. Countries with punitive laws and practices around HIV transmission, sex work, drug use or homosexuality that block effective responses reduced by half 8. HIV-related restrictions on entry, stay and residence eliminated in half of the countries that have such restrictions 9. HIV-specific needs of women and girls are addressed in at least half of all national HIV responses 10. Zero tolerance for gender-based violence. *Statistics provided by nat.org.uk

Left to Right: Matt Harmon, Hugh Markson, Pixie Lott, Matt Evers, boy band Blue, Harriet Thorpe and Joan Plowright taking part in the MAD Trust 2013 Red Bucket Collection for Theatre MAD. More pics online.

“My mum kicked me out when I was 16” How old are you now? “I’m 18 years old, so I’ve been on the streets for two years now, I’m originally from South East Essex” What brought you to London? “I was told it’s easier to live here if you’re homeless.” Is it? “Yeah, I’ve got it all worked out up here.” You don’t seem like a regular homeless person? “Yerp, I keep clean and keep my appearance up, I’m not a dirty person at all. I don’t do drugs, I’m just homeless.” You even have bleach blonde hair... “Yeah, I like to keep my appearance up.” Why do you tell people to smile, what’s your message about? “When people have long hard days at work they’re never happy, they never smile, so I tell them to smile, I smile it’s free, even though I’m homeless I remain happy, it’s free so just smile.” B.C ¢

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60

47


ARTS AND CULTURE

The number of people living with HIV and AIDS is falling, but discrimination of the virus sadly is not. ‘Getting to Zero’ is the aim

I

n 2012, it was estimated that there were about 98,400 people living with the HIV virus. Of that number 48% of people living with the virus contracted it through heterosexual sexual contact compared to 43% who transmitted the virus through same sex sexual contact. Since 1988, the first of December every year, is Worlds Aids Day. Observed globally, WAD is designed to raise funds for treatment of the estimated 35 million people that live with HIV and AIDS worldwide. In the modern day however, with the number of people infected with HIV actually decreasing, the day is now more commonly being used to also raise awareness of the virus and ultimately stop stereotyping and discrimination of those of all ages living with the disease. “Discrimination of people living with HIV or AIDS is still rife. A lot of the misconceptions and stereotypes from the 1980’s still bounce around today. We need to challenge and address the stigma to make the fight truly more effective”; Steven Inman, Charity Director at the Make a Difference Trust explains. “Here at MAD Trust, our mission and ethos is to use people within the British entertainment community and their audiences to raise that awareness.” Inman, who has been involved in HIV and AIDS charities since 1997 – and was awarded the Humanitarian Peace Award in Kenya, twiceis passionate about the charity’s methods. In the society we live in today, the idea of using entertainers and celebrities to raise this crucial awareness is something of a fantastic one. During the year, the MAD Trust work with a plethora of dance, theatre, music, film and TV companies and institutions to raise money and awareness. World AIDS Campaign’s ‘Global Steering Committee’, every year decides on a yearly

MakE a Difference

theme of WAD. From 2011 to 2015 the theme is simple: ‘Getting to Zero.’ Zero Deaths, Zero Discrimination and Zero New Cases. The theme is simple but the message powerful. “It is also key to note that currently in the UK most people living with HIV transmitted it through heterosexual contact, not by same sex and most people assume. This is one of the biggest stigmas of the disease, vitally it means that many heterosexuals are not testing for the virus and therefore spreading it unknowingly” Steven explains. HIV medication is currently so effective that with early diagnosis and treatment, levels of the virus can be brought so low that it becomes undetectable. This advancement of medicines mean that positive/negative status relationships are more common, and mother fetus infection is far more rare. The important thing is to get yourself tested – regardless of sexual orientation – get your friends tested and get educated on the facts. The more we know about HIV and AIDS the better, and the earlier you are diagnosed, the it easier it can be treated and managed. A.C.P ¢

