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A FESTIVAL FOR THE REST OF Y’ALL Summer gatherings abound in Great Lakes Bay region

making

LPGA EVENT PUTS REGION AT THE ‘FORE’-FRONT OF GOLF Dow Invitational puts focus on community

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Tall Ship Celebration returns to Saginaw Bay

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June 2019 $3.95


Lifestyle

FINE HOMES UNLIKE ANY IN THE REGION. Quality, services and convenience are all rolled into one beautiful space at THE H Residence. Gorgeous upscale finishes. Spacious floor plans. Stunning balcony views overlooking Midland’s vibrant downtown. Enjoy an abundance of amenities at your fingertips, from room service to spa treatments.

Contact THE H Residence Sales Center to learn more about our move-in ready models, or creating your own unique space.

Denise Fladeboe

Jan Hauck

Tina Patnode

Matt Rapanos

117 E. MAIN • MIDLAND, MI • 989.837.2300 HRESIDENCE.COM


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BUILDING THE BEST WITH YOU IN MIND. McLaren is proud to be building the best for you in Midland. Coming soon we will offer a new freestanding location so we can continue to offer comprehensive care.

COMING SOON TO JOE MANN BOULEVARD: Cardiology • Imaging • Laboratory • Neurosurgery • Occupational Health & Convenient Care • Orthopedics & Spine • Physical Therapy • Primary Care • Vascular


06/19 contents 26

32

making waves

LPGA event puts region at the ‘fore’front of golf

Tall Ship Celebration returns to Saginaw Bay

Dow Invitational puts focus on community, youth

06.19 | great lakes bay | 3


live

contents

10

STYLE

Wedding Season is Here The joys of finding your perfect dress

NATURE

12

Cattail Community Wetland plants play a critical ecological role

FAMILY MATTERS

14

Words of Wisdom Pulling from your playbook to provide life lessons

UP NEXT

16

June Fun A rundown of the upcoming events, activities and happenings in the Great Lakes Bay region

work

10

20

TRENDING

22

LOVE MY JOB

24

PROFILE

A Festival for the Rest of Y’all Summer gatherings abound in Great Lakes Bay region Cuckoo for German clocks Defining Michaela Davert

play

40 22

40

TASTE

42

WHAT’S COOKING

44

BEST SEAT IN THE HOUSE

46

SEEN HERE

A Fresh Take on Fresh Eats Sushi Remix’s customizable poke bowls are something for everyone Mezzaluna a Costine Corte Gratzi Midland Chef Ismael Herrerea

Discover Your Region Heat up date night with these June offerings

DEPARTMENTS

6 PUBLISHER’S NOTE 48

WRAP UP

Great Lakes Bay magazine, Volume 16, Issue 6, June 2019 (ISSN 1550-8064) is published monthly by The F.P. Horak Company, 1311 Straits Dr, Bay City MI 48706. Periodicals postage pending at Bay City MI. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to Great Lakes Bay Magazine, P.O. Box 925, Bay City MI 48707. Copyright © 2019 The F.P. Horak Company. All rights reserved. Reproduction in whole or part without permission is prohibited.

4 | great lakes bay | 06.19


GLBRA Message

Summertime STEM in the Great Lakes Bay Region

A

re you ready to have some fun? Summer camps are designed to teach science, technology, engineering and math to students in an exciting and engaging way. Students are able to explore in-demand careers, learn new skills, get outside of their comfort zone and build self-confidence. Here in the Great Lakes Bay region there are endless opportunities to have productive experiences outside of the normal school environment. So put Netflix on hold because it is time to make plans for students to spend their summer in a constructive way. Explore the following opportunities from our regional partners and pursue more options by visiting @greatlakesbayparents on Facebook or stempipeline.com. If your child is in early elementary school, don’t forget to take advantage of the great coupons in the STEM Passports that were distributed in the region during the school year.

Lori Flippin STEM Initiative Leader Great Lakes Bay Regional Alliance

The Central Michigan University Center for Excellence in STEM Education is excited to offer 19 STEM camps for K-9 students during summer 2019. One new highlight this year is esports gaming. The center is also supporting five professional learning opportunities for teachers with the ability to enroll children in camp simultaneously. Check it out at cmich.edu/stemed/.

The Saginaw Children’s Zoo is dedicated to enriching the lives of children through STEM initiatives. On every trip to the zoo you will get a hands-on learning experience like nowhere else in the region. This year families can look forward to keeper chats on their visit, along with several animal inspired education events throughout the season! Find more at saginawzoo.com/visit/.

The Bay County Library System offers a variety of free STEM programs for kids in preschool through upper elementary grades. Library programs are fun, educational and cover a wide range of topics, including making slime, building with Lego bricks, gaming in “Minecraft,” animating with stopmotion, 3D printing keychains and coding. STEM@SVSU has incredible summer opportunities for K-12 students and teachers. Educators can participate in water quality research or grow through professional development aimed at changing student STEM attitudes; students can participate in technology, health, and elementary camps as well as a water quality research internship. For more information, visit svsu.edu/stem.

This summer, the Midland Center for the Arts will offer a variety of summer camp sessions that help campers build confidence and discover unique talents. Summer camp programs are offered in the areas of STEM, visual art, theater, music and history. For more information, visit mcfta.org/education/ youth-family/summer/ .

Your next business success is waiting by the Bay. greatlakesbay.org


publisher’s note

let’s get ready for summer

Y

ou know summer has truly arrived when we see the tall ships anchor in Saginaw Bay. We roll out the welcome mat during Bay City’s Tall Ship Celebration not only for the ships but also for the thousands of residents and visitors who help us celebrate the arrival of the vessels. (Page 26) It’s no wonder Bay City has been named “Port of the Year” four times – more than any other of the 11 port cities the ships visit. The Great Lakes Bay region will also welcome some of the best women golfers in the world when Midland Country Club hosts the inaugural LPGA Dow Great Lakes Bay Invitational (Page 32). The tournament is unique in that it is the first team event that counts as official points for the golfers. While we are all enjoying the warmth and sunshine that the season brings to the region, parents need to keep their children involved in activities that are also educational. The summer slide, in which children stop focusing on what they’ve learned in school, is very real. You’ll find some helpful suggestions on how to keep them focused on learning in fun ways. (Page 13) Also, in this issue, we offer a glimpse into a restaurant that takes a fresh look at sushi by offering poke bowls. These are delicious bowls of deconstructed sushi rolls offered in both Saginaw and Bay City by Sushi Remix. (Page 40) Readers will be mesmerized by the story of Michaela Davert, a popular blogger with a following of nearly 40,000 people. She talks about how she did not let a physical disability get in the way of her success. (Page 26) I hope you enjoy reading about the wonderful summer opportunities we have in our Great Lakes Bay region. But don’t forget the sunscreen! Have fun in the sun,

Publisher: Marisa Horak Belotti marisa@greatlakesbaymag.com Editor: Kelly Mazurkiewicz kmazurkiewicz@ greatlakesbaymag.com Associate Editor: Mary Gajda mgajda@greatlakesbaymag.com Art Director: Chad Hussle chad@greatlakesbaymag.com Photographer: Doug Julian doug@greatlakesbaymag.com Contributors: Richard Adams Alician Finch Mary Gajda Jessica Klein-Hill Jeanne Henderson Chef Ismael Herrera Adam Lansdell Christopher Nagy Rachel Trumble Advertising Sales Representative: Paul Oslund paul@greatlakesbaymag.com (989) 891-1783 Cover: Tall Ships photo by Doug Julian

Marisa Horak Belotti Publisher

we want to hear from you! Letters must be signed and include the writer’s name and address. Please send to: Great Lakes Bay Magazine, 1311 Straits Dr., Bay City MI 48706, or email info@greatlakesbaymag.com.

6 | great lakes bay | 06.19

1311 Straits Dr. Bay City MI 48706 Phone (989) 893-2083 info@greatlakesbaymag.com Subscription Inquiries Call (989) 893-2083


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Member SIPC


COMMITTED TO COMMUNITY At Dow we are committed to the success of our communities. When we invest in the places that we live and work, we invest in our future. Whether we support events and organizations or roll up our sleeves and volunteer, we work to bring together our employees, friends and neighbors to build a better community in the Great Lakes Bay Region. www.dow.com

®™The DOW Diamond Logo is a trademark of The Dow Chemical Company © 2019

Donna M. Hammond, PPCNP-BC | Jamie A. Simon, PA-C Oksana K. Lidke, CPNP-PC | Laurisa Cummings, LMSW Randi Price, LMSW

Office Hours Monday-Friday Saturday

• 8am-5pm 9:30-Done (sick visits only)

Same-day sick check appointments. Accepting new patients. Prenatal visits welcome. 248 Washington Ave, Suite A • Bay City • 989-892-5664

• • •

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live STYLE P. 10

NATURE P. 12

FAMILY MATTERS P. 14

• UP NEXT

P. 16

TROPICAL TREATS ON TAP Since opening in this year, Tiki Pineapple has become a favorite stop for those looking for a sweet treat. Serving up Dole soft-serve ice cream with ingredients and toppings coming from the Dole Plantation in Hawaii, plenty of guests have said “aloha” to the Midland business.

