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SPRING 2016

Royal Edition & Tribute to William McClurg

Italy’s Crown Prince Emanuele Filiberto di Savoia

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Uomo Moderno magazine would not have come into existence had this guy, William McClurg, not come into the life of its publisher, Francesco. Thanks for standing by my side!

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SPRING 2016 The 1st and only Men’s Fashion & Lifestyle Magazine from Italy. Awarded 2014 Hottest Magazine Launch! Cover Emanuele Filiberto di Savoia Total Look: Stephen F Accessories: PerePaix Location: Lincoln Square Steak, New York Editor in Chief Francesco Di Maio PR & Communications Federica Fatale HAIR & GROOMING Francesco Cilidonio—Cily Hairstylist Graphic Design Cecilia Giménez de Paz - cgimenezdepaz@gmail.com Photo Credits Miss Paparazzi Inna Race Photography (pp. 2-3) Mikhail Veter (Cover, pp. 4-5, 10-19, 96-97) Andersphoto, fotolia.com (pp. 20-21) Rostislav Glinsky, shutterstock.com (pp. 22-23) theartofphoto, fotolia.com (pp. 24-25) Monica Busin (pp. 82-85) Alessandro Pizzi (pp. 86-89) Sina Hotels (pp. 90-91) Victor Sorgato (pp. 92-95) Amy Morse with Daniel Perry (pp. 98-99) ADDITIONAL CREDITS Total Look: Stephen F (Cover, pp. 2-5, 10-19) Accessories: PerePaix (Cover, pp. 2-5, 10-19) Stylist: James Kirk (Cover, pp. 2-5, 10-19) Hair & Makeup: Jennifer O’Conner at Tearsheet (Cover, pp. 2-5, 10-19, 96-99) Total Look: Moma (pp. 82-85) Stylist: Stefano Gatto (pp. 82-85) Hair: Claudio Guadagnoli (pp. 82-85) Pants: Fendi; cardigan & t-shirt: Hugo Boss; shoes: Pollini (p. 86) Shirt: Calvin Klein; Pants: Hugo Boss; belt: Gucci; shoes: Fendi (p. 88) Contact Info info@uomo-moderno.com Website: uomo-moderno.com Uomo Moderno is a quarterly publication of Men’s Fashion by Francesco LLC. ISSN 2329-9258 © 2016, All Rights Reserved

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Publisher & Owner of Uomo Moderno, Francesco, dressed in black jeans and a single-breasted lily print tuxedo blazer of the Lili Collection by Stephen F. Stephen Ferber is a Swedish designer who recently opened a boutique in the Meat Packing District of New York: 100% Made in Italy. Stephen named the Lili collection after his maternal grandmother, who survived the Auschwitz internment camp during WWII. The print is a loose interpretation of the lily flower and its petals are in black stitching on midnight blue wool.

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what’s inside

Contents

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Cover Story The Crown Prince Emanuele Filiberto di Savoia

18 Stephen F 100% Made in Italy

14 The Royal House of Savoy A History

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20 Royal Palaces Palaces of Power Palaces of Court Life Palaces of Retreat


FASHION

Grooming

CINEMA

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68

86

Muusa

Cily Hairstylist

Andrea Bosca

The Opia Collection

The Pub Generation

The Blue-Eyed Baby

cuisine

TRAVEL

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90

32 Edith Marcel When Clothing Has No Gender

38 Andrea Cammarosano Personal Liberation

44 Plùs Que Ma Vìe New Venice

Morena Beer

Venice and Its Carnival

The Pub Generation

74 Pecorino Toscano PDO Don’t Be Fooled

DÉCOR

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50 Wanna Maria Fiori

Minotti Kitchens

3 Names Say It All

Simple. Beautiful. Forever.

56 Studiopretzel Hana-Bi

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events

96 A Royal Evening & Carnival Ball

Made in Italy

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Etrusca

Anthony Peth

Collezione Tre

Ambassador of Made in Italy Uomo Moderno Spring 2016

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Benvenuti!

Welcome to the 2016

While I was packing up my belongings the other day, I found a card that my partner had given to me in 2013, the cover of which read “Dreams really can come true.” When I opened the card, it began playing the song When You Wish upon a Star. With tears welling up in my eyes, I read his words: “Congratulations on your new career adventure—you’ll be great!” Sure enough, a year after its launch, Uomo Moderno went on to win 2014 Hottest Magazine Launch in the U.S. I attribute my success to Bill, who encouraged me to dream—realistically but big! When I felt like throwing in the towel (or the sponge, as we say in Italian), he would simply reply “I think you should give it some more time.” Bill loved me unconditionally, as I did him. He also loved helping me, from choosing the magazine cover to planning the events. He would take off work, hang and steam garments, and pack it all up at the end. I will miss Bill forever; but there’s much more to this story of devotion and love. You see, I had been married for twenty years and, when I came out, I lost my job, my home, all my friends, and most of my family. Alone, I was forced to embark on a new life, which amounted to walking through what seemed to me like a dark tunnel for ten long years. Then I met Bill, who immediately lit up my tunnel with his simplicity, sarcasm, and smile. I had found true love. We never fought, never argued; we never exchanged a harsh word. Bill was my prince and I worshipped him as he did me. When he suffered a fatal heart attack, the light of my life went out again and I found myself back in that long dark lonely tunnel. Saddened and grieved to the point of pain, I lost every desire to live. Fortunately with the help of my friends, fans, and counselors, I managed to muster up what inner strength I could—a tiny spark within me that had not been extinguished—and go on with life. Nevertheless, I acknowledge that my life has changed forever and I will never be the same; so I cling to the wonderful five years of memorable romance and say “thank you, Billy.” You are my prince—the true love of my life—and now you have become my shining star…. Francesco Di Maio Publisher

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Spring & Royal

Edition of Uomo Moderno!

In Loving Memory of William A. McClurg June 9, 1959窶年ovember 21, 2015

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The Crown Prince Emanuele Filiberto di Savoia

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the crown prince

Tall, blond, blue-eyed, educated, gallant— Emanuele Filiberto di Savoia is like in the fairy tales, a real Prince Charming, the symbol and embodiment of traditional values, typical of nobility, but with a modern interpretation. What was it like to be born and raised as a prince? I was born a prince, this is a fact; but the most important thing is that I grew up with so much love from my parents! You know, I was born when there was no longer a monarchy, so my parents wanted to give me a “normal” upbringing, always respecting my family, my history, and my homeland. Do you recall any outstanding memory from your childhood? The memory I have, and I realized it later, is that on my every birthday many Italians from all parts of Italy came to celebrate me. It was very nice…. But one day I asked if I could return with them to Italy, and then I knew that I was different; I understood the meaning of the word exile! What values or ideals has nobility taught you? Family, respect, honesty, love…. The curiosity to discover and learn, to believe in oneself, freedom…even if for me ideals and values are very close. Does the word “nobility” bear any meaning for you today? What matters nowadays is nobility of the heart…. For me the greatest Queen and King were Mother Teresa and Nelson Mandela! So too are the many non-media people who fight every day for an ideal…. Watch them to define nobility!