You can see a list of all entertainment events and donate to the MAD Trust via their website. Website: madtrust.org.uk TW: @MADTrust FB: The-Make-a-Difference-Trust

LIVERPOOL STREET

10 Worldwide Goals for 2015 1. Sexual transmission of HIV reduced by half, including among young people, men who have sex with men and transmission in the context of sex work 2. Vertical transmission of HIV eliminated and AIDS-related maternal deaths reduced by half 3. All new HIV infections prevented among people who use drugs 4. Universal access to antiretroviral therapy for people living with HIV who are eligible for treatment 5. TB deaths among people living with HIV reduced by half 6. All people living with HIV and households affected by HIV are addressed in all national social protection strategies and have access to essential care and support 7. Countries with punitive laws and practices around HIV transmission, sex work, drug use or homosexuality that block effective responses reduced by half 8. HIV-related restrictions on entry, stay and residence eliminated in half of the countries that have such restrictions 9. HIV-specific needs of women and girls are addressed in at least half of all national HIV responses 10. Zero tolerance for gender-based violence. *Statistics provided by nat.org.uk

Left to Right: Matt Harmon, Hugh Markson, Pixie Lott, Matt Evers, boy band Blue, Harriet Thorpe and Joan Plowright taking part in the MAD Trust 2013 Red Bucket Collection for Theatre MAD. More pics online.

“My mum kicked me out when I was 16” How old are you now? “I’m 18 years old, so I’ve been on the streets for two years now, I’m originally from South East Essex” What brought you to London? “I was told it’s easier to live here if you’re homeless.” Is it? “Yeah, I’ve got it all worked out up here.” You don’t seem like a regular homeless person? “Yerp, I keep clean and keep my appearance up, I’m not a dirty person at all. I don’t do drugs, I’m just homeless.” You even have bleach blonde hair... “Yeah, I like to keep my appearance up.” Why do you tell people to smile, what’s your message about? “When people have long hard days at work they’re never happy, they never smile, so I tell them to smile, I smile it’s free, even though I’m homeless I remain happy, it’s free so just smile.” B.C ¢

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PEOPLE

whitechapel

BRUSHFIELD STREET

“I’m from America, I’m over here to study for the semester.” “What do you study?” “Fashion. Can’t you tell?!” he laughed “Why did you choose to study in London?” “Who would pass up the chance to study in London?! It’s a wonderful city. I’m from New York so I didn’t think I would find it that much different to home but boy was I wrong. London can be so much harsher than New York. The people are crowded, there’s less space and everybody is in a hurry. But it’s also beautiful, and all of the Brits I’ve met since I arrived here have been really great.”

I had never seen this part of London in the daylight before this moment. Whenever I am in Brick Lane I’m usually too intoxicated and lost, slipping into several nightclubs throughout the evening. Usually I’m not even up before 10am on 48

the weekends. This particular weekend, I setup my alarm to wake up early for the Brick Lane Vintage Markets. I passed by this women standing by the huge vintage market sign. She was waiting to set up her stand for the day. They were selling all kinds of dinglehoppers and doodads.

From thrifty worn-out shirts to Polaroid cameras from the eighties, I found all kinds of trinkets at the market. Brick Lane is as fascinating in the early mornings as it deep into the night. F.D ¢

“Will you London it when you go back to America?” “Yes. I have 11 days before I fly home for Christmas and for good. I’m blessed and I am grateful that I got the chance to live in such a wonderful city for a while but man, do I miss my mother’s pot roast!” J.D.L ¢

48

49


PEOPLE

whitechapel

BRUSHFIELD STREET

“I’m from America, I’m over here to study for the semester.” “What do you study?” “Fashion. Can’t you tell?!” he laughed “Why did you choose to study in London?” “Who would pass up the chance to study in London?! It’s a wonderful city. I’m from New York so I didn’t think I would find it that much different to home but boy was I wrong. London can be so much harsher than New York. The people are crowded, there’s less space and everybody is in a hurry. But it’s also beautiful, and all of the Brits I’ve met since I arrived here have been really great.”

