{' '} {' '}
Limited time offer
SAVE % on your upgrade.

Page 1

G REAT LAKES BAY

BUSINESS M

A

G

A

Z

I

N

E

BUSINESS LEADERS Focus on giving back to the community LAYING THE FOUNDATION Area nonprofits enrich lives, strengthen neighborhoods COMPANIES TO THE CLASSROOM How corporate partners are advancing student education

education

T HE BUS INES S OF

REGIONAL SCHOOLS BUILD TOMORROW’S PIONEERS

December Biz 2019 $3.95


Congratulations to the CITY OF BAY CITY

COMMUNITY

Excellence Award

2019 WINNER

Congratulations to the City of Bay City on being awarded the prestigious Michigan Municipal League 2019 Community Excellence Award! The Uptown Bay City Project transformed a blighted industrial site into a dynamic mixeduse development.

BayCityMI.org

UptownBayCity.com

Assistance from

Developed by

MichiganBusiness.org

ShaheenDevelopment.com


NOW OPEN AT MCLAREN WE’RE BUILDING THE BEST WITH YOU IN MIND.

MIDLAND

WEST BRANCH

WEST BRANCH

MIDLAND

BLV D

6 M-7

JEFFERSON AVE

JOE M AN N

55

55

30 75

EASTMAN RD

75

801 Joe Mann Blvd. Midland, MI 48642

30

2110 South M-76 West Branch, MI 48661

6 M-7

75 10


GLBRA Message

SHOP GREAT LAKES BAY

T

his holiday season, remember to shop in the Great Lakes Bay Region! The Great Lakes Bay Region is home to a wide array of outstanding shopping destinations. Please take time to visit our hometown shopping centers and support the Great Lakes Bay Region economy! •

BAY CITY TOWN CENTER: Shop, dine and more with national retailers including J.C. Penney, Marshalls, PetSmart, Ollie’s Bargain Outlet and Dunham’s Sports. First-run movies at Bay City 10 GDX’s state-of-the-art theater. Satisfy your dining desires at Red Lobster, Bob Evans, Taco Bell, Panda Express or any of our quick-serve food destinations. Get your late-night fix at Starbucks or meet up with friends at Planet Fitness, open 24 hours a day through the week. Pamper yourself at Refresh Spa or J.C. Penney Salon. Enjoy Bay City’s best shopping and entertainment. baycitytowncenter.com •

BIRCH RUN PREMIUM OUTLETS: Located just minutes from Frankenmuth, Birch Run Premium Outlets is one of the country’s first and most successful outlet centers. Located conveniently off of Interstate 75, Birch Run Premium Outlets features over 100 stores for your shopping pleasure including Kate Spade New York, The North Face, Under Armour, Adidas, Columbia and Michael Kors. One of the original outlet malls, Birch Run

Premium Outlets features plentiful shopping, dining and entertainment options to provide guests with a world-class experience. premiumoutlets.com/outlet/birch-run •

FASHION SQUARE MALL: Fashion Square Mall has all the great stores you love to shop at, from J.C. Penney, Macy’s, Sears, H&M, American Eagle, Buckle, Hollister and Encore Shoes, to name a few. Fashion Square Mall is also home to more than 100 specialty retailers along with a 10-screen movie theater. shopfashionsquaremall.com

MIDLAND MALL: Midland Mall is Midland’s premier shopping destination with over 40 shopping, dining and entertainment options, including Target, Younkers, Dunham’s Sports, Victoria’s Secret, Barnes and Noble, Buckle and much more! In addition to amazing shopping choices, The Esplanade’s Food Court has many delectable dining options from your favorites such as Midland Burger Co., Matty’s Pizza, Yummy Japan and more. shopmidlandmall.com

SHOP MOUNT PLEASANT: Shopping is an activity enjoyed by many – and with countless shops in Mount Pleasant, you’ll be pleasantly surprised at all the items you can find. While the area boasts many big-box stores – such as Target, Meijer, Maurice’s, Kohl’s and T.J. Maxx, just to name a few – it’s the independently owned and operated retail shops that make shopping in the area an exclusive experience. meetmtp.com/thingsto-do/shopping Matt Felan President & CEO Great Lakes Bay Regional Alliance

Your next business success is waiting by the Bay. www.greatlakesbay.org


Editor: Kelly Mazurkiewicz kmazurkiewicz@greatlakesbaymag. com Associate Editor: Mary Gajda mgajda@greatlakesbaymag.com Art Director: Chad Hussle chad@greatlakesbaymag.com Photographer: Doug Julian doug@greatlakesbaymag.com Contributors: Richard Adams Beth Bryce Katherine Franz Dan Handley Adam Lansdell Christopher Nagy Marketing Account Specialist: Liz Reno-Hayes lreno-hayes@greatlakesbaymag.com (517) 420-1341 Advertising Sales & Subscription Representative: Jim Williams jim@greatlakesbaymag.com (989) 891-1783

1311 Straits Drive Bay City MI 48706 Phone (989) 893-2083 info@greatlakesbaymag.com Subscription Inquiries Call (989) 893-2083 Great Lakes Bay Business, Volume 9, Issue 4, December 2019 (ISSN 1550-8064) is published by The F.P. Horak Company, 1311 Straits Dr, Bay City MI 48706. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to The F.P. Horak Company, 1311 Straits Dr, Bay City MI 48706. Copyright© 2019 at The F.P. Horak Company. All rights reserved. Reproduction in whole or in part without permission is prohibited.

publisher’s note

Publisher: Marisa Horak Belotti marisa@greatlakesbaymag.com

THE CIRCLE OF INVESTMENT It’s better to give than receive. That sentiment dates back to the New Testament teachings; however, when it comes to business – where bottom lines and profit margins are what keeps a company moving forward – a little tweak may be in order: It’s better to give, so you receive. When a new business opens, it’s essentially asking the community to make an investment in seeing it prosper. However, companies that are seeking to advance and thrive – both inside as well as outside their doors – understand that this is a mutual exchange. The best path for true success is going to come through a reciprocal relationship, and an investment needs to be made into the wider community. Here are a few considerations to ponder on why giving back to the community is a plus for any business: • It builds a positive reputation As previously stated, investing in the community where you do business is quite often reciprocated, which develops a mutually beneficial relationship. As you conduct more outreach, you’re going to come into more frequent contact with the local prominent leaders and organizations that are going to become your future customers. At the same time, you’re putting your brand out before the public. • Potential customers increasingly lean toward socially responsible brands Several studies have shown that consumers, particularly millennials, are going to be swayed toward a

company that exemplifies strong corporate citizenship. The 2015 Global Corporate Sustainability Report from Nielsen Holdings showed that as millennials have taken on a greater percentage of the consuming public, they are looking for companies that are upholding ethical standards and are interested in making a social impact on the world around them. • Community outreach and participation boosts worker morale Businesses that have strong community connections, especially the kinds of involvement where employees can participate in hands-on helping activities, instills a sense of pride within workers as well as with the workers’ perception of their place of business. In turn, that can increase morale, productivity and loyalty to the company. In this issue, we offer suggestions on how companies can work handin-hand with local schools to nurture interest in specific skills that will strengthen the talent pipeline in the region as well as the state. In addition, we speak to several notable business leaders in the Great Lakes Bay Region who offer their insight on why it’s important to support the community that supports them. They already have a full understanding of what many other companies are starting to learn: A business that gives back is simply good business.

