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Resler Orthodontics carries on a dental legacy

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Community theater is alive and well in the region

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SAKE Wyersberg gets into the red as a professional Santa

December 2019 $3.95


Congratulations to the CITY OF BAY CITY

COMMUNITY

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2019 WINNER

Congratulations to the City of Bay City on being awarded the prestigious Michigan Municipal League 2019 Community Excellence Award! The Uptown Bay City Project transformed a blighted industrial site into a dynamic mixeduse development.

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contents

12/19

all the world’s a stage

Great Lakes Bay Region hosts a healthy community theater scene

25 a man for one season

30

Wyersberg brings joy to kids as Santa Claus 12.19 | great lakes bay | 3


live contents

10

STYLE

12

NATURE

14

FAMILY MATTERS

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UP NEXT

Celebrate NYE in Style Predator in the Sky Bird feeding is often interrupted by the Cooper’s hawk Staying Busy on Break Are you and your kids feeling cooped up this winter? December Events A rundown of the upcoming events, activities and happenings in the Great Lakes Bay Region

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TRENDING

’Tis the Season Exploring the great outdoors this winter in the Great Lakes Bay Region

LOVE MY JOB

Promoting Community Through Smiles It’s about more than straight teeth

PROFILE

Sisterhood of the Skate Chemical City Derby Girls find camaraderie on the track

play 36

TASTE

Molasses Smokehouse and Bar Brings St. Louis to Midland Downtown’s new hotspot is dripping with flavor and authenticity

38

WHAT’S COOKING

40

BEST SEAT IN THE HOUSE

Never Stop Cooking Retired chef Michael Tuma still has the chops

Discover Your Region Heat up date night with these September offerings

42

SEEN HERE

DEPARTMENTS

6 PUBLISHER’S NOTE 44

WRAP UP

Great Lakes Bay magazine, Volume 16, Issue 12, December 2019 (ISSN 1550-8064) is published monthly by The F.P. Horak Company, 1311 Straits Dr, Bay City MI 48706. Periodicals postage pending at Bay City MI. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to Great Lakes Bay Magazine, P.O. Box 925, Bay City MI 48707. Copyright © 2019 The F.P. Horak Company. All rights reserved. Reproduction in whole or part without permission is prohibited.

4 | great lakes bay | 12.19


NOW OPEN AT MCLAREN WE’RE BUILDING THE BEST WITH YOU IN MIND.

MIDLAND

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30 75

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2110 South M-76 West Branch, MI 48661

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publisher’s note

F

giving back during the holidays

or whatever reason, this time of year brings out the best in people. Despite the fact that everyone seems to be in a hectic rush to finish off their to-do lists before the dawn of Dec. 25, for the most part, people seem to smile a bit more readily, acts of kindness come a bit easier and the idea of looking out for your fellow resident becomes a bit more top of mind. It’s that last part I want to focus on in this month’s column for Great Lakes Bay Magazine. Throughout this month’s issue, you’ll find a wide range of holiday-themed offerings from how different cultures and religions celebrate during this time of year to the inspiring story of a man who spreads seasonal joy as a professional Santa Claus. Roger Wyersberg underwent a rigorous educational regiment at Midland’s Charles W. Howard Santa Claus School to assume the role of Old Saint Nick – and his story could benefit us all. I’m not saying we have to enroll in Santa Claus school, but we can all do a little more this month to spread a bit of holiday cheer to those who need it most. Here’s a partial list of some local agencies that could use your help to assist others this time of year: • The Salvation Army Bay City Corps, 401 Tenth St., Bay City • The Salvation Army Saginaw Corps, 2030 N. Carolina St., Saginaw • The Salvation Army Midland Corps, 330 Waldo Ave., Midland • City Rescue Mission of Saginaw, 1021 Burt St., Saginaw • Mustard Seed Shelter, 1325 Cherry St., Saginaw • YWCA Great Lakes Bay Region, 1104 Washington Ave., Bay City • CAN Council Great Lakes Bay Region, 1311 N. Michigan Ave., Saginaw • CAN Council Great Lakes Bay Region, 715 N. Euclid Ave., Bay City • United Way of Midland County, 115 Jerome St., Midland • United Way of Saginaw County, 100 S. Jefferson Ave., Suite 3, Saginaw • United Way of Bay County, 909 Washington Ave., Suite 2, Bay City • United Way of Gratiot and Isabella Counties, 524 E. Mosher St., Mount Pleasant Time and time again, you’ve proven that there’s no shortage of generosity and compassion among the residents of the Great Lakes Bay Region. Let’s all do a little more during this time of year to ensure that we remember everyone in our communities, whether they are going through good times or hard times. Together we can give more of ourselves to provide a happier holiday to all.

Publisher: Marisa Horak Belotti marisa@greatlakesbaymag.com Editor: Kelly Mazurkiewicz kmazurkiewicz@greatlakesbaymag.com Associate Editor: Mary Gajda mgajda@greatlakesbaymag.com Art Director: Chad Hussle chad@greatlakesbaymag.com Photographer: Doug Julian doug@greatlakesbaymag.com Contributors: Rich Adams Alicia Frank Mary Gajda Jessica Klein-Hill Adam Lansdell Christopher Nagy Rachel Trumble Michael Tuma Marketing Account Specialist: Liz Reno-Hayes lreno-hayes@greatlakesbaymag.com (517) 420-1341 Advertising Sales & Subscription Representative: Jim Williams jim@greatlakesbaymag.com (989) 891-1783

1311 Straits Drive Bay City MI 48706 Phone (989) 893-2083 info@greatlakesbaymag.com

Marisa Horak Belotti Publisher

we want to hear from you! Letters must be signed and include the writer’s name and address. Please send to: Great Lakes Bay Magazine, 1311 Straits Drive, Bay City MI 48706, or email info@greatlakesbaymag.com. 6 | great lakes bay | 12.19

Subscription Inquiries Call (989) 893-2083

Correction: In our October issue, we incorrectly identified the couple in a photo on page 9 as Dianne and Dale Tribfelner. The caption should have read Rich and Terrie Brown, in Florence Italy.


GLBRA Message

WELCOME TERA SZELIGA

Tera Szeliga

T

he Great Lakes Bay Regional Alliance would like to welcome Tera Szeliga as the director of internal operations/institute for leaders. In this role, Tera will lead the annual Institute for Leaders Class, which brings together leaders from Bay, Isabella, Midland and Saginaw counties. Tera is also responsible for leading the daily operations of the Great Lakes Bay Regional Alliance, including regional quality-of-life initiatives. Tera spent the previous 10 years with the United Way of Bay County serving as the director of marketing and community impact, where she designed and implemented all marketing materials, led grant/funding processes and allocations of funds as well as agency reporting and accountability, developed and executed internal programs, organized awareness and fundraising events, and supported fund development efforts. Previously, Tera spent 10 years at General Motors Powertrain in Bay City working in various areas such as salaried personnel, Health and safety, and communications.