06.19 | great lakes bay | 9


live / STYLE

wedding season

is here THE JOYS OF FINDING YOUR PERFECT DRESS

BY GREAT LAKES BAY FASHION EXPERT Jessica Klein-Hill, Owner, OMONI Boutique 1. Gown: Lace fit and flare dress, $1,748, by Lillian West Collection at Infinity Bridal 2. Veil: Corded lace-edge cathedral veil, $255, by Giselle Bridal at Infinity Bridal 3. Florals: Sweet Beets Floral, “We’ll establish a look to naturally reflect your style and our vision.” 4. Hair, Makeup & Model: Simone Vaughn, Miss Bay County

ON THE RADAR!

Mlostek’s tip to saving cash on your dream dress: “Your bridal gown should be a reflection of your personality, not your bank account. For the bride looking to find her dream gown without breaking the bank, be open-minded to purchasing a gown off the rack. This is not an option that is often advertised, but a bride could ask – and many times this can reduce the price of a gown by a couple hundred dollars.”

Imagining how you will look, how your partner will be looking at you, and how all your friends and family are gathered to see you walk down the aisle can be an exhilarating and also perhaps a daunting thought. Do you go A-line, empire waist, mermaid form-fitting, lace, high-neck, strapless, embroidered, long sleeve, long train, veil or no veil? The list can go on and on. So, we asked expert Britney Mlostek, owner of Infinity Bridal in uptown Bay City, to share bridal 10 | great lakes bay | 06.19

*

Thank you to contributing businesses // Infinity Bridal, 142 Uptown Drive, Bay City, (989)8937377, infinitybridal. net Samantha at Sweet Beets Florals, sweetbeetsfloral.com // Simone Vaughn, Miss Bay County, IG @simonejai // City Hall in Bay City, 301 N. Washington Ave., Bay City contributing writer Jessica Hill, @omoniboutique photographer Doug Julian

trends this season, “our collections are aligning with the very modern, clean bridal trends that have been popping up over the past six months. There is also a lot of romance that plays into this current trend with large patchwork and embroidered florals.” Infinity Bridal’s focus on finding the most flattering dress for your body type as well as working within your budget will make you and your family breathe a deep sigh of relief, Of course, the champagne doesn’t hurt either.


for cardiac care

no one beats

covenant

> >

>

An expert team of board-certified cardiologists, including a pediatric cardiologist The region’s first and largest Structural Heart Disease Program, giving new hope to inoperable or moderate-risk heart patients The highest volume of heart procedures performed in Saginaw

Choose a Covenant cardiologist at CovenantCardiology.com


live / NATURE

LOOK FOR

LOOK FOR

New flowers on the broad-leaved cattail show the pollen above and the green cattail below.

Recognize a red-wing blackbird male by its red and yellow wing feathers.

cattail community WETLAND PLANTS PLAY A CRITICAL ECOLOGICAL ROLE BY JEANNE HENDERSON, INTERPRETIVE NATURALIST 400 S. BADOUR ROAD, MIDLAND, (989) 631-0830 CHIPPEWANATURECENTER.ORG

12 | great lakes bay | 06.19

What comes to mind when you picture a marsh? I immediately think of cattails with their tall green flat leaves waving in the breeze. In terms of their abundance and ecological importance, cattails are the classic wetland plants that characterize marshes. Forming dense colonies around the shoreline, cattails grow in water up to 2 feet deep. At their base, rhizomes spread horizontally just below ground, anchored by side roots in the soft mud. New sprouts emerge in the spring along the rhizome, with the leaves

developing before the stem. The round stem supports the flower clusters, which appear in June, looking like green cylinders. At the stem tip, the male staminate flower is up to 5 inches long and full of pollen. The female pistillate flower grows below that, becoming 5-8 inches long and almost an inch thick. The male flower disintegrates after releasing its pollen, leaving a bare stem tip. After pollination occurs, the cattails turn brown and persist for many months until they break open in a fluffy downy mass with the tiny seeds attached. Wind disperses the seeds.


LOOK FOR Two young red-wing blackbirds fledged their nest and await food from their parents.

tales of the tails The marsh wren places wads of plant material into a globular shape interlaced between the upright cattail stems, then makes a side entrance. The nest is invisible to all but its occupants, who are also suitably camouflaged. The tiny cattail moth caterpillars feed on the seeds inside the brown cattail during winter, weaving silk threads to hold them in place. By spring, they turn into cocoons inside the cattail fluff, hoping to remain warm and protected. Blackcapped chickadees probe the cattails in winter – and by early spring red-winged blackbirds do the same, hungry for any insects they can find.

DID YOU KNOW? All stages of cattail life cycle are seen here – brown stems and fluffy down from last year and ripening brown cattails with empty stem above.

Two common species grow throughout Michigan. The broad-leaved cattail Typha latifolia has 1-inch-wide leaves and the male and female flowers touch on the stem. The narrow-leaved cattail Typha angustifolia has half-inch-wide leaves and a small gap separates the two flowers. Cattails adapt to living in saturated conditions. The leaves and stem are comprised of spongy tissue with many air spaces that allow oxygen and carbon dioxide to exchange between the roots and atmosphere. The flexible plants can sway in the wind and waves. Cattails’ ecological benefits include reducing erosion, stabilizing

soil and buffeting storm damage. Those growing near fields and lawns can accumulate pesticide residues, thus cleaning the water. In some locations, cattails dominate by not allowing growing space and sunshine for other native plants. However, when muskrats move in, they eat the cattail tubers, carry off stems and leaves to make their domed homes and create openings through the cattails. Red-winged blackbirds build camouflaged nests in brown cattail stems and leaves left standing from last year. After weaving a small bowl suspended above the water surface, the female blackbird hides down inside, laying and incubating her three to five eggs.

Folded-over leaf tips forming a triangular “box” indicate the presence of a sac spider. She folds the leaf over herself, secures it with silk, deposits an egg mass and rests inside the shelter until she dies. The spiderlings’ first meal will be their mother’s body before they leave the chamber. Humans use cattails too. Harvest rhizomes from late autumn to early spring for an edible source of protein, then scrape the starch from the tough fibers and crush into flour. Young sprouts can be cut, peeled and eaten raw or boiled. Historically, Native Americans tied cattail leaves into mats for the walls of summer wigwams. They used the fluffy down to line their moccasins and for diaper absorbent.

06.19 | great lakes bay | 13


things to do!

live / FAMILY MATTERS

words of wisdom PULLING FROM YOUR PLAYBOOK TO PROVIDE LIFE LESSONS BY ADAM LANSDELL

While school focuses on the constructs of academic excellence and core areas of study, parenthood focuses on the constructs of life. So what lessons will you provide? Don’t overthink it – your life has provided you with a playbook, so you don’t need to analyze it too much. There are so many things that you’ve learned along the way from your personal experience that can be applied to provide life lessons to your child. Call back to the mistakes you’ve made. Create a list of

14 | great lakes bay | 06.19

specific “aha” moments you’ve experienced in your work or personal growth. Share your biggest regrets. Share the moments that you wouldn’t trade for anything. If anything, these conversations can help build the foundation of trust between student and teacher to create a stronger bond between parent and child. Make a conscious effort to show your child the way, while instilling valuable lessons centered on responsibility, patience, resilience and compassion.

DIY: POPSICLES AN EASY-TO-EAT SUMMER TREAT We all want something cold to enjoy on a hot summer’s day, which is why frozen pops are typically first to mind when seeking out a simple solution. However, store-bought Popsicles really aren’t very good for you nutritiously and use packing materials that can be harmful to the environment if not disposed of properly. So why not nip those issues in the bud by making your own healthy frozen pops? WHAT YOU’LL NEED: Fruit (your choice) Juice (a flavor complementary to the selected fruit) Choice of yogurt – we recommend whole Greek yogurt as it holds shape best Milk Popsicle sticks Small paper or plastic cups Tin foil HOW TO: Simply puree your fruit and mix with all other ingredients inside of a pitcher or bowl. Pour mixture into small cups. Place a Popsicle stick in the middle of each cup. Place tin foil over each cup, while making a small hole to accommodate the stick. Place assembled cups in freezer and for roughly three hours. Remove from freezer, discard paper cups and foil. Enjoy!