Marisa Horak Belotti Publisher

12.19

| BUSINESS | 3


contents

22 33

THE GREAT EDUCATORS OF GREAT LAKES BAY

Regional collegiate presidents share how they’re paving the way for successful careers

BUSINESS LEADERS FOCUS ON GIVING BACK TO THE COMMUNITY

Investing in community is giving back to those who support your business

12.19

| BUSINESS | 5


contents BIZ 101

10

Startups

12

Invest In

14

Coaching

16

6 | BUSINESS | 12.19

RESETTING TO NORMAL Renue Physical Therapy expands with three new locations

AREA FOUNDATIONS ENRICH LIVES, STRENGTHEN COMMUNITIES Organizations enable everyday people to invest in their neighborhoods

BUSINESS EXECUTION CREATING A CLIMATE OF FOCUSED ACTION Effective execution is a direct competitive advantage

Career Moxie THE NOT-SO-OBVIOUS WINNING EDGE Bold and audacious career advice to live your dream job

BIZ SCENE

40 3 44

Exposure MY BUSINESS COMMUNITY Professional highlights from the Great Lakes Bay area

PUBLISHER’S LETTER THE CLOSE

WE WANT TO HEAR FROM YOU! Letters must be signed and include the writer’s name and address. Please send to: Great Lakes Bay Business, 1311 Straits Dr, Bay City MI 48706, or email kmazurkiewicz@ greatlakesbaymag.com.


Whether it’s making deposits or whatever the case may be,

Wildfire is always

welcoming, they know us by name. It’s just a really pleasant place to do business. Marc Owczarzak

Owner, O’s Pub and Grill

Financing is critical for a business just starting out. O’s Pub and Grill in Auburn selected Wildfire Credit Union because of flexible financing options. Every business has unique needs. Wildfire delivers Business Banking done right for each…with business lending plus business checking, remote deposit capture, autobooks, Work Place Perks, online and mobile banking and more. If you’d like to engage in Business Banking done right, visit wildfirecu.org or give us a call at 800.227.2328.


Charles Addams: Friends and Family October 4, 2019 - January 4, 2020

It’s Simple with a Holiday Loan from SFCU! Rates as low as

*Annual Percentage Rate.

800.589.1079 • www.sunrisefamilycu.org Charles Addams The Skier 1940 Pen, ink, wash on Whatman board #SFCUFeelLikeFamily

Three convenient locations: Bay City • Essexville • Standish

1126 N. Michigan Ave. Saginaw, MI 48602 www.saginawartmuseum.org | (989)754-2491

NMLS #469609

GIFT IDEA! BUY ONE SUBSCRIPTION, GIVE ONE SUBSCRIPTION

for

FREE

*

* applies to new subscriptions only

TO SUBSCRIBE, CALL (989) 893-2083


101 biz

STARTUPS p.10 • INVEST IN p.12 • COACHING p.14 • CAREER MOXIE p.16

12.19

| BUSINESS | 9


biz 101 / STARTUPS

Physical Therapist Assistant Michael Rader provides a variety of specialties, including sports medicine, at Renue Physical Therapy’s Saginaw location on Bay Road.

RESETTING TO NORMAL RENUE PHYSICAL THERAPY EXPANDS WITH THREE NEW LOCATIONS BY CHRISTOPHER NAGY | PHOTO BY DOUG JULIAN

Treatment, rehabilitation and prevention are the three primary tenets of physical therapy; however, at Renue Physical Therapy, they fall under the single overarching goal of customer satisfaction. Since opening the first Renue Physical Therapy clinic in October 2011 on Bay Road in Saginaw, that emphasis on customer satisfaction has allowed the company to expand by leaps and bounds, even being named on Inc. Magazine’s 2016 and 2017 lists of the 5,000 fastest-growing private companies in the United States. With demand continuing to climb, Renue Physical Therapy recently expanded its fold yet again with three additional locations – in Auburn, inside the Saginaw YMCA and within the

10 | BUSINESS | 12.19

Primrose Retirement Community in Midland – bringing the total number of mid-Michigan clinics to 13. “When it comes to physical therapy, convenience is key. Since some of our patients come to therapy as often as three times per week, we want to make sure our locations are easily accessible,” said Kate O’Shea, marketing manager for Renue Physical Therapy. “Adding new locations … offers three new options for patients to have therapy accessible near where they live or work.” Physical therapy provides an opportunity to create an ongoing relationship with patients to help them feel their best, O’Shea said. Opening the initial clinic, Renue’s founders saw an opportunity to provide a unique care

model for patients, which ultimately saves the patients time and money. “Our therapists really have a chance to get to know each patient through our oneon-one care model, which means they have a better opportunity to help them get and stay healthy for the long term. Seeing our patients feel better is truly rewarding,” she said. All Renue Physical Therapy clinics offer services including sports medicine, manual therapy, post-surgical recovery, orthopedics, pain management, fall prevention and more. Some of the clinics offer additional specialties, including a pelvic/women’s health program and LSVT BIG program for Parkinson’s patients. The Saginaw clinic on Bay Road also is part of the U.S. Olympic Committee National Medical Network and one of only two facilities in Michigan authorized to treat Olympic athletes. O’Shea said the goal of Renue Physical Therapy is to be recognized as the best and most innovative outpatient physical therapy provider in Michigan. “We are committed to a pure patientcentered practice model,” she said. “This model is supported through evidence-based … results and focused on patient experience, satisfaction and outcomes.” That satisfaction and positive outcomes are evidence in the response Renue Physical Therapy typically receives from its customers. “It is extremely rewarding to read the testimonials that come directly from our patients,” O’Shea said. “When people are coming to physical therapy after an injury, surgery or other setbacks, it can be hard for them to believe they can feel normal again. Our patients repeatedly tell us how happy they are with our caring therapists; how much better they feel and that Renue is truly different from other clinics they’ve been to. Our testimonials show that our therapy teams make a real difference in the lives of our patients.” For more information on Renue Physical Therapy, visit renuept.com.


biz 101 / INVEST IN

Area Foundations Enrich Lives, STRENGTHEN COMMUNITIES ORGANIZATIONS ENABLE EVERYDAY PEOPLE TO INVEST IN THEIR NEIGHBORHOODS BY RICH ADAMS

The Merriam-Webster Dictionary describes a nonprofit as “not conducted or maintained for the purpose of making a profit.” That’s the dry and dispassionate description of a nonprofit. The actual purpose of nonprofits is to serve, invest in and better the communities in which they operate. There is so much more to a nonprofit than the dictionary definition. They advocate enriching the lives of people, strengthening communities by doing so. They fill in the gaps that government and private industry cannot cover. Simply put, nonprofits are essential to every community’s quality of life. The Bay Area Community Foundation not only invests in the immediacy of now, foundation President and CEO Diane Fong said the organization is investing in the area’s future. “At the Bay Area Community Foundation, we are driven to leave both Bay and Arenac counties better places for the generations that follow,” Fong explained. “The Bay Area community is one filled with grit, history and perseverance. Through all of its ups and downs, our community has always had at its heart people who love this place and want to help it succeed. “There isn’t one company, family or foundation driving change,” she added. “We are a community of people who come together to make good things happen.”

12 | BUSINESS | 12.19

The Bay Area Community Foundation encourages and connects what Fong called “community believers – our donors” with causes that are dear to them. “These are the people who believe they can make a difference,” Fong said. “Those who believe when others may not, and those who believe and truly understand how powerful ‘community’ is.” Saginaw Community Foundation has supported hundreds of organizations for 35 years, and those organizations have helped support thousands of individuals across Saginaw County, according to foundation President and CEO Renee Johnston. “At the Saginaw Community Foundation, we are uniquely positioned to connect donors to the causes they are most passionate about: education of youth, economic development, public safety, and the health and well-being of our residents, just to name a few,” Johnston said. “We bring together the financial resources of individuals, families and local businesses to support nonprofits in our community. We act as a convener by bringing groups and individuals together to reach common goals,” she continued. “We’re a place where diverse interests and different voices come together to make real change happen.”