Tera serves as the drama director at Pinconning High School, treasurer and coach of AYSO 825, treasurer of PYLO, and co-chair of the Bay City State Theatre. Tera has spent much time serving on a wide array of Bay County taskforce groups such as the Great Start Collaborative, Bay Arenac Diaper Council, Bay County Prevention Network, Bay Area Chamber of Commerce Ambassador Group, Hop Riot Development and Bay County Relay for Life. She has spent time volunteering for programs such as Reading is Bay County’s Business, the Bay Area Community Foundation Scholarship Program, Junior Achievement, the Arenac County Queens Pageant and Bay Area Mock Job Interviews. Tera is a graduate of the 2017 Leadership Bay County class and acted as an adviser for the 2018 class. She earned community awards such as the Bay Area Chamber of Commerce Ambassador Team of the Year 2016 and the Energize YPN Award in 2018. Tera is a lifelong resident of the Great Lakes Bay Region. She is a graduate of Pinconning High School and has attended both Delta College and Davenport University studying business management and human resources. Please join us in welcoming Tera to the Great Lakes Bay Regional Alliance team! Matt Felan President & CEO Great Lakes Bay Regional Alliance

Your next business success is waiting by the Bay. www.greatlakesbay.org


Can inclusion make us stronger? Diversity isn’t just a numbers game at Dow. We believe it fuels creative thinking and makes our solutions stronger. Our diverse workforce is a powerful asset, but we don’t want to take our progress for granted. So we constantly measure and track how we’re doing, and look for ways to do more. A commitment to inclusion requires action and results. Want to join a diverse and collaborative workforce? Get in touch.

dow.com ® and ™ are Trademarks of The Dow Chemical Company © 2019


live STYLE P. 10

NATURE P. 12

• FAMILY MATTERS

P. 14

• UP NEXT

P. 16

MAKING A SPLASH Baby it’s cold outside, but the water is warm at Soaring Eagle Waterpark in Mount Pleasant! There, you’ll find Soaring Eagle’s longest slide, Otter’s Run! No inner tubes – it’s just you vs. a continuous flow of water for the ride of your life. For details, visit soaringeaglewaterpark.com.

12.19 | great lakes bay | 9


live / STYLE

celebrate NYE in style

BY GREAT LAKES BAY FASHION EXPERT

PHOTOS BY DOUG JULIAN

Jessica Klein-Hill,

Owner, OMONI Boutique

THANK YOU TO THE CONTRIBUTING BUSINESSES:

Whether it’s a black tie or no tie, or a heading out or staying in affair you are planning this New Year’s Eve, make sure you add a bit of sparkle to your night by being with the ones you love!

Viper Apparel,

Michigan’s largest retailer for prom, pageant and events, located 5050 Zelle Drive, Bridgeport, MI, (989) 401-5001

Edward’s Men Shop,

your one-stop shop for menswear and personalized signature services including alterations, tailoring and custom-made apparel. Located 4928 Gratiot Road, Saginaw, MI, (989) 793-4523

Korina is wearing a gorgeous A-Line floral ballgown from Viper Apparel and Zak is donning a custom black suit from Edward’s Men’s Shop.

Dance, laugh and glam the night away! Sequin cocktail dress found at Viper Apparel (not only for prom and pageants!) 10 | great lakes bay | 12.19

Let it snow, let it snow, let it snow! Classic black will always be in style, no matter the occasion, weather or avenue. Shop this elevated mermaid beaded gown at Viper Apparel in Bridgeport. Need to learn how to tie a bow tie? Stop into Edward’s Men’s Shop and they will gladly show you. Hair and makeup done by Elite Stylist Megan Phillips IG @hairbymeganphillips

Korina and Zak McClellan of Prost! Wine Bar & Charcuterie, located at 576 1/2, S. Main St., Frankenmuth, MI. (989) 262-8690


Heart emergency?

“Take me to

Covenant.”

Wishing you and your family a joyous holiday season and a prosperous new year! Wilder Road Branch 4265 Wilder Road Bay City, MI 48706

Straits Drive Branch 1479 Straits Drive Bay City, MI 48706

Cabaret Trail S Branch 3262 Cabaret Trail S Saginaw, MI 48603

COPOCO.org • 800.292.2897 When you or a loved one experience the symptoms of a heart attack, there’s no time to research hospitals. But you don’t need to. Just tell the ambulance crew to take you to Covenant HealthCare: the most preferred hospital in the region for both heart and emergency care. Our expert board-certified cardiologists perform the highest volume of heart procedures in Saginaw, and our Emergency Care Center handles the highest volume of visits each year. Covenant also has the region’s first and largest Structural Heart Disease program, and the most comprehensive cardiac care.

More Than Investments I help families achieve their financial goals. I do this by working with my clients to develop strategies that help to address:

Trust your heart only to the best: Covenant HealthCare. Learn more at CovenantCardiology.com

• MULTIGENERATION WEALTH TRANSFER • PROTECTING THEIR LOVED ONES AND THEIR WEALTH • EDUCATIONAL NEEDS (CURRENT AND FUTURE) Michael L. Southgate Financial Advisor 499 Franklin Street Suite B Frankenmuth, MI 48734 989-652-9622 Check us out on Facebook!

www.edwardjones.com Member SIPC


live / NATURE

WATCHING An immature Cooper’s hawk waits near a brush pile to ambush nearby prey.

predator in the sky BIRD FEEDING IS OFTEN INTERRUPTED BY THE COOPER’S HAWK BY JEANNE HENDERSON, INTERPRETIVE NATURALIST 400 S. BADOUR ROAD, MIDLAND, (989) 631-0830 CHIPPEWANATURECENTER.ORG

12 | great lakes bay | 12.19

More than 52 million people enjoy feeding birds at home. Are you one of them? As you observe the behavior of finches, woodpeckers, doves, cardinals and jays jockeying for positions, you may see them suddenly scatter. As birds disappear into the bushes, the scene turns eerily quiet. Look around and you will likely find an aerial predator: the Cooper’s hawk. Catching birds is the natural niche of a Cooper’s hawk, along with their similar-

looking cousin, the sharp-shinned hawk. The Cooper’s hawk pursues birds through dense forests on its short, powerful rounded wings, using its long tail for stability. Easy prey at bird feeders helps them subsist during winter. Some people get upset when a hawk takes their favorite birds, but other people – like me – get excited to see a hawk up close, realizing the food web connection. The hawk conceals itself in trees while perching and scanning. Short forays often


differences in juveniles and adults, and similar species Adult Cooper’s hawks are dark gray on the head and back, with orange and white bars on the breast and belly. Their red eyes are distinctive, and the barred tail is long with rounded edges. The body can be up to 17 inches long and the wingspan is 31 inches.

WATCHING

WATCHING

Finding a pile of mourning dove feathers like this means that a Cooper’s hawk made a successful kill.

A juvenile Cooper’s hawk looks down on the feeders at Chippewa Nature Center’s wildlife viewing area, not realizing that a downy woodpecker is watching from behind.

end with walking on the ground as they search in bushes. The Cooper’s hawk seizes prey with its sharp talons and squeezes the animal to death. Its meal includes mediumsized birds like doves, robins and jays, or rodents such as chipmunks and voles. Like other raptors, it tears pieces off the victim with its hooked beak. The hawk plucks the feathers off first and keeps looking around to ensure the scene is safe. Later, it flies off with the carcass to finish eating elsewhere or to take to its family. Food moves into the bird’s muscular gizzard, which grinds material before digestion in the stomach. The gizzard also crushes the nondigestible feathers, bones or fur, and

gradually compacts them into a pellet. Hawks, owls and eagles will regurgitate pellets; finding and dissecting them gives us clues to the diet and whereabouts of these predators. During summer, the male Cooper’s hawk builds most of the nest and hunts for the whole family, passing prey to the female who broods three to five juveniles. After fledging, the young are fed by both parents until they are 7 weeks old. If a hawk frequently visits your yard and you do not want to witness the action, take down your feeders for several days until the hawk moves on. Songbirds will find other natural food supplies, but they will return after you replace your feeders.

