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EXPLORING OPPORTUNITY

The Midland Center for the Arts welcomes a new communications manager

MODERN LOVE

Finding dating success in the digital age

E

Fabiano Brothers Inc., 1911

RICH IN

H ISTORY

HISTORICAL BACKGROUNDS BEHIND THE GREAT LAKES BAY REGION’S BUSINESSES

RUBY AWARDS

THE REGION’S NOTABLE PROFESSIONALS UNDER THE AGE OF 40

February 2020 $3.95


LEADING THE WAY IN CARDIOLOGY INTERVENTIONAL CARDIOLOGY

PHYSICIAN ASSISTANTS Michael “Marty” Bedell, PA-C Certified Physician Assistant

Yousef Bader, MD Interventional & Structural Cardiologist

Japhet Joseph, MD Interventional Cardiologist

Daniel T. Lee, MD Interventional Cardiologist & Peripheral Vascular Medicine

Stephen Mattichak, MD Interventional Cardiologist

INTERVENTIONAL CARDIOLOGY

Meghan Kelly, PA-C Certified Physician Assistant Brittany Phillips, PA-C Certified Physician Assistant Kathleen Revard, PA-C Certified Physician Assistant Roger Ward, PA-C Certified Physician Assistant

NURSE PRACTITIONERS Kochunni Mohan, MD Interventional Cardiologist

M. Anas Obeid, DO Interventional Cardiologist

Eric Sweterlitsch, MD Interventional Cardiologist

David Ternes, DO Interventional Cardiologist

CARDIOLOGY

Aimee Bellinger, NP-BC Family Nurse Practitioner - BC Beth Britt, NP-C Certified Nurse Practitioner Sue Hafer, NP-C Certified Nurse Practitioner Sharon Hakes, NP-C Certified Nurse Practitioner

Gassan Alaouie, DO Cardiologist

Kalil Masri, DO Cardiologist

CARDIOTHORACIC SURGERY

Ramesh B. Cherukuri, MD Cardiovascular Surgeon

Robert J. Holmes, MD Cardiothoracic Surgeon

Mark Sierra, MD Cardiologist

Subbarao Chavali, MD Cardiologist

ELECTROPHYSIOLOGY

Rehan Mahmud, MD Electrophysiologist

Shikha Sharma, MD Electrophysiologist

Thomas Tomczak, NP-C Certified Nurse Practitioner


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contents

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RUBY Award Recipients Annual recognition spotlights up-and-coming gems in the Great Lakes Bay Region

33

Region’s Business History Has

DEEP ROOTS 2.20 | great lakes bay | 3


live contents

10

10

STYLE

12

NATURE

14

FAMILY MATTERS

’90s Tracksuits for the Win Running errands never looked so good Great Horned Owls Prepping for parenthood and spring Bask in the Past Introduce your kids to the rich history of our region

work 18 20

EXPOSURE

My Business Community Professional highlights from the Great Lakes Bay Region

LOVE MY JOB

Exploring Opportunity Midland Center for the Arts welcomes new communications manager

21

STARTUPS

22

PROFILE

Quality is Key with Bay City’s New Business, Therapeutic Health Choice Bringing the industry to a professional standard Modern Love Finding dating success in the digital age

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play 40

TASTE

ONe eighteen Brings a Unique Experience to The H Hotel A new dining experience that will put you in your element

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WHAT’S COOKING

44

BEST SEAT IN THE HOUSE

46

SEEN HERE

Artisanne Chocolatier Anne Boulley Fall in love with Belgian Butter Truffles

Discover Your Region Heat up date night with these February offerings

DEPARTMENTS

6 PUBLISHER’S NOTE 48

WRAP UP

Great Lakes Bay magazine, Volume 17, Issue 2, February 2020 is published monthly by The F.P. Horak Company, 1311 Straits Drive Bay City MI 48706. Send address changes to Great Lakes Bay Magazine, P.O. Box 925, Bay City, MI 48706. Copyright © 2020 The F.P. Horak Company. All rights reserved. Reproduction in whole or part without permission is prohibited.

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EXCELLENCE BEATS HERE Heart Rhythm Disorders Treatment Diagnostic and therapeutic treatment options for complex heart rhythm disorders are a vital part of MidMichigan Health’s comprehensive Heart and Vascular Program. The electrophysiology laboratory at MidMichigan Medical Center - Midland is equipped with complex 3D mapping of the heart. This enables our experienced electrophysiology team to pinpoint the exact origin of the abnormal heart rhythms and to treat them. Electrophysiologists Opesanmi Esan, M.D., Nilofar Islam, M.D., and William Michael Mellana Jr., M.D.

www.midmichigan.org/ep

ACCEPTING NEW PATIENTS!

“THANKS FOR VOTING ME THE GREATEST DENTIST FIVE YEARS IN A ROW!” provider

3433 East Midland Road | Bay City | 989-686-6110 | www.Mason.dental


publisher’s note

Publisher: Marisa Horak Belotti marisa@greatlakesbaymag.com

a love for our past Thanks to Valentine’s Day, thoughts often turn to love and romance in February. This issue of Great Lakes Bay Magazine is no exception, but we’re adding a twist. Several of the stories throughout the following pages explore our ties to the past, and this edition of the magazine is an open and unapologetic love letter to the Great Lakes Bay Region and its deep, rich history. It’s difficult not to run into our area’s past when you look around the region. From our early inhabitants of the Sauk and Chippewa tribes in Mount Pleasant and the Saginaw Valley to the growth of the shipbuilding and sawmill industries in and around Bay City, from the long-reaching ties to German heritage in Frankenmuth to the creation of a technology and industrial innovation hub in Midland, the Great Lakes Bay Region has covered a large and important swath in the fabric of Michigan’s storied growth and development. Among our features this month are: • A glance at some of our local business that have stood the test of time and trial over the past 100-plus years and continue to serve the cities, townships and villages where they stand today. • An exploration of the origins and evolutions of our area’s historic business districts and how they still maintain a sense of tightly knit community in the modern age. • A discussion of where current residents and guests can delve into the lives of previous generations through our area’s historical societies and museums. Take a step back in time with us and recognize who we are now by celebrating the long and winding path that brought us here. The next steps for the Great Lakes Bay Region will be important ones because they will help shape our communities for our children’s children and beyond. Looking back helps us move forward, and having a healthy understanding of and appreciation for the past helps cast the decisions we make and the directions we take for the future.

Marisa Horak Belotti Publisher

we want to hear from you! Letters must be signed and include the writer’s name and address. Please send to: Great Lakes Bay Magazine, 1311 Straits Drive, Bay City, MI 48706, or email info@greatlakesbaymag.com. 6 | great lakes bay | 2.20

Editor: Kelly Mazurkiewicz kmazurkiewicz@greatlakesbaymag.com Associate Editor: Mary Gajda mgajda@greatlakesbaymag.com Art Director: Chad Hussle chad@greatlakesbaymag.com Photographer: Doug Julian doug@greatlakesbaymag.com Contributors: Rich Adams Anne Boulley Alicia Frank Amanda Fischer Mary Gajda Jessica Klein Hill Jenn Kirts Adam Lansdell Christopher Nagy Rachel Trumble Marketing Account Specialist: Liz Reno-Hayes lreno-hayes@greatlakesbaymag.com (517) 420-1341 Advertising Sales & Subscription Representative: Jim Williams jim@greatlakesbaymag.com (989) 891-1783 1311 Straits Drive Bay City, MI 48706 Phone (989) 893-2083 info@greatlakesbaymag.com Subscription Inquiries Call (989) 893-2083


Great Lakes Bay Magazine presents its annual “GREATEST OF GREAT LAKES BAY� reader poll. PLACE YOUR VOTES TODAY!

vote 2020! From your favorite place to dine to your favorite people and places, let us know who is at the top of your list.

HOW IT WORKS: 1. 2. 3. 4. 5.

Visit www.greatlakesbaymag.com. Click on the link for the 2020 Greatest of the Great Lakes Bay ballot. Write in your favorites! Vote in all 131 categories or just a few. Submit by April 15, 2020.* Look for the results in the July 2020 issue of Great Lakes Bay magazine.

*One ballot per person: A unique name and email address must be included with each vote. Duplicates will be discarded.


