__MAIN_TEXT__
feature-image

Page 1

We Are One

Altogether Better Key Competences assessment (For Educators& Trainers only) Course designed by Marco De Cave and Francesco Zaralli APS Futuro Digitale

This project has been funded with support from the European Commission. This publication [communication] reflects the views only of the author, and the Commission cannot be held responsible for any use which may be made of the information contained therein. Project No. 2016-1-UK01-KA204-24478


Do you know what does soft skill means? Could you name any soft skill?


Have you ever heard about key competences?


Key Competence= Knowledge + Skills + Attitudes


What does “Key Competence� mean? Competences are a combination of knowledge, skills and attitudes appropriate to the context. Key competences are those which all individuals need for personal fulfilment and development, active citizenship, social inclusion and employment. The Reference Framework sets out eight key competences: 1) Communication in the mother tongue; 2) Communication in foreign languages; 3) Mathematical competence and basic competences in science and technology; 4) Digital competence; 5) Learning to learn; 6) Social and civic competences; 7) Sense of initiative and entrepreneurship; 8) Cultural awareness and expression.


Communication in the mother tongue Communication in the mother tongue is the ability to express and interpret concepts, thoughts, feelings, facts and opinions in both oral and written form, and to interact linguistically in an appropriate and creative way in a full range of societal and cultural contexts; in education and training, work, home and leisure. Skills: • To communicate both orally and in writing in a variety of communicative situations and to monitor and adapt their own communication; • To distinguish and use different types of texts, to search for, collect and process information, to use aids, and to formulate and express one’s oral and written arguments in a convincing way appropriate to the context


Communication in foreign language It is the ability to understand, express and interpret concepts, thoughts, feelings, facts and opinions in both oral and written form in an appropriate range of societal and cultural contexts according to one’s wants or needs. Communication in foreign languages also calls for skills such as mediation and intercultural understanding. Skills: • to understand spoken messages, to initiate, sustain and conclude conversations and to read, understand and produce texts appropriate to the individual’s needs.


Mathematical competence and basic competences in science and technology It is the ability to develop and apply mathematical thinking in order to solve a range of problems in everyday situations. Mathematical competence involves degrees, the ability and willingness to use mathematical modes of thought and presentation. Competence in science refers to the ability and willingness to use the body of knowledge and methodology employed to explain the natural world, in order to identify questions and to draw evidence-based conclusions. Skills: • to apply basic mathematical principles and processes in everyday contexts; • to use and handle technological tools and machines as well as scientific data to achieve a goal or to reach an evidence-based decision or conclusion


Digital Competences Digital competence involves the confident and critical use of Information Society Technology (IST) for work, leisure and communication. It is underpinned by basic skills in ICT: the use of computers to retrieve, assess, store, produce, present and exchange information, and to communicate and participate in collaborative networks via the Internet.

Skills: • To search, collect and process information and use it in a critical and systematic way, assessing relevance and distinguishing the real from the virtual while recognising the links. • to use tools to produce, present and understand complex information and the ability to access, search and use Internet-based services.


Learning to Learn Learning to learn is the ability to pursue and persist in learning, to organise one’s own learning, including through effective management of time and information, both individually and in groups. This competence includes awareness of one’s learning process and needs, identifying available opportunities, and the ability to overcome obstacles in order to learn successfully

Skills: • literacy, numeracy and ICT skills that are necessary for further learning; • Effective management of one’s learning, career and work patterns, and, in particular, the ability to persevere with learning;


Social and civic competences personal, interpersonal and intercultural competence and cover all forms of behaviour that equip individuals to participate in an effective and constructive way in social and working life, and particularly in increasingly diverse societies, and to resolve conflict where necessary. Civic competence equips individuals to fully participate in civic life, based on knowledge of social and political concepts and structures and a commitment to active and democratic participation Skills: • to communicate constructively in different environments, to show tolerance, express and understand different viewpoints, to negotiate with the ability to create confidence, and to feel empathy


Sense of initiative and entrepreneurship individual’s ability to turn ideas into action. It includes creativity, innovation and risk-taking, as well as the ability to plan and manage projects in order to achieve objectives. This supports individuals, not only in their everyday lives at home and in society, but also in the workplace in being aware of the context of their work and being able to seize opportunities,and is a foundation for more specific skills and knowledge needed by those establishing or contributing to social or commercial activity. Skills: • proactive project management (involving, for example the ability to plan, organise, manage, lead and delegate, analyse, communicate, debrief, evaluate and record), effective representation and negotiation, and the ability to work both as an individual and collaboratively in teams. The ability to judge and identify one’s strengths and weaknesses, and to assess and take risks as and when warranted, is essential.


Cultural awareness and expression

Appreciation of the importance of the creative expression of ideas, experiences and emotions in a range of media, including music, performing arts, literature, and the visual arts.