Juvenile Cooper’s hawks have a light-brown head, dark-brown back and dark-brown thin streaks on a white breast and belly. They have yellow eyes, and the barred tail has a broader white tip than the adult. This species lives year-round with a range from central Michigan to Florida. Those who breed in the northern part of our state will migrate south for winter into the year-round range. Identifying the sharp-shinned hawk from a Cooper’s hawk is a bird watcher’s challenge because their plumages are similar. When resting, the Cooper’s long tail is rounded, whereas the sharpshinned’s tail looks squared-off. The sharp-shinned’s legs are long like pencils, compared to the thicker, shorter legs of the Cooper’s. In flight, the Cooper’s looks like a flying cross with wide wings and noticeable head in front; the sharp-shinned flies with wings angled forward making the smaller head harder to see. A sharp-shinned hawk flies with a quick, snappy wing beat, while a Cooper’s hawk’s wings beat slower and stiffer.


live / FAMILY MATTERS Downtown Frankenmuth

PICTUREPERFECT LOCATIONS GREAT SPOTS TO SNAP THE PERFECT SHOT FOR YOUR HOLIDAY CARDS The Great Lakes Bay Region is home to many beautiful, picturesque backdrops that are perfect for family photos. Here are just a few you might want to consider for your next shoot.

Whiting Forest of Dow Gardens 2203 Eastman Ave., Midland Adjacent to Dow Gardens, this 54-acre park is made up of native forest, meadows and wetlands; the perfect winter wonderland when the snow begins to fall.

staying busy on break ARE YOU AND YOUR KIDS FEELING COOPED UP THIS WINTER? BY ADAM LANSDELL

Winter boredom is no joke, especially for children and young adults home from school with nothing to do and nowhere to go, thanks to the inevitable takeover of the tundra. But while it may be too cold to take on all your regular outdoor activities, there are plenty of things to do to stay active and engaged. Here are a few unique activities to give a shot this winter. SNOWBOARDING/SKIING: Dangerous at

times, yet exhilarating, this seasonal activity is great for recreational enthusiasts. If your kids were the type to never be seen without a skateboard, bike or some other way of going top speed, they will likely be quick to adopt these winter sports.

14 | great lakes bay | 12.19

SNOWSHOEING: Still hellbent on the

great outdoors? If extreme winter sports like snowboarding, skiing and snowmobiling aren’t your speed and you want to take things slower, this unique and leisurely activity could be for you. INDOOR ATTRACTIONS: If your children

are bookworms or seeking something mentally stimulating, the winter can be a perfect time to explore indoor attractions such as museums, science centers and aquariums. Here they may discover new interests that translate and connect with themes explored in their current educational journey.

Saginaw Valley Naval Ship Museum 1680 Martin St., Bay City Perfect for families of veterans and watercraft lovers alike, this historic naval museum has some of the best views of the Saginaw River and makes for some interesting and unique visual opportunities. Book a self-guided tour and explore at your own leisure. The Tridge at Chippewassee Park 101 Golfside Drive, Midland This local favorite is perfect for family photos thanks to its unique architecture and beautiful vistas. In addition to the tridge, Chippewassee Park is beautiful in its own right and a perfect place to scout out beautiful, woodland photos. Downtown Frankenmuth Let all of downtown Frankenmuth be a backdrop for holiday photos. Picture falling snow, charming shops and lots of smiles. Or check out Heritage Park’s riverside pathway for a picture-perfect pose. Deerfield Nature Park 2425 W. Reemus Road, Mount Pleasant From a covered bridge to hiking trails, Deerfield Nature Park has lots of spots to stop and strike a pose. Or step out of the box and snap photos while the family enjoys the sledding hill.


FINDING A GIFT THAT’S UNIQUE A PRESENT NOT SOON FORGOTTEN

an inclusive holiday season We all have a different take on the meanings and true purpose of the holidays we opt to celebrate, and toward the end of the year, it can be a struggle to acknowledge and be accepting of many conflicting festivities. Nonetheless, we should make an effort to better understand and appreciate both the unique subtleties and the grand similarities that drive them. This holiday season, I dare you to take it upon yourself to experience new things, with new people. In doing so, you can learn to embrace new principles, better understand your neighbors and maybe adopt a few new traditions of your own. HAVE OPEN ARMS If you’ve long celebrated Christmas, Hanukkah, Kwanzaa or even Festivus, you probably have traditions, ideals that are unique to you and your family. As you can imagine, we all do. Instead of sticking to what you know, engage with diverse

groups and individuals from different religious and cultural backgrounds. While their beliefs may not reflect your own, their traditions, like yours, are often ingrained with the intention of spreading positivity, sound morals and other admirable traits. MIX IT UP This season invite someone from a different background to join you in a tradition you hold closely or join in yourself. Remember, you aren’t doing this with the intention of changing someone’s opinion, but rather creating a bond that represents respect and friendship. EMBRACE OUR DIFFERENCES In no small part, the holidays for the majority of us come down to the opportunity to celebrate the great things we have in our lives: our families, our friends and the prospect of an incredible year to come. So why not welcome change and acceptance to your celebration?

The best gifts are the things you never expect. No surprises come from the things you receive on your coveted Christmas list – you were the author. So, when considering what to give a friend or loved one this holiday season, think outside the box.

Give them a little piece of yourself instead Putting your efforts into a unique, handcrafted gift is a good place to start. They’re generally less expensive and genuinely come from the heart. These qualities are the making of a great gift. If you’re an artist or creative, you may have the upper hand here, as making personalized, one-of-a-kind gifts are a great way to showcase you truly care about the recipient. These types of gifts represent and reflect an understanding that the love and admiration you have for someone is more valuable than anything money can buy but only time can give. Show you know them best In no way is the act of giving a gift a competition, despite how far some may go. The size of your gift isn’t what matters; it’s the thoughtfulness. Much like a presentation, it helps to know your audience – so use your unique understanding of your friend or family member to your advantage. Look for gifts associated with a special memory you two hold. Perhaps it’s reflective of an activity, hobby, fandom or other commonality you have bonded over or was the genesis of your relationship.