SLATHER ON THE SUNSCREEN PROTECT YOURSELF FROM RAYS WHEN IT’S TIME TO PLAY While ribbing your lobster-skinned friend who just got back from the beach might seem like fun, the concept of protecting yourself from the sun is nothing to laugh at. Damage from the sun can lead to skin cancer and other complications. Be it high in the sky or hidden behind the clouds, the sun emits potentially deadly ultraviolet (UV) rays that are difficult to avoid. If you’re going to be out and about this summer, don’t forget to slap on some sunscreen, stay in the shade and keep your skin covered. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), it only takes as little as 15 minutes for UV rays to damage your skin. The CDC also recommends you put on broad-spectrum sunscreen with at least SPF 15 before you go outside, even on slightly cloudy or cool days. Don’t forget to put a thick layer on all parts of exposed skin. Get help for hard-to-reach places like your back. And remember, sunscreen works best when combined with other options to prevent UV damage.

THE SUMMER SLIDE IS REAL DON’T LET YOUR KIDS’ HARD-EARNED KNOWLEDGE DRIFT AWAY Lose focus on just about anything for too long and you’ll find yourself forgetting the finer details. Whether it be a hobby, sport, job, school or otherwise, when we give ourselves extra time to breathe the results can be the opposite. Instead of a fresh perspective, you’re left with an empty take. When children depart from their daily routine of attending classes for that cherished summer break period, they’re threatened by the Summer Slide. During the summer, kids can relax and take their minds off the pressures of schooling and socialization. But it’s important that they don’t fully let their grasp slip from that routine, the things they’ve learned or their enthusiasm to obtain more knowledge.

Parents need to keep their kids engaged to some degree in the summer to prevent progress from slipping away. Summer courses, camps, retreats, clubs and other learning-centric experiences are a great way to keep children engaged and also give them something to do. These activities don’t necessarily even need to be directly related to an area of study. Instead, why not mix it up by engaging your student with opportunities to explore topics of interest that aren’t provided by your school or enable them to take on a new hobby? No matter how you dice it, a little bit of structure to the off-season will go a long way toward helping ensure your student picks up where he or she left off when the school year resumes.

06.19 | great lakes bay | 15


live / UP NEXT

june fun

A RUNDOWN OF THE UPCOMING EVENTS ACTIVITIES AND HAPPENINGS IN THE GREAT LAKES BAY REGION

COMMUNITY EVENTS

(989) 752-3821, saginawlibrary.org

“A Muse of Fire” Auditions June 1-2, 1-4 p.m., Center Stage Theatre, Midland, dillard@ midlandcenter.org, mcfta.org/event/ auditions-muse-of-fire/e25827/

Ribbon Cutting at Dow Gardens June 25, 4 p.m., Dow Gardens, Midland, tlewis@mbami.org, macc. org/events/details/ribbon-cuttingdow-gardens-10615

Pretzel Rolling at Bavarian Inn Restaurant June 1, 2:30 p.m., $6.49, Bavarian Inn Restaurant, Frankenmuth, (989) 652-9941, frankenmuth.org

MountainTown Harmony Explosion Camp 2019 June 26-29, $289, Central Michigan University, Mount Pleasant, mountaintownharmonyexplosion@ gmail.com

Temple Theatre Organ Club Meeting June 2, 3 p.m., Temple Theatre, Saginaw, (877) 754-7469, office@ templetheatre.org, templetheatre. com/event/organ-club-jun-2/ Midland-Run Michigan Cheap June 2, 8 a.m., $30-$40, 1300 W. Main St., Midland, runmichigancheap@gmail.com, runsignup.com/Race/MI/Midland/ MidlandRunMichiganCheap Homestead Sunday June 2, 1-5 p.m., Chippewa Nature Center, Midland, info@ chippewanaturecenter.org, chippewanaturecenter.org American Chemical Society 2019 CERM June 3-8, various venues, Midland, (989) 631-5930, acscerm2019.org Mid-Mitten Chapter of Wild Ones June 5, 6:30 p.m., Chippewa Nature Center, Midland, jhenderson@ chippewanaturecenter.org, (989) 631-0830, chippewanaturecenter.org Coffee and Conversations: Fiddleheads and Fronds June 12, 9-10 a.m., Chippewa Nature Center, Midland, info@ chippewanaturecenter.org, chippewanaturecenter.org

Family Yoga: Plant Parade June 26, 10 a.m., $5, Chippewa Nature Center, Midland, info@ chippewanaturecenter.org, chippewanaturecenter.org

ENTERTAINMENT Yoga Classes for Patients Fighting Cancer and Survivors June 3, 4:30-5:30 p.m., Covenant Medical Center Mackinaw, Saginaw, covenanthealthcare.com Teachers Night in Nature June 4, 6 p.m., $30, Chippewa Nature Center, Midland, info@ chippewanaturecenter.org, chippewanaturecenter.org Zehnder’s Summer Lunch Show June 6, noon to 2 p.m., $45, Zehnder’s, Frankenmuth, (844) 2965197, zehnders.com Friday Fun Nights June 7, 6-9 p.m., downtown Frankenmuth, (989) 652-6106, membership@frankenmuth.org, frankenmuth.org Nature Tour by Golf Cart June 13, 3 p.m., $15, Chippewa Nature Center, Midland, info@ chippewanaturecenter.org, chippewanaturecenter.org

Saginaw Valley Radio Control Club June 12, 7:30 p.m., Dr. Kurumety Meeting Room, Zauel Memorial Public Library, Saginaw, (989) 7992771, saginawlibrary.org

Summer Sing! June 23, 7 p.m., $13, Midland Center for the Arts, Midland, (989) 631-8250, mcfta.org/event/summersing/e25316/

City Hall Tour June 14, 11 a.m., $1, Bay County Historical Society, Bay City, (989) 8935733, bchsmuseum.org/id57.html

River Junction Poets June 26, 7-9 p.m., Zauel Memorial, Saginaw, (989) 799-2771, saginawlibrary.org

Celestial Sail June 15, 8 p.m., $80, BaySail, Bay City, (989) 895-5193, fareharbor.com

FESTIVALS

Exotic Zoo June 17, 6-7 p.m., ButmanFish, Saginaw, (989) 799-9160, saginawlibrary.org Teen Time June 20, 4 p.m., Wickes, Saginaw, 16 | great lakes bay | 06.19

Art & Garden Festival June 5, 10 a.m., Andersen Enrichment Center & Lucille E. Andersen Memorial Rose Garden, (989) 759-1362, andersencenter.org Frankenmuth Bavarian Festival June 6-9, downtown Frankenmuth, bavarianfestival.org

YWCA Riverside Art Festivals June 8, 9 a.m., downtown Bay City, ywcaglbr.com/documents/riverside St. Stan’s Polish Festival June 27-30, St. Stan’s Athletic Club Complex, Bay City, (989) 522-3846, Jgoik1@aol.com, facebook.com/StStans-Polish-Festival

EDUCATIONAL Going Geocaching June 1, 10 a.m., Chippewa Nature Center, Midland, info@ chippewanaturecenter.org, chippewanaturecenter.org Whole Health Orientation Class June 3, 9:30-11 a.m., Aleda E. Lutz VA Medical Center, Saginaw, facebook.com/ events/1188224004674126/ Breastfeeding Support Group June 3, 6:30-7:30 p.m., Covenant Andersen -Wellness Room, Saginaw, covenanthealthcare.com Horizons Town Talk Lecture Series: Tina Rivers Ryan, Ph.D. June 4, 11:30 a.m., Horizons Conference Center, Saginaw, (989) 799-4122, inquiry@horizonscenter. com, horizonscenter.com/upcomingevents/town-talks/ Coping with Cancer Support Group June 4, noon to 1:30 p.m., Covenant Medical Center Mackinaw, Saginaw, covenanthealthcare.com Valley Herb Society June 6, 7 p.m., Chippewa Nature Center Midland, cdevendorf@ chippewanaturecenter.org, (989) 631-0830, chippewanaturecenter.org Turtle Time June 8, 3-4 p.m., Chippewa Nature Center, Midland, info@ chippewanaturecenter.org, chippewanaturecenter.org Families in Nature: Frogs and Pollywogs June 8, 2-3 p.m., Chippewa Nature Center, Midland, info@ chippewanaturecenter.org, chippewanaturecenter.org Coping with Cancer Support Group June 18, noon to 1:30 p.m., Covenant Medical Center Mackinaw, Saginaw, covenanthealthcare.com