Johnston added that people don’t have to be wealthy to have an impact on their community. “Our goal is for the community to recognize that we can all play a philanthropic role to make a difference in our community,” Johnston noted. “ When we all work together, we can make our village a place we are all proud to call home.” Midland Area Community Foundation President and CEO Sharon Mortensen echoed the sentiments that foundations empower everyday people to engage in philanthropy to build a better community. “The goal when Midland Area Community Foundation was founded in 1973 is the same goal we have today: to enrich and improve the quality of life in Midland County,” Mortensen said. “We want to help individuals thrive. We do this through funding nonprofit organizations doing important, transformational work.” Mortensen said the essence of a community foundation is people putting their money together to address the diverse needs in their communities. “Gifts enable people to dream bigger, to see the many possibilities. As money is endowed, the gifts grow forever, providing ongoing support to help the community prosper,” she said. “We believe that to work toward a more vibrant, thriving community, our efforts should be focused on these broad areas: building our livelihood, developing our talent, caring for our people and enriching our community.” Mortensen said the Midland Area Community Foundation is working with funds exceeding $100 million, which has positively impacted the area’s health, environment, education, arts and culture, and more. “Our big-picture goal is to positively change the world, knowing that changing the world starts with changing where we live,” Mortensen added. For more information on the area community foundations: • Bay Area Community Foundation, bayfoundation.org • Saginaw Community Foundation, saginawfoundation.org • Midland Area Community Foundation, midlandfoundation.org


BUILDING HIGHER EDUCATION FROM THE CLASSROOM

Delta College

TO THE DORM ROOM

Saginaw Valley State University

TO THE OFFICE

Saginaw Valley State University

Central Michigan University

More Than Investments I help families achieve their financial goals. I do this by working with my clients to develop strategies that help to address: • MULTIGENERATION WEALTH TRANSFER • PROTECTING THEIR LOVED ONES AND THEIR WEALTH • EDUCATIONAL NEEDS (CURRENT AND FUTURE) Michael L. Southgate Financial Advisor 499 Franklin Street Suite B Frankenmuth, MI 48734 989-652-9622 Check us out on Facebook!

www.edwardjones.com Member SIPC


biz 101 / COACHING Fact 1: Challenges, intentions and strategies are simple to describe, but not easy to implement. Fact 2 People, combined with technology, make strategic plans and systems work.

BUSINESS EXECUTION Creating a Climate of Focused Action EFFECTIVE EXECUTION IS A DIRECT COMPETITIVE ADVANTAGE

by Dan Handley, regional president and CEO, Dale Carnegie Training

14 | BUSINESS | 12.19

The Bottom Line: Effective execution is a direct competitive advantage. Competitors are everywhere. Customers are demanding, global events are impacting us all. Everyone is working to create competitive advantage, reduce costs, and provide memorable and distinctive customer service. Winning requires execution of these strategies through people. People make strategies, plans and systems work. Who is driving your business? Is it just you, or you and your people? We work with hundreds of thousands of people each year across the 80 countries we serve in Dale Carnegie Training. One thing we have learned is that a high percentage of the core business issues across various organizational sizes and shapes are similar. Techniques change with the times but strategies built on sound principles still work. Top 5 Execution Issues: 1. Finding and keeping effective people 2. Handling the stress associated with doing more with less 3. Building accountability in people 4. Communication 5. Linking strategy to operations and people Challenges, intentions and strategies are simple to describe, but never easy to implement. Here’s the good news: Getting more serious about execution can wake up you, the business and your people. The Fundamentals of Execution • Interrupt the present: Go for the wake-up call for you and your organization. • Clarify what is really happening in your marketplace and organization:

Relearn your business and get closer to where your people are at. • Clarify where you are going: A clear picture in contrast to your current reality. • Engage a willing team to help you get there: Handling change resistance – everyone is connected and knows their role. • Connect everyone and set team and personal goals: Three or Four goals will do. • Clearly design and implement actions: That are aligned to strategies, operations and people. • Coach everyone for performance improvement: Be a coach or go get one. • Hold people accountable for their specific improvement results: Praise, point out improvements, make sure everything is in writing, constantly follow-up and reward the “doers”. Find out where your people’s attitudes, engagement and skills are at and link incentives, training and compensation to fit your scorecard. The heart of execution lies in people, strategy and operations process. The leader or leadership team must be deeply engaged in all three. When you get the people process right, you will fulfill the potential of your business. “We all have possibilities we don’t know about. We can do things we don’t even dream we can do. It’s only when necessity faces us that we rise to the occasion and actually do the things that have seemed impossible.” - Dale Carnegie Let’s continue to execute focused action to move the Great Lakes Bay Region forward. For more ideas on improving leadership, employee engagement and organizational performance visit dalecarnegie.com or contact Dan Handley at dan.handley@ dalecarnegie.com (989)799.7760 or (800) 518.3253.


FOR S! OW PRICE N BUY WEST LO THE

2020 GOLF PASSES Make it your perfect season.

APPLEMOUNTAIN.COM | 989.781.6789


biz 101 / CAREER MOXIE

The Not-So-Obvious WINNING EDGE BOLD AND AUDACIOUS CAREER ADVICE TO LIVE YOUR DREAM JOB

by Beth Bryce, career strategist

What if you could miraculously wake up tomorrow and transform every area of your life? There is a not-so-obvious secret that is guaranteed to do this faster than you ever thought possible. Hal Elrod, the author of “The Miracle Morning,” promises that it only takes six minutes a day. Seriously? One of the most important concepts ever discovered in the field of human performance is called the “winning edge concept.” This concept states that “small differences in ability can translate into enormous differences in results.” Simply, how you wake up each day dramatically affects your level of success in every single area of your life. Intentional mornings generate productive days leading to a stellar life. Why would you ever choose mediocracy? “An extraordinary life is all about daily, continuous improvements in the areas that matter most.” – Robin Sharma

For you to stop settling for less than you deserve and to create the next level of personal, professional and financial success you desire, you must dedicate time each day to becoming qualified and capable of creating what you want. Elrods’s advice begins with establishing a morning routine of six practices for six minutes. 1. Silence: Get grounded. Sit in silence,

2.

3.

4.

5.

6.

meditate and focus on your breath to achieve clarity and peace of mind Affirmation: Jot down what you want and why, who you are committed to being, and what you’re committed to doing to change your life. Read daily. Visualization: Align your thoughts and feelings with your vision. Mentally rehearse what it feels like to achieve your future goals. Exercise: Motion creates energy. Manage your emotions; enhance your health, self-confidence and mental acuity. Learning: Read something for your personal development from experts, those who have done what you want to do. Writing: Journal. Get your thoughts down on paper to gain valuable insights, ideas, breakthroughs and lessons learned.

Whether you’re an early bird or night owl, how you spend the first hour of your day becomes key to unlocking your full potential and creating the amazing life and career you desire. When you create a morning practice, you change your entire life. My friend, it’s worth passing on the snooze button. Rise up!

16 | BUSINESS | 12.19


SMALL BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT CENTER

Our business consultants can help at no cost to you.