Congratulations, Christopher Chandler

Christopher Chandler

Dow congratulates Christopher Chandler, who has won the “Ruby” award for 2020. The “Ruby” award honors the area’s brightest professionals under the age of 40 who have made their mark in their profession, as well as had an impact on the Great Lakes Bay Region. We are Dow, the world’s most customer-centric materials science company.

dow.com ®™Trademark of The Dow Chemical Company (‘Dow’) or an affiliated company of Dow. © 2020 The Dow Chemical Company. All rights reserved.


live STYLE P. 10

NATURE P. 12

• FAMILY MATTERS

P. 14

MAKING THE LEAP

Since 1976, Bay Valley Academy has been enriching the lives of Great Lakes Bay Region residents by providing the highest standards in gymnastics instruction, dance technique training and age-appropriate choreography. Visit bayvalleyacademy.com.

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’90s live / STYLE

tracksuits for the win

RUNNING ERRANDS NEVER LOOKED SO GOOD PHOTOS BY DOUG JULIAN

The tracksuit has made its way back in all the comfort/chic head-to-toe glory we loved back in the 1990s. Keep it simple with monochromatic colors or color-blocking design and pair with a huge BOSS coat and a cool pair of sneakers. A high neck and jogger-style bottoms will keep this blast from the past looking more modern. It’s the new modern sweatsuit for the fashion-forward minded. Roomy/boxy blazers are being appreciated recently for all their versatility; dressing up any outfit, worn as a jacket and, if big enough, even worn as a dress paired with a belt. Stop into your local boutiques and keep an eye out for these 2020 trends.

BY GREAT LAKES BAY FASHION EXPERT Model: Brianna Bennick, Instagram: @briannabennick Clothing provided by: OMONI Boutique, 130 Uptown Drive in Bay City; omoniboutique.com 10 | great lakes bay | 2.20

Jessica Klein-Hill,

Owner, OMONI Boutique

MAKEUP/HAIR BY

Megan Phillips, Elite Stylist

Instagram and Facebook: @hairbymeganphillips


BUILDING FOR F D

Your Future OUR FUTURE

The F.P. Horak Company is committed to the community, to our customers and employees, and to using advanced technology in delivering print and marketing solutions. 1311 Straits Drive, Bay City, MI 48706

fphorak.com

800.735.6505


live / NATURE

WATCHING Adult great horned owl

great horned owls PREPPING FOR PARENTHOOD AND SPRING

BY JEANNE HENDERSON, INTERPRETIVE NATURALIST 400 S. BADOUR ROAD, MIDLAND (989) 631-0830 CHIPPEWANATURECENTER.ORG

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Long before the warm temperatures and sunny days of spring, resident great horned owls are preparing for parenthood. These birds are the “hoot owls� of Michigan, filling forests and backyards with deep, soft hoots as the monogamous pair communicates with each other and neighbors. They select a territory well before egg-laying, often roosting in the area for several months before working on their nest. Preferring to make use of a preexisting nest, they often adopt an abandoned

crow, hawk or squirrel nest or find a tree cavity to get them started. Some pairs move right in, while others add a fresh lining of bark, leaves, feathers, fur or trampled owl pellets to prepare it for the eggs. The female lays between one and four white, spherical eggs, usually during the month of February in this region. She will incubate the eggs for just over a month (3037 days) while the male brings her food. Once the eggs hatch, both parents will spend


built to hunt When spread out, a great horned owl foot can cover an area of 4 inches by 8 inches. Armed with sharp talons and incredible strength, these feet help owls tackle prey bigger than themselves including geese, opossums and other birds of prey.

WATCHING Fringed edge of a flight feather

the next several months feeding the owlets as they transition from nearly featherless pink chicks to well-feathered juveniles learning to hunt on their own. It takes six weeks from the time of hatching before the young are able to walk on branches around the nest and another three weeks before they learn to fly. Parental care can extend for months beyond that first flight as the young learn to hunt. During this time, the parents are providing food, teaching skills and protecting the young from predators. Some scientists believe the early nesting of the parents helps match those

WATCHING Juvenile owl in man-made nest

first hunting adventures with the abundance of small mammals in the spring. Great horned owls are sit-and-wait predators, preferring to perch, look and listen for prey before silently descending upon it. Able to catch everything from tiny mice to large skunks and even other birds of prey, these owls are at the top of the food chain. Only when they are young or injured are they vulnerable to predators such as coyote, fox, crows or other birds of prey. Listen carefully as you enjoy the winter weather, you may have the opportunity to listen in on a great horned owl pair getting ready for spring.

Silent flight allows owls to sneak up on their prey. Soft feathers with fringed edges break up the air flow over the wings, enabling them to approach undetected. Their short, wide wings help them steer through the trees in the forest as they hunt. Excellent hearing enables these owls to find small prey deep beneath the snow. Their facial feathers are arranged as a facial disc, directing sound to their ears. Owl ears are not directly across from each other, so they can pinpoint the location of a sound. Note: The “horns� on the great horned owl are not ears, just feathers designed to break up their silhouette. Well adapted for nighttime hunting, owls have huge pupils that open widely in the dark, letting in as much light as possible. They also have a lot of rods, resulting in excellent vision in low light conditions. Due to their large eye size, owls are not able to move their eyeballs, but can rotate their heads more than 180 degrees in each direction.


live / FAMILY MATTERS

bask in the past

Castle Museum of Saginaw County History

INTRODUCE YOUR KIDS TO THE RICH HISTORY OF OUR REGION BY ADAM LANSDELL

The area’s history and heritage have shaped what the Great Lakes Bay Region is today, and it never hurts to revisit it to create a better understanding of today’s culture. From the great Saginaw Chippewa Indian Tribe to the modern global influence of Dow Inc. the Great Lakes Bay Region continues to make its mark. To learn more, we recommend checking out the region’s historical centers and museums for a greater appreciation of how we’ve arrived here today.

BAY COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY (321 WASHINGTON AVE., BAY CITY) The museum, which offers an extensive research library and several feature galleries, is located in a former 1910 National Guard armory, listed on the state and national historic registers. Two permanent galleries, “Bay County ... Trails Through Time” and “Bay City: Seaport to the World,” recount the community’s distinctive heritage and evolution as a prosperous international port.

CASTLE MUSEUM OF SAGINAW COUNTY HISTORY (500 FEDERAL AVE., SAGINAW) The Castle Museum was originally built as a post office in 1897 in the style of a French chateau. It is now home to the Historical Society of Saginaw County and features numerous displays on this area’s history, including archaeology, lumbering and automotive manufacturing.

ALDEN B. DOW HOME 14 | great lakes bay | 2.20

AND STUDIO (315 POST ST., MIDLAND) Explore an oasis of mid-20th century modern architecture that inspires and entices you to think and to question. The Alden B. Dow Home and Studio is alive with dynamic color, angle light and unmatched integration of structure with its natural surroundings. Designated a National Historic Landmark in 1989, the Alden B. Dow Home and Studio is shared with the public through a tremendous amount of educational programming, public tours and researchers utilizing the Alden B. Dow Archives, the repository of Dow’s architectural records.

THE KIDS NEED LOVE TOO A VALENTINE’S NIGHT OUT WITH THE OTHER LOVES OF YOUR LIFE While cupid’s arrow may have sparked love for your significant other, he or she might not be the only love in your life. Valentine’s Day is about so much more than romance, it’s about love in general. So, don’t leave your kids in the dark on this special holiday. A family dinner or date night is the answer. Young or old, no one’s complaining about a great meal. Bring the kids out for an adult-style date-night dinner to show them the importance of expressing love and give them a glimpse of the romantic formalities of Valentine’s Day. Get dressed up and bring the kids along for a sit-down meal, and don’t forget to grab some dessert!


Marshall M. Fredericks Sculpture Museum

a region of romance GO-TO DESTINATIONS FOR YOUR NEXT DATE NIGHT ’Tis the season of love, and you’ve come to the right place. The Great Lakes Bay Region is flush with perfect date-night destinations that will spark romance in your life. Here are a few of our favorite places that make sparks fly. DINNER AND MOVIE MAGIC The historic State Theatre of Bay City brings the charm of a classic date night. A single-screen theater that was once a burlesque house transports you to the golden age of theater and cinema and creates a night that won’t be soon forgotten. BED-AND-BREAKFAST STAYS What’s more romantic and relaxing than waking up alongside your significant other and letting the morning slip away as you enjoy the comfort of a fresh meal? The region is dotted with quaint and quiet bed-and-breakfast experiences, such as the Frankenmuth Country Bed & Breakfast. Here you’ll enjoy a peacefully scenic farmhouse-style stay.