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You were born and raised in exile…. Do you feel Italian? I always felt Italian! My father, when I was little, gave me lessons on the history of my family. We have a common passion, numismatics, and through coins he explained to me the people and kings of my family and the history of my country. I have always felt Italian! How did you feel when you returned to Italy for the first time? Returning to Italy was magnificent…. To discover my country with the maturity of a 32 year old was beautiful and exciting. What does it mean to be Italian? To belong to the most beautiful country in the world and have extraordinary people as fellow citizens! Can you see from my answer that I love my country? What do you miss most when you are abroad? Hearing Italian spoken freely in the streets.... Feeling at home…. Is there a city or region with which you feel a close connection? I’m very close to Turin and Piedmont, the cradle of our family. But all Italy is beautiful from north to south; for instance, Palermo and Naples are very lovely and interesting cities! Do you have favorite dish? Good spaghetti with tomato and basil. For the rest I’ll give you the scoop: I am creating a food truck in Los Angeles that makes fresh pasta right in front of the customer. I want to bring a bit of my Italy to America. The food truck will be ready in April and will be a novelty. The name? Prince of Venice Cantina. Uomo Moderno Spring 2016

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Do you follow fashion? Yes, I do and I also created a line that is called Prince Tees. I wanted to create t-shirts under the sartorial pretense of cashmere and cotton. They are enjoying great success and now we are even launching pajamas. Which designers do you appreciate most? I love the new generation of Italian designers: Riccardo Tisci for Givenchy, Maria Grazia Chiuri and Pier Paolo Piccioli for Valentino. How does a prince spend his free time? My passion is art, cinema…. I engage in lots of sports; every morning I run 5k, but I also play tennis, ski, and waterski. Is there a certain lesson that you teach your daughters? Curiosity about everything and respect for one another! Love and respect for nature! How did you begin your career on Italian TV? When I came back to Italy after 32 years in exile, I found that there was a discrepancy between how the press had painted me and how I was in reality. I decided to do television, therefore, to introduce myself to Italians. I participated in Dancing with the Stars, which I won with a world record of televoting, even more than the American one (1,200,000 votes). After this huge success, I presented various programs and I’ve written some too. Working in television has been nice, but I have gone full circuit and don’t see myself presenting programs all my life in Italy. That’s why two years ago I stopped and created my own TV production company—Royal Me Up. We develop and create television shows around the world. What type of TV shows do you enjoy most? I do not like programs in the studio where you have to follow a teleprompter and have no freedom. I love shows that are freer and where new things are discovered. I’m a big fan of Bear Grylls and shows like Top Gear and so on. I would love to be able to work in America!!!

In 2010 you took second place at the Festival of Sanremo…. I love music, I follow it so much! My participation in Sanremo was a provocation: I wanted to show the world of television that, even if you are not a singer but are very loved and famous, you can win this song festival, because—yes—I won it. But the organization had to close my telephone line to take second; everyone knows this now and can talk about it. What has transpired since you founded the movement Values and Future? I no longer believe in politics. I realized that the vast majority of Italian politicians do it as a profession and not as devotion to an ideal. This is very sad! At my level I created the foundation to help my fellow citizens in need at the economic level. I have a project to support small- and medium-sized Italian companies. I created a label Italian Excellence; it is a real challenge to defend the true flagbearers of Italy who are often not helped: a challenge to defend those small- to medium-size enterprises that truly produce in Italy and should be valued because they represent the true excellence of our country. Do you have any exciting projects in store for the near future? I have so many projects; but today I focus on my fashion line Prince Tees, my television and film productions (I’m producing the upcoming animated film by Sylvain Chomet and a beautiful documentary on Federico Fellini). Then I travel a lot throughout Italy for my brand Italian Excellence, and the cherry on the cake is my food truck of fresh pasta that takes me often to America. Does the Prince have any dreams? My dream is to be able travel to marvelous places with my daughters, reveal to them their diverse cultures and civilizations, and make them understand that we must preserve this beautiful planet and respect those who are different from us. There’s much to learn from everyone! Interview by Federica Fatale.

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the crown prince

Feature Story

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Art Deco mural by Giancarlo Impiglia at Lincoln Square Steak, New York.

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the crown prince

Feature Story

The Royal House of Savoy A History By the dawn of the 21st century, the Royal House of Savoy was Europe’s oldest sovereign family as it was founded 1003AD in today’s Rhône-Alpes, France, and later expanded to reign over the Kingdom of Sardinia by 1720. The House of Savoy led the unification of Italy in 1861 and ruled the Kingdom of Italy from 1861 until the end of World War II with four monarchs: Vittorio Emanuele II, Umberto I, Vittorio Emanuele III, and Umberto II. After a constitutional referendum in 1946, the monarchy was abolished, a republic was established, and the male members of the House of Savoy were required to leave the country in a state of perpetual exile. As the only male-line grandson to Umberto II, Emanuele Filiberto di Savoia was born in Geneva, Switzerland, on June 22, 1972 and holds the title Prince of Piedmont and Venice. The constitutional ban was abolished in October 2002 and the male members were permitted back to Italy; however, the titles and distinctions of the House of Savoy are not recognized by the Republic of Italy. Uomo Moderno Spring 2016

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Lincoln Square Steak Located at 208 West 70th Street, New York, Lincoln Square Steak is a swanky place for nine cuts of aged beefsteak, seafood, and Italian dishes, plus live piano music and an early prix fixe. Thanks to the owner, Bruno Selimaj, for welcoming Uomo Moderno to perform the photoshoot of the Crown Prince.

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the crown prince

Feature Story

PerePaix As a gift to the Prince of Venice, publisher and host Francesco commissioned Israeli designer Avshalom Rave of PerePaix to handcraft two golden cufflinks, which were inspired by the lions of Venice. Thanks also to PerePaix for accessorizing the entire photoshoot with the Crown Prince.

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Stephen F

100% Made in Italy Stephen Ferber hails from Sweden where he has been working in the fashion industry since 1990. His label Stephen F represents timeless welltailored clothing in high quality fabrics. When did you launch Stephen F? Started as a hobby a couple of years ago; but when we made the decision to open up our store, we launched officially. It was 2014. The store in Meatpacking opened up summer 2015. 18

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How would you define your design aesthetic? Classics cuts in brave colors or classic cuts in unique fabrics. We are working with the finest fabrics, for example, cashmere and reindeer leather. Every single piece has its own story. It can be the unique designs or limited quantities that we do—everything for making the person who wears it feel special. What type of person in New York wears Stephen F? Our consumer has a big self-confidence. He wants the


the crown prince

best! He (sometimes even a she) is not afraid of trying something new. Our clientele is demanding, but that makes us work even harder. We love hard work; it makes us even better. So thanks to our clients! How do you feel about the photoshoot with Italy’s Crown Prince? It makes us proud! I mean, he can select whatever he wants to wear. There are a couple of brands out there. We are used to helping celebrities. They can be singers, actors,

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or athletes. We love and truly respect the relationship we have with all people around us. Any other closing remarks? I just enjoy working with you, Francesco. You believed in me from the very first beginning. RESPECT to you and a big hug!! Special thanks to stylist and model James Kirk (photo left) for styling the Prince in Stephen F and offering to model! Uomo Moderno Spring 2016

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Palaces of Power Palazzo Reale Palazzo Madama Palazzo Carignano Palazzo Chiablese

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royal palaces

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Palazzo Reale Designed and redesigned over the centuries, the Royal Palace is a symbol of diversified opulence, the epicenter of command, and the hub of royal power—the heart of the House of Savoy.

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Palaces of Retreat Reggia di Venaria Villa della Regina Castello del Valentino Castello di Moncalieri Palazzina di Caccia di Stupinigi Castello di Rivoli

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royal palaces

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Palazzina di Caccia di Stupinigi Designed in the 18th century by Baroque Architect Filippo Juvarra, the royal hunting lodge for sovereign festivities, stately weddings, and lofty leisure—a crown of royal delights.

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Palaces of Court Life Castello Ducale di Agliè Castello de La Mandria Castello e Parco di Racconigi Tenuta Reale di Pollenzo Castello di Govone Castello di Casotto Castello Cavour di Santena Castello di Susa

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royal palaces

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Castello e Parco di Racconigi Built in the 17th century by Baroque Architect Guarino Guarini, the castle offered romantic gardens, panoramic views of the village, and a holiday home to the royal family.