Medical Center Mackinaw, Saginaw, covenanthealthcare.com Summer Exploration Days: Plants and Fungi June 26, Chippewa Nature Center, Midland, info@ chippewanaturecenter.org, chippewanaturecenter.org Live Reptiles and Amphibians June 27, Averill Preserve, Midland, info@chippewanaturecenter.org, chippewanaturecenter.org

KIDS’ EVENTS Youth Choir Auditions June 3-4, 4:30 p.m., Center Stage Choirs, Midland, schroeder@ midlandcenter.org, (989) 631-5930 ext. 1716, mcfta.org/event/youthchoir-auditions/e26547/ Story Hour: Around the Pond June 6, 9:30-10:30 a.m., ages 3-5, Chippewa Nature Center, info@chippewanaturecenter.org, chippewanaturecenter.org Free Saturday Matinee June 8, 11 a.m. to 1 p.m., Hoyt Library auditorium, Saginaw, saginawlibrary.org Nature Preschool Institute 2019 June 10, 8:30 a.m., $400, Chippewa Nature Center, Midland, mpowell@ chippewanaturecenter.org, chippewanaturecenter.org Toddler Playgroup June 12, 1 p.m., Wickes, Saginaw, (989) 752-3821, saginawlibrary.org Insect Exploration June 14, 3 p.m., Sylvan Solace Preserve, Mount Pleasant, info@ chippewanaturecenter.org, chippewanaturecenter.org Children’s Drive-in Movie June 15, 10 a.m. to noon, ButmanFish Library, Saginaw, (989) 7999160, saginawlibrary.org Family STEM Night June 20, 4-8 p.m., museum admission, Alden B. Dow Museum of Science & Art, Midland, mcfta. org/event/family-stem-nights/ e25823/

Bariatric Seminar June 19, 6-8 p.m., Covenant Medical Center Mackinaw, Saginaw, covenanthealthcare.com

Fun in the Mud: International Mud Day June 29, 11 a.m. and 6 p.m., Discovery Preserve, Bay City, info@chippewanaturecenter.org, chippewanaturecenter.org

Cancer Support Group for Young Women June 25, 6-7:30 p.m., Covenant

Do you want your event listed here? Email details to info@ greatlakesbaymag.com


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SIGNS LANGUAGE

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Midland Riverdays Festival and Balloon Fest

a festival for the rest of y’all SUMMER GATHERINGS ABOUND IN GREAT LAKES BAY REGION

BY RICH ADAMS

Summer brings with it many fun and cherished family events, such as reunion picnics, days on the water and enjoying the beach. The warmer days also herald the return of festivals and events in the Great Lakes Bay region. Perhaps the highlight is the Tall Ship Celebration on July 18-21 (see cover story for details), but there are plenty of other opportunities for fun throughout the summer months.

Highlights include the free street party June 7 as well as the Festival Olympics and Maibaum Dancers. On tap June 8 is the Kindertag Parade and Rotary Duck Race. Performers will bring music and more at the main tent and rock tent. June 9 brings the Bavarian Festival Parade at 1 p.m. and wraps up with more performers in the main tent.

Michigan Antiques & Collectables Festival, June 1-2 Pickers will be in hog heaven June 1-2 as the Michigan Antiques & Collectables Festival takes place at the Midland County Fairgrounds. Between 800 and 1,000 vendors and dealers will display their wares inside seven fairgrounds buildings. If you miss the June festival, the event repeats itself Sept. 21-22.

Tapped: Downtown Midland Craft Beer Festival, June 16 From 2-6 p.m. the Tasting Tent will be open, offering the products of 29 craft breweries and eight wineries and cideries. Tickets are $25 at the gate and include a commemorative cup, six complimentary drink tickets and live music. That night Michigan craft breweries will take over the taps at

20 | great lakes bay | 06.19

Riverscene Indie Music Festival, June 1-2 Dozens of bands are on tap for the Riverscene Indie Music Festival in Bay City. This eclectic music fest is set in Wenonah Park, and includes food trucks and Michigan craft beer. Matrix: Midland Festival, June 3-16 The event kicks off June 3 at the Midland Center for the Arts and continues

through June 16. Featured events include a Drone Festival at Barstow Airport; a performance by Matthew Morrison, star of the hit TV show “Glee;” a performance of the all-female country quartet Farewell Angelina; and architect Alan Metcalfe presents his influences and inspiration in designing Whiting Forest’s new canopy walk. Frankenmuth Bavarian Festival, June 6-9 Admission to the four days of celebrating everything German is only $5, with kids 5 and under admitted free. The festival includes a wide variety of events and entertainment.


Hop Riot Beer Fest

Fourth of July fireworks displays Saginaw African Cultural Festival

During the day the Skerbeck Family Carnival will take place at Vet’s Park, featuring a midway and all kinds of rides and attractions. Tickets or family armbands can be purchased at the gate.

several watering holes in downtown Midland. Check out the website at tappedbeerfest.com to find out which locations are participating. You’ll also be able to attend the Makers Market, featuring artisans and food vendors on Main Street between Gordon and Rodd streets. The market will be open from 11 a.m. to 7 p.m. St. Stan’s Polish Festival, June 27-30 Michigan’s largest Polish Festival takes place in Bay City June 27-30. The event features Road Race Night,

Kids’ Day and an Outdoor Heritage Mass at 11 a.m. June 30, followed by a barbecue chicken dinner. Homemade Polish and American food, major carnival rides and games for all ages, a large beer tent, dance floor and the live polka music will be among the attractions. Entertainment tent admission is $5 per day. Bay City Fireworks Festival, July 4-6 One night a year is not enough for Bay City, which will have pyrotechnic displays at dusk on July 4-6.

Fourth of July fireworks displays Cities and towns throughout the Great Lakes Bay region offer fireworks displays July 4. Check with your local government to find locations and times. Hop Riot Beer Fest, Aug. 3 The festival is from noon to 5 p.m. in Bay City. A variety of breweries and wineries bring their offerings to Wenonah Park. Music is provided by Lightnin’ Licks Vinyl Preservation Society. Tickets are $35 for the VIP event, $25 for general admission, and include five tasting tickets and a Hop Riot glass and bottle opener. Midland Riverdays Festival and Balloon Fest, Aug. 1-3 The fun takes place Aug. 1-3 next to

Midland Area Farmers Market Plaza. It’s three days of fun including music, food, entertainment, hot-air balloons and activities for all ages. There will be kayaking, zip line trips, concerts, a beer tent and more. Frankenmuth Summer Music Fest, Aug. 8-10 and Aug. 15-17 The music fills the air over two weekends at the Harvey Kern Pavilion in Heritage Park. Music of all genres is on the agenda. Ticket prices are $20 Thursdays and $22 Fridays and Saturdays, or a three-day pass for $60. Saginaw African Cultural Festival, Aug. 9-11 The celebration at the former Morley School grounds is the oldest ongoing Black Arts Festival in the country. The weekend-long event includes live music, crafts and activities for kids, face painting, clothing vendors, food vendors, dominoes, card games and chess for adults, and more.

06.19 | great lakes bay | 21


work / LOVE MY JOB

cuckoo for german clocks BY RICH ADAMS | PHOTO BY DOUG JULIAN

Q& A How did you become involved in clocks? I started at the clock company in 2014. Mike Nestell, who founded the company had found my resume and called me in for an interview. I always had a love for clocks since I was a child. I would always find and collect small pieces that I would find in different places. I learned the business from Mike. What training have you completed to do your job? All of the training I received on repairs has been learned in the store with the other repair staff. Learning from master clock repairers is, in my opinion, the best way to learn. I believe the best way of learning how to repair clocks is to apprentice with someone who has been doing it for many years.

Greg Burton is co-owner of Frankenmuth Clock Co. He sells and repairs classic German-made clocks, including cuckoo clocks.

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What sets German clocks apart from other similar timepieces? The Germans have always been known for clocks, especially cuckoo clocks. What sets German clocks apart from others is the craftsmanship. Authentic cuckoo clocks are only made in the Black Forest region of Germany. They are truly a work of art.

How did you become owner of Frankenmuth Clock Co.? After a couple of years working for the company, I was out on a delivery with Mike, who owned the company for over 30 years. Mike asked me where I saw myself in five to 10 years from then. I told him that when he was ready to retire I hoped to be able to purchase the company. In January of 2018, Mike asked me to start the process of purchasing the business. I had come in contact with my business partner, Dr. Bradford Bopp of Carmel, Indiana, through a repair service I performed for him. He had purchased a cuckoo clock while he was in Germany in 2017, and something was stopping the music from playing. The manufacturer asked me to help Brad with his clock. I worked with him over the phone to try and solve the problem, and then had him ship us the clock. I had the clock repaired in five minutes, and then sent him a video of the clock playing like it should. From then on, we started talking, and we met in person when he came to pick up his clock. It was here that we both realized that our dream was united – to own a clock and gift store. People say that this was divine intervention at its finest. Had Brad’s clock not have needed an adjustment, we would have most likely never met.