I had never seen this part of London in the daylight before this moment. Whenever I am in Brick Lane I’m usually too intoxicated and lost, slipping into several nightclubs throughout the evening. Usually I’m not even up before 10am on 48

the weekends. This particular weekend, I setup my alarm to wake up early for the Brick Lane Vintage Markets. I passed by this women standing by the huge vintage market sign. She was waiting to set up her stand for the day. They were selling all kinds of dinglehoppers and doodads.

From thrifty worn-out shirts to Polaroid cameras from the eighties, I found all kinds of trinkets at the market. Brick Lane is as fascinating in the early mornings as it deep into the night. F.D ¢

“Will you London it when you go back to America?” “Yes. I have 11 days before I fly home for Christmas and for good. I’m blessed and I am grateful that I got the chance to live in such a wonderful city for a while but man, do I miss my mother’s pot roast!” J.D.L ¢

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ARTS AND CULTURE

Paying homage to ldn

We take you through the streets of London to show you its evolutionary cycle. Among the city that “holds for tomorrow”, left are the inevitable out-dated and forgotten ruins of its past Words by Ben Collier

The 70’s saw Mods from Ladbroke Grove cruising down the A23 on their Vespas. They’d meet their rivals “the rockers”, on the beaches of Brighton to fight.

L

ike the people of London that see change over time, the city where they chose to claim their lives does so also. London city has come a long way from its workhouses of the Victorian era. The Right-to-buy act meant tenants

50

In an attempt to out-do the ladies of the 80’s, men smothered their faces with sharp white powder, tinted their eyes and brushed their cheeks with red blusher.

Acid house ravers of the 90’s sucked dummies, and coated themselves with fluorescent paint when raving in London’s underground dance halls.

from ‘79 onwards could buy their own council houses. What I’m trying to get at is that this city of London is forever changing, industrialising and expanding. Slumped in a dark hidden corner of the city, or sticking out like an excruciatingly sore thumb

are some of the remaining architectural triumphs of that of the past. Some are left to die as the thriving city around them increasingly expands; others are utilized by local councils or property investors who attempt to renovate these shabby has been skeletons into new projects.

A DISAPPEARING LONDON - se1

H

eygate housing estate was one of the city’s more prestigious examples of social housing. In the past month Heygate saw its last few residents removed as a result of a new Land Lease development by Southwark council. In a new scheme that is set to sell luxury houses in the countries capital, residents felt they were pressured into selling their properties ‘for unrealistic prices’. The Elephant and Castle estate, built in 1974 has been a home for lower earning tenants for decades. A true example of a London urban community, the estate hosts works of graffiti and is the home to vast youth activity. Sports activities and dance groups meet in available spaces in the building to practice. A place for the community in more recent times, Highgate has shrugged off its bad-boy reputation for crime and gang activity though there still does loom a sense of public apprehension. Though still an urban jungle, Highgate will always be remembered for its citified culture and merging of the community through social housing. Highgate is set to be rejuvenated in a development scheme by Southwark council, single room homes up to £1.1 million are set to stand in the place of the once social housing. The work is currently under way and the estate is in the process of being demolished. Previous home owners are set to move outside of London as cost of living is too high.

51


ARTS AND CULTURE

Paying homage to ldn

We take you through the streets of London to show you its evolutionary cycle. Among the city that “holds for tomorrow”, left are the inevitable out-dated and forgotten ruins of its past Words by Ben Collier

The 70’s saw Mods from Ladbroke Grove cruising down the A23 on their Vespas. They’d meet their rivals “the rockers”, on the beaches of Brighton to fight.

L

ike the people of London that see change over time, the city where they chose to claim their lives does so also. London city has come a long way from its workhouses of the Victorian era. The Right-to-buy act meant tenants

50

In an attempt to out-do the ladies of the 80’s, men smothered their faces with sharp white powder, tinted their eyes and brushed their cheeks with red blusher.