A SCENIC SUNSET ON THE BAY Nothing marks the end of a beautiful day and the beginning of an incredible evening quite like watching the sunset on Saginaw Bay. Work this one in as the finale to a fun afternoon out or the start to a night on the town. INSPIRED BY THE ARTS There’s something romantic about exploring the unknown of the arts with someone close. You learn a bit about each other as you work to dissect each piece you encounter. There are a few great art galleries that showcase the best work of local artists and masterworks from international artists. One of our favorites is Saginaw Valley State University’s Marshall M. Fredericks Sculpture Museum, which focuses on the life and works of sculptor Marshall Fredericks. His artworks are celebrated to this day in Detroit, Grand Rapids and beyond and include the famed Spirit of Detroit.

LOVE YOURSELF TOO Before you go throwing yourself at someone else, don’t forget to take a moment to love yourself. Self-care and maintenance are extremely important to your physical and mental health, so take a second to relax and pamper yourself. Treat yourself to a spa day, a personal massage or simply shut yourself in for the day and take on a hobby you’ve long neglected. Finding time for yourself is a must.

AFFIRMATION: DISCOVERING LOVE The better you know yourself, the better you’ll know who to look for. If you’re seeking love, look inward. If you aren’t aware of what’s missing, you won’t ever understand how to achieve true self-fulfillment. Define yourself to discover what will lift you up, instead of what will take you further away from your true self.


CONGRATULATIONS ON YOUR RUBY AWARD!

Candice Colby-Scott, MD EAR SURGEON | HEARING & COCHLEAR IMPLANT SPECIALIST

Open

8am-9pm every day!

7 naw, MI 4860 hington, Sagi 201 N. Was (989)754-SHOW www.templetheatre.com

(Includes weekends.)

989-772-3221 • www.greentree.coop GreenTree Co-op is Mt. Pleasant’s very own community-owned natural foods grocery store! Located at 214 N Franklin St*.

THE CAPITOL STEPS March 6, 2020

Local and Organic Meats • Vegan and Vegetarian Options • Grab-n-Go Deli • Gluten-Free Foods • Craft Beers • Organic Produce *Expanding to a new downtown location in 2021!

DRUM TAO 2020 March 8, 2020

DOG MAN: The Musical March 13, 2020


work EXPOSURE P. 18

LOVE MY JOB P. 20

STARTUPS P. 21

PROFILE P. 22

SEMPER PARATUS ON THE GREAT LAKES Petty Officer 2nd Class Peter Brown serves the U.S. Coast Guard out of Station Saginaw River in District 9. District 9 is responsible for all Coast Guard operations on the five Great Lakes, the St. Lawrence Seaway and the surrounding states.

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work / EXPOSURE

my business community PROFESSIONAL HIGHLIGHTS FROM THE GREAT LAKES BAY REGION

AMIGO MOBILITY FOUNDER RECEIVES MFG LIFETIME ACHIEVEMENT AWARD

With over 50 years as a Michigan familyowned-and-operated business, Amigo Mobility International has been recognized many times. Now, the Michigan Manufacturers Association announced that Al Thieme, the owner, founder and driving force behind Amigo Mobility, has received its MFG Lifetime Achievement Award. “I think of the impact he has had and it’s almost overwhelming; the way in which Al and Amigo Mobility are able to touch the lives of others,” said Beth Thieme, Al’s wife and vice president of Amigo Mobility. “It’s amazing to meet people who come in to visit us and write to us, and see how mobile and active they are. That’s all because of him and who he is as a person.” Al Thieme founded Amigo Mobility International Inc. in 1968. GMCA APPOINTS PURDY AS DIRECTOR OF ADMISSIONS AND PLACEMENT SERVICES

The Greater Michigan Construction Academy announced new staff member Carly Purdy will take the role of admissions and placement services director. Purdy will work out of the Midland-area office and will be responsible

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Carly Purdy

for the admissions process for apprentices as well as a resource for those students who are looking for employment. “We are excited about the experience Carly brings to GMCA. Her role will continue to build the caliber and quality of GMCA.” said GMCA Vice President Stephanie Davis. DOW GREAT LAKES BAY INVITATIONAL WINS GOLD DRIVER AWARD AS 2019 LPGA TOURNAMENT OF THE YEAR

The LPGA Tournament Partners recently selected the Dow Great Lakes Bay Invitational

The Dow Great Lakes Bay Invitational

as 2019 Tournament of the Year. The honor recognizes the LPGA event that “stands out among all tournaments as truly exceptional.” The Dow Great Lakes Bay Invitational also received the Gold Driver Award for Best Social Media Campaign as well as runner-up honors for Best Foodie Experience and the LPGA Spirit Award. “We are so honored to be recognized by the LPGA, and to receive this award in our first year is unbelievable,” said Dow Great Lakes Bay Invitational Executive Director Chris Chandler. “It’s a testament to the hard work of our team and how much the


Anne Randall

Dawn Wright

Great Lakes Bay Region really welcomed this tournament with open arms. We want to thank everyone in our community who was a part of the event, and we look forward to continuing to build this tournament together for years to come.” The 2020 Dow Great Lakes Bay Invitational will take place July 13-18 at the Midland Country Club in Midland. For more information about the Dow Great Lakes Bay Invitational, visit DowGLBI.com. SYM FINANCIAL ADVISORS EARN SPECIAL DESIGNATIONS

Anne Randall, financial paraplanner qualified

professional with SYM Financial Advisors, has been authorized by the College for Financial Planning to use the FPQP certification marks in accordance with board certification and renewal requirements. Randall joined SYM in 2017 to serve the financial needs of corporate executives, health care professionals, retirees and business owners as a client service representative. She is a 2006 graduate of Saginaw Valley State University. Individuals who hold the FPQP designation have completed a course of study encompassing the financial planning process, the five disciplines of financial planning and general financial planning concepts, terminology and product categories. They must also pass an end-of-course examination testing their ability to synthesize complex concepts and apply theoretical concepts to real-life situations. Dawn Wright, financial advisor with SYM, has been authorized by the Certified Financial Planner Board of Standards to use the Certified Financial Planner™ and CFP certification marks in accordance with board certification and renewal requirements. The CFP marks identify people who have met the rigorous experience and ethical requirements of the CFP board, have successfully completed financial planning coursework, and have passed the CFP certification examination covering the financial planning process, risk management, investments, tax planning and management, retirement, and employee benefits and estate planning. LOCAL CONSTRUCTION TRADE STUDENTS TO COMPETE AT NATIONAL COMPETITION

The Greater Michigan Construction Academy announced the winners of its Local Craft Championship. Competitors in the championship were required to complete a written exam and a three-hour project performance test.

The competitors were judged on safety, quality of workmanship, layout of project, use of materials, assembly of components, sequence of project, ability to follow instructions, ability to complete in a timely manner and accuracy. “We are very proud to announce that not only do we showcase the best and brightest skilled professionals during our local craft competition, but they are now among the many who will showcase their talent at the national level,” said Stephanie Davis, vice president and chief learning officer at the academy. Local Craft Championship

The winners are: Chase Gohsman, pipefitting, Three Rivers Corp. Jason Honeman, electrical, A & B Electrical Logan Schweinsberg, plumbing, Custom Plumbing & Heating Daniel Beebe, carpentry, Three Rivers Corp. The students will complete in the Craft Championship competition in March.


work / LOVE MY JOB

exploring opportunity MIDLAND CENTER FOR THE ARTS WELCOMES NEW COMMUNICATIONS MANAGER BY ALICIA FRANK

Q& A Lansing native Josh Holliday recently moved to the Great Lakes Bay Region, where he accepted a new position as the communications and public relations manager for the Midland Center for the Arts. Holliday discusses his love of the performing arts and his excitement to become a member of the new community in which he now resides. In his new role, Holliday is responsible for making sure people know of the tremendous things they have access to in the Great Lakes Bay Region. How did you end up in the Great Lakes Bay Region? I have been passionate about the performing arts my entire life. After attending college at Michigan State University, I discovered that I wanted to be working in a performing arts center as my career. Thankfully a few of my professional mentors have landed here at the Midland Center for the Arts, opening that opportunity for me to explore working here. As someone who is recently new to the area, what do you find most appealing about living in the Great Lakes Bay Region? As someone who moved from Lansing, equally a cool and upcoming town in our state, I always desired to be closer to the Great Lakes. I have found the ways in which this region invests in