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work / PROFILE

defining michaela davert THE NEW FACE OF BEAUTY

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BY MARY GAJDA


Davert has a passion for makeup and fashion

M

ichaela Davert is your typical 20-year-old. She loves beauty and fashion, makeup, and all the things 20-year-old women enjoy. But that doesn’t define her. Davert was also born with a disability called osteogenesis imperfecta, which is associated with countless fractures, surgeries and other complex medical issues. The condition she was born with causes the body not to produce enough effective collagen, which is the most abundant protein in the human body. The obvious effect of this condition is that she stands at 2 feet, 7 inches tall.

But that doesn’t define her either. The Bay City resident is currently in her third year of college at Davenport University and is working toward a Bachelor of Business Administration degree in marketing with a concentration in digital marketing. “Due to a variety of factors, I have chosen to complete my entire degree 100 percent online, and I absolutely love the format,” Davert said. “It’s definitely not everyone’s cup of tea, but it works great for me.” When she’s not in class, Davert is a YouTube vlogger under the name “FunSizedStyle.” She touches on topics from beauty to fashion and lifestyle.

Davert’s popular vlogs can be found by searching FunSizedStyle

“I knew I couldn’t be the only young woman with a physical disability with a passion for makeup and fashion. I wanted to be that new face of beauty,” Davert said. She also uses this platform to educate her 38,500 YouTube subscribers about her disability. “With my motto, ‘Makeup is an accessory, not a necessity,’ my hope is to inspire young women and girls to embrace their physical difference,” she said. Davert is a glass-full personality type, especially when it comes to her disability. “Some of my biggest challenges have resulted in the best opportunities,” Davert said. “Just like we all continue to face challenges, I choose to find joy amongst them knowing that everything happens for a reason, and with an amazing support system … and awesome medical teams, I continue to accomplish many things and enjoy life along the way.” The social media influencer gets several positive messages a day as a result from her YouTube channel and other platforms, and she credits social media for changing her life. “I have so many goals in life,” Davert explained. “I look forward to being on my own, doing YouTube full time after college and so much more. As my social platforms continue to grow, so many opportunities have presented themselves and I cannot wait to see where that continues to take me.” Davert’s message to the public? “I want readers to know that I absolutely love life and to never feel sorry for me! My disability is my biggest blessing and I’ve had so many amazing opportunities that none of my peers have ever gotten to experience. I’m so grateful for the gift of life.” Grateful. Talented. Smart. That is what defines Michaela Davert.

06.19 | great lakes bay | 25


feature M

Choose in advance which ships to tour, as lines grow rapidly.

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WAVES BY CHRISTOPHER NAGY | PHOTOS BY DOUG JULIAN

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TALL SHIP CELEBRATION RETURNS TO SAGINAW BAY


again, the ship is AHOY! Once going to hit the fans when

the Tall Ship Celebration marks its seventh voyage to the Great Lakes Bay region this summer. The popular triennial maritime festival is gathering a fleet from throughout North America to drop anchor in Bay City on July 18-21. The city has served as a host for the Tall Ships Challenge every three years since 2001. As one of 11 host sites on the Great Lakes this year, Bay City remains a friendly and favorite port of call for the event, having earned the distinction of “Port of the Year” four times since the city became a host site – an honor the city has earned more than any other host site in North America. Shirley Roberts, executive director of BaySail and the producer of the Tall Ship Celebration, estimated that 103,000 guests attended the festival the last time Bay City hosted the event in 2016.

“I like to think many of guests keep coming back because Tall Ship Celebration is a worldclass event in the heart of Michigan,” Roberts said. “When you experience our maritime festival, you are experiencing the most-recognized tall-ship festival in all of North America. … In the 20 years since we started offering Tall Ship Celebration, we’ve welcomed guests from almost every state in the country and from more than 30 countries around the world.” Although international maritime music and a plethora of other family-friendly events are held throughout the four-day festival, most eyes are tuned into seeing the main attractions up close and personal – and Roberts said Bay City offers a unique advantage over other host ports. “The setting,” she explained. “You can take in all of the ships at a glance because they’re docked

The Draken is a replica of a Viking long boat.

06.19 | great lakes bay | 27


feature

The Tall Ships Celebration brings a fleet of ships to the region to impress record crowds each year.

on either side of the river and not stretched out over miles. Our event occurs in two city parks, not on paved surfaces in industrial districts. Many of our guests have never been to Bay City before and they are amazed at how easy it is to get here and, when you do get here, how safe, charming and walkable our waterfront community is.” As usual, the lineup this year is impressive. Returning to Bay City for the first time since a $20 million restoration, Nova Scotia’s famous Bluenose II will be a highlight for guests. The image of the iconic ship graces the Canadian dime and is a faithful replica of the original Bluenose schooner that was launched in 1921 and was undefeated in international racing competition for 17 years. The Barque Picton Castle will make her way back to Bay City following her seventh worldcircumnavigation voyage and the returning Picton Castle will be the largest Class A vessel in the fleet this summer. New to the 2019 event is the 95-foot Santa Maria, an authentic replica of Christopher Columbus’ flagship. Other featured vessels include the Pride of Baltimore II, a 157-foot Baltimore clipper; Madeline, a 95-foot gaff topsail schooner from Traverse City; St. Lawrence II, a 72-foot brigantine from Canada; the Denis Sullivan, a 137-foot, three-masted schooner from Wisconsin;

(Sittin’ On)

THE SAGINAW BAY 28 | great lakes bay | 06.19

the Flagship Niagara, a 198-foot brig from Pennsylvania; and Perception, a 68-foot schooner from Traverse City. Two homegrown favorites will also be part of the Tall Ship Celebration: the 85-foot schooner Appledore IV and the 65-foot schooner Appledore V will offer a full schedule of sail-away trips during the festival. Both are owned by BaySail. The Bay city nonprofit offers experiential educational programs in environment stewardship through sail training voyages and was instrumental in creating the Tall Ship Celebration by bringing the Tall Ships Challenge to Bay City in 2001. “Shortly after BaySail was created in partnership with the Bay Area Convention and Visitors Bureau, we learned of a series of tallship races and rallies that was being organized in the Great Lakes by the American Sail Training Association,” Roberts said. “We thought the event would be the ideal platform to promote Bay City’s new tall ship as well as improve the community’s image to a national audience.” The Tall Ships Challenge is organized by the American Sail Training Association and rotates between the East Coast, West Coast and Great Lakes. Host ports are recruited to produce events that feature a fleet of ships that either race or travel in company from one to another. Other host ports

Saginaw Bay extends southwest for 51 miles from its entrance between Au Sable Point in the northwest to Pointe Aux Barques in the southeast.


~ Shirley Roberts, executive director of BaySail and the producer of the Tall Ship Celebration

IN THE 20 YEARS SINCE WE STARTED OFFERING TALL SHIP CELEBRATION, WE’VE WELCOMED GUESTS FROM ALMOST EVERY STATE IN THE COUNTRY AND FROM MORE THAN 30 COUNTRIES AROUND THE WORLD.”

this year include Toronto, Ontario; Buffalo, New York; Cleveland, Ohio; Green Bay, Wisconsin; Kenisha, Wisconsin; Midland, Ontario; Sarina, Ontario; Kingsville, Ontario; Erie, Pennsylvania; and Brockville, Ontario. Planning the event, Roberts said, is a roughly two-year process as logistics are ironed out and contracts are negotiated with

The bay is 1,143 square miles in area and touches portions of Arenac, Bay, Huron, Iosco and Tuscola counties.

the owners of each vessel. Appearance fees range between $7,000 and $62,500 and will total $257,000 this year. Total expenses to pull off the festival climb much higher, such as the $703,000 it cost to host the Tall Ship Celebration in 2016; however, the event funds itself through ticket sales and corporate sponsorships. “The companies and organizations that have agreed to invest in Tall Ship Celebration recognize the importance of the event to our community and our region,” said Mary Lou

While Lake Huron was the first of the Great Lakes explored by Europeans, the first to trek into Saginaw Bay was Jaques Marquette, a French Jesuit missionary.


feature SHIPLY SPEAKING

The Tall Ships Celebration offers activities for kids, live music and pirates too!