Acid house ravers of the 90’s sucked dummies, and coated themselves with fluorescent paint when raving in London’s underground dance halls.

from ‘79 onwards could buy their own council houses. What I’m trying to get at is that this city of London is forever changing, industrialising and expanding. Slumped in a dark hidden corner of the city, or sticking out like an excruciatingly sore thumb

are some of the remaining architectural triumphs of that of the past. Some are left to die as the thriving city around them increasingly expands; others are utilized by local councils or property investors who attempt to renovate these shabby has been skeletons into new projects.

A DISAPPEARING LONDON - se1

H

eygate housing estate was one of the city’s more prestigious examples of social housing. In the past month Heygate saw its last few residents removed as a result of a new Land Lease development by Southwark council. In a new scheme that is set to sell luxury houses in the countries capital, residents felt they were pressured into selling their properties ‘for unrealistic prices’. The Elephant and Castle estate, built in 1974 has been a home for lower earning tenants for decades. A true example of a London urban community, the estate hosts works of graffiti and is the home to vast youth activity. Sports activities and dance groups meet in available spaces in the building to practice. A place for the community in more recent times, Highgate has shrugged off its bad-boy reputation for crime and gang activity though there still does loom a sense of public apprehension. Though still an urban jungle, Highgate will always be remembered for its citified culture and merging of the community through social housing. Highgate is set to be rejuvenated in a development scheme by Southwark council, single room homes up to £1.1 million are set to stand in the place of the once social housing. The work is currently under way and the estate is in the process of being demolished. Previous home owners are set to move outside of London as cost of living is too high.

51


ARTS AND CULTURE

A

Poplar Baths - e14

generation rife with community spirit and high moral, World War Two London saw catastrophic damage to thousands of buildings, homes, churches and landmarks. Prior to the war, communal baths and recreational centres were popular among the public.

Between the years 1954 – 1959, Poplar Baths

maintained as many as 250,000 swimmers. As a result of the buildings bombed ceiling during The Blitz and the poor funding of the buildings maintenance following this tragedy, it meant that the baths had to close in 1988. The larger pool known as the East India Hall was floored over and used as a theatre, dance hall, exhibition room and sports hall especially for boxing and wrestling. It is said that during the deprivation of the 80’s, squatters, drug addicts and homeless people would find solitude within its grand walls. In July 2012, its doors were opened to the public. Standing in its original (but empty) pools were inflatable art works instigated by the arts organisation ‘Create’, part of the London 2012 Cultural Olympiad. This was also a bid to raise awareness in a hope that

the baths may re-open. Since this project, the baths are to be given a new lease of life with an expected £36 million budget to be spent on a restoration project creating a gym, café, and swimming pool. Not a recommended place to go snooping about, but if you fancy having a look at some Victorian baths, there’s no difficulty in

so.

L

Roa Brick Lane - E1

ondoner’s ability to rebuild their city and make the best of times of hardship are evident in history. From the fire of London to the riots of 2011, London has seen hard times yet prospered. A social action towards derelict properties is to plaster these empty buildings with works of art. Though crime is frowned upon in society, a wide range of graffiti isn’t seen as anti social but in

fact an accepted form of contemporary art. Here is the artist Roa’s work. Often mistaken for the works of Banksy, Roa is a street artist that produces stupendous black and white street art pieces of animals. Roa produces works of wild animals, like rats, hares and hogs all over the world including London. In recent times, one of Roa’s most prolific pieces of work had been in the threat of being taken down by local council. The owner of

the music studios that the Belgium artists work is painted upon ran a petition in order to keep the street art alive. An ASBO worthy sentence, Graffiti is becoming a cultural phenomenon that with a family friendly appeal.