WHERE TO MEET MR. CLAUS SANTA CAN BE FOUND THROUGHOUT THE REGION IF YOU KNOW WHERE TO LOOK Santa will be making the rounds this year, so don’t miss out on your chance to introduce him to your kiddos and get a picture taken. While times and dates may vary by location, most destinations listed below have offered Santa meet and greets throughout the holidays in past years. • Bay City Town Center, 4101 E Wilder Road, Bay City • Bronner’s CHRISTmas Wonderland, 25 Christmas Lane, Frankenmuth • The Nate and Mary Ida Doan Santa House, 1001 John F. Kennedy Drive, Bay City • Santa House, Main Street and M-20, Midland

We encourage you to keep your eyes peeled for details on Santa sightings at these locations throughout the year. Most locations offer a variety of exciting Christmas-themed outings for the entire family.


live / UP NEXT

december fun COMMUNITY German Christmas Songfest Sunday, Dec. 1, St. Lorenz Lutheran Church, Frankenmuth, (989) 6526141, stlorenz.org Grandparents Play Free Through Dec. 1, Mid-Michigan Children’s Museum, Saginaw, (989) 399-6626, michildrensmuseum.org Midland County Courthouse Lighting Dec. 3, Santa House, Midland, (989) 839-9661, info@midlandfoundation. org Hollyday Art Fair Dec. 4, Andersen Enrichment Center & Lucille E. Andersen Memorial Rose Garden, Saginaw, (989) 759-1362, andersencenter.org/publicevents. php The Great Lakes Market Winter Market Dec. 6-7, Dow Diamond, Midland, (989) 272-9939, facebook.com/ events/241772486498724/ Trombley/Centre House Holiday Open House Dec. 6, Trombley House, Bay City, (989) 893-5733, bchsmuseum.org/ id4.html Nature Art Show & Sale Dec. 7, Chippewa Nature Center, Midland, (989) 631-0830, chippewanaturecenter.org/natureart-show-sale The Boar’s Head Christmas Festival Dec. 5 and Dec. 7-8, Bethlehem Lutheran Church, Saginaw, (989) 755-1144, bethlehemsaginaw.org/ boarshead Book Club: “The Lost Painting” Dec. 10, Saginaw Art Museum, Saginaw, (989) 754-2491, saginawartmuseum.org Youth Choirs Holiday Concert Dec. 10, Midland Center for the Arts, Midland, (989) 631-5930, mcfta.org/ event/youth-choir-holiday/e27023/ Dow Gardens Christmas Walk Dec. 12-21, recurring weekly on Thursday through Saturday, Dow Gardens, Midland, (800) 362-4874, dowgardens.org

HORIZONS Ultimate Holiday Party Dec. 12, Horizons Conference Center, Saginaw, (989) 799-4122, horizonscenter.com

Winter Exploration Days Dec. 21 to Jan. 5, recurring daily, Chippewa Nature Center, Midland, (989) 631-0830, chippewanaturecenter.doubleknot. com Lunch with Elsa 2! (second seating) Dec. 27, Bavarian Inn Restaurant, Frankenmuth, (989) 652-9941, bavarianinn.com/events/lunch-withelsa-2-2

Keepsake Collections Arts & Craft Show Dec. 14, Horizons Conference Center, Saginaw, (989) 799-4122, keepsakecollectionshows.com/ Horizons_Dec_2019.php

ENTERTAINMENT

Holiday Tea Dec. 15, Dow Gardens, Midland, (800) 362-4874, dowgardens.org/ holiday-tea

Frankenmuth ChristKindlMarkt Dec. 1, Frankenmuth Farmers Market, Frankenmuth, (989) 7517605

KIDS

The Freeland Lights Show Through Dec. 31, Tittabawassee Township Park, Freeland, freelandlights.com

“Goosebumps: The Science of Fear” Through May 25, Midland Center for the Arts, Midland, (989) 631-5930, mcfta.org/alden-b-dow-museumof-science-and-art/currentexhibitions/ Santa Visits at Bronner’s Through Dec. 24, Bronner’s CHRISTmas Wonderland, Frankenmuth, (989) 652-9931, bronners.com Santa’s Village Through Dec. 22, Saginaw County Fairgrounds, Chesaning, (989) 8452143, saginawcountyfair.org/index. php/node/4 Sundays in the City Dec. 1-22, recurring weekly Sundays, downtown Bay City (989) 893-3573, downtownbaycity.com/ events/sundays-in-the-city-2019/ all/ Toddler Time! Through Dec. 18, recurring weekly Wednesdays, Mid-Michigan Children’s Museum, Saginaw, (989) 399-6626, michildrensmuseum.org Santa Train Dec. 6, Birch Run Area Chamber of Commerce and Convention and Visitors Bureau, Birch Run, (989) 624-9193, birchrunbridgeportchamber.com Breakfast with Santa & Mrs. Claus Dec. 7, Zehnder’s of Frankenmuth, Frankenmuth, (855) 359-8900, zehnders.com

Mid-Michigan Gun & Knife Show Dec. 1, Frankenmuth Credit Union Event Center, Birch Run, (517) 6764160, migunshow.com

“The Giver” Dec. 6-8, Pit & Balcony Community Theatre, (989) 754-6587, pitandbalconytheatre.com SVSU Percussion Ensemble and Valley Steel Concert Dec. 2, Saginaw Valley State University: Rhea Miller Recital Hall, University Center, Saginaw, (989) 964-4159, svsu.edu/musicdepartment/ currentconcertsandevents/ Comedy Nights Through June 4, recurring monthly on the first Thursday, Midland Center for the Arts, (989) 6315930, mcfta.org SVSU Jazz Ensemble Concert Dec. 5, Saginaw Valley State University: Rhea Miller Recital Hall, University Center, Saginaw, (989) 964-4159, svsu.edu/ musicdepartment Cocktails & Tennis Through Dec. 6, Greater Midland Tennis Center, Midland, (989) 6316151, greatermidland.org

The Comedy Series presents “David Dyer” Dec. 7, State Theatre of Bay City, Bay City, (989) 892-2660, statetheatrebaycity.com/Events Holidays with Saginaw Choral Society Dec. 8, Temple Theatre, Saginaw, (989) 753-1812, saginawchoralsociety. com/holidays-with-scs Men of Music Christmas Concert Dec. 8, First United Methodist Church, Midland, (989) 631-5930, mcfta.org Bavarian Inn Restaurant’s New Year’s Eve Dueling Pianos Dinner Show Dec. 31, Bavarian Inn Restaurant, Frankenmuth, (989) 652-9941, bavarianinn.com New Year’s Eve Bash Dec. 31, Golden Glow Ballroom, Saginaw, (989) 781-2120, goldenglow.com

EDUCATIONAL Let It Snow Dec. 1-22, Delta College Planetarium, Bay City, (989) 6672260, delta.edu/planetarium/index. html “Transfigurement” curated by Tom Phardel Through Jan. 11, Marshall M. Fredericks Sculpture Museum, University Center, Saginaw, (989) 964-7125, marshallfredericks.org/ calendar “Organic Forms” curated by Kate Shin Through Jan. 11, Marshall M. Fredericks Sculpture Museum, University Center, Saginaw, (989) 964-7125, marshallfredericks.org/ calendar Life Under the Arctic Sky Through Jan. 4, recurring weekly Saturdays, Delta College Planetarium, Bay City, (989) 6672260, delta.edu/planetarium/index. html

Holiday Murder Mystery Dec. 6, Golden Glow Ballroom, Saginaw, (989) 781-2120, goldenglow.com

Stars of the Pharaohs Through Jan. 4, recurring weekly Saturdays, Delta College Planetarium, Bay City, (989) 6672260, delta.edu/planetarium/index. html

“The Snow Queen” Dec. 6-8 and Dec. 13-15, Bay City Players, Bay City, (989) 893-5555, boxoffice.etix.com/ticket

Pages of History Book Club Dec. 17, Castle Museum of Saginaw County History, Saginaw, (989) 7522861, castlemuseum.org

DO YOU WANT YOUR EVENT LISTED HERE? EMAIL DETAILS TO INFO@GREATLAKESBAYMAG.COM. 16 | great lakes bay | 12.19


work TRENDING P. 18

LOVE MY JOB P. 20

PROFILE P. 22

ALL HAIL THE QUEEN OF THE KITCHEN The beloved matriarch of Frankenmuth’s world-famous Bavarian Inn has been called the “Queen of the Kitchen.” Dorothy Zehnder has been serving up great food accompanied by her beautiful smile for years and is a December birthday girl! Seventy of her 98 years have been spent in the restaurant business.