Benecke, chairwoman of the Tall Ship Celebration Planning Council. “Representing the state of Michigan to the tall-ship fleet, the other Great Lakes states and the more than 100,000 people from around the world who are expected to attend is a humbling and daunting task. It would not be possible without the strategic investment of our sponsors.” Major sponsors this year include the Michigan Sugar Co., Consumers Energy, D.H.T., Wildfire Credit Union, Chemical Bank, Amerilodge Group, Ascension Michigan, Huntington Bank, McLaren Bay Region and Independent Bank. “Bay County residents and businesses look forward to the return of the triennial tall-ships festival,” said Ryan Tarrant, president and CEO of the Bay Area Chamber of Commerce. “Tall Ship has been a tremendous success, bringing in nearly 100,000 visitors and more than $8 million

in economic impact to the Great Lakes Bay region in previous years. Here in Bay City, it is the perfect opportunity to showcase our vibrant small-business community, complete with its unique shops, eateries and waterfront views. Shirley and her team deserve a huge thanks for the countless hours spent organizing this incredible event.” Tickets for the Tall Ship Celebration are available at every Kroger grocer in Michigan. Daily admission tickets are $8 prior to June 30 and $10 after June 30. Tickets give guests access to the festival grounds and the free activities and entertainment that occur throughout the weekend. In order to board and tour the visiting ships, guests need to also purchase a souvenir passport, which are also $8 prior to June 30 and $10 after June 30. For more information about Tall Ship Celebration or BaySail, visit tallshipcelebration. com or baysailbaycity.org.

If you’ve ever been told you curse like a sailor, it was probably said to you in a disapproving tut-tut tone. However, chances are that you speak like a sailor quite often and don’t even realize it. Here are a few words and terms that have nautical origins:

LOOSE CANNON

Dating back to the days when a warship’s cannons were mounted on rollers and tied down, when a cannon became unsecured and started rolling around on deck, it could wreak havoc.

EVEN KEEL

Originally a reference to a ship that was not tilting to one side, today the phrase means steady or balanced.

FIGUREHEAD

The figurehead in nautical terms referred to the detailed carving on the front of the ship – the ceremonial figure out front.

SCUTTLEBUTT

Today referring to gossip, the scuttled butt on a ship was the cask where fresh drinking water could be found as well as where sailors would swap stories.

HAND OVER FIST

If you make money hand over fist, you’re accumulating cash at a steady pace. The term’s origins can be found in steadily pulling a rope or climbing a rope on a ship.

TALL SHIP HAS BEEN A TREMENDOUS SUCCESS, BRINGING IN NEARLY 100,000 VISITORS AND MORE THAN $8 MILLION IN ECONOMIC IMPACT TO THE GREAT LAKES BAY REGION IN PREVIOUS YEARS.” ~ Ryan Tarrant, president and CEO of the Bay Area Chamber of Commerce

30 | great lakes bay | 06.19

GROGGY

Christened in honor of an 18th century British Royal Navy admiral nicknamed by his crew as “Old Grog.” He was known for mixing water with the rum rations of his sailors.

UNDER THE WEATHER

When a sailor was feeling seasick, he was sent below deck to aid in his recovery, hence he was under the weather.


feature

LPGA

EVENT PUTS REGION AT THE ‘FORE’-FRONT OF GOLF DOW INVITATIONAL PUTS FOCUS ON COMMUNITY, YOUTH BY RICH ADAMS

32 | great lakes bay | 06.19


LPGA players at MCC (May 10) , Juli Inkster, Katherine Kirk, Angel Yin, Brittany Lincicome and Jenny Shin”

The LPGA Dow Great Lakes Bay Invitational tournament tees off next month at Midland Country Club, ushering in a whole new ballgame for the 69-yearold professional women’s golf organization. When Dow Chemical Co. officials began serious consideration of hosting an LPGA event at the Midland Country Club a few years ago, the innovative chemical company wanted to come up with an innovative format for the tournament, said Chris Chandler, executive director of the Dow Great Lakes Bay Invitational. “Primarily we saw this as another thing we can bring to the region to help build the community, something we could do to attract people to the community and give back to the community,” Chandler said. “Secondarily, we asked how this event could help us tell our Dow story, the things we talk about like inclusion, STEM, sustainability and innovation. Dow does think differently and we want to do things better.

“So we took that mantra of innovation and went to the LPGA and said we had something different, something we thought would be successful,” he continued. “Here is the team concept. LPGA golfers had never done anything like this before for official money and official points.” Soon the concept evolved, and on July 17, 142 golfers on 72 teams will follow a new format for a $2 million purse. The first and third days of golf will be based on an alternate shot concept and the second and fourth days of the tournament will follow a best-ball format. Soon the team concept picked up steam and the Dow tournament officials found themselves in a four-hour meeting with the LPGA rulesmakers hammering out guidelines for the new team format. “We sat in the room for half a day and had to write out the rules, because there were no rules for team play – they had never done team play,” Chandler said. “We had to decide how the players pick teams, who

06.19 | great lakes bay | 33


feature

Above: Suzan Petterson speaks to children about life as an LPGA Player Far Left: Suzann Pettersen coaches junior golfers at Northwood University. Left: Chris Chandler and Katherine Kirk on the course with members of the community.

qualifies to golf – the qualifications are different – and what do you do if a team drops out?” The golfers are intrigued by the prospect of team play as well. LPGA veteran Suzann Pettersen, who has enjoyed a Dow sponsorship, said just choosing teams is going to be a new experience. “It’s going to be a very cool and different event,” Pettersen, a tour pro since 2003 with 15 career wins, including two majors, told the Midland Daily News. “It will be fun to pick your partner and team up with a good friend or maybe even a feisty competitor for the week and try to win it.” Chandler said Dow is not just focusing on the pros. Admission to the four-day event will be very affordable, with an emphasis on exposing younger people to the game of golf. Through the First Tee youth golf program, Dow has partnered with Currie Golf Course and Dow Gardens

34 | great lakes bay | 06.19

and Canopy Walk to give children a unique golf experience. There also will be a youth STEM center focusing on the use of science, technology, engineering and math as it applies to sports. Chandler said the tournament will have a significant economic impact on the region, bringing an estimated $12 million to $15 million to the area just during the week of the tournament. Admission to the practice round and pro-am event July 15-16 is free. General admission for the tournament itself is $10 each day, with children 17 and under admitted free with a ticketed adult, Chandler said. Another element of the tournament is the Eat Great food festival, bringing in restaurants, breweries, wineries and more from Midland, Saginaw, Isabella and Bay counties. For more information on the Dow Great Lakes Bay Invitational, go to the website at dowglbi.com.


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SPECIAL ADVERTISEMENT

RESPECTING THE RESOURCES AROUND US BaySail provides experiential environmental education

S

ince 1997, BaySail has Introduced learners of all ages to the Saginaw Bay Watershed and the Great Lakes by providing experiential programs that highlight the special natural resources found right here in the Great Lakes Bay Region. Approximately 2,000 people participate in a BaySail educational program every year. However, it is the organization’s hope that every person who sails with BaySail has an experience that educates and inspires them to become better stewards of Michigan’s freshwater resource. “Our flagship program is Science Under Sail, which is a hands-on educational experience offered aboard our vessels, the topsail schooners Appledore IV and Appledore V,” explained BaySail Executive Director Shirley Roberts. “Science Under Sail is targeted to fourth- through sixth-grade students, but variations of the program are regularly offered

to children as young as 5, high school students and adult groups.” Another foundational program is the Windward Bound sail training program, a voyaging camp program available to 14- to 18-year-old students offering several voyages annually that range from four days to 10 days. In years when the TALL SHIPS CHALLENGE® visits the Great Lakes, BaySail offers more Windward Bound voyages as the Appledore IV and Appledore V travel from port to port throughout the course of the season. “The Windward Bound program is not necessarily focused on learning to sail as much as it is learning from sailing as a member of a tall ship’s crew,” Roberts said. “Appledore IV and V serve as ambassadors for Bay City and the Great Lakes Bay Region as they travel around the Great Lakes delivering programs.”

Roberts said it’s vital for the younger generation to get an early understanding of how they can have an impact on the world around them – providing the next generations with an appreciation for the environment as well as an understanding of the importance of the Great Lakes to their communities, state, region, country and world. “Young people who participate in a Windward Bound sail training program are developing the character traits and communication skills that are so important as they become adults and employees,” Roberts said. They learn the importance of responsibility, knowing when to work independently and when to work as an integral part of a team, how to communicate clearly and how to listen to others. Each program is unique – but, in our experience, they are all powerful and often life-changing.” For more information on BaySail, call (989) 895-5193 or visit baysailbaycity.org.