Through times of hardship, austerity and conflict, London still remains the thriving

city it is now and has always been. This is LDN paying homage to our great city of

London, the people, and the intimate places that makes this city great. B.C ¢

doing

Crystal Palace park - se19

T

he Shard, The Cheese-grater and The Gherkin are colossal infrastructures that intimidate smaller standing buildings that quiver below them. These buildings are the modern day panicle of a human’s willingness to exceed the expectation of creation. Sir Joseph Paxton, a name that not too many of you will be acquainted with, created the cast iron and glass plated building that glistened in Hyde Park known as Crystal Palace. Still today in the surrounding grounds of the original buildings site lays

52

Crystal Palace Park. The park displays full-scale models of Victorian concepts of dinosaurs, a maze, lakes and a concert bowl for performances. Despite their existence 65 million years ago the dumpy dinosaurs still roam the grounds today. Although the Victorians didn’t quite get their interpretation of these creatures correct, they certainly succeeded in ingenuity. The success and industrialisation of cast plate glass resulted in the success of a self-lighting mega-structure. This temporary building was set to host the Great Exhibition of 1851, an industrial

exhibition that displayed the world’s works of culture and industry that became a popular 19th century feature. The building was reconstructed in a larger form in a Penge Common, a South London suburb and stood there until 1936 until its destruction by a tragic fire. Crystal Palaces’ slow decay is evident, as undergrowth has buried parts from the remnant building and surviving parts today begin to fade away too. After its dismissal to the suburbs, the original grounds were used as a dumping station for bomb debris during WW2.

53


ARTS AND CULTURE

A

Poplar Baths - e14

generation rife with community spirit and high moral, World War Two London saw catastrophic damage to thousands of buildings, homes, churches and landmarks. Prior to the war, communal baths and recreational centres were popular among the public.

Between the years 1954 – 1959, Poplar Baths

maintained as many as 250,000 swimmers. As a result of the buildings bombed ceiling during The Blitz and the poor funding of the buildings maintenance following this tragedy, it meant that the baths had to close in 1988. The larger pool known as the East India Hall was floored over and used as a theatre, dance hall, exhibition room and sports hall especially for boxing and wrestling. It is said that during the deprivation of the 80’s, squatters, drug addicts and homeless people would find solitude within its grand walls. In July 2012, its doors were opened to the public. Standing in its original (but empty) pools were inflatable art works instigated by the arts organisation ‘Create’, part of the London 2012 Cultural Olympiad. This was also a bid to raise awareness in a hope that

the baths may re-open. Since this project, the baths are to be given a new lease of life with an expected £36 million budget to be spent on a restoration project creating a gym, café, and swimming pool. Not a recommended place to go snooping about, but if you fancy having a look at some Victorian baths, there’s no difficulty in

so.

L

Roa Brick Lane - E1

ondoner’s ability to rebuild their city and make the best of times of hardship are evident in history. From the fire of London to the riots of 2011, London has seen hard times yet prospered. A social action towards derelict properties is to plaster these empty buildings with works of art. Though crime is frowned upon in society, a wide range of graffiti isn’t seen as anti social but in

fact an accepted form of contemporary art. Here is the artist Roa’s work. Often mistaken for the works of Banksy, Roa is a street artist that produces stupendous black and white street art pieces of animals. Roa produces works of wild animals, like rats, hares and hogs all over the world including London. In recent times, one of Roa’s most prolific pieces of work had been in the threat of being taken down by local council. The owner of

the music studios that the Belgium artists work is painted upon ran a petition in order to keep the street art alive. An ASBO worthy sentence, Graffiti is becoming a cultural phenomenon that with a family friendly appeal.