GROW YOUR

• CONSULTING FOR STARTUPS AND EXISTING BUSINESSES • IN-PERSON AND ONLINE TRAINING • MARKET RESEARCH • TECHNOLOGY COMMERCIALIZATION

BUSINESS SBDCMICHIGAN.ORG

Visit SBDCMichigan.org & Request Business Consulting TODAY! POWERED BY

Funded in part through a cooperative agreement with the U.S. Small Business Administration

SMARTER SOLUTIONS SINCE 1944

75

YEARS ENGINEERS S U RV E YO R S PLANNERS ARC H ITEC T S

spicergroup.com

building effective insurance solutions for your

FAMILY + BUSINESS auto l home l life & health l business (800) 875-8395 l agency@meadowbrook.com www.meadowbrookagency.com


ALL-BUSINESS?

We are too.

Northwood specializes in business-focused programs to help you succeed in a world where entrepreneurial thinking is greatly valued. Whether starting out or finishing your degree, Northwood offers the right fit with more than 20 specialty majors and graduate-level studies. So why wait? Contact an Admissions Representative today!

northwood.edu • 800.622.9000


Be part of the conversation We’re interested in how science can enhance people’s lives. That can mean discovering a new material or working with our customers to apply fresh thinking to the world around us. It can also mean using science to build an exciting career—with the opportunity to explore, exchange ideas, and make a meaningful difference on global challenges. Can you see yourself on the team?

careers.dow.com ® and ™ are Trademarks of The Dow Chemical Company © 2019

NOT JUST ANY TEAM. YOUR TEAM.

Commercial Loans Manager

Kurt Hanus

Tom Sullivan II Commercial Lender

Joy O’Neill Commercial Lender

Jason VanWormer Treasury Sales Officer

Nick Bellestri Commercial Lender

Brad Wahr Commercial Lender

Mercantile Bank was started by entrepreneurs, for entrepreneurs. We focus on what makes us one of the regions best partners - our customers and their success. mercbank.com


Local Partners. Local Success. We are proud of the fact that Delta College is important to the area’s economic well being.

Of our 50,000+ graduates, 83 percent live and work in the Great Lakes Bay Region.

Through partnerships, we’ve shown that success isn’t a dream, it’s a shared vision.

This is possible because community leaders have recognized the need of higher education for a skilled workforce.

How can you partner with Delta? Contact us.

delta.edu • careerdevelopment@delta.edu • 989-686-9072

Think Big. Think Delta.


THE GREAT EDUCATORS OF GREAT LAKES BAY

BY ADAM LANSDELL

REGIONAL COLLEGIATE PRESIDENTS SHARE HOW THEY’RE PAVING THE WAY FOR SUCCESSFUL CAREERS

Recent high school graduates and grad students alike are provided a wealth of educational opportunities within the region. With so many options to choose from, we’re here to lend a hand by breaking down what makes each institution unique, featuring perspectives from each college or university.

Saginaw Valley State University

Northwood University


feature Central Michigan University

Delta College

12.19

| BUSINESS | 23


MID MICHIGAN COLLEGE

MID MICHIGAN AT A GLANCE With more than 100 student veterans, Mid is proud to have earned Gold Standing by the Michigan Veterans Affairs Agency. Mid has two campus locations: one in Harrison and one in Mount Pleasant. Each offers its own amenities and attractions. The 560 wooded acres on the Harrison campus include some of the best bike trails in the state. Mid faculty members care about students. Faculty work to create open educational resources that replace high-priced textbooks. Since 2016, these resources have saved Mid students over $1 million.

HOW IS YOUR HIGHEREDUCATION INSTITUTION POSITIONED TO MAKE A POSITIVE IMPACT IN THE GREAT LAKES BAY REGION? “Mid Michigan College provides the knowledge and abilities that empower learners and transform our communities. We do this by providing certificate and degree programs, workforce training and lifelong learning opportunities that are accessible and affordable. Throughout the Great Lakes Bay Region, Mid helps students launch their college careers by providing dual-enrollment opportunities to more than

1,000 students each year at more than 40 high schools. In the last year, Mid provided more than 35,000 hours of workforce training in business, health care, manufacturing and technology. Lifelong learning comes to life for citizens across our region through courses like artistic welding, herbal medicines, bird watching and dog training. Like the other colleges and universities being featured in this edition, Mid has a strong and positive impact in our region. According to a study by EMSI Inc., the impact of Mid’s operational spending in fiscal year 2018-19 was $21 million. Mid draws more than half of its students

from the Great Lakes Bay Region, but the remainder comes from 72 counties in our state. At Mid, we retain and attract talent. The economic impact of student spending in the last fiscal year is estimated at $4.8 million. Our alumni work in our health care facilities, our businesses and our industries. They enrich our region with their talents and their service to our communities. In addition, the economic impact of their spending and their taxes is estimated at $69 million. One out of every 43 jobs in our service area is supported by the activities of the college and its students.” – President Christine M. Hammond

THE MID MICHIGAN COLLEGE DIFFERENCE Mid offers both transfer programs that provide a strong foundation for completion of a bachelor’s degree and applied programs that enable students to be career-focused and job-ready. Mid’s partnership with the Central Michigan Manufacturers Association ensures that Mid’s curriculum is relevant to the work of area employers. Mid’s advanced integrated manufacturing program includes five pathways and industry-based certificates that teach basic manufacturing concepts and specialized skills in an area of their choice.

24 | BUSINESS | 12.19


HOW IS YOUR HIGHER-EDUCATION INSTITUTION POSITIONED TO MAKE A POSITIVE IMPACT IN THE GREAT LAKES BAY REGION? “MSU helps people improve their lives by bringing the vast knowledge resources of MSU directly to individuals, communities and businesses across the state. For more than a century, through MSU Extension, Spartans have helped grow Michigan’s economy by equipping Michigan residents with the information that they need to do their jobs better, raise healthy and safe families, build their communities, and empower our children to dream of a successful future.” – President Samuel L. Stanley Jr.

THE MICHIGAN STATE UNIVERSITY DIFFERENCE Michigan State University has been advancing the common good with uncommon will for more than 160 years, pushing the boundaries of discovery and forging enduring partnerships to solve the most pressing global challenges. U.S. News & World Report ranks its graduate programs the best in the U.S. in elementary teacher education, secondary teacher education, industrial and organizational psychology, rehabilitation counseling, African history (tied), supply chain logistics, and nuclear physics in 2019. MSU pioneered the studies of packaging, hospitality business, supply chain management and communication sciences. The university’s campus houses the National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory, the W. J. Beal Botanical Garden, the Abrams Planetarium, the Wharton Center for Performing Arts, the Eli and Edythe Broad Art Museum, the Facility for Rare Isotope Beams, and the country’s largest residence hall system.

MSU AT A GLANCE 93% STUDENT PLACEMENT RATE 65% OF GRADUATES REMAIN TO LIVE AND WORK IN MICHIGAN STUDENTS FROM EVERY COUNTY IN THE STATE

feature

MICHIGAN STATE UNIVERSITY

RANKED NATIONALLY NO. 1 BY U.S. NEWS & WORLD REPORT IN: Graduate programs: elementary and secondary education, African history, nuclear physics, organizational psychology, rehabilitation counseling and supply chain management (also undergraduate)

RANKED 35 AMONG NATION’S PUBLIC UNIVERSITIES RANKED 85 AMONG THE WORLD’S TOP 100 UNIVERSITIES RANKED 20 AMONG ALL RESEARCH UNIVERSITIES (UP EIGHT PLACES FROM 2018)


CENTRAL MICHIGAN UNIVERSITY

CMU AT A GLANCE Central Michigan University touts its as the most comprehensive leadership development programming in the state. Through CMU’s Sarah R. Opperman Leadership Institute, every student has access to innovative and inclusive learning opportunities, and all students are empowered and encouraged to seek. CMU is focused on career readiness. CMU’s Gold Path program helps students take advantage of the classroom and cocurricular activities that build the skills employers say are most vital for workplace success: critical thinking and problem solving, oral and written communications, teamwork and collaboration, leadership, professionalism and work ethic, and cultural competency.