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Muusa

The Opia Collection

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muusa

Out of all your world travels, which was the most impressionable? Two years after several trips and still recovering from New York’s September 11, which sealed the fate of America and Europe, I chose Shanghai as “home” and I lived it out with unexpected intensity. It was as if there was a huge magnetic pole that made it all surreal and somewhat magical. I would say that China, with all its paradoxes, has definitely transformed me, enriching my sensitivity. How would you describe your experience of living there? Living in Shanghai is like watching a movie in Technicolor: vivid and hazy colors, palpable perceptions. It was like returning spiritually to the thrill and dynamics of the 1930s: art, fashion, and design in the foreground and new opportunities after the Wall Street crash. What impressed you most about today’s generation? Their fascination with a glorious and mysterious past, which is then transformed into a “clean slate” because of the counter-revolution that is being rediscovered, perhaps only now by the new generation, whose precious and unique roots have crossed ours in ancient times. This often paradoxical China is loved and hated but only understood by living it up close, just to realize that we are more alike than you think and that respect for family, passion for cooking, and historical depth are the common denominators of Chinese and Italians who, around a table for dessert, talk about what they will eat that evening. Has China influenced your sense of design? Absolutely. If the 8 years in Milan have instilled me with a minimalist urban chic and the two in New York with a strong sense of creativity outside European rules, the 6-8 years in Shanghai have deconstructed, shaped, and sharpened my

FASHION

perception and creation of design as I implement an Eastern Zen footprint with an Italian sensitivity to detail and style. Today, Muusa offers minimal conceptual graphics and an artistic vision that Raphael Cattan, Muusa’s graphic artist, knew how to incorporate into the soul of the collection, enriching it and making it unique in his own way. Can you elaborate on the relationship of music to wellbeing? We worked on frequencies and musical instruments that, by nature, create a deep sense of wellbeing and psychophysical contentment which, I would dare to say, are good for the soul and create a sense of rather unusual synesthesia. Do these concepts relate to fashion? Muusa was born out of music and has developed into a lifestyle, wherein clothing—that, which cloaks us—can help us feel well, pampered, and satisfied by fibers and soft light lunar shades. How do you and your brother combine music, wellbeing, and fashion? As a sensory journey that starts precisely from applied art and onto wellbeing, connected with the senses and spirit through meditation, yoga, or that particular synesthesia, which is experienced during a Muusa massage, so as to arrive at a more tangible wellbeing like fashion and design which affect how we love ourselves. In fact Muusa has two branches today: Luca concentrates on a new interactive sensory music system that is linked to the world of spas and resorts, while I am committed to transforming a niche fashion line suitable for the prestigious resort world with noble yarns like cashmere, silk, and linens, as well as soft deconstructed styles that are suited for moments of indoor relaxation and refined socialization.

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Do you work well together as brother and sister? We have a deep bond—even if working elbow to elbow for years, traveling, and sharing virtually everything have made us experience occasional jolts. Working with people very close to us is both beautiful and dangerous, since boundaries become thinner and reactions can be amplified, especially among creative people with strong characters like ours. Time to identify our strengths and weaknesses by directing our efforts to the evolution of a project like Muusa has greatly enriched us, and the journey continues. How did this partnership emerge? During the years in Milan where Luca graduated with honors from Brera, our paths crossed outside family life. Then in the States, the bond strengthened even more to the point we shared the devastating and incredible experience of the Twin Towers. But a collaborative spark was born in 2004 with his art project at the Domus Academy when we asked the director of archives at the New York Stock Exchange to grant us access to books that documented the stock market crash of ‘29 and, then, almost a year after, through a performance in which Luke transformed the data of Black Monday/Tuesday into a musical concert with 15 musicians, two opera singers, and an opera conductor who worked with Moni Ovadia. For the occasion, I recreated 1929 Wall Street clothing from Shanghai. That’s how the combination of music and fashion first came together. What prompted you to launch a line of clothing? When we returned to Italy in 2008, after a couple of shows with the “H Chairs” collection—art-deco armchairs from Shanghai that were upholstered with clothing of the same period as a tribute to Shanghai’s “Golden Years”—I became involved in the conceptualization of an art project in an important spa. I asked Luca, who had just come back from another successful show, to think about a new concept of art for wellbeing; hence, Muusa was born and two years later, along with several trips to the most important resorts in Asia, it was suggested that we expand the first wellness garments: kimonos, Cashmere pantalounge stoles, which become an extension of a project born from art. 28

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muusa

FASHION

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Why the name “muusa,” which is the Turkish word for ‘muse’? The sound of Muusa Moon Movement Music is melodic and its meaning is precious: the inspirational muse of artists has become for us the brand and mother of continually evolving projects in which luxury becomes accessible and an integral part of a lifestyle. How would you describe the man and woman that wear Muusa? He’s the modern man who likes to pamper himself without losing his virility, one who lives out that, which is avant-garde and searches for it with taste and respect. She is the woman who loves silent luxury, consisting of details, caresses, and style, which goes beyond fashion. What does “Opia” refer to in your current collection? To that mysterious universe in all of us; and it would be enough to stop and look to see that we are all bound by a timeless destiny that evolves and influences us. Opia is that ambiguous feeling of looking into one’s eyes, making us feel invaded and fascinated at the same time; in fashion it becomes a way to go against the tide, to go beyond the surface of beauty. Why a unisex collection? From the modern-day awareness that male and female coexist in each of us and that these boundaries are increasingly narrowing and generating new sensibilities and free identities to express ourselves. Men can cry, laugh, and love each other without having to follow archaic canons that for centuries have distanced them from women. The Muusakind-of man loves beyond gender and, above all, loves himself. Interview with Monica Bertini.

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muusa

FASHION

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Edith Marcel When Clothing Has No Gender

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edith marcel

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In the ancient culture of the Greeks there was a myth that recounted the events of the god Hermaphrodite, a beautiful youth with whom a nymph fell in love. One day while he was bathing in a lake, she spied on him and then threw herself on him, praying that the gods would never separate her from her lover and for both to become one. Her prayers were answered and that was how the merger of the two gave birth to a creature with both genders. Why do I mention this myth? Simply because I present two designers with an exceptional talent that have made this gender diversity a concept of fashion. Edith Marcel was born out of the collaboration between Andrea and Gianluca Ferracin Masato who were educated at the IUAV University of Venice in Fashion Design and Architecture, respectively. Reflecting on the theme of gender, the brand was conceived as a study of forms, volumes, and lengths that can dress the male and female body alike. Their first collection, spring/summer 2016, was presented at Pitti Uomo 88, combining the clean and sharp lines of traditional tailoring with the delicate details of women’s clothing, along with rigid materials and a palette borrowed from the illustrated covers of magazines in the 1920s, such as Vogue, Harper’s Bazaar, and Vanity Fair.

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edith marcel

FASHION

The Current Collection Eccentric but rigorous, the garments created by Edith Marcel for the 2016 spring/summer collection demonstrate an interesting combined originality. Interesting is the concept of ignoring the dualism between male and female to join them as one. The clothes become versatile, almost playfully worn by a man, rigorously worn by a woman. A line of visual impact, square lines tempered by soft colors. An evolution of style, designed to the last detail. Interesting is the use of the color white, which separates and gives contrast to the various colors used for “blocking” (defined sections without shading), never exceeding too much vivacity but remaining faithful to the pre-established style. Large untapered shapes create a softening of square lines without emphasizing the male or female body but rather annihilating that physicality, which mingles in a slightly subtle confusion, at times tender, forcing the eye to want to pry more into this “diversity.” By Francesco Cilidonio, Cily Hairstylist. Uomo Moderno Spring 2016

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edith marcel

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Andrea Cammarosano Personal Liberation

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andrea cammarosano

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Let’s begin with your background…. I was born and raised in Trieste, near Venice, of Roman and Tuscan-Neapolitan parents. So I’m a mix from all over Italy. At the age of 18 I went to study Fashion in Antwerp, Belgium, where I lived for six years. My subsequent travels were to London, Amsterdam, Vienna, San Francisco, and Florence where my studio is based. I chose to produce clothing in Italy for the quality and imagination of our laboratories. But my sensibility for design is greatly attributed to Antwerp: I search for not only the quality of the product but also the quality of ideas. How would you describe your design philosophy? For me, the work of a creative is one of interpretation. Imagination, as I understand it, does not consist of escaping from reality but rather interpreting it, filtering it, and communicating it. Among my icons are Pasolini, neorealism, arte povera, as well as magic realism. My man has three characteristics: he’s romantic, engaged, and subversive. This is also my philosophy of life. What has changed since last year’s article about you? Our values have not changed. We speak of a new man, rebellion and sophistication, and a powerful, postconsumer, creative and modern craftsmanship. Tell us about your current collection…. For spring/summer 2016, my man is the head of a tribal army; he wears elements of military uniforms that are similar to those of De Sade or a hierarch of Salò; but as I said above, these military garments open up into numerous cuts to become Berber tunics. I never use references in a literal way: like I said, I like to filter reality and reinterpret it. Nevertheless, I could not resist a large embroidery of the dying Marat, created completely by hand and using a mix of 30 different techniques—it’s a tribute to the man, Ami du Peuple, and his great ideas.