Through times of hardship, austerity and conflict, London still remains the thriving

city it is now and has always been. This is LDN paying homage to our great city of

London, the people, and the intimate places that makes this city great. B.C ¢

doing

Crystal Palace park - se19

T

he Shard, The Cheese-grater and The Gherkin are colossal infrastructures that intimidate smaller standing buildings that quiver below them. These buildings are the modern day panicle of a human’s willingness to exceed the expectation of creation. Sir Joseph Paxton, a name that not too many of you will be acquainted with, created the cast iron and glass plated building that glistened in Hyde Park known as Crystal Palace. Still today in the surrounding grounds of the original buildings site lays

52

Crystal Palace Park. The park displays full-scale models of Victorian concepts of dinosaurs, a maze, lakes and a concert bowl for performances. Despite their existence 65 million years ago the dumpy dinosaurs still roam the grounds today. Although the Victorians didn’t quite get their interpretation of these creatures correct, they certainly succeeded in ingenuity. The success and industrialisation of cast plate glass resulted in the success of a self-lighting mega-structure. This temporary building was set to host the Great Exhibition of 1851, an industrial

exhibition that displayed the world’s works of culture and industry that became a popular 19th century feature. The building was reconstructed in a larger form in a Penge Common, a South London suburb and stood there until 1936 until its destruction by a tragic fire. Crystal Palaces’ slow decay is evident, as undergrowth has buried parts from the remnant building and surviving parts today begin to fade away too. After its dismissal to the suburbs, the original grounds were used as a dumping station for bomb debris during WW2.

53


ARTS AND CULTURE

VLOTOPIAN

Y OH Y SHOULD I DOWNLOAD THis AGAIN?

Y

Plan is for the spontaneous. The latest in last-minute activities, the go-to if god forbid, you live in London and you’re bored. Whether you like music or film, theatre or art, comedy and beers, too much food for a lot less money or pretentious portions that cost the same as your mortgage: YPlan is almost definitely for you. In fact, YPlan is for everybody; they just don’t know it yet. According to their FAQ, YPlan works in just three steps; ‘get inspired, pay in two taps, and go out tonight.’ I never thought I’d describe an app as inspiring but this one undoubtedly is. The premise is simple: YPlan is an app that specialises in event bookings. Sign up, choose the type of thing you’re interested in and if there’s an event happening you feel like attending, you can book tickets without having to visit a box office. Like I said, simple. But not quite inspiring is it? Nor does it sound any more unique or noteworthy than Ticketmaster, right? Wrong. YPlan is probably the most used app on my phone. It’s the one I check the most, that’s for sure. It doesn’t list reams and reams of events happening in the City, nor does it

A man sporting rather fetching trousers, hunched over a briefcase, catches my eye as a stroll through East London. As I approach him, he seems to have a nervous disposition towards me. I introduce myself and ask him where he is from; excuse my ignorance but I don’t think ‘Vlotopia’ is a real place. I peered inside this Vlotopian’s bag and spotted a banana pencil case filled to the brim with scrabble pieces accompanied with a list of words too distant for my vocabulary. ‘What do they mean?’ I asked. Letting a smile spread across his angular cheekbones he replied “I make up words by mixing up both English and Vlotopian and then I write about them on my blog.” Now relaxed around my company the Vlotopian native began to open up to me giving an excuse for his recent hostility. “Sorry about my vulnerability, my girlfriend shouted at me.” R.H ¢

56

56

list the most popular, the most advertised, or the most expensive. YPlan’s entertainment experts as they call them, curate three shortlists of the ‘best events in town’ for the same day, tomorrow and a condensed list of the week ahead, most of which are so under the radar you could be the only person that turns up. Not that that’s a bad thing, I mean, right now YPlan is advertising a DJ Set hosted by the Haim sisters at the Purple Turtle in Camden on Monday night. Unless you’ve singed up specifically to the venue’s mailing list, there’s a good chance not a lot of people know that this is happening and at £7 a ticket you could find yourself hanging out with the band at the top of the UK number one album chart. It’s not that YPlan doesn’t ever feature more popular events, it’s just the smaller ones are much cooler.