HOW IS YOUR HIGHEREDUCATION INSTITUTION POSITIONED TO MAKE A POSITIVE IMPACT IN THE GREAT LAKES BAY REGION? “Since opening our doors in 1892, Central Michigan University has been committed to meeting the needs of our community. We began by training exceptional teachers and ethical business leaders to address a statewide shortage in both areas. Today, we remain committed to serving our community by leveraging the full power the university’s

resources to address the most pressing needs of the region. We opened our College of Medicine in response to a growing shortage of health care professionals, especially in rural and underserved urban areas around the state. This year, CMU signed a historic 25-year partnership with Covenant HealthCare to strengthen medical education opportunities and increase opportunities for clinical research on public health issues prominent in the Great Lakes Bay Region.” – President Robert O. Davies

CMU is a leader in Great Lakes research. Faculty and students are engaged in activities around the region to protect and preserve the waters, wetlands and wildlife of the Great Lakes – the nation’s largest and most important freshwater resource.

THE CMU DIFFERENCE Central Michigan University is committed to meeting the needs of our students and our community. CMU was an early leader in distance education in the 1970s and in online education in the early 1990s, and we continue to offer students flexible options to access a high-quality education and successfully complete their degree. CMU graduates are leaders in their professions and in their communities, carrying forward our core values and dedicated to making a positive impact on our region, our state and the world.

26 | BUSINESS | 12.19


HOW IS YOUR HIGHER-EDUCATION INSTITUTION POSITIONED TO MAKE A POSITIVE IMPACT IN THE GREAT LAKES BAY REGION? “Talent development and retention for our region’s employers are central to our mission at SVSU. Those employers compete for business internationally, so we must be committed to providing a world-class academic experience for our students. Through outstanding classroom instruction and extraordinary determination and work ethic, our students not only compete against the best in the nation, they consistently outperform their peers attending schools with ‘bigger names.’” – President Donald Bachand

SVSU AT A GLANCE NO. 1 DORMS IN THE COUNTRY AMONG PUBLIC INSTITUTIONS, ACCORDING TO NICHE, AND NO. 4 AMONG ALL INSTITUTIONS 97% JOB PLACEMENT RATE OVERALL AND ACROSS MAJORS FOR GRADUATES 44% OF ALUMNI STAY IN THE REGION TO PURSUE CAREERS IN THEIR FIELDS OF STUDY

THE SVSU DIFFERENCE SVSU prides itself on preparing students to realize their full potential; oftentimes, their potential is greater than what they see in themselves. That’s why SVSU provides opportunities for its students to compete among the nation’s best. SVSU’s Cardinal Formula Racing Team placed in the top 15 in the world overall this year, and they have had the top finish among exclusively undergraduate engineering programs for five consecutive years. The Moot Court program for pre-law students is currently ranked No. 17 in the nation, ahead of universities such as Duke and Texas A&M. This year, all 10 of SVSU’s undergraduates who applied for early admission to medical school were accepted; the average acceptance rate is 40%.

feature

SAGINAW VALLEY STATE UNIVERSITY


ALMA COLLEGE

HOW IS YOUR HIGHEREDUCATION INSTITUTION POSITIONED TO MAKE A POSITIVE IMPACT IN THE GREAT LAKES BAY REGION? “Alma College will nurture an inclusive and respectful campus community where students, faculty, staff, alumni and the general public can work together to learn, grow and serve others. We believe that the connections between the college and the community must be robust and mutually enriching, and the college works collaboratively with regional organizations

to positively impact our communities in a variety of ways. Examples include the recently completed renovation of the historic Alma Opera House in downtown Alma that provides mutual benefit to the college and the community, developing student internships to support the work of local nonprofit organizations and hosting collaborative strategic planning workshops for local leaders such as the Leading Change, Building Community leadership conference on Oct. 8 and the Rural Michigan Initiative forum on Nov. 7.” — President Jeff Abernathy

ALMA COLLEGE AT A GLANCE Ninety-five percent of the 2018 graduates reported working, being enrolled in graduate school, or participating within a service program – such as AmeriCorps – within six months of graduation. Alma College ranks among the top three schools in the nation in the percentage of students who participate in alternative break service trips, according to Break Away, the national organization

28 | BUSINESS | 12.19

that supports the development of alternative break experiences that inspire lifelong active citizenship. Alma College offers an ontime graduation promise, the Alma Commitment, that offers guidance to each student on how to make the most of an Alma education and plan for a rewarding future. As part of the Alma Commitment, the Alma Venture program provides up

to $2,500 to every student to offset the cost of a personalized experience consistent with their academic plans, such as study abroad, internship, hands-on research or clinical project and service or leadership opportunities. Five years since its launch, the Alma Venture program has awarded more than $1 million and funded more than 600 student experiences.

THE ALMA COLLEGE DIFFERENCE Alma College, a fouryear residential liberal arts college, offers a personalized education that allows students to create new knowledge through academic research, expand their horizons with global study initiatives, supplement their academic studies with relevant experiential learning opportunities, and indulge their artistic and athletic yearnings while completing a degree on time. Alma College offers more than 50 academic programs in the humanities, social sciences and natural sciences. Among the most popular majors are environmental studies, nursing, health care administration, biology, business administration, new media studies and education.


HOW IS YOUR HIGHER-EDUCATION INSTITUTION POSITIONED TO MAKE A POSITIVE IMPACT IN THE GREAT LAKES BAY REGION?

“‘I realized I couldn’t get a good job without a degree, so I went back to Delta. Now, I’m confident I’ll be able to get a good-paying job and really succeed in my field.’” We often hear things like this from our students, because Delta College provides exceptional career education to thousands of students each year. From accounting and nursing to criminal justice and welding, Delta has the hands-on learning students need to be job-ready. And what that means for our region is a skilled and ready workforce.” – President Jean Goodnow

THE DELTA COLLEGE DIFFERENCE Since 1961, Delta College has shown how the dreams invested in one institution can impact the lives of tens of thousands. Through the years, the programs, technology and faces of Delta College have changed, but what hasn’t changed is Delta’s commitment to providing students a place where their dreams can become a reality. We encourage students to think big, imagine who they want to be. Delta College will help them get there.

DELTA COLLEGE AT A GLANCE 300-PLUS STUDENTS ARE ENROLLED IN SKILLED TRADE APPRENTICESHIPS. LOWEST TUITION WITHIN 75 MILES. DELTA OFFERS A TOP-QUALITY EDUCATION AT AN AFFORDABLE COST. ONE IN THREE LOCAL HIGH SCHOOL STUDENTS CHOSE DELTA COLLEGE LAST YEAR.

feature

DELTA COLLEGE


feature

NORTHWOOD UNIVERSITY

THE NORTHWOOD UNIVERSITY DIFFERENCE Northwood University develops leaders, innovators and supporters of a global free enterprise society. Northwood students are able to gain valuable learning experiences, as they evolve into the next generation of free-market champions. This is a unique moment in the history of the world. The Northwood Idea is as relevant today as it has ever been. We must continue to teach students the importance of individual responsibility, freedom, liberty, free markets and self-governance. Learn more about The Northwood Idea at northwood.edu.