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amenities, cultural offerings and infrastructure to be a large driver in me finding this community appealing. Its close proximity to the Great Lakes and waterways connecting to them is just icing on the cake. What do you love best about working at the Midland Center for the Arts? The part that I love most about working at the center is the variety of programs and events we offer. We truly have something for everyone. Whether you want to attend a show, take an art class, perform on stage with our theater or choirs, or bring your family to our museums, we are able to provide access to some of the most incredible programs ‌ here in our own community. In my role, I get to tell that story and ensure people get to enjoy the gem of a facility we have here in the region. What advice do you have for someone looking to make a career change in a different town or city? My biggest piece of advice is to get involved, network, try local restaurants and businesses, and even attend the local festivals. I am finding this community to be incredibly welcoming, continually opening the door for me as I meet a new group of people. As a young person, I have found the events with MYPros are very helpful.


work / STARTUPS

quality is key with bay city’s new business, therapeutic health choice BRINGING THE INDUSTRY TO A PROFESSIONAL STANDARD The marijuana industry is rapidly growing throughout the state and country, and one of Bay City’s newest businesses, Therapeutic Health Choice, is working to keep consumers safe while positively impacting the community. As one of just a handful of safety compliance laboratories licensed in the state of Michigan, Therapeutic Health Choice will run quality assurance tests on medical marijuana and marijuana-based products on a state wide basis to ensure they are safe for consumption. THC plans to move into the recreational sector at a later date. “Testing involves the use of very sophisticated equipment to test grower, processors and manufacturer products to assure compliance with the state requirements. The state has set specific standards for potency , heavy metals, residual solvents and mold, to list a few. Each test upon completion is entered into the state wide system before it can be sold to the Public.”

BY AMANDA FISCHER

Therapeutic Health Choice owners Norm and Christine Van Wormer said they are like the police of the industry and, along with the state, work to bring the industry to a high quality and safety compliance standard. Even though the industry is emerging, the safety and compliance segment has banded together to become partners to support each other in quality and compliance. As such THChoice will be working with other labs in the area to confirm our results and support our findings.This collaboration yields continuity of testing and furthers public safety. The Van Wormers said they entered the marijuana industry for a variety of reasons. “It was a great opportunity,” said Christine Van Wormer. “It’s a brand-new business, a new endeavor and a good business for women’s growth and business development. We have a big impact here.” The Van Wormers also said Therapeutic Health Choice will help bolster the Bay City community.

Located at 903 Euclid Ave., Therapeutic Health Choice occupies a building that sat vacant for nearly five years. The Van Wormers said they renovated a long-damaged building to turn it into a business that will house between 12 and 20 employees. The Van Wormers said in addition to the health benefits marijuana and marijuana-based products can potentially provide to individuals, Therapeutic Health Choice will bring good-paying jobs, future economic development opportunities and a new industry to the region. “My husband’s family has been in business in the Bay City/Pinconning area for years, so it’s great to be able to stay in the area and continue doing good for the community,” said Christine Van Wormer. Therapeutic Health Choice is on the brink of opening and excited to embrace the future. For more information on Therapeutic Health Choice, visit thchoice.com

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work / PROFILE

modern love

FINDING DATING SUCCESS IN THE DIGITAL AGE

BY CHRISTOPHER NAGY | PHOTOS BY MARILYN POYER


The couple that plays together, stays together. Steve and Karen Stevenson have a mutual interest in riding.

While cautionary tales of predatory behavior on the internet continue to remind of the importance of maintaining vigilant safeguards, the social stigma once attached to online dating seems to be diminishing in correlation to the growing prevalence of success stories. A 2015 Pew Research Center report showed exposure to online dating services had grown since the research center first conducted a survey in 2005, with 15% of adults reporting they had used an online dating site or mobile app and the overall cultural acceptability of the practice increasing in the decade since the research was initially compiled. Although the majority of Americans still use offline dating methods to meet potential partners, Pew reported that 5% of Americans who are married or in a committed relationship met their partner online. Among that statistic are Bay City residents Karen Stevenson, an administrative assistant at a tri-city

hospital, and husband Steve Stevenson, a local machinist. “My husband and I started talking through an online dating service in November 2011,” Karen Stevenson said. “We had our first date on Dec. 4, 2011, and were married on Oct. 17, 2015. We did have kind of a false start. We started dating Dec. 4, but broke up in mid-January 2012. We started talking again on April 5, 2012, and have been together since. We simply weren’t ready the first time.” Karen said she turned to online dating because of her inability to meet new people. She said she previously had been told that she sometimes came off as unapproachable, and she thought it might be easier to meet someone online. For Steve, the foray into the world of online dating services came at the prompting of his sister, who helped him set up his online profile, Karen explained. Still the decision to try a new approach didn’t come without reservations.

“For me, I was hesitant in the respect that you don’t know for sure who you are talking to, and when it came to the first meeting, as a woman, I had to be extra careful,” Karen said. “Steve was hesitant because he didn’t know what to expect and also the aspect of not knowing for sure you are talking to the person pictured. One of his biggest concerns was that he did not want anyone that was associated with drugs. He did not want that around his kids, since they still lived with him.” As is the case in offline dating, there is no guarantee of immediate success in online dating, and Karen said she had to work through a line of frogs before finally coming across her prince. “I talked to a lot of guys and went on quite a few first dates,” Karen said. “For one reason or another, things didn’t work out, whether it was no chemistry, or he came off as a creeper. I had a lot of creepers that messaged me. … Steve talked to quite a few ladies but only went out with three, and I was the lucky one that he stuck with.” “Or got stuck with,” she added with a laugh. The type of “e-motional” connection the Stevensons found in cyberspace is becoming more and more the norm. The couple said they wouldn’t hesitate to recommend online dating to another person in pursuit of love or romance. “That seems to be how a lot of people meet these days,” Karen said. “It’s worth a try for sure. Just always be careful. I hate to say be untrusting, but I guess don’t be naive and don’t take everything at face value.”

2.20 | great lakes bay | 23


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here clinics working in prosthetics and orthotics help give patients new beginnings, Oakland Orthopedic Appliances is dedicated to seeing each patient through on their entire journey. “Most prosthetics clinics will do the fitting but not the rehabilitation,” Corey Smith, certified prosthetist and owner of Oakland Orthopedic Appliances, said. “We’re kind of taking a different approach in what we do.” That new approach came to fruition last year at the Oakland Orthopedic Appliances clinic at 515 Mulholland St. in Bay City. Following a renovation and expansion of the clinic, Oakland Orthopedic Appliances began offering access to an on-site state-of-the-art rehabilitation facility at no cost to patients. Smith said the decision to offer physical rehabilitation fit into Oakland Orthopedic Appliances’ overarching philosophy to keep patient needs as its pinnacle priority. “When I first started in this line of work, insurance allowed a lot of therapy accessibility. But now, insurance places a cap on that access,” Smith said. “High-tech prosthetics improve quality of life, but the positive outcomes go down if you’re not given opportunities to learn how to use the prosthetic. We want to improve those outcomes.”


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Smith said the idea for the rehabilitation facility initially came to him a decade ago when thinking about the close, intimate relationship patients have with their prosthetist. It’s a bond that stays with each patient for the rest of their life, he explained. That lifelong relationship is why Smith wanted Oakland Orthopedic Appliances to provide more than just high-quality, custom-designed prosthetics and orthotics. Rehabilitation is a vital step in the recovery process – receiving the new limb is just the start of the patient journey; learning how to live with it is the rest. The rehab facility at the Bay Clinic includes a Solo-Step harness system that takes the fear of falling out of the equation when a person is recovering, but the facility isn’t only available to recovering patients. “We don’t bill for our therapy services,” Smith said. “It’s free to patients, and they can come here every day for as long as they’d like. We have patients that do come and use the facility daily. They love it. Some people come just to walk, especially at this time of year, where they don’t have to worry about slipping and falling. It’s not just for therapy. In the long run, it’s something that is going to decrease health care costs because it’s keeping people active.”

The concept is both unique and revolutionary. “As far as we know, there are no other prosthetic facilities in the state that offer both custom prosthetic design and specialized prosthetic rehabilitation,” Smith said. “There are not a lot of physical therapy clinics that specialize in rehabilitation for amputees. To me, this is something that just made sense because it’s something that is designed to increase the continuity of care.” Folding rehabilitation into the services of Oakland Orthopedic Appliances helps the business fulfill its mission of being a full-service care provider that is determined to be synonymous with kindness, compassion and excellence. “At the end of the day, we care about the patient,” Smith said. “That’s the bottom line.” Oakland Orthopedic Appliances has been serving the orthotic/ prosthetic community since 1971. With offices in Bay City, Midland, Saginaw, Mount Pleasant, West Branch, Bad Axe, Owosso and Grand Blanc, the team at Oakland Orthopedic Appliances has numerous years of combined experience complementing a wide array of specialties in the orthotic and prosthetic fields. For more information, visit oaklandoandp.com.