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andrea cammarosano

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andrea cammarosano

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Can you elaborate on the element of “personal liberation” in the collection? Versatility is one of the qualities of my garments. A long trench coat in cotton gabardine has a zipper that crosses the front; opening it, the trench increases by one size. The same goes for pants with two large pleats in front; an elastic waist allows for adjusting the size of the trousers, redistributing the volume on the folds. Personal liberation, therefore, is also a factor of practicality. On the other hand, there are embroidered raffia and deliberately coarse trimmings which send a message of beauty and spontaneity—this too is liberation. Finally, how do you view the current state of fashion in Italy? All my cultural references are to Italy, but to an Italy that was in the forefront on the international level. The reason is it was an Italy that questioned itself, showing all its beauty. As Pasolini said “I am the tradition, the strength of the past.” Yet even his lyrics and his films were scandalous. If we want to lead the future, we must have less fear of scandalizing and be less afraid of making mistakes. Uomo Moderno Spring 2016

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Plùs Que Ma Vìe New Venice

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plùs que ma vìe

FASHION

Andrea Lazzari is the creative mind and owner of the label Plùs Que Ma Vìe. He is an eclectic artist, a perfectionist of clothing and details. The dominant characteristics of his style are linguistic influences and tastes. Considered a pragmatic visionary, Andrea was educated at the Marangoni Institute in Milan, from which he graduated with the award of Best Fashion Designer. Uomo Moderno Spring 2016

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Can you pinpoint a time when you first felt this passion? At the time of high school, as a simple game—as a simple selfidentification. I have always had a passion for the aesthetics of fashion or the pleasure of clothing itself. I always thought that fashion was the best way to express myself intellectually and iconographically. Now I believe that fashion is more a business than pure aesthetics. Venice is a dream world for outsiders, but how about for locals like you? For a pure Venetian, certainly the feelings of belonging and typical Italian pride coexist. It’s a magical aseptic city, an end in itself. You feel transported every time you are there. It inspires and lets you be inspired— this has always helped me in my aesthetic research. As a city, more specifically, I think it’s hard to live in. Why did you name your label in French? As a matter of marketing and advertisement. French is an elegant, refined, and courtly language. I wanted to carry the image of Venice into a French context to create fascination and interest in other markets right from the start.

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plùs que ma vìe

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What does it mean both literally and symbolically? It means “more than my life” and, incidentally, it is the identification of my style and my goals. The brand seeks to represent that which goes beyond simple life, beyond normal dress; it wants to flaunt a uniqueness that has never been seen before; it wants to transmit an experience never seen before. How old is your target market? Depending on the line, we work for an audience that is from 20 to 40 years old. What type of guy wears Plùs Que Ma Vìe? He is definitely a person full of himself, a person who definitely wants to rise above the average; the image of Plùs Que Ma Vìe is represented by the rich affluent class with a strong self-attitude— elegant and at the same time creative and ambitious.

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In what ways does your current collection depict a New Venice? We started with Venice. We studied it in all its artistic facets and cultural and tourist influences. The result is what has emerged, especially during the last fashion week in China whereby we created a break with what had been seen until that moment. We created a new story to tell and that is what I want to express in “New Venice�: it deconstructed the city of Venice abstractly and we gave to it a modern, futuristic, and revolutionary glaze. Can you give us a specific example? Prime example: the double-breasted waxed cotton bag with pockets and a UP print for the finishing touch. We studied the architecture of Venice and made it the detail. We used an untypical fabric for jackets and proposed it as an alternative solution of taste and style. This is my vision of fashion.

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plĂšs que ma vĂŹe

FASHION

Why the choice of colors? Black and orange have always been the colors of Venice, as well as the colors that I feel are close to my aesthetic taste. From these, I influenced my world by combining electric blue, clearly an atypical commercial color, so as to give it a new history. White is a corollary to the world of black; they must coexist. My color palette is meant to represent what is inside and outside Venice. Interview with Andrea Lazzari.

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Wanna Maria Fiori 3 Names Say It All

“ Both the concept and the brand were born from my idea and my stubbornness; but it is obvious and important to stress that the three elements— Wanna, Maria, Fiori—make sense and materialize only in a perfect mix. “My name is Wanna Grantelli. I was born and raised in Le Marche where I completed my first round of studies. After high school and a year of philosophy, I found myself in Milan at the Marangoni Institute. For fun and a bet, I studied and completed the full four-year fashion design program. “Immediately after my thesis, I departed to a town in Tuscany where threads, irons, and pins awaited me for my first experience in knitwear. I got acquainted and gained confidence with cashmere, learning that a sweater is how I fashion it and any material can be however I fashion it. This is how I view and think about what I do: as something that can be modeled, first by me, then by the recipient.

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wanna maria fiori

FASHION

“I was born and grew up breathing fashion, models, and dust. I performed hundreds of fashion shows under the desk of my father, who was also a designer and patternmaker of shoes: the scraps of his models gave life to my paper couture. What I learned from this simple environment is that you can do everything using your head and hands.

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“When I wanted to overdo it, I dressed up in the backroom of my mother’s unassuming avant-garde store: on the corner of a common neighborhood in a small town. It was just the beginning of the ‘80s— walls covered only with mirrors, cream-colored carpets, and me rolling around in the outerwear of Yohji Yamamoto. I tattooed my arms with the flowers of Kenzo and expressed desires as I watched the metal stars of Claude Montana. “My passion for shoes came when a man named Gianni Barbato decided to make me sit elbow to elbow at his side for several years, no less than ten hours a day. With him I learned that ideas are never to be given up. “The idea was born three years ago from the desire to give form to an established and essential principle that always wandered through my mind: to create something beautiful; with a real function of use; not superfluous; able to be used transversally by all; without gender, role, season, symbols of belonging, age, or class. A product that is truly such, without artistic presumptions or fatuous stylistic games.

FASHION

“For me to think about something for a woman, man, child, tall person, short, dark or light is literally useless. It is ghettoizing; it pigeonholes a thought; it dictates a rule that slides along a fixed track. “I prefer to think solely about the thing, understand what parts must form it, identify what’s superfluous, and ensure that it works so that it is never too tight for the body that it contains, that it is built simply but never cunningly. “A chronic dreamer, I met Ms. Maria, who, even while wearing men’s laced shoes two sizes too big, has created women’s shoes that have gone around the world for thirty years, and Mr. Fiori, who in men’s footwear has undoubtedly been among the first to be able to be called ‘a stylist’. We are three generations confronting each other, three very different characters, three experiences that had to find a meeting point, an ongoing dialogue in search of solutions.

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“Therefore, this is how Wanna Maria Fiori was born. I never believed in brands with made-up or representative names. I do not believe in logos or symbols, perhaps because I don’t need them and they don’t represent me. Instead, I believe it is important to call things by their name and we come in three: Wanna, Maria, Fiori. “Unisex is just a term that helps us define the ‘need not’ that everyone has to take a place in a defined drawer: men and women and also more and more children have the same needs, may want the same things, and may have the same desires and needs. Man, woman, child, young, old…the daily effort is to give life to products that can be for all, to products that may keep their own idea of simplicity, that should not take sides, that are neither in nor out, that leave aside the concept of time as a trend…that’s why ageless, timeless…. “That said, I think it is unnecessary to seek to define the Wanna Maria Fiori man or woman. I do not think there is a woman or a man…. What I am really proud about is the trans-versatility that we can give to every single pair of shoes, which can be chosen freely to be put on the feet of anyone, regardless of whether he or she is beautiful, ugly, good, or—why not—even bad. “I never find inspirations for my collections and I don’t even try. I smile at those who stubbornly maintain that inspiration can be taken from everything. I prefer to live, breathe, and work.” Interview with Wanna Granatelli.

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wanna maria fiori

FASHION

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A journalist and writer

of short stories and novels, Italo Calvino (1923—1 985) sought to remove weight from his subjects and “lighten” language so that the meaning appears weightless. In the same way, Emiliano Laszlo, founder and designer of Studiopretzel, approaches fashion design. In his current collection, Emiliano Laszlo was inspired by Hana-Bi, a masterpiece by Takeshi Kitano, in which the concept of fireworks becomes a flower and, in turn, a weapon.