NORTHWOOD UNIVERSITY AT A GLANCE 87% OF NORTHWOOD 2018 GRADS HAD FULLTIME EMPLOYMENT UPON GRADUATION 31% OF NORTHWOOD GRADUATES OWN ALL OR PART OF A BUSINESS $13 MILLION IN SCHOLARSHIPS AVAILABLE 84% RETENTION RATE **ALL STUDENTS FROM FALL TO FALL 65% SIX YEAR GRADUATION RATE

30 | BUSINESS | 12.19


WITH DRIVE AND DETERMINATION, OUR STUDENTS GO FAR.

ANTHONY R. BOWRIN, Ph.D.

DEAN OF THE SCOTT L. CARMONA COLLEGE OF BUSINESS STANDS ON THE THIRD FLOOR OF A 38,500 SQUARE FOOT BUILDING ADDITION THAT SVSU WILL OPEN IN JANUARY 2020.

We are SVSU, and we are innovative business leaders and entrepreneurs in Michigan’s Great Lakes Bay Region and around the globe. Our graduates are highly recruited by Fortune 50 companies because our world-class business programs are accredited by AACSB-International — less than 5 percent of all business schools worldwide have earned this distinction.

svsu.edu

7400 Bay Road, University Center, Michigan 48710 • (989) 964-4064


cares

Central Michigan University For Michigan. For the Great Lakes Bay Region. For everyone.

The CMU College of Medicine, with a campus in Saginaw, is committed to advancing medical education, residency training and health science research in the Great Lakes Bay Region. We graduated 257 new physicians in the first three classes, each prepared to provide comprehensive care to underserved populations.

med.cmich.edu CMU, an AA/EO institution, strongly and actively strives to increase diversity and provide equal opportunity within its community. CMU does not discriminate against persons based on age, color, disability, ethnicity, gender, gender expression, gender identity, genetic information, height, marital status, national origin, political persuasion, pregnancy, childbirth or related medical conditions, race, religion, sex, sex-based stereotypes, sexual orientation, transgender status, veteran status, or weight. 3855744 10/19

Our faculty physicians and student resident physicians are in Saginaw providing much needed quality care for the community alongside our health partners: » Covenant HealthCare (newly signed 25-year affiliation agreement) » Ascension St. Mary’s Hospital » Aleda E. Lutz VA Medical Center » Great Lakes Bay Health Centers » HealthSource Saginaw


feature

BUSINESS LEADERS FOCUS ON GIVING BACK TO THE COMMUNITY

Investing in community is giving back to those who support your business

BY RICH ADAMS PHOTOS BY DOUG JULIAN

It might be the name of a business on the back of a Little League jersey. Or it could be a sign at the ninth hole of a charity golf scramble, the signature line of a giant check being presented to a hospital or a placard next to a silent auction item. These are just a few of the ways businesses can get their names noticed. While networking and getting the word out about a product or service is certainly a goal, the more important aspect of business sponsorships is to give back to the community that supports local commerce.

12.19

| BUSINESS | 33


feature

RICHARD J. GARBER president of Garber Management Group, is a business owner who reinvests in his community. In 2017 he was honored with the Lifetime Humanitarian Award at the Governor’s Service Awards presentation.

I BELIEVE BUSINESSES HAVE A RESPONSIBILITY TO GIVE BACK TO THE COMMUNITY THEY ARE LOCATED IN AND SERVE.

“We attempt to support all worthy causes in our region, but are likely a little more sensitive to children and families that are underserved or in need,” Garber explained. While the community interaction definitely brings attention to his business, he said the more important factor in deciding to support a cause involves giving back to the people who support his business. “I believe businesses have a responsibility to give back to the community they are located in and serve,” he said. “How do you take community resources that keep your doors open without giving back? The landscape has changed, and many businesses today are more corporate in scope, replacing local business that had ties to the community. That leaves a bigger responsibility to local companies like ours to keep making our communities healthy and prosperous.”

34 | BUSINESS | 12.19


KATHIE FUCE-HOBOHM president and CEO of Space Inc. in Midland, gives her employees 26 hours of paid time off each year to volunteer for various causes.Fuce-Hobohm said the policy gives her team members a chance to make a positive impact in their communities.

“I’m passionate about building a company that gives back, improves work lives and makes a difference. Professionally, that’s the type of company I want to work for, and these values help attract the people with similar DNA,” she explained. “Our community service program with compensated time off has been our policy since 1995. And, the reasoning is simple: Giving back in all forms is the right thing to do. Our timeoff policy has weathered both the good times and the times when it would have been easier to let it go. But, how can you possibly let go of ‘doing the right thing?’ That wouldn’t make sense.” Fuce-Hobohm said devoting resources to the community also is an investment in business: “Business, especially small business, thrives in a thriving community. It is hard to separate the two. “Business leaders have to play a role in supporting the community. True business leaders, like the leaders in all walks of life, understand that it takes vision and the ability to bring together a diverse, dynamic group of individuals to execute that vision,” she continued. “They aren’t afraid of inclusion, they don’t need credit; they just want to make the community a better place.”

I’M PASSIONATE ABOUT BUILDING A COMPANY THAT GIVES BACK, IMPROVES WORK LIVES AND MAKES A DIFFERENCES.


feature

JIMMY GREENE president and CEO of the Associated Builders and Contractors of Greater Michigan, located in Midland, said he is heavily involved in the Make-A-Wish Foundation because a child belongs to the entire community.

I BELIEVE THAT EVERY CHILD IS OUR CHILD, AND OUR COMMUNITY HAS SUPPORTED THIS FOR THE PAST 30 YEARS.

36 | BUSINESS | 12.19

“It’s an opportunity for an entire community of builders and contractors to recognize the humility that someone else’s child could very well be our child,” Greene said. “I believe that every child is our child, and our community has supported this for the past 30 years.” He also serves on the board of directors for ShelterHouse and led the project for the new faculty being built. It was a personal experience that led to his support. “As a child that comes from a home where I saw my mother abused and even my sister murdered as a result of abuse, I’m not only sympathetic to the plight of these women but empathetic,” Greene said. “I want to provide whatever effort and resource that I can to prevent any woman being victimized. “Every time we empower just one more citizen to be self-sufficient, we’ve created yet another sustaining member of the community that becomes a consumer of goods and – even better – a potential volunteer of time and energy to impact our communities,” he continued. “They are returns on our investments.”


I LOVE TO WORKOUT AT THE DOW BAY AREA FAMILY Y, AND SUPPORTING THE Y IS A NATURAL FIT.

CLARENCE SEVILLIAN president and CEO of McLaren Bay Region in Bay City, said one of his personal guiding principles is continued improvement in the health outcomes of the community.

“I believe it is vital to provide resources to those who are in need, which is why McLaren Bay Region supports organizations like the United Way,” Sevillian said. “We also believe it is crucial to support initiatives like MiHIA’s THRIVE, whose mission is to deliver improved health and sustained economic growth in our communities.” Sevillian said personal health is a key for him. “I love to workout at the Dow Bay Area Family Y, and supporting the Y is a natural fit,” he said. In addition to financial support, Sevillian said McLaren encourages employees to take an active role in their communities. “We believe in supporting our staff to be involved by volunteering their time and talents on boards and steering committees for organizations who contribute to moving our region forward,” he explained. “This creates a better sense of place for our employees to live and work in a vibrant community.”