2020

FEATURE

ANNUAL RECOGNITION SPOTLIGHTS UP-AND-COMING GEMS IN THE GREAT LAKES BAY REGION

26 | great lakes bay | 2.20


RUBY

award recipients BY RICH ADAMS | PHOTOS BY DOUG JULIAN


FEATURE

THIS YEAR, THE 15TH ANNUAL RUBY AWARDS, SPONSORED BY GREAT LAKES BAY MAGAZINE AND WNEMTV, RECOGNIZE 10 OF THE GREAT LAKES BAY REGION’S EXCEPTIONAL PROFESSIONALS UNDER THE AGE OF 40 WHO HAVE DEMONSTRATED EXCELLENCE IN THEIR AREAS OF EXPERTISE. THE RUBY AWARDS – WHICH STANDS FOR RECOGNIZING THE UPWARD, BRIGHT AND YOUNG – ARE PRESENTED BY 1ST STATE BANK.

2020 28 | great lakes bay | 2.20

MEGHAN BARUTH

CHRIS CHANDLER

JENNIFER CHAYTOR

ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR, SAGINAW VALLEY STATE UNIVERSITY DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH SCIENCE

EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR OF THE DOW GREAT LAKES INVITATIONAL LPGA TOURNAMENT AND COMMUNICATIONS AND SPORTS SOLUTIONS MANAGER AT DOW CORP.

ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR, SAGINAW VALLEY STATE UNIVERSITY DEPARTMENT OF CHEMISTRY

WHAT IS YOUR REACTION TO RECEIVING A RUBY AWARD?

I was very honored to have been nominated for the RUBY Award; actually, receiving it is very exciting. I am in the company of professionals doing amazing things in our community. TO WHAT DO YOU ATTRIBUTE YOUR SUCCESS?

A strong passion to help people and the community, hard work and the strong team I am a part of, both at work and at home. WHAT ARE YOUR NEXT MAJOR GOALS?

Continue working with local community organizations to improve the health of those living in the Great Lakes Bay Region. Our current focus is on improving maternal and child health outcomes.

WHAT IS YOUR REACTION TO RECEIVING A RUBY AWARD?

I’m honored and thankful to 1st State Bank and the selection committee to be considered among the many great leaders and community advocates in the region and appreciative that so many people are working hard every day to make the GLBR a great place to live, work and play. TO WHAT DO YOU ATTRIBUTE YOUR SUCCESS?

I’ve been blessed to be surrounded by family and friends my entire life who have shaped me into who I am today. The example and parenting from my mom, specifically, has been instrumental in guiding my education and values. I’m also blessed with the most amazing, loving and supportive wife and two children who I’m lucky to get to do life with. WHAT ARE YOUR NEXT MAJOR GOALS?

My focus is to make a bigger impact in our community and at work through opportunities to collaborate across the many projects I work on to impact more people, give more back and provide opportunities for everyone to succeed.

WHAT IS YOUR REACTION TO RECEIVING A RUBY AWARD?

I am very pleased to hear that I was selected to be one of the recipients of the 2020 RUBY Award. I am honored to have been nominated by SVSU and am proud to represent our institution. I am appreciative to 1st State Bank for creating this award to recognize young professionals in our region. TO WHAT DO YOU ATTRIBUTE YOUR SUCCESS?

I attribute my success to my fantastic mentors and colleagues. I had supportive graduate and post-doctoral supervisors who encouraged me to pursue a career in academia and provided me with opportunities to publish in scientific journals. Since joining the faculty at SVSU, I have been fortunate to work with friendly and encouraging colleagues and administrators. I also owe a good deal of my success to SVSU’s commitment to funding undergraduate research and supporting quality studentcentered teaching. WHAT ARE YOUR NEXT MAJOR GOALS?

My next major goals are to continue to provide undergraduate students with opportunities to conduct independent research and to present their results at national conferences. I also intend to submit a paper detailing the results of our recent experiments for publication.


ROB CLEMENTS OWNER, CLEMENTS ELECTRIC INC. WHAT IS YOUR REACTION TO RECEIVING A RUBY AWARD?

I was honored just to be nominated for the RUBY Award. Winning the award is a very gratifying feeling. TO WHAT DO YOU ATTRIBUTE YOUR SUCCESS?

My upbringing. I learned at an early age that with drive and focus I could accomplish any goals I set for myself. WHAT ARE YOUR NEXT MAJOR GOALS?

My plans for the future include becoming much more involved in the Great Lakes Bay Region on a personal level. I would like to see the region continue to grow and attract more businesses and residents. I truly believe we can be the best region in the state of Michigan.

DR. CANDICE COLBY SCOTT OTOLOGY, NEUROTOLOGY AND SKULL BASE SURGERY AT BAKER ENT ASSOCIATES; ADJUNCT FACULTY, CENTRAL MICHIGAN UNIVERSITY MEDICAL SCHOOL AND AUDIOLOGY DEPARTMENT WHAT IS YOUR REACTION TO RECEIVING A RUBY AWARD?

It is such an honor to receive this award shortly after the return to practice in my hometown as I work hard to improve people’s quality of life in the community I grew up in that are more like family and friends than patients. TO WHAT DO YOU ATTRIBUTE YOUR SUCCESS?

I have a wonderful and necessary support system in my faith, my husband and my family, and would not have gotten this far in my career, as well as having three small children, without them. As a physician, I believe my strength is my ability to relate to and communicate well with my patients. WHAT ARE YOUR NEXT MAJOR GOALS?

I look forward to further educating the community about hearing loss and ear disease, and to rid the stigma associated with wearing assistive hearing devices. We are also continuing to grow the Cochlear Implant Center and develop programs to care for our littlest pediatric patients with hearing loss.

KEVIN DOUGLAS CORE ENGINEERING MANAGER AND GLOBAL REPS ARCHITECT FOR NEXTEER AUTOMOTIVE WHAT IS YOUR REACTION TO RECEIVING A RUBY AWARD?

I was honored to receive this award due to the continued success of past recipients. This is a great group to be considered among. It is humbling that I was nominated and chosen out of so many possible candidates around the area. TO WHAT DO YOU ATTRIBUTE YOUR SUCCESS?

My work ethic and drive for self-improvement are what have always set me apart from others. Even with both of these, I would not truly stand out if I did not have great mentors helping coach and promote me over the years. WHAT ARE YOUR NEXT MAJOR GOALS?

I want to pay forward what has been done for me by helping others coming after me to achieve the level of success they personally strive for.

LATRICE S. GOODWINE PERSONAL FINANCE COACH, GIRL! WHAT’S IN YOUR P.U.R.S.E? WHAT IS YOUR REACTION TO RECEIVING A RUBY AWARD?

My reaction to receiving the RUBY Award was thank you, Lord for providing confirmation that what I do matters. TO WHAT DO YOU ATTRIBUTE YOUR SUCCESS?

My faith. It keeps me secure during moments of insecurity. My children. They are my motivation and for everything that I do. My mother. She is my biggest fan; I just want to make her proud. Anthony. He has unselfishly been a super dad for our children as I build Girl! What’s In Your P.U.R.S.E? My members. They push and inspire me daily. When they succeed, I succeed, and it fuels me every day. Lastly, showing up, being consistent and relatable. My members know I’m going to consistently show-up with my best resources to help them complete their financial goals. WHAT ARE YOUR NEXT MAJOR GOALS?

One major goal for 2020 is developing the digital Purse app. The app will help women create, track and complete financial goals unique to their household, in a centralized location.


FEATURE

DR. JENNIFER NASH

ALAYNA WESNER

EMILY YEAGER

OWNER, DERMATOLOGY ASSOCIATES OF MIDLAND

CREATIVE DIRECTOR, CHEVRON CREATIVE/SUSHI REMIX/ MCLAREN

PRESIDENT AND CEO, CAN COUNCIL GREAT LAKES BAY REGION

WHAT IS YOUR REACTION TO RECEIVING A RUBY AWARD?

WHAT IS YOUR REACTION TO RECEIVING A RUBY AWARD?

As a young art director fresh out of college, it was my role at Great Lakes Bay Magazine to schedule the photo shoots of the RUBY Award winners each year. I remember being in complete awe of these accomplished and impressive professionals. When I was told that I was a recipient this year, it truly meant the world to me.