Skills: • the appreciation and enjoyment of works of art and performances as well as self-expression through a variety of media using one’s innate capacities; • ability to relate one’s own creative and expressive points of view to the opinions of others and to identify and realise social and economic opportunities in cultural activity; • development of creative skills, which can be transferred to a variety of professional contexts.


Which key competences are addressed by WAO training material?


We gain those competences through learning! How do you think a learning process should be?


Learning process to be efficient should be shared Roles/Processes

Where the learner is going

Where the learner is right now

How to get there

Trainer/Facilitator/Tea cher

Clarifying and sharing learning intentions

Engeneering effective Providing feedback group/class discussion, that moves learners questions, activities, forwards and tasks that elicit the evidence of learning

Peer

Understanding and sharing learning intention and criteria for success

Activating students as instructional resources for one another

Learner

Understanding Activating learners as the owners of their own learning intentions knowledge and criteria for success


Learning process to be efficient should be shared

According to this principles, We Are One training material should be adapted according to the needs of the specific group of learners. In other words, training material supports the trainer, who should be able to adapt it according to the context and the specific needs occurring in a particular time/moment.


Monitor learners to boost their empowerment and social inclusion Why do we need to assess learners’ skills and competences during the implementation of our activities? • • • • • •

To better define indicators for our activity; To measure the impact of the activities/trainings we are carrying out; To measure the progress of the learners; To be time/efficient; To re-target the learning material/activities and/or strategies if needed; To deliver a reliable recognition at the end of the training path/activity;


Assessing Key Competences

What should the assessment of key competences and skills be? The key competences should be operational for the assessment; so, taking the broad definitions of key competences in the EU Reference Framework or national documents and developing them into more specific learning outcome that would be ready for assessment; To develop a shared understanding of intended learning outcomes (key competences and skills) and how assessment criteria will be used to judge individual progress;

To assess just relevant competences and skills related to a specific context;


Assessing Key Competences and Skills

How should we assess learners? • Developing/applying a framework for the assessment; • Developing assessment tools (such as questionnaires); • Measuring learners process through observation;


Case study: SAGRADA FRAMEWORK Applying a framework for the assessment

SAGRADA model (Devedzic et al., 2015) is the acronym of Sampling, GRAding, Displaying and Acknowledging learners’ enhanced soft skills. It is much of an empirical framework purpose-based and experience-oriented, where its main elements are observation, measurement, assessment, evaluation, awarding and recognition – perfectly integrated in the Open Badge philosophy Its aim is to evaluate how learners react to real life situations and how they interact in terms of social learning.


Case study: SAGRADA FRAMEWORK

The overall model is based on the assumption of four phases, as parts of the interactive learning process: 1) Educators and learners will use technological tools; 2) Assessment and measurement of the acquired soft skills by awarding Open Badges – different ways can be used to understand how and if students/learners may be badge-awarded. Indeed, open badges can be different according to the acquired level;


Case study: SAGRADA FRAMEWORK

3) Showing the acquired soft skills – these are essential to complement how hard skills have been acquired. In this way, soft skills criteria and metrics ought to be designed neatly to define the badges in a more precise way and categorized in accordance with the context. 4) Updating the criteria and the modalities of issues badging. Such a possibility must be related to the process of feedback and continuous assessment, through fine-tuning the initial variables and metrics chosen at the beginning of the project activities.


Case study: SAGRADA FRAMEWORK

3) Showing the acquired soft skills – these are essential to complement how hard skills have been acquired. In this way, soft skills criteria and metrics ought to be designed neatly to define the badges in a more precise way and categorized in accordance with the context. 4) Updating the criteria and the modalities of issues badging. Such a possibility must be related to the process of feedback and continuous assessment, through fine-tuning the initial variables and metrics chosen at the beginning of the project activities.


Case study: SAGRADA FRAMEWORK Please note: The Figures in the boxes refers to the EU Funded project Code&Youth. The model mentioned has been applied by Futuro Digitale during the project activities to recognize skills and monitor the learners. Soft Skill

Soft skill Quality/Criteria

Key indicator

Collaboration

Collaboration effort - behavior during summer Learner school collaborative during the lab

Performance measure

Performance standard

displays Observation by the tutor during Tutor/Educator notice student’s behavior the lessons engagement in collaborative activities Likert scale. No collaboration: 0 Low collaboration: 1 Average collaboration: 2 High collaboration: 3

Collaboration

Collaboration

Threshold is defined as ‘2’ (average) Collaboration effort - code (evidence) during Learner shows significant Code review – number of valid Number of serious code attempts by summer school code improvement code commits (each team learners: member) 0 commits 1 commit 2 commits Up to 4 commits More than 6 commits Threshold is defined as ‘4’ Collaboration effort - code (evidence) during Learner shows significant Code review – number of The learner can cooperate to acquire summer school code improvement acquired concepts (each team relevant knowledge and put it in member) practice through team work through non-trivial commits Number of valid code lines: Less than 20 lines Less than 25 lines Less than 30 lines More than 30 lines