12.19 | great lakes bay | 17


work / TRENDING

get outside and play! EXPLORING THE GREAT OUTDOORS THIS WINTER IN THE GREAT LAKES BAY REGION BY CHRISTOPHER NAGY

18 | great lakes bay | 12.19

S

pring gets all the affection. It’s a season of too much undeserved reverence. Poets drone endlessly about renewal and rebirth. Curmudgeons bemoan how it can’t arrive soon enough before returning their attention to those darn kids on the lawn. Romantics wax about how it’s the time of year equated with budding young love. Blech! Well, I say, where’s the love for winter? If spring is the snooty belle of the ball – all gussied up in uptight “look-at-me” arrogance – then winter is the party gatecrasher who has spiked the punch and is coaxing you into the back alley to shoot a quick game of craps. Sure, you know that rascally winter is a bit rough around the edges – what with the cold temperatures, shoveling and somewhat precarious driving conditions – but, holy cow, he is so much more fun to hang around with! It’s time to ditch the belle because winter is bringing his own party to Michigan. And just like in any other northern state, he tends

to party a bit harder here. Fortunately, the Great Lakes Bay Region is always an ever gracious and well-prepared host for winter’s rambunctious annual arrival. Leave the chestnuts roasting over an open fire, let Jack Frost nip at your nose and embrace your inner child by gleefully romping around in the winter wonderland. The area offers a wealth of wintertime outdoor activities for kids of any age. The convention and visitor’s bureau serving the Great Lakes Bay Region, the Go Great Lakes Bay team, has compiled a list of the hottest local winter spots in one of their always-informative blog posts. Here’s a look at a few of the offerings they found. CROSS-COUNTRY SKIING

Explore nearly 100 miles of the Great Lakes Bay Regional Trail, rent equipment at the Midland City Forest and trek the 7-mile trail for beginners or tackle the 11K loop for advanced skiers, travel the 4-mile Anderson Nature Trail inside the 2,000-plus-acre Bay City State Recreation Area, or bask in the 19 miles of trail open to skiing at the Chippewa Nature Center.


SNOWSHOEING

“With almost 100 miles of snow-covered outdoor trails, places to snowshoe in Michigan are plentiful here in the Great Lakes Bay,” according to the Go Great Lakes Bay website. “Go snowshoeing from dawn to dark on 19 miles of scenic trails inside our 1,200-acre Chippewa Nature Center or try Midland’s City Forest for another snowshoeing adventure along 11 kilometers of gorgeously groomed trails.” FAT-TIRE BIKING

No need to put your two-wheeler in mothballs until the warm weather returns. Fat-tire biking opens the door to making cycling a year-round activity. If you don’t own a fat-tire bike, they can be rented from Jack’s Bicycle Shop in Bay City or Ray’s Bike Shop in Midland and Bay City to explore the winter miles across the region. According to Go Great Lakes Bay, the roughly 100 miles of the Great Lakes Bay Regional Trail offer ideal outings, including the 11 miles that take you through the

Shiawassee State Game Area from St. Charles to Saginaw on the Saginaw Valley Rail Trail, the 30-mile Pere Marquette Rail Trail from Midland’s Tridge to the outskirts of Clare, and the 21 miles of frozen woods and wetlands on the Bay City Area Riverwalk/Railtrail. SLEDDING, TOBOGGANING AND ICE SKATING

Those looking for faster wintertime thrills can turn to more traditional activities such as sledding, tobogganing and ice skating. The Midland City Forest Winter Sports Park offers all three. Rent a toboggan and race down snow-packed ice runs, enjoy sledding on a groomed and lighted hill until 10 p.m. or cruise across the glass-like lighted skating rink. Other area where skating can be had include the Emerson Park Ice Hockey Rink near downtown Midland, Hoyt Park in Saginaw and the Nickless Family Community Pavilion in Bay City’s Wenonah Park.

ICE FISHING

What did one ice fisherman say to the other? Drop me a line anytime. “Venturing out with the pro anglers of Mark Martin’s Fishing Vacation School or setting up a shanty for your own Michigan ice fishing adventure, a winter fishery full of world-class walleye awaits on the frozen Saginaw Bay of Lake Huron,” according to Go Great Lakes Bay. RISING ABOVE IT ALL

The 1,400-foot canopy walk at Whiting Forest of Dow Gardens in Midland overlooks 54 acres of forests, ponds, meadows and orchards from 40 feet off the ground. Designed to be accessible for all ages and abilities and open in every season, the canopy walk has three arms with each ending at a unique viewing platform. For more information on events and activities to be discovered throughout the Great Lakes Bay Region, visit the Go Great Lakes Bay website at gogreat.com.


work / LOVE MY JOB

promoting community through smiles IT’S ABOUT MORE THAN STRAIGHT TEETH BY ALICIA FRANK | PHOTO BY DOUG JULIAN

Q& A Dr. Rich Resler is proud to continue his father’s legacy throughout the Great Lakes Bay Region at Resler Orthodontics. But Resler and wife Dr. Tracie Resler bring more than just beautiful smiles and straight teeth to the region. The power couple work to help make the Great Lakes Bay community a great place to be. How long have you been practicing orthodontics in the Great Lakes Bay Region? I’ve been an orthodontist in the Great Lakes Bay Region since 2006, at which time I joined Resler Orthodontics, established by my father in 1976. From the time I was a boy, I held a variety of positions within the practice, from dental assistant to laboratory aid. My father was eager to teach me the art and science of orthodontics, and I acted as an “apprentice,” observing and learning as much as I could throughout my young life. I’m grateful that the people of the Great Lakes Bay area believed in me as I pursued the path to becoming an orthodontist and that they entrust me with their orthodontic care. That community encouragement has enabled me to evolve Resler Orthodontics from the single Saginaw office where I “grew up” to two more locations in Clio and Caro. Can you tell me about what it’s like owning and running a practice with your wife, Tracie? I believe having a husband-andwife practice benefits our patients tremendously. There is an old adage

20 | great lakes bay | 12.19

that two heads are better than one, but that really rings true in our profession, since there are often several possible ways to treat the same orthodontic problem. Together, we discuss each patient and consider all potential treatment options to create the perfect customized plan for every individual. I feel fortunate to work alongside my wife every day; having her here enhances the treatment experience for our patients and ensures that we give them the best end results. In your opinion, what is the most rewarding thing about being an orthodontist? It’s most rewarding to witness the significant boost in self-confidence that a beautiful smile gives to my younger patients; it can truly be life changing. Those teenage years are a very formative and influential period, and knowing we are giving these patients something that helps them feel more self-confident as they navigate life and learn who they are as individuals is incredibly fulfilling. What does it mean to be a part of the Great Lakes Bay Region community? I’m proud to carry the torch for Resler Orthodontics and to cultivate its role in the community. As an orthodontist, it’s my responsibility to give our patients smiles that benefit their health and boost their confidence, but I believe it is also my role to help them become selfassured individuals by showing them I sincerely care about them and by teaching them ways they can care for others. Our practice gives generously to area schools and organizations that are vital to our local culture, and we inspire our patients to give back with office projects that promote volunteering and service. I strive every day to give each of my patients their best smile, and my hope is that they share those smiles throughout the Great Lakes Bay Region and beyond.