I’m incredibly grateful to have my life’s work dedicated to serving in our nonprofit industry validated and honored among the accomplishments of such talented professionals.

WHAT IS YOUR REACTION TO RECEIVING A RUBY AWARD?

I am honored to be receiving the RUBY Award and humbled to be selected among so many accomplished young professionals. TO WHAT DO YOU ATTRIBUTE YOUR SUCCESS?

The road to becoming a doctor and a business owner is a long one that requires years of persistence, sacrifice, dedication and drive and the journey is nearly impossible without a wide net of support. I have to thank my family, friends, and many career mentors and colleagues who have provided me with endless support and encouragement to reach my full potential. WHAT ARE YOUR NEXT MAJOR GOALS?

One of my goals is to be able to expand the practice by adding another dermatologist so that we will be able to reach even more patients and provide care to those who need it most. My goals have always been to serve our community to the best of my ability and give back to the area where I grew up.

2020 30 | great lakes bay | 2.20

TO WHAT DO YOU ATTRIBUTE YOUR SUCCESS?

My career took a completely different direction when I decided to start saying yes whenever I wanted to say no out of fear of failure. I also had a number of mentors who have looked out for me through the years. When you surround yourself with inspiring people, you start to do inspiring things. WHAT ARE YOUR NEXT MAJOR GOALS?

I would love to start pursuing my MBA in the next year. Plans to expand Sushi Remix to a Midland location are on the horizon. I also would love to continue to grow my marketing skills while working for McLaren.

TO WHAT DO YOU ATTRIBUTE YOUR SUCCESS?

There have been people in my life who’ve built me up over the years and given me their shoulders to stand on, lean on and even cry on. Their encouragement, guidance and unwavering faith in me has made me who I am today. These folks are God’s greatest blessings in my life, and I’ll be forever grateful for all they’ve done and continue to do for me. WHAT ARE YOUR NEXT MAJOR GOALS?

As I work to advance the efforts of our CAN Council Great Lakes Bay Region, my greatest hope is that along the way I am able to inspire each member of our community to join me to the greatest capacity they’re able to serve in the fight against child abuse and neglect. Along the way, I’ll watch for opportunities to offer my shoulders to those around me as so many have done for me.


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WE ARE PROUD OF OUR RUBY AWARD RECIPIENTS

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Associate Professor of Chemistry


FEATURE FEATURE St. Mary’s of Michigan

Garber Automotive

Region’s Business History Has

DEEP ROOTS

Michigan Sugar Co.

BY RICH ADAMS The Great Lakes Bay Region is steeped in history, from Native American origins to today’s modern businesses and industries. In development of the area, historic businesses sprouted up in each major city of the region.

2.20 | great lakes bay | 33


BAY CITY

There are a number of business districts in Bay City, including the Banks, Broadway Avenue, Columbus Avenue, Downtown and Johnson Street districts. The historic Midland Street Historic Business District is on the west side of the city and is noted for a variety of unique businesses, according to the Bay City website. Based on a nominating form for the National Register of Historic Places, when lumbering died out, the district’s economy faltered and came to a standstill during the

Great Depression. As a result, many of the buildings look like they did in 1929, the application noted. The district is home to about 60 businesses. “When visitors come to the Midland Street district, they are charmed by the ambiance,” said Kevin Novellino, owner of Brooklyn Boyz Pizzeria and Italian Eatery. “There is potential for the Midland Street Historic District, and we are just waiting for investment in the district.”

Historic businesses

MICHIGAN SUGAR CO.: Founded in 1906, the Michigan Sugar Co. started with the beet sugar processing industry in Michigan growing from the decline of the lumbering industry in the Saginaw Valley in the late 1800s. Local leaders searched for a crop to bring economic revitalization to the area. In 1884, a man from Saginaw visiting Germany noticed how well sugarbeet crops were performing for the people there. Seeds he brought back with him from his travels ended up with Dr. Robert C. Kedzie, a chemistry professor at Michigan State Agricultural College. Kedzie was enthusiastic about the sugarbeet’s potential for the Saginaw Valley, and he imported 1,500 pounds of seed from France and distributed it to farmers across the state.

FABIANO BROTHERS INC.: Since 1885, when family patriarch Gennaro Fabiano opened a cantina in San Ippolito, Italy, the Fabiano family has prided itself on providing efficient and dependable customer service. Fabiano immigrated to the United States in 1899, and worked on the railroad in St. Louis, Missouri, to earn money to bring his family to America. Today, Fabiano Brothers Inc. is a family-owned and family-operated wholesale beer and wine distributor. The company provides service to licensed alcoholic beverage retailers in central and northern Michigan from headquarters in Bay City and regional office and distribution facilities in Petoskey.

34 | great lakes bay | 2.20


FEATURE

MIDLAND

Midland’s first fashionable residential neighborhood included Italianate and Queen Anne homes along West Main Street, built for early professionals and lumber entrepreneurs. Modest homes for shopkeepers and workers stood nearby. The West Main Street

Historic District was established in 1979, with the hopes of preserving and documenting Midland’s historical structures. In 1897, Herbert Henry Dow founded Dow Chemical Co. in Midland, which enabled the city to survive the end of the logging era and to grow to its present size.

DOW CHEMICAL CO: Founded in 1897, Dow has a long, rich history in the Great Lakes Bay Region. Herbert Henry Dow left the Midland Chemical Co., continued his research and in 1895 moved to Ohio to form Dow Process Co.based on his new research of extracting chloride and caustic soda from sodium chloride. The following year he returned to Midland, where he formed Dow Chemical. Dow today is helping address some of the world’s most challenging problems. The company works passionately to innovate and create sustainable solutions, and it has been vital to the success of the Great Lakes Bay Region.

CHEMICAL BANK: Founded more than 100 years ago in Midland with the purpose of providing banking services for the local community, Chemical Bank has grown extensively over the years, and now serves well over 100 different communities throughout the Lower Peninsula. At the core, it has remained a community bank committed to helping provide financial services to all the communities it serves. 2.20 | great lakes bay | 35


SAGINAW

Old Saginaw City was the original commercial center of Saginaw. The early to mid-1800s saw the development of a commercial area dependent upon traffic from the Saginaw River and the lumbermen working in the area. As the lumber boom developed in the 1860s, most of the existing brick businesses were

built. The lumber eventually disappeared, but the commercial district of Old Saginaw City survived, mainly because it supplied the community with needed goods. Today Old Saginaw City remains a visible commercial center, changing to meet the needs of new generations on the west side.

Historic businesses

STEVENS WORLDWIDE VAN LINES: Established in 1905 in Saginaw, founder Frederick H. Stevens Jr. used a single horse and dray to haul baggage to and from the Michigan Central Passenger Depot. Stevens has continued under the leadership of the same family for its entire history. Members of the fourth and fifth generations of the company founder continue to hold executive positions in the company.

GARBER AUTOMOTIVE: Guy S. Garber, a young farm implement salesman of exceptional ability and bold vision, saw the automobile as the vehicle of the future. In 1907, he founded Garber Buick of Saginaw, now America’s oldest, family-owned General Motors dealership. In 1913, Garber Buick was appointed by GM Buick Division as one of the original “Buick Thirteen” distributors, and he was granted wholesale responsibility for selling Buicks from Saginaw County north to the Straits of Mackinac.

36 | great lakes bay | 2.20

ST. MARY’S OF MICHIGAN: Prior to 1874, the Saginaw area didn’t have a hospital. In fact, there wasn’t a hospital north of Detroit. But because of the influx of workers from the rugged lumber industry, the county’s population grew rapidly, and four Daughters of Charity came to Saginaw to establish St. Mary’s Hospital. The sisters used Monitor House, a 15-room building that was used both as a hotel and boarding house, as their medical facility. St. Mary’s performed the area’s first open heart surgery in 1984, and its cardiac care department has performed over 20,000 procedures since.


FEATURE

MOUNT PLEASANT The Mount Pleasant Downtown Historic District has been the commercial, business and social site of the city’s historic core since its establishment in 1860, according to the National Register of Historic Places. The district contains historic buildings dating to 1875 and contained the bulk of the city’s commercial activities during that period. The district contains 135 businesses, including 70 buildings dating from the 1870s to the 1950s. “Historic downtown is the very core of Mount Pleasant,” said Helen Chase, owner of Trillium Fine Clothing for Women on Broadway Street, which was founded in 1947 as Marianne Fashion Center and has been continuously operating for 72 years. “These blocks hold the origins, the history and the memories of the city; it is ‘home.’ Generations have shopped, eaten, attended to financial needs, enjoyed ice cream, had a haircut, strolled the streets and visited Santa in December. A special array of local, unique, independent retailers, services industries and restaurants continue to choose the community of historic downtown Mount Pleasant.”