Now, you’re probably thinking ‘how is any of this different from Time Out?’ and the fact is simply this: YPlan not only advertises great events, but you can also purchase tickets via them too. If there are tickets you want to book for an event on YPlan you can do so with two taps of your finger. Literally. Upon signing up you enter your card details and the app saves them so you never have to look at your bankcard again whilst booking via YPlan. The cherry on the cake however, is the savings you make when you purchase via YPlan: there are no hidden costs. No booking fees on top of your initial ticket price, and no seller fees. YPlan also offers many tickets at a discounted price of up to £15. Not bad for a free app, huh? Download the app at: yplanapp.com Available for iPhone and Android

J.D.L ¢

57


ARTS AND CULTURE

VLOTOPIAN

Y OH Y SHOULD I DOWNLOAD THis AGAIN?

Y

Plan is for the spontaneous. The latest in last-minute activities, the go-to if god forbid, you live in London and you’re bored. Whether you like music or film, theatre or art, comedy and beers, too much food for a lot less money or pretentious portions that cost the same as your mortgage: YPlan is almost definitely for you. In fact, YPlan is for everybody; they just don’t know it yet. According to their FAQ, YPlan works in just three steps; ‘get inspired, pay in two taps, and go out tonight.’ I never thought I’d describe an app as inspiring but this one undoubtedly is. The premise is simple: YPlan is an app that specialises in event bookings. Sign up, choose the type of thing you’re interested in and if there’s an event happening you feel like attending, you can book tickets without having to visit a box office. Like I said, simple. But not quite inspiring is it? Nor does it sound any more unique or noteworthy than Ticketmaster, right? Wrong. YPlan is probably the most used app on my phone. It’s the one I check the most, that’s for sure. It doesn’t list reams and reams of events happening in the City, nor does it

A man sporting rather fetching trousers, hunched over a briefcase, catches my eye as a stroll through East London. As I approach him, he seems to have a nervous disposition towards me. I introduce myself and ask him where he is from; excuse my ignorance but I don’t think ‘Vlotopia’ is a real place. I peered inside this Vlotopian’s bag and spotted a banana pencil case filled to the brim with scrabble pieces accompanied with a list of words too distant for my vocabulary. ‘What do they mean?’ I asked. Letting a smile spread across his angular cheekbones he replied “I make up words by mixing up both English and Vlotopian and then I write about them on my blog.” Now relaxed around my company the Vlotopian native began to open up to me giving an excuse for his recent hostility. “Sorry about my vulnerability, my girlfriend shouted at me.” R.H ¢

56

56

list the most popular, the most advertised, or the most expensive. YPlan’s entertainment experts as they call them, curate three shortlists of the ‘best events in town’ for the same day, tomorrow and a condensed list of the week ahead, most of which are so under the radar you could be the only person that turns up. Not that that’s a bad thing, I mean, right now YPlan is advertising a DJ Set hosted by the Haim sisters at the Purple Turtle in Camden on Monday night. Unless you’ve singed up specifically to the venue’s mailing list, there’s a good chance not a lot of people know that this is happening and at £7 a ticket you could find yourself hanging out with the band at the top of the UK number one album chart. It’s not that YPlan doesn’t ever feature more popular events, it’s just the smaller ones are much cooler.

Now, you’re probably thinking ‘how is any of this different from Time Out?’ and the fact is simply this: YPlan not only advertises great events, but you can also purchase tickets via them too. If there are tickets you want to book for an event on YPlan you can do so with two taps of your finger. Literally. Upon signing up you enter your card details and the app saves them so you never have to look at your bankcard again whilst booking via YPlan. The cherry on the cake however, is the savings you make when you purchase via YPlan: there are no hidden costs. No booking fees on top of your initial ticket price, and no seller fees. YPlan also offers many tickets at a discounted price of up to £15. Not bad for a free app, huh? Download the app at: yplanapp.com Available for iPhone and Android

J.D.L ¢

57


LDN. Magazine Issue 1  

The People That Make London. This issue features several stories including a forgotten “Portugal Idol” turned busker, a photographer that us...