Donna M. Hammond, PPCNP-BC | Jamie A. Simon, PA-C Oksana K. Lidke, CPNP-PC | Laurisa Cummings, LMSW Randi Price, LMSW

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work / PROFILE

sisterhood of the skate CHEMICAL CITY DERBY GIRLS FIND CAMARADERIE ON THE TRACK BY ALICIA FRANK PHOTOS BY DOUG JULIAN


The sisterhood shows in their smiles as the Chemical City Derby Girls pose while taking a trip around the track.

T

he Great Lakes Bay Region is known for many things. The area has fabulous festivals, celebrations, Lake Huron and, of course, chemistry. The town was partially built around the study of chemistry. So it just seemed fitting for this group of roller derby girls to pay tribute to that founding study by calling themselves the Chemical City Derby Girls (CCDG). “Roller derby itself is life changing and incredibly empowering,” said CCDG President Rachel Baker – or Easy Bake Shovin,’ as she’s known in the roller arena. “Our sport has built a place where all sizes, ages, religions, genders – you name it – are welcome with open arms.” Roller derby is a strength-based, contact sport on skates consisting of two teams of five members skating around the track to win the bout. A roller derby bout is played in two 30-minute periods broken into jams. During each jam, the two teams each put five players in the

rink: one jammer, three blockers and one pivot. The objectives of a roller derby bout are relatively simple. Each team fields a single pointscoring skater (the jammer) whose object is to lap as many opposing skaters as possible.

Each player plays a vital role in the team, not just from the positions they play but the support and sisterhood that comes along with the sport. For many of the women on the roller derby team, taking the hits and bumps as well as the teamwork have become an important part of life. The women shed their identities, strap on thick knee pads and assume their roller derby personas for the bouts in hopes of winning the jam. “I have a feeling that creating sisterhood was most likely at the top of our founders’ list when the idea of our team was first brought about – and that is what CCDG fully embodies,” explained Baker. CCDG formed many years ago and is made up of about 30 females from all different walks of life. The team does a large amount of training to get ready for each bout. In fact, in order for a player to be able to skate as a rostered player in a game, she must have passed a minimum skills test and be deemed ready to play by the training committee. Every skater is different because of her experience level, and the sport itself requires physical demands in order to play. “The minimum skills test itself is not a test that is taken the first day a skater shows up to practice. This test may take weeks or even months to pass,” said Baker. The team competes around the state and calls Midland’s Roll Arena home. The team is a part of the Women’s Flat Track Derby Association league. To follow the Chemical City Derby Girls or check upcoming bout dates, visit the team’s Facebook page or email Baker at chemicalcityderbygirls@ gmail.com.

12.19 | great lakes bay | 23


There’s No Place Like Home. From our Family to Yours, Happy Holidays. We wish you peace, health, and happiness.

www.Cobblestone.me

(989) 692-0210


FEATURE

A MAN FOR ONE

s

e

a

s

o

n WYERSBERG BRINGS JOY TO KIDS AS SANTA CLAUS

BY RICH ADAMS | PHOTO BY DOUG JULIAN

12.19 | great lakes bay | 25


R

oger Wyersberg never intended to become a professional Santa Claus. When he was music director at Ovid-Elsie Area Schools and the Christmas concert season came around, he could depend on a friend to appear as Santa. One year the friend was unable to participate as the jolly old elf and offered to loan his suit, beard and hair wigs to Wyersberg. “I really enjoyed the fact that my new temporary persona could bring so much joy to so many so quickly,” Wyersberg explained. Fast forward to 2003, when he was in a grocery store and saw a mother and her two children approaching. “The children’s eyes got as big as saucers,” he said, explaining he was prematurely gray at age 51 and his full beard likely played a role in the children’s attention. He spotted them later in his shopping trip, and the mother asked if her son could ask a question.

26 | great lakes bay | 12.19

Young Olivia meets with Santa.

“Are you Santa Claus?” “My response was ‘No, but I AM his brother. I am excited to share with him how good both you and your sister have been for your mother here in the store. Keep up the great work,’” Wyersberg said. “I felt I had dodged a bullet, but the experience made me inquisitive. There must be someplace I can go or something I can read to find out more about how to respond and react in situations like I had just experienced.” A quick Google search for Santa schools led him to the Charles W. Howard Santa Claus School in Midland, the oldest school of its kind. “I was so surprised something like this existed no more than 40 miles from my house, and I had never heard of it,” Wyersberg said. The class for 2003 was full, so he enrolled in 2004. “My life has not been the same,” Wyersberg said. “The first year I attended, there were 84 Santas and Mrs. Clauses. Since 2004, I have only missed one or two years of classes.”


FEATURE

When I am in character, IT IS NOT ABOUT ME. It is all about how to make the exchange and experience MEMORABLE, POSITIVE AND HOPING that no matter what they may be facing in life, they can have a few MOMENTS OF JOY to take with them because of our visit. ~Roger Wyersberg

Wyersberg said he learns much at the three-day Santa school, including how to talk in a way that won’t scare children, a bit of sign language, storytelling, how to hone his laugh, how to hold children on his lap, how to handle media interviews and what to never promise a child. “The most important lesson is Santa doesn’t enter through a chimney or hearth; Santa enters through the heart,” he said. “For me, making the persona of Santa as uniform as possible from Santa to Santa … truly makes the chance of believability last so much longer. “When I am in character, it is not about me. It is all about how to make the exchange and experience memorable, positive and hoping that no matter what they may be facing in life, they can have a few moments of joy to take with them because of our visit,” Wyersberg added. Wyersberg grew up in the Detroit area and went to college at Michigan State University. He then taught music for 30 years at OvidElsie and another 11 years at Saginaw Valley State University.

“Not only have I served as Santa, I am a contract musician who has performed with groups in Bay City and Saginaw as well as performed with my own group, the Maple River Brass Quintet,” he said. Wyersberg has advice to anyone interested in becoming a “Brother in Red,” as he put it. “Be humble, be a good listener. Know that it is a service,” he said. “It is always about who I can help to have a better day, a better week, a better Christmas. Know that when you wear that suit, you have an awesome responsibility to uphold the traditions and all that Santa represents.” Wyersberg has served as a mall Santa, the Santa for the Ashley Country Christmas and Polar Express excursions. He portrayed Santa for packagefromsanta.com, in television commercials and in parades, and he has been Santa in both the Midland and Bay City Santa houses.

12.19 | great lakes bay | 27


FOR YOUR HIGH QUALITY HIGH TECH ORTHODONTIC NEEDS

OFFERING COMPLIMENTARY CONSULTATIONS FOR PATIENTS OF ALL AGES.