GIFT IDEA! BUY ONE SUBSCRIPTION, GIVE ONE SUBSCRIPTION

for

FREE

*

* applies to new subscriptions only

TO SUBSCRIBE, CALL (989) 893-2083


biz

SCENE EXPOSURE p. 40 • THE CLOSE p. 44

12.19

| BUSINESS | 39


biz SCENE / EXPOSURE

MY BUSINESS COMMUNITY PROFESSIONAL HIGHLIGHTS FROM THE GREAT LAKES BAY AREA

LEADERSHIP CLASS AND CHAMBER HOLD PARK DEDICATION The Bay Area Chamber of Commerce Leadership Class of 2019 celebrated the completion of its yearlong project revitalizing Realtor Park, 401 S. Henry St. in Bay City, with a ribbon-cutting ceremony and dedication. The class was responsible for fundraising, publicity/ marketing and project management. They were able to raise over $100,000 to clean up the neglected park and secure artist Jason Graham from Saginaw to create

40 | BUSINESS | 12.19

the sculpture “Before the Bay,” which represents the Saginaw River as it flows through Bay City. “Most leadership classes don’t face such a large project like this. We had a lofty goal of fundraising, and thankfully raised over $100,000,” said Tammy Claramount, financial adviser with Edward Jones. “We are thrilled to have exceeded this goal; more importantly, we are proud of the collaboration and support that we received. The west side has not had much attention lately, so the residents and businesses nearby have been grateful for the cleanup and reinvigoration.”

CNC RECEIVES GRANT FOR CHIPPEWA TRAIL BRIDGE Chippewa Nature Center (CNC) has received a $125,000 grant from the Midland Area Community Foundation’s Healthy Community Fund for its Chippewa Trail Bridge maintenance and repair project. In 2005, CNC built the 3.5-mile Chippewa Trail connecting CNC to downtown Midland at the Tridge. Over the years, the Chippewa Trail bridges have sustained weather-related damage, which has been addressed with hinged ramps, repaired decking and railings, and asphalt to level out the approaches. One of the two bridges will be reconstructed in 2020 with improved building techniques including helical pilings in unstable soils and improved decking and railing materials with longer life expectancy. Reconstruction of the bridge will restore universal accessibility to the Chippewa Trail, while also providing a safer experience for the thousands of annual users of the Chippewa Trail, a recreational asset that promotes fitness, non-motorized travel to downtown Midland and access to nature and green spaces. H HOTEL TO DEBUT RESTAURANT CONCEPT A new restaurant will celebrate the history of Midland. The H Hotel, a Dolce Hotel, announced the creation of a new restaurant concept scheduled to open in downtown


Midland in early 2020. The restaurant will welcome the local community with a modern, mid-century-inspired ambiance; hand-crafted cocktails; local seasonal menu; and new indoor and outdoor spaces fit for everything from date-night dinners and family outings to group dining and celebratory events. Located on the corner of Ashman and Main streets, ONe Eighteen at the H will take over the space currently occupied by the Table Restaurant. Inspired by the 118 elements of the periodic table, representatives from the H Hotel explain that the new name complements the hotel’s playful branding, demonstrating to guests that mixing good food and good company makes great chemistry. “The restaurant pays homage to the history of mid-century modernism in Midland in a setting that inspires connectivity with friends, colleagues and the community,” said Derek Grimaldi, general manager of the H Hotel. “This fresh new concept along with the reimagination of the H’s courtyard reinforces our commitment to the continued growth of downtown Midland and the Great Lakes Bay Region.”

Abby Rogner

CREDIT UNION PROMOTES ROGNER TO SUPERVISOR Jolt Credit Union has promoted Abby Rogner to e-Services supervisor. The e-Services department is the member support area for online and mobile banking tools.

“We are delighted to have Abby lead our newly formed eServices team,” said Amy Mikolaiczik, vice president of systems and development at Jolt. “She brings energy and compassion to the department from her years of experience working in our member support area.” Rogner has been employed at the credit union for five years and is looking forward to helping members move confidently through all of Jolt’s information and communication technologies. SAVANT GROUP UNVEILS NEW HEADQUARTERS The Savant Group – comprised of four individual companies that provide products and services to the lubricant, transportation and energy industries – unveiled the first look of the new 53,000-square-foot global headquarters at its 50th anniversary celebration. The new facilities will be constructed on Bay City Road in Midland, reaffirming the group’s long-term commitment to the Great Lakes Bay Region. The new building will house Savant Labs, Tannas Co., King Refrigeration and the Institute of Materials of the Savant Group along with the Center for Quality Assurance and a new machine shop. The $10 million investment will include laboratory testing, manufacturing, research, technical training and administrative space for more than 85 employees with room to grow. “This is an exciting time for us as we unveil our new headquarters in the year of our 50th anniversary,” said Rebecca Cox, president. “We have come a long way since Ted Selby started Savant Labs in 1969 as a

materials-consulting firm. It truly shows the dedication and hard work of our employees and is a significant milestone in pursuit of our goal to continuously improve our service to our growing global customer base.” The headquarters are scheduled to be completed in early 2021. ANNUAL RUBY AWARD SEEKING NOMINEES 1st State Bank is now seeking nominations to “Recognize the Upward, Bright and Young.” Since 2005, the RUBY Award has recognized 160 young people based on their professional achievements and the impact they have on our community. The awards are supported by WNEM TV-5; Great Lakes Bay Regional Lifestyle Magazine; and the Young Professionals Networks of Saginaw, Bay and Midland counties chambers of commerce. To be eligible, nominees must be 39 or younger as of Dec. 31. Nominees must either work or live in Saginaw, Bay or Midland counties. Online nomination forms are available at 1stStateBk.com. HEALTH CENTERS RECEIVE GRANT TO HIRE NURSE PRACTITIONER Great Lakes Bay Health Centers received a grant from Blue Cross Blue Shield helping it hire an additional nurse practitioner to expand integrated behavioral health services and medicated-assisted treatment for substance use disorder treatment at the new Davenport Avenue location in Saginaw and the center in Bad Axe. “We are excited to partner with organizations that share our goal of increasing

12.19

| BUSINESS | 41


biz SCENE / EXPOSURE

access to high-quality care,” said Kim Kratz, senior health care analyst for Blue Cross Blue Shield of Michigan. “The Great Lakes Bay Health Centers have been a strong partner since 2014, providing critical services for those in need. This funding will help them innovate, providing compassionate treatment for substance use disorder and integrating medical and behavioral health services.” WARNER PARTNER APPOINTED CHAIR OF MICHIGAN ATTORNEY DISCIPLINE BOARD The Michigan Supreme Court has appointed Jonathan E. Lauderbach, a partner with Warner Norcross + Judd LLP, as chairperson of the Michigan Attorney Discipline Board.    Lauderbach, who is based in the firm’s Midland office, began his term as chair on Oct. 1. He has served on the board since 2015 and was vice chairperson in 2018.  A former circuit judge, Lauderbach focuses his practice on litigation and resolution of disputes arising out of commercial transactions and government affairs. In 2018, Lauderbach was named as a Leader in the Law by Michigan Lawyers Weekly. Currently, he is recognized by Michigan Super Lawyers.  Lauderbach was one of two attorneys who helped to launch the firm’s Midland office in 2013. The office has grown to 19 attorneys, legal professionals and staff who serve clients throughout the Great Lakes Bay Region and beyond. He also is a member of the firm’s management committee. Lauderbach is active in the community, as well. In 2018, he was elected to a four-year term on the board of education for Midland Public Schools. He is a past chair of the board of the Midland Area Chamber of Commerce and has served as a director of Midland Business Alliance.  THE MARSHALL M. FREDERICKS SCULPTURE MUSEUM OPENS TWO DYNAMIC EXHIBITIONS FEATURING ARTWORK BY STEPHENSON AND SUNG-KUEN The Marshall Fredericks Sculpture Museum