CENTRAL MICHIGAN UNIVERSITY: Established in 1892, Central Michigan University has more than 20,000 students on its Mount Pleasant campus and 7,000 students enrolled online at more than 60 locations worldwide. CMU offers 200 academic programs at the undergraduate, master’s, specialist and doctoral levels, including programs in entrepreneurship, journalism, music, audiology, teacher education, psychology and physician assistant. The School of Engineering and Technology has accredited programs in mechanical, electrical and computer engineering. CMU has also established a College of Medicine, which opened in fall 2013

FRANKENMUTH The walkable shopping district of Frankenmuth is dotted by Bavarian architecture. With the famed Bavarian Inn, Bronner’s CHRISTmas Wonderland and Zehnder’s of Frankenmuth, the unique appeal of the city is hard to pin down because there is so much it offers. There are cuckoo clocks, quilt shops and woolen mills; sausage companies serving up house-made Bavarian specialties and a massive Cheese Haus with 160-plus options; and the Frankenmuth River Place Shops that include more than 35 stores for a European-inspired shopping experience.

ZEILINGER WOOL CO.: William Abraham developed his fiber-processing skills in 1910. His son, Arnold Abraham, focused on wool processing during World War II and up until the mid1970s. Arnold’s daughter, Kathy, and her husband, Gary Zeilinger, opened their new facility on Weiss Street in 1985. The Zeilinger Wool Co. has a retail store and also offers tours where visitors can see the processing of sheep wool and other exotic animal fibers.

“At Frankenmuth Insurance, our ‘neighbor helping neighbor’ value holds true after more than 150 years of operation,” said Sarah Peyok, marketing specialist for the company. “From the area’s beginnings in the mid-1800s to the vibrant tourist destination of today, community members have remained committed to helping one another achieve success. Our company grew out of this spirit. Early settlers banded together to face the toughest trial of the time—fire—and pledged to help each other in times of need by creating an association that eventually evolved into today’s Frankenmuth Insurance.”

FRANKENMUTH INSURANCE: In 1868, a group of Bavarian pioneer settlers decided to form a mutual insurance society for protection against perils striking their buildings and goods. In exchange for a premium, all members contributed toward the coverage of one another’s sustained losses. Upon establishing Deutschen Frankenmuther Unterstützung Verein (German Frankenmuth Aid Association), operating out of the back room of the Nuechterlein Mortuary, the seed of Frankenmuth Insurance was planted. 2.20 | great lakes bay | 37


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play TASTE P. 40

WHAT’S COOKING P. 42

BEST SEAT P. 44

SEEN P. 46

THE CULTURE OF ROMANCE From art and music to theater, dance and film, the Midland Center for the Arts provides the perfect backdrop to make date night special for everyone. The center provides world-class cultural programming in a vast array of mediums under one roof.

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play / TASTE

ONe eighteen brings a unique experience

A

new restaurant has emerged within Midland’s The H Hotel and it’s likely to become one you’ll frequent more than periodically. ONe eighteen is an exciting destination for longtime residents and visitors to the region as it brings something new but doesn’t hesitate to honor regional traditions. The mid-century American tavern has been in the planning stages since mid-2018 and recently opened its doors to the public. “We wanted to create a restaurant that had a connection with Midland,” said Derek Grimaldi, general manager of The H Hotel. “Today more than ever, consumers are looking

A NEW DINING OPPORTUNITY THAT WILL PUT YOU IN YOUR ELEMENT BY ADAM LANSDELL PHOTOS BY DOUG JULIAN

for authentic experiences that are reflective of the towns they grew up in and celebrate the cities that they visit.” You may have noticed the unique spelling of the restaurant: ONe eighteen. This is no typo, but rather a way to further connect the eatery and bar to its homestead at The H Hotel. The H Hotel is heavily themed after the symbol for hydrogen, the first element on the periodic table. “In naming the restaurant ONe eighteen, our goal was to build off the branding of the hotel in a not-so-obvious way, while having a story to tell about its origin,” explained Grimaldi. “The 118 represents the current number of elements on the periodic table.” As a hub for visitors of the region, The H Hotel set out to create an environment that was


FROM PLATING TO TASTE ONe eighteen offers an authentic food and beverage experience with menu items like deviled eggs and ONe eighteen fries.

memorable as a first impression. It is a landing spot for many when they first visit Midland. For those within the region, the new concept has proven to be intriguing. “At The H, we are fortunate to host visitors from not only within the state and across the nation but also from dozens of countries around the world,” said Grimaldi. “Our hope is that the natural curiosity that travelers bring to the region will lead them to explore ONe eighteen along with the many other great amenities and attractions the area has to offer.” ONe eighteen is designed to be a captivating new concept for the community as well, and its menu boasts an impressive array of options that resonate with any diet.

The team behind its development worked diligently to create a space that unites the community for incredible eats. With a selection of large snack and shareables section, ONe eighteen is an ideal destination for group and family dining. “Our team has worked hard to create an environment that is warm and inviting that will evoke a sense of civic pride for the community,” said Grimaldi. “We think guests will really appreciate the design of the restaurant, the focus on food quality and our commitment to friendly and genuine service. We want ONe eighteen to be a place where people can enjoy good company and great food.” ONe eighteen has been long in the making, and its launch is something Grimaldi

hopes is celebrated by the community in which the restaurant aims to support. “Anytime you have the opportunity to be involved with the development of a project that has benefit and meaning to a community, you can’t help but feel a sense of purpose and responsibility in what you are doing,” said Grimaldi. “Our journey over the last 18 months has been rewarding, inspiring, fun and, most importantly, a great learning experience. From our perspective their seems to be a great deal of excitement in the city about this project, and our entire team is very proud of what we have accomplished.” In the spring, ONe eighteen will transform to the perfect outdoor dining spot, thanks to a newly renovated courtyard that’s been outfitted with new fire pits, gathering areas and event spaces.

2.20 | great lakes bay | 41


play / WHAT’S COOKING

artisanne chocolatier anne boulley FALL IN LOVE WITH BELGIAN BUTTER TRUFFLES PHOTOS BY DOUG JULIAN

Bay City’s Anne Boulley is a chocolatier and owner of Artisanne, featuring online chocolate classes, in-person classes and workshops. Find her on facebook @ArisanneChocolatier and you’ll see the magic she creates when she tries her hand at chocolate and lace, isomalt bowls, sugar garnishes and more. The result is always beautiful, edible art. She’s no stranger to the readers of Great Lakes Bay Magazine and we thought she’d be a perfect fit for this month’s recipe.

BELGIAN BUTTER TRUFFLES INGREDIENTS: • 2 sticks or 8 ounces of unsalted butter • 4 tablespoons corn syrup or honey • 16 ounces of dark chocolate (best quality you can find) • 2 tablespoons brandy or liqueur (optional) • 16 ounces dark chocolate (to coat) • 1 cup cocoa powder (to coat) Bring butter to room temperature, then cream with a mixer until fluffy. Add corn syrup and beat a minute or two more. Melt the first listed chocolate and let cool to 95 degrees and then combine with the butter on low until combined.  Add the brandy and mix for 15 seconds more, then set aside. Let mixture sit for a few minutes then place in piping bag and pipe out onto parchment paper or aluminum foil truffles about a half-inch in diameter.  Let truffles set until firm (not in a refrigerator).  Melt the second listed chocolate and let cool to 90 degrees.  Using a fork, dip one truffle at a time into the chocolate and carefully remove it, tapping the excess off by rapping the fork gently against the side of the bowl.  Toss the truffle into cocoa powder and sift to remove them once they are all coated. They can now be refrigerated for a couple weeks, but are best served at room temperature, so pull them out at least 1 hour before you’ll be serving them.

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what’s in season? BY REGISTERED DIETITIAN RACHEL TRUMBLE

HERE’S A ‘SWEET’ IDEA Sweet potatoes, recognized by their coppercolor skin and their vibrant orange flesh, are rich in beta carotene, a phytonutrient that protects your body through disease prevention. True to its name, sweet potatoes are naturally sweet in flavor. Sweet potatoes are loaded with the essential mineral potassium, which can help regulate blood pressure and fiber that keeps our digestive track on the healthy track. For a quick meal, slice a baked sweet potato in half and top with cooked beans, broccoli, feta cheese and some Greek yogurt. So simply delicious! 