CALL US TODAY TO SCHEDULE: BAY CITY (989) 686-7591 MIDLAND (989) 631-1334


YOUR SMILE BEGINS HERE BAY CITY 989.686.7591 MIDLAND 989.631.1334

ANDREW GRILLO, DDS, MSD DALE DAVIS, DDS LISA DAVIS, DDS, MS

Showcasing our pride in the communities we live in and serve, in October 2019, Davis and Davis Orthodontics in Midland will become Great Lakes Bay Orthodontics! Together with our satellite location in West Branch and our newest location in Bay City, we are excited to create more beautiful smiles in the Great Lakes Bay region! Great Lakes Bay Orthodontics holds to the same values that patients at Davis & Davis Orthodontics in Midland have come to expect from Drs. Dale and Lisa Davis and Dr. Andrew Grillo (who is officially a partner of our practice!). Our community knows Davis & Davis Orthodontics as a family-friendly practice with a 24-year history in providing excellent care while continually implementing cutting-edge technology. We also pride ourselves on a strong sense of community by giving back and contributing wherever we can. We are a rare combination—big-picture thinkers who live in the moment. We stay alert to new advances and trends in the orthodontic industry and are quick to incorporate them, but we never lose sight of the importance of being patientcentered. We foster a happy, fun environment for patients and staff. We want every patient to feel a sense of belonging and connectedness. We are motivated to find points of common interest, to make sure every patient knows we care not just about their treatment, but more importantly about them as a person. Straightening teeth is where our story starts, but we keep finding new ways to write better endings. We believe in better and smarter technology. We believe in better connections that lift spirits and brighten lives. We believe in returning something from ourselves to build a better community.

Your smile begins here...at Great Lakes Bay Orthodontics! WE BELIEVE IN BETTER!! FOR MORE INFORMATION PLEASE VISIT OUR WEBSITE AT WWW.GREATLAKESBAYORTHODONTICS.COM OR CALL US FOR A COMPLIMENTARY CONSULTATION AT BAY CITY (989) 686-7591 | MIDLAND (989) 631-1334


FEATURE

(L-R) Hanna Nicklyn, Briana Bivins, Anne RussellLutenske, Julie Griffin, Sarah Gochenour, Allicia Russell, Rachel Creed, Holly Booth, Mary Monroe, Danielle Katsoulos, Natalie Slawnyk, and Rebecca Smith

30 | great lakes bay | 12.19

ALL THE WORLD’’S A STAGE Great Lakes Bay Region hosts a healthy community theater scene BY CHRISTOPHER NAGY PHOTOS BY JESSICA CARPENTER


It’s not their job and it’s more than just their hobby. It’s their passion. Sure, professional actors and actresses get the fame, the glory and their faces splashed across tabloid magazines in the supermarket checkout aisle; but, for community theater members, the drive is something purer. They aren’t in pursuit of a paycheck. It’s more of a hunger that needs to be fed; a desire that needs to be satisfied. Being on the stage is like being called home. “If you love the performing arts, it can be hard to find places

beyond school and college where you can come together with fellow artists who are passionate about the magic of live storytelling,” said Dexter Brigham, director of theater programs for the Midland Center for the Arts Center Stage Theatre. “Community theater is a place where performing artists can grow and learn and enjoy the process and product of bringing a story to the stage.” The Great Lakes Bay Region is no stranger to quality community theater. Over the fall, three local troupes – Pit & Balcony Theatre,

Bay City Players and Center Stage Theatre – collaborated to present numerous well-received performances of “Mama Mia!” in a unique, first-ofits-kind production. “It was an amazing learning experience,” said Kathy Pawloski, operations manager for the Bay City Players. “I learned how the other theaters operate, which of their systems could be adjusted and utilized in my organization, and I learned that for a theater of my size, we’re doing a great job. I also now have resources and new friends I didn’t have before.”

Karly Laskowski and Aaron Haines

Ryan Smith

Bill Adamo and Ann Russell-Lutenske

12.19 | great lakes bay | 31


A NIGHT AT THE THEATER Amy Spadafore, managing director of Pit & Balcony Theatre, said local theater benefits the community from both the perspective of the performers as well as members of the audience. For those either on the stage or behind the scenes, it offers a sense of camaraderie and the avenue to create something out of nothing. “It offers opportunities to learn and grow, hone skills, realize dreams,” she said. “To be able to share all of that, not only with the people on stage with you but with your community … is an experience like none other.” From an audience member’s perspective, community theater offers affordable and accessible live entertainment audiences would otherwise have to travel miles and pay high prices to experience, Spadafore noted.

“Getting to see your co-worker, neighbor, classmate or friend on stage is a unique experience that community theater audiences relish in,” she said. “Live theater is a fun addition to a night out – and in a place like Saginaw, where the community theater is within walking distance of many favorite bars and restaurants in Old Town, it is an excellent stimulator of the local economy.” Brigham, Pawloski and Spadafore each said the greatest personal experience from community theater can be found in the sense of pride and accomplishment that comes when production wraps. “My favorite part of a production is when you can sit back and admire all the work the cast and the team put into creating this beautiful piece of storytelling and say to yourself, ‘That’s it. We have a show!’” Spadafore said.

Want to make some plans for the coming months that are a sure bet for an evening of entertainment? Here’s a look at the early 2020 performance schedules for a few of the community theater groups in the Great Lakes Bay Region.

Pit & Balcony Theatre

• “The Great Gatsby” Jan. 24-26 and Jan. 30-Feb. 1 • “Meteor Shower” March 13-15 and March 20-22 • “The Toxic Avenger” May 7-9 and May 15-17 • “Pit & Balcony After Dark: Unwrap Your Candy” June 18-20

Bay City Players

• “They’re Playing Our Song” Feb. 7-9 and Feb. 14-16 • “God of Carnage” March 20-22 and March 27-29 • “Newsies” May 1-3 and May 7-10

Center Stage Theatre

• “Picasso at the Lapin Agile” Jan. 10-19 • “August: Osage County” Feb. 15-23 • “Carousel in Concert” March 7-8 • “A Gentleman’s Guide to Love and Murder” May 8-17 • “Fantastic Mr. Fox” June 11-14

FEATURE

(L-R) John Barnes, Julie Griffin, Brianna Bivins, Cameron Plarske, Hadley Gorsline, Sarah Gochenour, Patrick Kemmerling, Gabby Kujawa, Spencer Beyerlein, Natalie Slawnyk, Rachel Creed, Mary Monroe, Rebecca Smith, Aidan Montgomery, Allicia Russell, Danielle Katsoulos and Hannah Nicklyn

32 | great lakes bay | 12.19


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play TASTE P. 36

WHAT’S COOKING P. 38

BEST SEAT P. 40

SEEN P. 42

THE STATE ON A PLATE There are few better places to momentarily step away from holiday shopping and duck into a unique dining experience than at MI Table in Bay City. The new farm-to-table establishment in Bay City showcases all the best amenities the state has to offer. 12.19 | great lakes bay | 35


play / TASTE

molasses smokehouse and bar brings st. louis to midland DOWNTOWN’S NEW HOTSPOT IS DRIPPING WITH FLAVOR AND AUTHENTICITY BY ADAM LANSDELL | PHOTOS BY DOUG JULIAN

N

ew on the scene in Midland is Molasses Smokehouse and Bar. The exciting addition to the evolving downtown district has garnered hype surrounding its barbecue delicacies, and the commotion isn’t just a matter of blowing smoke. Rather, this dining experience cracks open the barbecue history books to bring patrons an authentic taste of St. Louis-style barbecue – known for its sweet, sticky, bold flavor. Molasses has been long in the making, even before a clear vision came into focus. The brains behind this project, Downtown Restaurant Investments, a group formed by industry veteran Dave Dittenber, has had its eyes set on Midland as a future destination for some time. Having already established

36||great greatlakes lakesbay bay||12.19 11.19 36

recognition for its previous ventures in Bay City (Old City Hall, American Kitchen, Tavern 101) and with many of its core staff being area natives, the group hoped to bring an exciting destination to the downtown area in hopes of fueling the district’s ongoing revitalization. “Having grown up here, it’s nice to see Midland have a comeback. It means a lot to us personally. Dave and I are both raising our families here, so we want to build that up. We want to do everything we can to promote a great growth in the area,” said Kurt Busard, chief brand officer for Downtown Restaurant Investments and general manager of Molasses Smokehouse and Bar. “We’ve been looking at spots here for probably the better part of 10 years. But the timing was right, and Midland has been rebuilding its infrastructure form the ground up, so that attracted us to get in now.”