Hana-Bi

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studiopretzel

FASHION

You initially began your career in theater, cinema, and photography. So why fashion? Over time I have experienced different disciplines because they allowed me to express concepts in an ever new way. I thought about fashion as a new ground on which to experiment, try out, and express something very personal. How much do these fields influence your design aesthetic? The influences from other fields are mostly on the level of training, a scenic framework as it were. In creating I always start with something else, a place that is detached from fashion, so that I may cover a wider range of action. Let’s say that interdisciplinarity gives me the freedom that I need. Why the name Studiopretzel? The brand name is exactly what fashion is for me; that is, a game. The symbol of a pretzel reminds me of something happy, carefree, like a heart or the face of a child.

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Why does your clothing bear both labels: Made in Italy and Made in Tuscany? Very simply, both Made in Italy and Made in Tuscany may be two false definitions in the sense that we have hundreds of brands that label their garments with such definitions. In reality, however, it turns out that their supply chain is further than Italy or Tuscany. Clothes made in foreign countries, often taking advantage of cheap labor, apply the famous zipper on Italian soil and mystically receive the magic label of guarantee. Or worse yet, there are those who manufacture clothing in Italy but use foreign labor. In short, they are all very cunning. Is there a difference? My “Handmade in Tuscany” label is a statement of intentions. We are not only Made in Italy but also Made in Tuscany. We are not shrewd, we’re honest. The production process of our collections is always available on demand and the fabrics’ origin is on the tags, not only of the finished garment. 58

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studiopretzel

FASHION

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studiopretzel

FASHION

What particularly attracts you to Japan? Japan has always been part of my life, from childhood with manga and cartoons onto adulthood with its cuisine, theater, cinema, cultivated friendships, and martial arts. Therefore, the sources from which to draw are countless and constantly give me inspiration, even just hints, which I then incorporate into the collections, such as a color, a sensation that a fabric gives me, or a recurring theme. Can you elaborate on the imagery from HanaBi in your current collection? I chose specifically the concept of fireworks in the film because I wanted a part of the collection to ‘burst’, literally, with the use of cotton thread embroidery on denim, with a three-dimensional inside-out effect. I thought about live tactile clothes that could be caressed like denim, which is already alive as the base and changes according to its use. The colored threads that come out seem to breathe, reminding us of cherry flowers: they move with the wind. They live together with the person that wears them. Uomo Moderno Spring 2016

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etrusca

FASHION

Etrusca Collezione Tre “ Raised in Toronto , I am a proud citizen of both Italy and Canada. My family emigrated in search of opportunities. Due to the difficult times in Italy during the depression, my grandparents were not afforded an education beyond a few years of grade school. Working hard and saving, they were able to offer their children much more. While I was growing up, they placed significant emphasis on higher education and becoming a professional. Nonna Rosa would frequently remind me: ‘Always catch the pig from the head and not the tail.’ “With this encouragement, after university it was an easy choice to start a career in finance. However, it wasn’t long before I realized two things: when shopping for dress shirts to wear to the office, it was difficult to find a brand that allowed me to express my personal style while meeting the high expectations of quality and craftsmanship that ‘Made in Italy’ has to offer. I also realized that I’m strongly affected by a drive for creativity, especially related to fashion. “As a finance professional, I didn’t really have an outlet to satisfy this affection. I created Etrusca Made in Italy as an exclusive brand to satisfy this and also offer others the opportunity to wear garments that embrace my roots of Italian craftsmanship and style. These significant notions are truly important to me and I want to be able to share them. Uomo Moderno Spring 2016

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“Many people have heard the Italian phrase bella figura. My favorite photo of nonna Rosa is from when she was 19 and dressed in her finest. She didn’t have much at the time, but what she had was exquisite and she always presented herself in her best. She would frequently tell me that you don’t need to have a lot, but what you do have should always be the best possible quality that you can afford. “From their purple robes later worn by Roman Emperors to sophisticated art and unsurpassed jewelry, the Etruscans laid the foundation for the quality and style that are synonymous with ‘Made in Italy’ today. With pride we write Etrusca, which to us symbolizes a flamboyant culture: one that is centered on affluent banquets attended by the gentry to show off colorful attire and ornate embellishments. “When you start to see ‘foreign-run sweatshops’ situated in Italy, it becomes evident that ‘Made in Italy’ is almost a brand within itself. I personally feel it’s a shame what is going on in places like Prato. That no longer embodies the true nature of what ‘Made in Italy’ stands for. However, when visiting our manufacturer, I’m always refreshed to see Italian workers who take such pride in what they do. They have the space, time, and skills to produce garments that are nothing short of exquisite. For many of them it’s a special craft that has been passed down for several generations. “Consumers should always be cautious if something seems too good to be true. There’s no way of getting around it. When you don’t cut corners, it’s going to cost more. A proper manufacturing facility that is safe, well spaced, and whose workers are encouraged to take their time to focus on quality is not going to churn out shirts at the rate of a ‘sweatshop’.

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etrusca

FASHION

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etrusca

FASHION

“There are many factors that go into producing high quality fabrics for shirting, from the cotton selected and how tight the yarn is spun to the type of weave and number of knots per centimeter. All these factors will determine how a shirt looks, feels, moves, and wears over time. Without experience, it can be difficult at times to tell the quality of the fabric. How it feels and looks is a good starting point. From there you would have to trust the brand and retailer or really take a closer look; however, I can’t imagine anyone taking a magnify glass and ruler to determine the thread count while shopping. “The yoke is the panel of a shirt that spans the back of your shoulders. It is two layers of fabric to improve wear and structure. In higher end shirts it is often split in the center, allowing for the fabrics to be cut on the biest (horizontally). Cutting the fabrics on the biest allows the garment to take advantage of the natural stretch of the fabric. We produce our shirts with a split yoke so that they lay smoother across the back of the shoulders. This construction provides a little extra comfort when working at a desk or simply moving your arms forward. “Collezione Tre is focused on prints, patterns, texture, and sometimes a couple mixes to provide you with a unique way to express your personal style while still remaining professional. It is always important to feel comfortable in what you are wearing. A shirt that fits you well should drape over your body in a way that is not restrictive. “Etrusca shirts are cut to be comfortable but stay close to the shape of an average man. Eliminating extra fabric will accentuate your physique in the best possible way, allowing you to look and feel your very best.” Interview with John Bartello, founder of Etrusca. Uomo Moderno Spring 2016

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The Pub Generation

Cily Hairstylist

More and more young people

in Italy love gathering in cozy bars where they can drink a good beer with friends. This pub generation is carefree, simple, able to enjoy the little things of life, and curious about surrounding events. So allow me to show you how you can be alternative and, at the same, time suitable for this generation’s style.

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the pub generation

Cily Hairstylist

Red like Francesco Francesco has a mysterious charm; his dark side is accentuated by buzzed sides, which gradually taper into a longer top that is combed up high but slightly disheveled. Hints of reddish hues are carefully mixed with his natural brown hair color to highlight his alternative appearance but without becoming gaudy so as to contaminate his darker side.

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Gold like Elena Elena’s look offers a unique fusion of Californian highlights and shadows which give a solar aspect to the model. Color is reflected with a special herbal dye called “mother of pearl.” The hair is layered in a “country chic” style with rough and romantic waves that frame her face, as well as an untidy braid that shows off her highlights. It’s an everyday look that is simple and pleasing to the eye. 70

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the pub generation

Cily Hairstylist

Green like Giovanni Giovanni sports a comfortable double-edged cut with a high disheveled wave. Variations of blue and green blend into aqua green, thanks to a special technique. The tapering on the sides is pronounced and the cut is clean, although it reflects a very underground style. His beard is trimmed as it frames his face and softens the angles. By Francesco Cilidonio, Cily Hairstylist. Uomo Moderno Spring 2016

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Morena Beer The art of manufacturing fermented beverages is rooted in the DNA of the Tarricone Family. As far back as the early 1900s, Giuseppe Tarricone had already owned several vineyards that produced excellent wine, which was sold throughout Basilicata on horse drawn wagons. In 1999 the Tarricone family took over an establishment that had been built in the ‘80s upon the orders of an Austrian Prince and because of a series of acquisitions— including the Prinz Bräu Group, Birra Moretti Group, Labatt Group, Interbrau, and Heineken—the entire know-how has been safely guarded. Birra Morena is a product of Drive Beer, which is situated in the industrial area of Baragiano, Balvano (Potenza, Basilicata).