Badges


Collaboration

Collaboration effort - code (evidence) during Learner shows significant Code review – code testing The learner shows flexibility in achieving summer school code improvement for through different commits per non-trivial commits changing the roles his/her team role team member (assigned to him/her by the educator). Threshold: two roles

Collaboration

Collaboration effort - code (evidence) summer school

Participation

Presentation/discussion - overall impression

during Learner shows significant Code review – number of Number of non-trivial code attempts by code improvement for robot commits of the learner in making learners in guiding Edison robots: functioning the Edison robots function 0 commits 1 commit 2 commits Up to 4 commits More than 6 commits Threshold is defined as ‘4’ Students can well explain Observation by the tutor during The educator/tutor recognizes strategies and give a good the discussion presentation/speeches as clear presentation comprehensible.

the and

Likert scale: No clarity: 0 Some clarity: 1 Clarity: 2 Sound knowledge: 3 Very inciting: 4

Problem Solving and Creative PSCT-effort during the summer school activities Thinking (PSCT)

PSCT-display by the learners Observation by the tutor during the summer school

Threshold: 2 Tutor/teacher recognizes the student as Not active - Somewhat active - Active - Very active Threshold:

Problem Solving and Creative PSCT-effort on coding during the summer school PSCT to code by the learner Thinking (PSCT) activities

Observation by the tutor

Student produces a significant number of nonempty lines of code per day (Scale: Less than 25 lines - 25-30 lines - 31-35 lines - more than 35 lines Threshold1: 31 lines)


Problem Solving and Creative PSCT-effort on coding during the summer school Code reviewLearners Thinking (PSCT) activities engage in activities continuously during the summer school (before and later)

Number of days during which the work has been done Number of absences of the learner

Sense of initiative

Enthusiasm during the summer school classes

The learner shows engaging Observation by the tutor behavior during the classes

Sense of initiative

Enthusiasm after the summer school classes

The learner shows engaging E-communication with behavior after the classes summer school tutors

Student produces code commits in a time period of more than a 7 days (Scale: Less than 7 days - 7-10 days - 11-13 days - more than 13 days Threshold: 7-10 days)

Tutor/educators notice that student engages more than asked in the activities (e.g.: the student asks meaningful what-if questions, he/she tries to find alternative solutions, etc.) Likert scale: Not enthusiastic - Somewhat enthusiastic - Enthusiastic - Very enthusiastic Threshold: Enthusiastic

the The student/learner is engaged in vitalizing the virtual community, asking for and giving advice. The student actively shares the C&Y summer school during the project span. Scale: 0 comments/online sharing times: no commitment; 1-4 comments/online sharing times: Low commitment 5-8 comments/online sharing times: Normal commitment 9-12 comments/online sharing times: Good commitment 13< comments/online sharing times: Extra commitment Threshold: Normal commitment


Case study: SAGRADA FRAMEWORK

Outcome: • A structure method of assessment; • Valid Key Indicators; • Recognition of soft skills based on the Open Badge System (see more at: https://openbadges.org/)


Case Study: YOUTHREACH Framework Measuring learners process through observation

The Youthreach Soft Skills framework directs attention to the personal and social skills. Its goals are: a) b) c) d)

to identify the soft skills involved in personal and social development; to consider how they can be taught systematically to find a way of measuring the progress made by individuals in relation to these skill areas; to devise a method for recording progress.


Case Study: YOUTHREACH Framework

The framework consists of a matrix of three competencies and three skills. The notion of competence or competency is a broad one, incorporating dimensions such as knowledge, experience, cognitive skills, practical skills, attitudes, emotions, values, ethics, and motivation. Competence refers to a general capacity. It helps the person meet complex demands in their life through the mobilisation of the psychosocial and other resources embedded in them which function in interaction with real world tasks.


Case Study: YOUTHREACH Framework

The benefit of a concept like ‘competence’ is that it directs attention beneath the observable behavioural surface of ‘skills’ to inquire into the mental capacity that creates the behaviour and into the processes by which knowledge is created. Skill is being defined as the ability, usually learned or acquired through training, to perform actions which achieve a desired outcome. Skill includes the notion of being able to perform these motor or cognitive acts with ease and precision and with the adaptability to changing conditions.