GET THE MOST OUT OF THE TALL SHIP CELEBRATION

I

t only comes around once every three years. So when the Tall Ship Celebration returns to the Great Lakes Bay Region on July 18-21, you’ll want to make the most of the event.

afternoon to experience the organized chaos that happens when the ships arrive. Nine ships will be available for boarding and touring on Friday, Saturday and Sunday from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.

Where are the best places to stay? There is so much to see and do at the Tall Ship Celebration, we think it takes a full two days to experience everything. The most conveniently located hotels are the Doubletree Bay City Riverfront, the Comfort Inn Bay City and the Courtyard by Marriott. Information about other lodging options is available at gogreat.com. We are excited to announce a partnership with the Bay City Northeast Little League Association to offer on-site camper and RV parking.

How can someone get aboard the ships? A daily admission ticket is required to enter the festival each day. In order to board and tour the visiting tall ships, guests must purchase a souvenir passport that allows each guest to tour each visiting ship one time. Both daily admission tickets and souvenir passports are $8 per person through June 30 and $10 per person as of July 1. They are available online at tallshipcelebration.com and at every Kroger store in Michigan.

When is the best time to see the ships? Many people enjoy being at the festival on Thursday

Do any of the ships take passengers out? Bay City’s own tall ships, the schooners Appledore IV

and Appledore V, will be offering day sails four times per day throughout the festival for $65 per person. On Thursday from 12:30-3:30 p.m., passengers can board one of the Appledores and join the Parade of Sail as visiting ships arrive for the festival. Parade of Sail tickets are available for $100 per person. What is Ballad and Brews? Ballads and Brews is an evening activity that occurs Friday, Saturday and Sunday after the ships no longer accept guests and other festival activities end for the day. Ballads and Brews features Michigan craft beers, wines and the musicians who offer a saucier repertoire than that which is presented during the day. For all the information surrounding Tall Ship Celebration 2019 in Bay City, visit tallshipcelebration.com.


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WHEN THE SPIRIT MOVES YOU

Specializing in whiskey, vodka, rum and moonshine, Old Town Distillery has been wetting whistles since opening in 2015. Located in a historic building in Old Town Saginaw, the atmosphere and character of the establishment is only heightened by a knowledgeable staff and the delicious drinks.

play TASTE P. 40

WHAT’S COOKING P. 42

BEST SEAT P. 44

SEEN P. 46

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play / TASTE

a fresh take on fresh eats SUSHI REMIX’S CUSTOMIZABLE POKE BOWLS ARE SOMETHING FOR EVERYONE BY ADAM LANSDELL | PHOTOS BY DOUG JULIAN

T

here’s no question about it. Sushi and other Japanese culinary staples have become more widely accepted and sought out within the United States in the past decade. You’d be hardpressed to find someone in your inner circle who isn’t a fan. One such fan of the delicacy is Alayna Wesner, owner of Sushi Remix. With locations in Bay City and Saginaw, this unique concept is sure to bring more fans on board. The region’s first eatery of its kind took shape in June 2018 and offers guests a variation of sushi known as the poke bowl (pronounced poh-kay). Like variety bowls you can find at fast-casual dining concepts like Chipotle, guests are encouraged to select ingredients to create a unique fusion dining experience. “The idea to open Sushi Remix came to me while on a vacation in California. When it came time to look for a place to grab dinner, I stumbled upon a poke restaurant that was just around the corner,” said Wesener. “I decided to give it a try. When I took my first bite, I

ABOVE:

SUSHI REMIX DUBS POKE BOWLS AS “SUSHI’S COOL LITTLE COUSIN.”

40 | great lakes bay | 06.19

literally proclaimed out loud ‘I am going to open a poke bowl restaurant!’”From then on, the concept seemingly haunted Wesener – lingering in the back of her mind, waiting to be brought to life. Realizing the idea had become a passion, Wesener took the leap. While she is recognizing that the Great Lakes Bay region had many successful sushi restaurants, she was undeterred, knowing the region was ready for a new take. With the help of her husband and co-owner, Aaron, her dream became a reality. So, what makes poke similar to sushi? It’s all about the ingredients. Each bowl is essentially a deconstructed sushi roll. Sushi Remix dubs them “sushi’s cool little cousin.” Guests begin by selecting a serving size and either a rice or spring mix base. They then are encouraged to select from fresh protein options such as tuna, salmon, tofu or shrimp. From there, the customization expands to mix-ins like avocado or edamame, sauces like wasabi or eel and toppings like tempura flakes or ginger. The combinations are seemingly endless, ensuring each bowl is the perfect fit for the customer.


If customization isn’t your thing or you want to take a tour before stepping into the driver’s seat, Sushi Remix also offers predetermined combinations on its recipe. According to Wesener, the California bowl is the brand’s most popular menu item. The item is just as you’d assume: a remix on a classic sushi favorite. “It’s our take on the classic California roll. It also happens to be the best option for our guests who love sushi, but are not necessarily fans of raw fish,” explained Wesener. “We sell three times more Californication bowls than any other item on the menu.” The restaurant also offers a host of bubble/ boba teas, which are similarly customizable and equally as sought after. Traditionally, the popular Japanese concoction is uses a tea base that’s combined with a milk or fruit flavoring and then accented by jell-like pearls known as bobas – typically made from tapioca starch. The unique combination is a cultural favorite; however, Sushi Remix provides its own twist in terms of flavoring options. “We work with a local Bay City-based company, Real Flavors, to have our own line of custom flavors created. We still have all of the traditional flavors, but we also have fun combinations like cherry cola, a cola flavored tea with cherry boba or orange creamsicle, an

orange/vanilla cream soda flavored tea with honey boba.” Aside from being a concept that’s unique to the Great Lakes Bay region, the idea speaks to another booming group: the health conscious. Sushi Remix serves as a perfect option for rushed individuals seeking something fresh, organic and nutritious. The variety offered inherently fits every individual’s dietary needs and promotes adopting healthy habits. “We definitely have something for everyone. We can easily accommodate lowcarbohydrate, Keto, low-calorie, gluten-free and vegan diets, just to name a few,” said Wesener. “This wasn’t necessarily a conscious component of our business model, but more so a happy accident due to the healthy and versatile nature of poke.” Sushi Remix aims to continue providing innovation to the region and anticipates the business continually growing via the introduction of new ingredients and sauces. When the timing is right, Sushi Remix hopes to open a third location, potentially within a franchise model to reach areas beyond the region. However, the company isn’t in a rush, recognizing that the support it has found here in its own backyard is a huge component to the success. To learn more about Sushi Remix, visit sushiremix.com.

ABOVE LEFT:

STAFF BUILD A POKE BOWL CUSTOMIZED TO EACH GUEST.

ABOVE:

THE CALIFORNIA BOWL IS A REMIX ON A CLASSIC FAVORITE.

BELOW:

BUBBLE AND BOBA TEAS ARE POPULAR AT SUSHI REMIX.

06.19 | great lakes bay | 41


play / WHAT’S COOKING

MEZZALUNA A COSTINE CORTE (BRAISED SHORT RIB)

mezzaluna a costine corte GRATZI MIDLAND CHEF ISMAEL HERREREA BY MARY GAJDA | PHOTOS BY DOUG JULIAN

Chef Ismael Herrera is a hardworking and self-made chef who has spent his career developing a reputation of excellence and exceeding expectations. Head chef at Gratzi in Midland, he is continuing to please the community and patrons with his attention to detail. Bringing authentic Italian food to life with passion and devotion as well as working with top-of-the-line ingredients and talented staff make cooking an adventure that warrants a sense of accomplishment. Helping provide memorable experiences is the greatest reward in Herrera’s eyes, and he truly loves the support from the community. Here is Herrera’s recipe for braised short rib in his own words.

2 ounces oil blend 2 pounds beef chuck flats 1-ounce salt ½ teaspoon ground pepper ½ tablespoon garlic ½ ounce thyme ½ ounce rosemary 1 ounce tomato puree 6 ounces red wine 32 ounces homemade stock 6 ounces demi-glaze In a pan that is able to go in the oven, heat oil until it is hot and nearly smoking. Carefully place seasoned beef in the pan and rotate, allowing all sides to sear. Once all sides are seared, add garlic and herbs to perfume in the oil for about two minutes (being careful to not burn the garlic). Then add the tomato puree and allow it to simmer until the color has become crimson. Once the color of the puree has darkened, add wine and reduce in half. Finish with half of the homemade stock, which will add depth to the sauce. Bring to a simmer, cover and place in the oven. Braise for one hour or until meat is falling apart. Remove from sauce and shred. The sugo, or dripping, will be strained and added to the remaining stock to make the sauce for the short ribs. Reduce to preferred consistency and serve. We place this on a nice ricotta mezzaluna, but it would complement just about any other pasta.