Did You

Know?

“In Italy light beers have never been particularly liked; whereas in the USA, they have been consumed abundantly since the ‘70s; as for other parts of the world, such as China and Japan, Coors Light has enjoyed success.” Tonino Figorilli, Brand Sales at Birra Morena. 72

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the pub generation

Cily Hairstylist

How to Pair Beer with Food The rules of pairing beer with food differ from those of wine and food since beer is paired with food according to their similarities, whereas wines are paired to food according to their opposites. There exists a notable difference between the two types of pairing, because beer contains three different types of fermentation: low, high, and spontaneous—a missing factor in the case of wine. The 4 four fundamental rules for the correct pairing of beers with food include: • Fermentation • Percentage of alcohol • Color • Bitterness Tonino Figorilli, Brand Sales at Birra Morena.

Did You

Know?

“Corona Extra arrived to Italy through Genoa towards the end of the ‘80s and, perhaps, is the most appreciated light beer in our nation.” Tonino Figorilli, Brand Sales at Birra Morena.

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Pecorino Toscano PDO Don’t Be Fooled

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pecorino toscano pdo

What exactly is Pecorino Toscano and how is it produced? There is only one ingredient: sheep’s milk from Tuscany. The milk, which is produced exclusively from recognized and certified herds, arrives at dairies where it is once again analyzed. Only sheep milk of quality is used to produce Pecorino Toscano PDO, according to the recipe that is written in the product regulations. Rennet is added to the milk and, after reaching the desired consistency, we proceed to break the curd until it is reduced to the size of a grain of corn to produce seasoned (or nutty) Pecorino Toscano or fresh Pecorino Toscano—hence, softer. The curds are poured into molds where it takes on the characteristic shape. The cheese is then kept in a hot and humid environment until it is ready for salting, normally after 24 hours. After a day spent in salt, the Pecorino Toscano begins aging, which is a minimum of 20 days for fresh and at least 4 months for aged. At the end of its aging process, the cheeses are checked by hand, one by one, and only the eligible ones are branded and sold as Pecorino Toscano PDO. What does PDO stand for? PDO (‘protected designation of origin’) is the European Union’s trademark of protection that is reserved for those productions of a delicate balance between natural factors (climate and environment) and human ones (mode of production and craftsmanship) which allows

Cuisine

for a unique nonreplicable product outside the area of origin. Only the cheese that is produced, seasoned, packaged, and distributed according to the regulatory norms of production is Pecorino Toscano PDO. How can the consumer recognize a good pecorino? A Pecorino Toscano that is marked PDO is always a quality product. During its aging process, in fact, the wheels that have any sort of defects or deformities other than indicated in the production regulations are discarded and cannot bear the PDO mark or the name of Pecorino Toscano. Is there an ideal age? Fresh Pecorino Toscano is a soft cheese that still smells of milk and is very suitable for a young audience that seeks a delicate flavor. Aged Pecorino Toscano is very suitable for an older audience that enjoys the aromas, which develop with the aging of the product from 4 months onwards and make our cheese something on which to reflect, suitable to be accompanied by aged red wines. How do you pair wines with pecorino? It depends on the degree of aging: dry white wines go with fresh Pecorino Toscano, vintage red wines with 4-month aged Pecorino Toscano, reserve red wines with 8-month aged ones. Pecorino aged more than a year is best accompanied by wines produced in small barrels.

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What foods can pecorino accompany? In Italy, fresh Pecorino Toscano is predominantly served sliced, while the aged ones can be eaten either in slices or shavings. Many traditional dishes, especially pasta, can be enjoyed with grated cheese. Pecorino Toscano has a harmonious taste, strong but never spicy, with very little salt and normally good amounts of Omega 3, so it is a product that can be consumed often. Traditionally in Tuscany, a slice of Pecorino Toscano concludes the meal, leaving a pleasant taste in the mouth. Which is better, cooked or raw? To fully appreciate its characteristics, it is best consumed raw. If it is cooked, it should never be at high temperatures. How should pecorino be stored? A cellar in a modern home would be the ideal place to keep Pecorino Toscano. Nowadays, we recommend that you keep it at the bottom of the refrigerator and remove it at least 30 minutes before eating, to enjoy it at room temperature. What is the difference between pecorino and parmesan? There are many differences. First, Parmigiano Reggiano is produced with cow’s milk (half whole and half skimmed) and is then processed at much higher temperatures than 76

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Pecorino Toscano. The forms are much larger, about 3035 kg, and for this reason it takes much longer to age. Pecorino Toscano is made from whole sheep’s milk, processed at about 36°C (the same temperature within the sheep udder), and produced in forms of about 2-2.5 kg, allowing for much shorter aging times. Can pecorino and parmesan be mixed? They go very well together and, in many dishes or preparations like Genoa pesto, they mix naturally. What is your Consortium’s role in all this? Product control and compliance with the law are the best guarantee for us, but moreover for consumers. Our Consortium, for some years, has registered the name “Pecorino Toscano” not only in Europe but also in the US and Canada. This means that, if a cheese is labeled “Pecorino Toscano,” then it is PDO. Cheese that states, for example, “Pecorino Cheese Toscana” or other is not Pecorino Toscano PDO and, therefore, does not have the same quality and characteristics. Our work should be focused on information and awareness of consumers, who have the right to know what they eat. The transparency of information on the label is the best guarantee that a product is Made in Italy or Made in Tuscany. Interview with the Pecorino Toscano PDO Consortium by Federica Fatale.


pecorino toscano pdo

Cuisine

Potato Gnocchi with Grated Pecorino Toscano Serves 4 Ingredients for the Gnocchi 400g (14oz) white potatoes 130g (4.5oz) whole-wheat flour 70g (2.5oz) butter 2 egg yokes Ingredients for the Sauce 150g (5oz) fresh Pecorino Toscano 150g (5oz) aged Pecorino Toscano 200g (7oz) tomatoes 100g (3.5oz) extra-virgin olive oil 100g (3.5oz) mascarpone 1 glass warm water Preparing the Gnocchi Wash, boil, and peel the potatoes while they are still warm and pass them through a sieve. Mix in the flour with the egg yolks, knead the dough, and let it sit for 10 minutes. Stretch out the dough to form strips 1cm (1/2 inch) high and cut them lengthwise every 3cm (1 inch). Press the gnocchi with the thumb on the tip of a fork. Bring a potful of water to boil and then throw in the gnocchi. The gnocchi are ready when they come up to the surface.

Did You

Know?

The word pecora in Italian means ‘sheep’—hence the name pecorino; that is, cheese made from sheep’s milk.

Preparing the Sauce Cut the tomatoes cross-wise on the bottom, then boil them for 2 minutes, peel, and slice them. Stir fry the tomatoes on a light flame until they start crumbling apart. Add the fresh diced Pecorino Toscano and water until you have a creamy mixture, then pour the cooked gnocchi on the cream and add the mascarpone. Mix the gnocchi and cream, add the aged Pecorino Toscano cut into thin slices, a few knobs of butter and bake in an oven at 200°C (390°F) until a thin crust forms. Serve warm. Uomo Moderno Spring 2016

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Minotti Kitchens

Simple. Beautiful. Forever.

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minotti kitchens

Let’s start with how and when Minotti Kitchens was founded? As it often happened in postwar Italy, enlightened parents scoured the streets of production: my father, Adriano Minotti, distinguished himself in producing kitchen furniture with a contemporary flair. At the age of 21 in 1949, dad first started producing wooden furniture; then toward the end of the ‘60s, he specialized in modern kitchens. How did you become involved in the company? As is often the case, children breathe the same air of a company from the time of birth and become involved in the company without realizing it. They experience the company by accompanying their parents and living with them. My father loved his family in the same way he loved his company.