Case Study: YOUTHREACH Framework


Case Study: YOUTHREACH Framework


Case Study: YOUTHREACH Framework Ongoing and ex-post the implementation of specific training activities to be matched with the daily routine of the organisation (see. Youthreach paper) the staff team discuss each learner in turn using 2 specific templates. They rate the learner under each of the three competencies â&#x20AC;&#x201C; either by giving one general rating or by allocating a rating separately to the two skill areas encompassed within a competency. The rating is out of 10, with 1 representing the lowest level found among learners on entry to the programme and 10 representing the highest level achieved by learners at the end of their training. The evidence can be how the learner was observed to behave in the venue of the activities in various situations or in contexts outside of the venue or it can be what the learner has said about themselves or how they contributed in a conversation with others. Evidence can also include reports by others (e.g members of the same community). The evidence being cited will need to be explored and clarified in discussion before the rating is determined. If there is disagreement among the staff the rating may need to be negotiated and a compromise reached.


Case Study: YOUTHREACH Framework

The staff team then discuss the priority areas for improvement that they will concentrate on over the coming period. This plan will contain the formal and informal approaches that will be used to improve the learnerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s soft skills and will name those who will be responsible for this work.

The experience of the trainers, either in the centre and in activities carried out with the specific target group are crucial to have a reliable outcome of the Assessment.


Assessing through ICT tools


Assessing through ICT tools Computer-based testing: In particular, for the reading and text comprehension as well as mathematical competence, computer-based tests can provide contexts that are rich enough to comprehensively assess these competences. The advantages of computer-based tests over traditional assessment formats lie in the provision of instant and targeted feedback and in the possibility to automatically adapt the difficulty of the test items to learnersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; different performance levels. ePortfolios are ideally suited as environments scaffolding the assessment of collections of works produced by learners and are thus particularly powerful tools for communication in the mother tongue, communication in foreign languages and cultural awareness and expression. they support online collaborations, self- and peer assessment, which contribute to fostering and at the same time assessing students' learning to learn skills, as they promote self-regulated learning and improve motivation, engagement and participation.


Assessing through ICT tools

Immersive environments and multiplayer games recreate learning situations which require complex thinking, problem-solving and collaboration strategies and thus allow for the development of these skills, which are key components of all eight Key Competences. These environments replicate authentic contexts; encourage collaboration, empathy and negotiation; and reward strategic thinking, initiative and experimentation. They are thus specifically suitable for competences in science and technology, for social and civic competences and the development of sense of initiative and entrepreneurship. Since learnersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; behaviour in these electronic environments is tracked, their individual learning journey â&#x20AC;&#x201C; and with it these skills â&#x20AC;&#x201C; can, at least in principle, be automatically assessed.


Assessing through ICT tools Computer simulations and virtual laboratories provide opportunities for students to develop and apply skills and knowledge in more realistic contexts and provide feedback in real time. Practical tasks, embedded in electronic environments, using mobile devices or making available online resources, are a further promising avenue for developing ICT enabled assessment formats that better capture Key Competences, in particular as concerns digital competence. Educational software solutions such as intelligent tutoring systems take this idea one step further by offering embedded assessment with instant feedback and targeted support. In particular for mathematical competence these systems allow students to investigate mathematical concepts and problems in complex contexts, at their own pace, through a series of tasks adapted in level of difficulty and with the help of hints that encourage them to develop adequate solution strategies.


Assessing through ICT tools Computer simulations and virtual laboratories provide opportunities for students to develop and apply skills and knowledge in more realistic contexts and provide feedback in real time. Practical tasks, embedded in electronic environments, using mobile devices or making available online resources, are a further promising avenue for developing ICT enabled assessment formats that better capture Key Competences, in particular as concerns digital competence. Educational software solutions such as intelligent tutoring systems take this idea one step further by offering embedded assessment with instant feedback and targeted support. In particular for mathematical competence these systems allow students to investigate mathematical concepts and problems in complex contexts, at their own pace, through a series of tasks adapted in level of difficulty and with the help of hints that encourage them to develop adequate solution strategies.


Thank you! Marco De Cave & Francesco Zaralli APS Futuro Digitale m.decave@futurodigitale.org f.zaralli@futurodigitale.org

wao.courses@gmail.com

This project has been funded with support from the European Commission. This publication [communication] reflects the views only of the author, and the Commission cannot be held responsible for any use which may be made of the information contained therein. Project No. 2016-1-UK01-KA204-24478

Profile for Francesco Zaralli

Key competences and assessment for educators  

http://www.futurodigitale.org/en/erasmus-plus-en/cooperation-for-innovation-and-the-exchange-of-good-practices-ka2/wao-we-are-one-altogether...

Key competences and assessment for educators  

http://www.futurodigitale.org/en/erasmus-plus-en/cooperation-for-innovation-and-the-exchange-of-good-practices-ka2/wao-we-are-one-altogether...

Advertisement

Recommendations could not be loaded

Recommendations could not be loaded

Recommendations could not be loaded

Recommendations could not be loaded