42 | BUSINESS | 12.19

at Saginaw Valley State University presents two new exhibitions, “Susanne Stephenson: Transfigurement II” and “Lee Sung-Kuen: Interconnected.”  Both exhibitions will run through Jan. 11. “Transfigurement II” is a retrospective exhibition of Stephenson’s work and a new version of the original presented at Pewabic Pottery in Detroit and curated by Tom Phardel. Stephenson has been an important contributor to the field of ceramics for six decades. “While color and gesture are paramount to the visual experience of her work,” wrote Paul Kotula, associate professor of ceramics at Michigan State University, “Stephenson delivers humanscale vessels with thickly textured strokes of painted color, sensual and rough edges, and unique empty volumes that curious hands delight in exploring.” In Sung-Kuen’s “Interconnected” exhibition, he focuses on building a bridge between man and nature. Sung-Kuen’s work is a perfect illustration of the concept of vital energy (Qi), which is omnipresent in the artistic culture of Eastern Asia. “Lee Sung Keun: Interconnected” was organized by the Waterfall Mansion and Gallery, NYC and curated by Kate Shin. The exhibitions and museum are free of charge and open to the public. For a full up-to-date list of programming, visit the museum website at MarshallFredericks.org.   PERCEPTIONS ANNOUNCES NEW EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR Perceptions, the Great Lakes Bay Region’s LGBTQ nonprofit organization, has announced Scott Ellis as executive director of the organization, succeeding Chris Lauckner. Lauckner will remain with Perceptions as chairman emeritus. Ellis previously served the community as a Perceptions board member John LaFever and committee leader and

has directed the organization’s Great Lakes Bay PRIDE events for the past three years. “I am excited and honored to take on this new role with Perceptions and continue making strikes toward achieving our vision of a community that inspires engagement, equality and respect for all,” Ellis said. “Working within our community has provided me the opportunity to connect with incredible individuals, businesses and other nonprofits organizations that believe diversity and inclusion are vital to our future success as a region.” NEWLY APPOINTED DIRECTOR OF INSTRUCTOR DEVELOPMENT FOR THE GREATER MICHIGAN CONSTRUCTION ACADEMY The Greater Michigan Construction Academy board of directors has announced the hiring of John LaFever as its director of instructor development. LaFever joins the Greater Michigan Construction Academy after a 35-year career at Dow. LaFever led many divisions inside of Dow and was the geographic implementation leader as a part of the DowDupont division. “We are thrilled to have someone like John join us, and this demonstrates our commitment to recruiting, training and developing the best instructors to educate the next generation of skilled tradespeople” said Jimmy Greene, CEO of the Greater Michigan Construction Academy.


Michael E. Wooley

WARNER PARTNER APPOINTED TO U.S. CITIZENSHIP AND IMMIGRATION SERVICES LIAISON COMMITTEE The Michigan Chapter of the American Immigration Lawyers Association has appointed Michael E. Wooley, a partner with Warner Norcross + Judd LLP, as member of the U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services Liaison Committee. Wooley, who is based in the firm’s Midland office, has been appointed to serve for the 2019-20 committee year. Wooley focuses his practice on immigration and specializes in working with C-suite officers and general counsels to formulate long-term immigration plans and short-term solutions for U.S. and international companies. Wooley is a published author and regularly speaks on immigration topics to various professional organizations. Wooley is the current vice chairman of the Bay City Charter Review Commission and a member of the State Bar of Michigan and the Bay County and Saginaw County bar

associations. He is a past member of the Bay Arts Council board of trustees. CAN COUNCIL EXPANDS TO HURON COUNTY The CAN Council Great Lakes Bay Region has announced the expansion of its Children’s Advocacy Center and Child Abuse Prevention Education programming into Huron County through an affiliation with the Huron County Child Abuse/Neglect Council. The new office is located at 219 E. Huron Ave. in Bad Axe.  “The CAN Council Great Lakes Bay Region takes great pride in expanding our services to protect Huron County’s children,” said Emily Yeager, president and CEO of the CAN Council Great Lakes Bay Region. “Huron County Child Abuse/ Neglect Council board members care deeply for their community and have entrusted our CAN Council with enhancing their efforts. Just as we do for the children of Arenac, Bay and Saginaw counties, we’ll work tirelessly to secure an end to child abuse and neglect for the children of Huron County.”

#NETWORKING OPPORTUNITIES TO MEET, GREET AND LEARN IN GREAT LAKES BAY

Dec. 17: Women in Entrepreneurship Mixer Energize Workspace, Midland, 7:30 p.m. For information, visit energizeworkspace. com. Jan. 9: Percolator Breakfast Horizons Conference Center

7:30 – 9 a.m. For information, call (989)752-7161 Jan. 9: Business After Hours Saginaw County Chamber of Commerce 5 – 7 p.m. For information, including location, phone (989)752-7161

Jan 27: Midland Business Alliance New Member Luncheon Gerstacker Commerce Center, Midland, 11:30 a.m. – 1 p.m. For information, visit MBAmi.org. Feb. 13: 2020 MBA Annual Meeting Great Hall Banquet

and Convention Center, Midland, 4:30 – 7 p.m. For information, visit macc.org/events. March 26: Great Lakes Bay Job Fair Delta College, University Center. For more information, visit delta.edu.

12.19

| BUSINESS | 43


biz SCENE / THE CLOSE

BUSINESSES IN THE CLASSROOM Part of running a successful enterprise is being involved in the community surrounding a business. Many companies work hand-in-hand with schools to further the education of students. Here are a few examples of how your business can go to school:

Tutor students in reading, writing, science or mathematics skills.

Volunteer to instruct through Junior Achievement. Junior Achievement of North Central Michigan serves Midland, Bay, Isabella and Saginaw counties.

44 | BUSINESS | 12.19

Provide incentive awards and recognize students for improved performance in attendance, academics or behavior.

Provide students with financial literacy classes to teach them this vital life skill, but make the lessons fun.

Recruit volunteers from your company to instruct students on computers.

Give employees paid time off to participate in school and community events.

Allow shortterm job shadowing for students and/ or teachers.

Conduct mock interviews to prepare kids for the real thing.

Host a college information day to advise students and parents on college opportunities related to your business.

Become a sponsor for studentdriven environmental projects.


BUILDING FOR F D

Your Future OUR FUTURE

The F.P. Horak Company is committed to the community, to our customers and employees, and to using advanced technology in delivering print and marketing solutions. 1311 Straits Drive, Bay City, MI 48706

fphorak.com

800.735.6505


The Great Lakes Bay Region Does Better With Garber. “The commitment from the Garber family to the Great Lakes Bay Region has been absolutely astounding. The Great Lakes Bay Region is thriving because of the support of Garber. They give generously to our regional nonprofits, schools, universities, community events, and so much more. And every single day, the Garber team provides outstanding customer service. It matters where I buy my car. That’s why I buy from Garber!” Matthew Felan, President & CEO, Great Lakes Bay Regional Alliance

®

GoGarber.com

Profile for FP Horak

Great Lakes Bay Magazine December 2019  

Great Lakes Bay Magazine December 2019  

Profile for fphorak