DÉCOR

So now you are continuing the legacy of your father…. Exactly! Today I head the artistic direction of Minotti Kitchens, which has been part of the Asso Group since 2014. I hold the same role for the Maistri brand, also kitchens, which was acquired by Asso in 2012. Was it difficult to follow in your father’s footsteps? I would say that dad was an entrepreneur focused on production. To the contrary, I am more market oriented. I first implemented kitchens that were inspired by trends of the time and later looked for a design identity. My father was not the controlling type but rather open-minded to new things.

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What words of wisdom did your father leave you? One advice that my dad gave me was “smaller is better.” What he meant was that good wine can be found in small packages.

to create essential, pure environments as I am guided by rigorous geometric shapes, utilizing natural materials: wood, stone, plaster, oxidized brass, and glass—simple lines and simple materials, but eternal.

Have you implemented many changes over the years? After earning money from the business in the late ‘90s, I found the courage to change the business model, moving from the contemporary and modern kitchen to a timeless style. I believe that the spirit of abstraction enables us to carry out projects and products that go beyond fashion: a faucet that you cannot see cannot get old, because it’s not there. This phrase may seem obvious and trivial, but it contains a profound truth.

Can these principles be applied to kitchen environments? I believe that kitchen design or any other type is immaterial, since the founding principles that guide me are the same: reduction. Exaltation of empty space, not as an absence but as a space in which the true color of the house/kitchen is the human being; that is, the family, the people—they are the true color of the house.

You are known as the father of “Mediterranean Minimalism” and “Essentialism”…. I don’t like the word minimalism; I prefer that we speak of purism. In any case, the spirit that animates me is the one that takes away, one that subtracts. I hold others as the true fathers of Mediterranean Minimalism, not me. I just try 80

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How would you define your personal style? Pure geometric lines. Materials from nature. Exaltation of the void. The spirit of subtraction. Ceating surprise, excitement, and awe with the ambition of a timeless project or product. Name three adjectives that describe your kitchens. Simple. Beautiful. Forever.


minotti kitchens

What is the most important aspect of a minimalist kitchen design? The surprise effect! Can you describe the creative process of your kitchens? It happens by scouring unexplored streets. It happens by looking at all the great artists of the past in painting, sculpture, philosophy, mathematics, geometry. Looking to the ancients‌. Thinking that, if you really want to make a timeless object or product, you should make it in the same way our grandparents or great-grandparents would have made it, or even further back. A successful object, kitchen, home, building should be abstracted from temporality! Perfection is the most important virtue to pursue. Design excellence is my virtue. Why so much use of stone in your kitchens? Stone, plaster, wood, glass, and metal have always been used to create buildings. Stone can be used for horizontal surfaces, floors, and volumetric elements, supporting surfaces, and also vertical surfaces or walls. I was lucky

DÉCOR

enough to be born in the Italian stone valley: Verona. In my town, there is a Romanesque church that is more than a thousand years old: San Giorgio Ingannapoltron. This church forms the foundation to the spirit of subtraction and, at the same time, exalts the majesty of stone. Look at the church tower. So stone will never go out of style because it has existed in homes for thousands of years. Stone has millions of years of life. Mountains contain rivers, trees, animals, and human beings: the rock, the stone contains life. What trends do you foresee in kitchen design? There will be more areas of taste, diverse possibilities of purchase. Minotti Kitchens is exploring the possibility of making the entire kitchen disappear completely, but to have it when you need it! Maistri is building almost perfect products and kitchens, using stone, wood, metal, and plaster. Maistri, a beautiful kitchen forever. Without time, timeless, but also accessible. Interview with the founder’s son, Alberto Minotti, by Federica Fatale. Uomo Moderno Spring 2016

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anthony peth

Made in Italy

What was your first reaction when you were chosen? Initially I thought it was a publicity campaign, and then I realized that it was a proposal of great importance and responsibility.

Anthony Peth Ambassador of Made in Italy

The Made in Italy project is one of internationalization that offers a message of hope to medium- and largesize companies, aiming to enhance and promote Italian products through culinary arts, creating marketing networks around the world for products from Italy’s regions, and soliciting funds from the European Union and Italian companies. The ambassador of this project is Anthony Peth, so far the youngest to have received this charge.

With the excellence of Made in Italy, how is it that our country faces a crisis? The crisis has now become the main reason we are in a state of absolute inner negativity, and we blame the crisis for every single problem that we face. Surely we find ourselves in this state for many reasons, such as poor governance and too many taxes, which in other countries are not as high as ours. But it is also true that many problems can be solved; I think we should complain less and roll up our sleeves; otherwise, we will find ourselves drifting very soon. Italy is one of the most popular countries in the world. We must resist and return to what everyone once called “beautiful Italy.” What are your thoughts on the many individuals trying to become chefs on TV? Nowadays, TV abounds in cooking shows and the numbers of viewers speak for themselves: the public likes this type of format. But I think it’s also fair, like in every other sector, to require proper experience. In my point of view, those who are not prepared, especially on TV, are a merely passersby. What do you think about the invasion of chain stores in Italy? Boutiques are synonymous with tradition. Supermarkets represent innovation. The choice goes to the consumer, as it has always been. I personally prefer tradition; the quality is excellent and less industrialized. Is there a specific type of beer that you enjoy? Personally I prefer craft beer; I’m not a big beer consumer. I have a preference for wine, but if I had to recommend a beer to a tourist, as a good Sardinian I would suggest Ichnusa, an excellent product of quality. How do you manage your personality as a TV presenter? I’m a somewhat atypical presenter; my particularity lies in my origins, in my accent, which I use with great spontaneity— and the public likes it. Each one of us is a unique personality, Uomo Moderno Spring 2016

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and I use my spontaneity without forcing it so that the public can recognize it. When I find myself organizing broadcasts, I trust the editorial team, which is made up of professionals with whom I have collaborated for years. Definitely teamwork is the best formula to bring home good results. Time for some gossip‌. How did you feel stripping for the Made in Italy calendar? Oh good question! The calendar was not an easy experience for me to handle; but like any colleague who has done it, perhaps the time had come at the age of thirty to do so. Honestly I must admit that being naked in front of all Italy was not easy at all. Receiving messages from friends and people in every region who respect me artistically and reading sarcastic comments made me smile. At the same time I think that, when the end justifies the means, every artist should feel honored to participate in a project related to real healthy solidarity that is good for the heart; and if something fills us all with joy, then why not do it. The embarrassment was so much that no one saw me completely naked; there are tricks of the trade that reveal little in the finished product. But it was a glamorous project and not vulgar, one in which I offered my physical body as a TV personality. In reality the true stars were the excellences of Made in Italy: the fashions, the food, and the designers. Throughout your travels, has there been a country that you liked most? I have visited about eight countries. The one country that I liked the most was Brazil, a rich culture of traditions, fun, beautiful music, and a lot of nice people. When you look in the mirror, do you see the person that you want to be? I see it, I see it! I want to grow older, but with the same principles and morals that I have today: an artist who is dedicated to people in need, and not just to the general public. I’d like to do increasingly more. Interview by Francesco Cilidonio.