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play / BEST SEAT IN THE HOUSE

discover your region HERE’S A LOOK AT SOME OF THE TOP BETS FOR YOUR NIGHT OUT WITH THAT SPECIAL SOMEONE

FOR THE LOVE OF GOURD

The ancient tradition of gourd art originated in Africa and Asia, as well as among the indigenous people of the Americas. This exhibit showcases the evolution of the art form from early hand carvings to how featured artist Bonita Miner creates her masterpieces. By utilizing electric wood burners and high-speed pen-shaped rotary tools, Miner uses a specific design for each piece. When: Through Feb.15; recurring weekly on Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday, Friday and Saturday; noon – 5 p.m. Where: Saginaw Art Museum Price: Regular museum admission Information and ticket prices: www. saginawartmuseum.org/exhibitions (989)754-2491

THIS MONTH’S EVENTS Find the perfect night out no matter your interests

Center Stage Theatre’s “Cornerstone Series” presents “August: Osage County.” Bursting with humor, vivacity and intelligence, “August: Osage County” is funny, vicious, compassionate and an unstoppable force of nature.

When: Saturday, Feb.15, Feb. 21 and Feb. 22 at 7 p.m.; Feb. 16 and Feb. 23 at 2 p.m. Where: Center Stage Theatre, Midland Center for the Arts, Midland Price: Start at $20 More information and tickets: mcfta. org/event/august-osage-county

Perspective Series: 20/20 Vision- Seeing HERstory Exhibition Through April 26, recurring daily, Midland Center for the Arts, Midland, (989) 631-5930, mcfta.org A Century of Preservation: Stories from our Collection Through May 29, recurring daily Monday-Friday 10 a.m.-5 p.m. and Saturday noon-4 p.m. free, Bay County Historical Society, Bay City, (989) 893-5733 Contra Dance Through May 9, 7–9:30 p.m., $7 per person,

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2020 CORNERSTONE SERIES SELECTION – “AUGUST: OSAGE COUNTY”

recurring monthly on the second Saturday, Greater Midland Community Center, Midland, (989) 439-3911 Explorations in Wood Exhibition Through May 16, recurring daily, Marshall M. Fredericks Sculpture Museum, Saginaw Valley State University, Saginaw, (989) 964-7125, marshallfredericks.org/ calendar Saginaw Bay Symphony Orchestra Feb. 8, 8–10 p.m., $7 student or $15 general

admission, Temple Theatre, Saginaw, (989) 754-7469 “Riverdance” Feb. 20, 7:30 p.m., The Dow Event Center, Saginaw, 989-759-1320, doweventcenter.com/ events/riverdance-new25th-anniversary-show “Roustabout: The Great Circus Train Wreck” Feb. 19–Feb. 23, Wednesday-Saturday shows 7:30 p.m., Sunday 3 p.m., $15, Malcolm Field Theatre for Performing Arts, University Center, Saginaw, (989) 964-4261,

www.svsu.edu/theatre Hell’s Half Mile Film Series: “It’s Not Too Cold for Shorts” Feb. 21, 7–8:30 p.m., $7, State Theatre of Bay City, Bay City, (989) 892-2660, hhmfest.com/film-series The Blue Man Group Speechless Tour Feb. 21–Feb. 23, $26 – $71, Midland Center for the Arts, Midland, (989) 631-5930, mcfta.org/ event/blue-man-group/ e26695


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play / SEEN HERE

black and white

1.

2.

3.

4.

STUDIO 23, BAY CITY

1. Liberty Starkweather Smith and Leah Werth 2. Jeff and Stacie Quast 3. Louise Chen and Chinling Thomas 4. Julie and Tom Tabor

santa crawl

1.

2.

3.

4.

DOWNTOWN BAY CITY

1. Lance Licht and Michael Barber 2. Brittany Welchner and Jenna Fitzpatrick 3. Joe Gibson, Dan Verhaeghe and Bruce LaFrance 4. Brian Weaver and Tammy Bressette

46 | great lakes bay | 2.20


Whether it’s making deposits or whatever the case may be,

Wildfire is always

welcoming, they know us by name. It’s just a really pleasant place to do business. Marc Owczarzak

Owner, O’s Pub and Grill

Financing is critical for a business just starting out. O’s Pub and Grill in Auburn selected Wildfire Credit Union because of flexible financing options. Every business has unique needs. Wildfire delivers Business Banking done right for each…with business lending plus business checking, remote deposit capture, autobooks, Work Place Perks, online and mobile banking and more. If you’d like to engage in Business Banking done right, visit wildfirecu.org or give us a call at 800.227.2328.


WRAP UP

OVER

businesses CESS C U S emories are m f F o k O o o b Y at cluded in th region. d history. In ges in the A CENTUR

that

villa mente towns and well-docu the cities, a long and h s it a w h n w io ro g g Re nue to Lakes Bay o and conti The Great 0 years ag 0 1 n a th began more

MIDLAND

FRANKENMUTH

BAY CITY

SAGINAW

In 1890, 130 years ago, Herbert Henry Dow moved from Ohio to Midland and founded the Dow Chemical Co., which today is the most innovative, customercentric, inclusive and sustainable materials science company in the world.

Founded in 1862, Frankenmuth Brewery is 158 years old and is Michigan’s oldest craft brewery. It still operates in its original location.

St. Laurent Brothers candy shop opened in 1904 by brothers Joseph and Alex St. Laurent and was later taken over by the son of one of the brothers, Howard St. Laurent. At 116 years, St. Laurent Brothers is the oldest candy shop in Michigan.

Beginning as the first furniture store in Michigan, Feige’s Interiors opened in 1854, 166 years ago. Founder Englehardt Feige was a master cabinetmaker and built custom-made furniture in Saginaw with his four sons. In 1867 his sons took over the business. By that time, both the store and factory, now named The Feige Brothers, were nationally known.

(cityofmidlandmi.gov/551/MidlandHistory)

Midland Paper Packaging + Supplies was incorporated 113 years ago in 1907 by E.S. Rookes. The original Midland Paper Co. was a Chicago-based paper distribution operation. In 1945 private investors purchased the company and hold it today. (midlandpaper.com/about-us/history/)

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(mlive.com/entertainment/2016/11/19_of_ michigans_oldest_things.html)

Zehnder’s of Frankenmuth began as the Exchange Hotel 164 years ago in 1856. The Zehnder family bought the building in 1928 and served the first of its famous chicken dinners on Mother’s Day 1929.

(mlive.com/news/bay-city/2016/08/ senator_talks_small_business_c.html)

MOUNT PLEASANT

The Bavarian Inn Restaurant was founded in 1888 – 132 years ago – as the Union House Hotel by Theodore Fischer. It was later renamed Fischer’s Hotel. The sale to William “Tiny” Zehnder took place in 1950.

General Agency Co. was founded by three active Mount Pleasant insurance agents 105 years ago in 1915. The three founders were of pioneer stock in Isabella County and were determined to provide a growing community with much better and broader insurance service.

(bavarianinn.com/dine/restaurant-history/)

(ga-ins.com/history/)

(zehnders.com/zehnders-history/)

(michiganhistory.leadr.msu.edu/oldestcompanies-of-saginaw-michigan/


CELEBRATING YEARS

95

SERVING NORTHERN MICHIGAN

Forward Corporation is a fifth-generation company serving 24 counties across central and northern Michigan. From convenience stores and Subways to heating fuels, apparel, and hotels, Forward is as unique as the thousands of employees we’ve been fortunate enough to call family for 95 years.

219 N. Front St., Standish, MI 48658

forwardcorp.com


The Great Lakes Bay Region Does Better With Garber. “I support local companies who care for their people, their customers and our community. Nobody does it better than Garber. The Garber ripple effect throughout the region is immeasurable, like the economic impact driven by all the people they employ and others who work for them. It’s also the cultural difference they make. Walk into any Garber location and feel the genuine warmth that you are greeted and treated with as well as how much Garber has enriched, inspired and brought joy to our region through their ongoing community financial and leadership generosity. I take pride in supporting Garber. It matters where I buy my car. That’s why I buy from Garber!” Larry Preston CEO of the Temple Theatre Foundation and Saginaw Art Museum

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Profile for FP Horak

Great Lakes Bay Magazine February 2020