WHAT’S IN SEASON

stop and smell the strawberries The beautiful red color of a strawberry contains antioxidants, lots of vitamin C for immunity, fiber for proper digestion and potassium to keep your blood flowing. This perennial plant holds berries that individually have over 200 seeds and will grow back year after year. Use freshly frozen strawberries in smoothies, add to your oatmeal or infuse to your water for a refreshing taste. Enjoy the sweet and savory taste of summer with some delicious and nutritious strawberries. Preparing tip: Don’t wash or rinse cut strawberries under water until you’re ready to taste their sweetness because it speeds up spoiling. 42 | great lakes bay | 06.19


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play / BEST SEAT IN THE HOUSE Billy Currington

discover your region HERE’S A LOOK AT SOME OF THE TOP BETS FOR YOUR NIGHT OUT WITH THAT SPECIAL SOMEONE

SAGINAW BAY SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA: TCHAIKOVSKY’S “PATHETIQUE”

BAY CITY COUNTRY MUSIC FESTIVAL

Concluding the season is a performance that includes selections from some of the most exciting romantic symphonic repertoire. Opening the concert is Wagner’s “Prelude” to his famous opera the “Meistersingers of Nurnberg,” followed by a composer who is known as the “Father of the Symphony,” Haydn’s “Symphony No. 83 (The Hen)” and concluding with one of Tchaikovsky’s most powerful and emotionally charged symphonies: “The Pathetique.” For tickets and event information, visit startickets.com/events/item/ sbso-tchaikovsky-s-pathetique.

The second annual Bay City Country Music Festival features a few great nights of country fun at Wenonah Park. The Bay City Country Music Festival is known for the live entertainment and beautiful amphitheater. Enjoy a two-night event with some of the best country tunes from artists Billy Currington, Jimmie Allen, Carly Pearce and High Valley. For tickets and event information, visit downtownbaycity. com/events/2nd-annual-bay-citycountry-music-fest/.

When: June 1, 8 p.m. Tickets: $7-$47 Where: Temple Theatre, Saginaw

When: June 21, 3 p.m. Tickets: $30-$45 Where: Wenonah Park, Bay City

THIS MONTH’S EVENTS Find the perfect night out no matter your interests

National Trails Day Hike June 1, 1-3 p.m., Green Point Environmental Learning Center, Saginaw, (989) 759-1669, fws.gov/ refuge/shiawassee/ Michigan Antiques Festival June 1-2, 8 a.m., $6$15, Midland County Fairgrounds, (989) 6879001, miantiquefestival.com Greater Midland Dow Run/Walk June 1, 7:30 a.m., individual and family rates available, Greater Midland Community Center, Midland, mail to:jadamcik@ greatermidland.org, greatermidland.org/races Midland Summer Art Fair June 1-2, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m., downtown Midland, mills@midlandcenter.org, mcfta.org

44 | great lakes bay | 06.19

Gypsy Goddess Festival 2019 June 1, 11 a.m., Saginaw County Fair, Chesaning, allevents.in/chesaning/ gypsy-goddessfestival-2019/ Eric Wiegardt Painterly Watercolors Workshop June 3-6, 9 a.m., $585, Saginaw Art Museum, Saginaw, (989) 239-4445, saginawartmuseum.org

Paddle & Pints June 6, 6 p.m., $40, Midland Farmers Market, Midland, info@ chippewanaturecenter. org, chippewanaturecenter. doubleknot.com/ registration/register.aspx#

After Dark Pit & Balcony Theatre: “The Cock Fight Play” June 20, 8:30 p.m., $15, Pit & Balcony Community Theatre, Saginaw, (989) 7546587

Comedy Night at the Center June 6, 8 p.m., $10, mcfta. org/event/comedy-night-9/ e25652/

WNEM After Hours: McMath and Friends June 20, 6-8 p.m., Saginaw Art Museum, Saginaw, (989) 754-2491, saginawartmuseum.org

Apps & Ales June 5, 5 p.m., Wenonah Park, Bay City, downtownbaycity. com/events/appsales/2019-06-05/

Full Moon Stroll June 16, 8:30 p.m., Chippewa Nature Center, Midland, info@ chippewanaturecenter.org, chippewanaturecenter.org

Drop-in Yoga Class June 6, 8:30-9:15 a.m., Aleda E. Lutz VA Medical Center, Saginaw, facebook.com/ events/281646212461274/

Adventures for Women: Evening Kayak June 19, 6-9 p.m., $30, Chippewa Nature Center, Midland, info@ chippewanaturecenter.org,

Great Lakes Bay Pride – After-party Drag Show 2019 June 29, 9 p.m., $10, Dow Event Center, Saginaw, eventbrite.com/e/ great-lakes-baypride-after-partydrag-show-2019tickets-54898778725


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play / SEEN HERE

dow tennis classic

1.

2.

3.

4.

1. Anna MacDonald and Brennan Connor 2. Emily Lyons, Elise LeBlanc and Don LeBlanc 3. Karen Staley, Jennifer Brenes and Kim McMahan 4. Lindsey Dice and Alexa Rogers

dow tennis classic 80s night

1.

2.

3.

4.

1. Steve Miles, Dan Hench, Jim Dorais, Paul MacNeil and John Clay Henry 2. Kim Chartier, Niki Nickel, Bryan Jendretzke and Alicia Dzurka 3. Nicole Lambert, Kimberly Gaskell, Lori Christiansen and Corey Christiansen 4. Talaya Schilb and Jamie Start

46 | great lakes bay | 06.19


uptown fashion show

1.

2.

3.

4.

1. Leah Werth and Charlotte Rancour 2. Jessica Hill, Olivia Wendland, and Joigel Pinero 3. Mckenzie Vinson and Haley Irwin 4. Katy Wendland and Stephanie Davidson

beauty in me fashion show

1.

2.

3.

4.

1. Brandon Webb and Dancia Mackey 2. Brittney Jackson and Christopher Watson 3. Kelce Bradley and Adia Jackson 4. Andrew Williams and Julia Calnen

06.19 | great lakes bay | 47


SALE POISON

BY RICH ADAMS

W WRAP UP P

YOU PROBABLY WON’T WANT TO BRING THESE ITEMS HOME It is estimated that 165,000 garage sales take place every week in the United States. While you can occasionally find a gem of a buy, there are some items that you definitely need to avoid, according to The Cheat Sheet.

BABY FURNITURE:

Used cribs, playpens, car seats and other baby gear might have a winning price, but they also might be missing key safety features found on new products. Older cribs might have design flaws that put your child at risk.

BIKE HELMETS:

The Bike Helmet Safety Institute warns that you never know if a used helmet has been in a crash, which could compromise its effectiveness. Older models may also not offer the same protection as new helmets.

MATTRESSES:

Stains. Odors. The possibility of bedbugs. Need we say more? Nonstick cookware: Sure, they were up to industry standards

48 | great lakes bay | 06.19

when they were first bought, but many will contain chemicals that are no longer used because of health risks. That goes double if the coating is flaking or scratched.

ELECTRONICS:

Technology advances quickly, and the item you are looking at on the clearance table is likely available in newer form at a reasonable price. And by all means check to be sure the TV or radio works.

USED SHOES:

First, think about the “ewww” factor: Someone else’s feet have been in those shoes. Secondly, the shoes have molded to the shape of someone else’s feet and will likely be uncomfortable. Go to an outlet store and buy new.

BOXES FULL OF OLD LONGPLAYING RECORD ALBUMS: Don’t

ever buy the whole box because you will be forced to find room for Herb Alpert or

The Captain and Tennille in your house. They might be scratched or broken. Go for single albums in a genre you enjoy if you see records for sale.

PUZZLES AND GAMES:

Unless you are a true game collector and know every piece that should be in that vintage 1939 Monopoly game, steer clear of games and puzzles. Both games and puzzles are likely to be missing important pieces.


BUILDING FOR F D

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The Great Lakes Bay Region Does Better With Garber “Why do I buy from Garber? The TOTAL experience! Friendly and knowledgeable sales staff, clean facilities, great selection, efficient sales process, and outstanding leadership that put the customer first and value the communities they live and work in. I’m a 10-plus year loyal customer and now am proud to #TeamUp with Garber Chevrolet as the official vehicle of the Dow Great Lakes Bay Invitational. What a great community partner and a first-class automotive group to buy your next car from. It matters where I buy my car. That’s why I buy from Garber!” Chris Chandler, Executive Director, Dow Great Lakes Bay Invitational

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GLBM June 2019 Issue  

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