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anthony peth

Made in Italy

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Andrea Bosca

The Blue-Eyed Baby

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Cinema

We are in a dream world, in a library, in the company Had I been in love, I could not have been more of Andrea Bosca—one of the best-known Italian wretchedly blind! But vanity, not love, has been my actors. He looks a bit lost, dreaming, but serene. We folly. are surrounded by 10 books placed on crystal tables. Pride and Prejudice Each book contains a question, a past, a future, a soul. Through them, we will come to know the depths of “I love life completely, but to favor career alone would be like Andrea, the one with the heart of a blue-eyed baby. using only one leg to walk. After a while you find yourself All grownups were once children, but only few of them remember it. The Little Prince “We are all children a few layers below the surface and not only inside but also outside: in our enthusiasms, in our most exposed fragilities. Life experiences mark us and close us up. It’s our job to remain open and listen like children, a kind of daily gardening. I have changed so many times and each time I have had to figure out what makes me stay open. This allows me to be vulnerable and impressionable, because creativity starts with the child. Games. Transformation. In my world, the teacher and child resemble one another—very much.” To be, or not to be, that is the question— Hamlet “I believe that each of us is given an identity. But the paradox of an actor is that he or she must be credible in so many different identities. I think popularity changes you, just as goals change you. But this is human. Once you arrive at one point, you are already thinking of the next. Over the years I have realized what counts a lot is ‘how you perceive yourself’. If you see yourself as a person who is searching and wants to bring something true and precious to more people, then popularity is something useful. I think anyone who has to deal with popularity and has not moved away from people can be full of life to share, to give.”

still, tired, and you do not know how to restart. I do a job that requires everything of you: body, heart, and mind. So it is important to have a home, something to build for ‘us’, someone to love and construct the present and future. No one has ever asked me to maim myself, to leave my job. It does not work with me. Whoever loves me knows well that I’m a whole man and that my love and attention are strong both in private life and at work.” It is the things we love most that destroy us. Mockingjay “I’ve had to face my insecurities and happened to deal with disappointments. I realized that you cannot erase them, not even avoid them. I think what counts more is always to get up quicker, be able to refocus more, and be freer to return to the ring. Anyway, yes! It’s the things we love most that destroy us. But this should not make us stop loving, bringing people near our hearts, taking risks again and again for something beautiful.” The people who cross your path always hide a piece of your soul and of your story. Purgatory by F. Gungui “I love them all. They are all part of me. This is the sign that, when I was there, I was giving it my best at the moment. There are characters that I have loved but have not had the success that was imagined. Others have had a contrary fate. When I live the life of a character, I do not give grades, I Uomo Moderno Spring 2016

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do not judge. For me, good or bad, they are ways in which they are defined from outside. From inside, everyone has a life of facts and needs that push them to derive something humanly precious and indispensable. They are pieces of the soul and history that I have lived. In all there is a piece of me. I would like to disappear. But when I do, something that belongs to me always appears. It is truly an amazing job. I do not know what I would do if it were not there.”

of the Bosca Bakery. He was swarthy like Eminem and came from L.A. He said he was searching for his Italian family. In fact he was a distant cousin. I brought Toby to see the Underground Cathedrals of Canelli, now protected by UNESCO, and he literally went crazy for our wines and their history. Italy and my Piedmont have this great beauty. I saw with my own eyes what happens to the Americans who encounter it.”

There is nothing in the world so irresistibly contagious as laughter and good humor. A Christmas Carol

People usually take refuge in the future to escape their suffering. Draw an imaginary line on the trajectory of time, beyond which its suffering of today ceases to exist. The Unbearable Lightness of Being

“Honestly I feel I’m a simple person, born and happily raised in a beautiful Italian province, someone who knows how to get along with everyone. I would have liked to learn more about some colleagues, but we all work intensely on our characters. We were acquainted on the scene. Through and through. And that was fine. It all depends on the set, the directors, the stories. Lately I have laughed much more and have also shared it on social media.” The food of the gods, bubbling and frothing in ceremonial goblets. The bitter elixir of life. Chocolat “I love my father’s hazelnut cake because it reminds me of the hills back home (it’s made of Tonda Gentile hazelnuts from Le Langhe) and of my city Canelli (in fact it’s called ‘Pan Canej’ in dialect). It is a simple desert that I gave to many friends and also impressed my girlfriend. I had her taste the cake with a bottle of Moscato made by a farmer friend. In a sip and a bite I presented my land, my people, and my soul.” For the drunken man, the affairs of this world seem twigs carried by the current. Diary of a Drunkard “Twenty years ago, a young American knocked on the door 88

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“I have always tried to get out of this present impatience by imagining and planning the future. But then my plans do not always work out. I’m learning to live more and more in the present. To grab hold of wonderful things and stay open. I worked recently at a theater with a great actor who pushed me constantly to trust myself more and discover things in the present. It is a great lesson professionally and personally. I can say that Unbearable Lightness is a wonderful book, one of my all-time favorites.” The happiest man on earth would be able to use the Mirror of Erised like a normal mirror; that is, he would look into it and see himself exactly as he is. Harry Potter and the Sorcerer’s Stone “I told you that I am a seeker and journeyer. There is still much to explore, to live. I’m just at the beginning of a new life. I have many images inside. And outside, there are still millions of people to meet.” Thanks for your replies! Now, Andrea, you can wake up from the dream! Interview by Francesco Cilidonio.


andrea bosca

Cinema

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Venice and Its Carnival Venezia—the City of Water, also known as the City of Canals, the City of Bridges, and the City of Masks—is situated across 118 islands, which are separated by canals and connected by bridges. The original inhabitants were most likely refuges that fled from invading tribes of the North during the Roman era. By the 9th century, Venice had emerged as a city state whose strategic position led to naval and commercial dominance, first, of the Adriatic and, then, of the Mediterranean. At the height of the city’s power and wealth, noble families competed with one another in the construction of ornate palaces, which rest on wooden pilings.

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Travel

View of the Grand Canal from the Centurion Palace Hotel. Special thanks to the general manager, Paolo Morra, for his generosity and kind hospitality.

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View from the Centurion Palace Hotel of the charming terrace at Antinoo’s Restaurant.

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Despite plagues, wars, and the age of exploration, all of which contributed to the decline of the Queen of the Adriatic, Venice never lost its charm but rather has been the birthplace of numerous innovations and famous individuals like Marco Polo and Vivaldi. The Venetians have coined several popular words over the centuries, such as ciao (from ‘slave’ and ‘slav’), quarantine (’40’ day period to keep offshore the ships from plagued countries), gondola, and regatta. Instituted in 1516, the ghetto was the defined area in which Venetian Jews were restricted to live. Finally, the Prince of Venice is Emanuele Filiberto di Savoia and, in his honor, Uomo Moderno magazine threw a regal Venetian Carnival Ball in New York!

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Ornella Fado in the presidential suite of the Centurion Palace Hotel, filming a special edition of Brindiamo! from Venezia and dressed in a beautiful carnival costume as Lucrezia.

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Travel

Carnevale di Venezia The Carnival of Venice—a

citywide masquerade—typically attracts millions of visitors each year, with the Piazza of San Marco as the epicenter of festivities. According to tradition, the Carnival of Venice dates back to the 1162AD as a celebration of a military victory. The word carnival derives from the Latin carnem vale— ‘farewell to meat’—and is associated with pre-Lentan festivals like Mardi Gras (Fat Tuesday), which indulges the appetites prior to Lent’s 40 days of abstinence from meat and rich foods. Today, the Carnival of Venice kicks off about two weeks before Ash Wednesday and culminates on Fat Tuesday (Mardi Gras), which falls on the day before Ash Wednesday. A rigid caste system in an overcrowded city of vice led to the practice of wearing masks, which were necessary for anonymity—that is, until the promulgation of restrictive laws that forbid masks, except for during the Carnival.

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A Royal Evening with the Crown Prince & Carnival Ball

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Events

On Friday, January 22, Uomo Moderno magazine and Brindiamo! TV show hosted a Royal Evening with Italy’s Crown Prince & Carnival Ball, starting with a VIP/Press Hour & Cocktail Reception for 100 dignitaries, members of nobility, and journalists—all courtesy of the Hudson Terrace Rooftop. The live quartet Madkoi played throughout the Masquerade Ball; while the people’s tenor, Michael Amante, performed several songs for the Crown Prince. Francesco donned the attire of Louis XVI, while Ornella Fado dressed as Marie Antoinette—costumes were furnished by New York Costumes. Emanuele Filiberto di Savoia and Michael Amante were hosted in New York by the Iroquois Hotel, part of Triumph Hotels. Uomo Moderno Spring 2016

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Special Thanks to our Vendors: L´Arte del Gelato La Masseria Illycaffè Urbani Truffles

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Many Thanks for the Raffle & Costume Competition Prizes Zagara Restaurant, NYC Rafele Ristorante, NYC Angelina’s, Staten Island Trattoria L’Incontro, Queens Marcello’s Restaurant (Marcello Russodivito) Perepaix Jewelry Urbani Truffles Illycaffè Centurion Palace, Venice Iroquois Hotel, NYC La Masseria, NYC Uomo Moderno Spring 2016

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Uomo Moderno Spring 2016  

Welcome to the Spring & Royal Edition of Uomo Moderno magazine, with a special tribute to the publisher's late partner, William A. McClurg,...

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