A TASTE OF NEW YORK A New York Deli Style experience is an experience that sets the bar high for freshness, variety and flavor. Richie Rich’s Downtown Deli seems to have the recipe for success.

While tradition and authenticity remain at the heart of Molasses, they still make room for innovation. In addition to barbecue and barroom staples – like smoked brisket, pork, ribs and turkey – they are also serving up variations on Korean barbecue favorites such as banh mi in addition to vegetarian jackfruit alternatives. When paired with its impressive beer and cocktail offerings, Molasses has crafted a unique collective of menu items to satisfy the desires of any diner. “With each of our restaurants, we really want to build from a neat, central concept, but here we didn’t want to exclude anyone,” explained Busard. “We offer a lot of different barbecue styles and have made an addition to make sure this is a place where everyone could be included. We don’t want to leave anyone out.”

Traditionally, Downtown Restaurant Investments doesn’t have much experience in the world of barbecue – leaning more heavily toward French-inspired culinary offerings in its ventures. Those who know barbecue know it’s a style that takes master craftsmanship. From learning each cut of meat and how to develop a unique and flavorful sauce to the trivial pursuit of perfecting smoking techniques and cook times, the practice takes experience and knowledge to deliver memorable meals. Luckily, Molasses has been blessed with a barbecue master in Steve Seige, an industry veteran best known for owning and operating the award-winning former Rusty Saw Smokehouse in Hemlock, Michigan. “Having Steve on board has been essential. Smokehouses and barbecuing require more of an apprenticeship style of

cooking, and it’s not something you can simply learn at a culinary school,” Busard said. “To have Steve come through and be a part of what we’re trying to do at Molasses is what made what we were trying to do real. Once we got him on board, we knew we could do this. With him here, we’re able to take that learning curve away and deliver great barbecue right out of the gate.” Thus far, Molasses has proven itself to be a prime choice for many as a go-to destination for delicious barbecue in the heart of downtown Midland. Still, in its inaugural year, Molasses Smokehouse and Bar is expected to grow into a staple for saucy southern favorites. Molasses Smokehouse and Bar is at 201 E. Main St. in Midland. For more information, call (989) 486-9730 or visit molassesbbq.com.

11.19||great greatlakes lakesbay bay||37 37 12.19


play / WHAT’S COOKING

never stop cooking RETIRED CHEF MICHAEL TUMA STILL HAS THE CHOPS BY MARY GAJDA | PHOTOS BY DOUG JULIAN

Having grown up spending time in his uncle’s restaurant, The Embers, Michael Tuma knew at an early age what he wanted to do with his life. The Mount Pleasant resident was classically trained by French chefs whom he counted among the best in the world. In fact, Tuma was one of a select group who trained at the world-renowned Greenbrier under the direction of Herman G. Rusch. While the award-winning chef has been retired for two years, he’s not finished cooking anytime soon. We’re honored to share with you his recipe for Scallop and Sweet Corn Salad.

SCALLOP AND SWEET CORN SALAD INGREDIENTS: • 4-5 sea scallops • 1 ear of sweet corn • 1 tablespoon extravirgin olive oil • Medium radish (cut into 5 slivers) • 4-5 cherry tomatoes (cut in half) • White tip of green onion (thinly sliced) • 1 tablespoon red onion (diced) • Small cucumber peeled and diced

VINAIGRETTE INGREDIENTS: • 2 tablespoon of champagne vinegar • 6 tablespoons extravirgin olive oil • Sugar, salt and pepper to taste

Choice of herbs, cleaned, patted dry and coarsely chopped (for example - chives, tarragon, parsley) to taste.

what’s in season? BY REGISTERED DIETITIAN RACHEL TRUMBLE

INSTRUCTIONS: • Blanche corn and shock in ice water, cut kernels off the cob and set aside • Sear sea scallops in olive oil. Season with salt and pepper and set aside • Place corn and all vegetables on a plate to make a bed of salad • Dress with vinaigrette • Place scallops on top of salad • Garnish by sprinkling herbs as a topping

38 | great lakes bay | 12.19

CRANBERRY CRUSH! Cranberries are a favorite part of holiday celebrations. This beautiful deep-red healthful food is high in nutrients and antioxidants like proanthocyanidins that can help prevent a range of diseases. Cranberries are very low in calories and high in vitamin C, vitamin A and vitamin K. They can be refrigerated for up to two months and frozen for later use to throw in a delicious and nutritious fruit smoothie. Cranberries should be firm to the touch and unwrinkled. Add cranberries to your oatmeal or wholegrain cereal, or make a homemade trail mix with unsalted nuts, seeds and dried cranberries. So simply delicious.


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play / BEST SEAT IN THE HOUSE

discover your region HERE’S A LOOK AT SOME OF THE TOP BETS FOR YOUR NIGHT OUT WITH THAT SPECIAL SOMEONE

A MAGICAL CIRQUE CHRISTMAS

“THE GIVER”

When: Dec 13 at 8 p.m. Tickets: $60 Where: Heritage Theatre, Dow Event Center, Saginaw Details: saginaw-theater.com/theaters/ heritage-theatre/a-magical-cirquechristmas

When: Nov. 29 to Dec. 8, Fridays and Saturdays 7:30 p.m., Sundays 3 p.m. Tickets: $20 Where: Pit & Balcony Community Theatre, Saginaw Details: gogreat.com/event/the-giver

Featuring “America’s Got Talent” duo Transcend, the jaw-dropping, breathtaking circus acts of A Magical Cirque Christmas will transport all guests to the golden age of stunning costumes, extraordinary talent, Christmas carols and more. A Magical Cirque Christmas will include performances of many of your favorite carols with the help of live musicians on stage. This is a family-friendly event that is sure to leave a lasting memory for all.

THIS MONTH’S EVENTS Find the perfect night out no matter your interests

“The Giver,” a Newbery Award-winning book by Lois Lowry that is adapted for the stage by Eric Coble, tells the story of a utopian world where all is perfect. No war, no pain, no fear, but also no choices. When Jonas is chosen for special training by The Giver, he learns the truth about real life with joy and pain. He also realizes the hypocrisy of the world he lives in. Through this astonishing and moving adaptation, discover what it means to grow up, to grow wise and to take control of your own destiny.

Forever Forest: Museum Exhibit Through Jan. 5; tickets can be purchased in advance online, over the phone or in person at the box office; Midland Center for the Arts; Midland; (989) 631-5930; baycityarea. com/events/details

Zehnder’s of Frankenmuth, Frankenmuth, zehnders. com

The Come Hithers White Crow Christmas Show Dec. 1, 6 p.m., White Crow Conservatory of Music, Saginaw, whitecrowconservatory. blogspot.com

Wine Tasting and Bracelet Making Dec. 6, 6-7 p.m., $20, Modern Craft Winery, Frankenmuth, beadhaven.com

Sundays in the City 2019 Dec. 1, recurring Sundays through December, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m., downtown Bay City, downtownbaycity.com Holiday Dinner Shows Dec. 3-4, 6 p.m., $50, registration required,

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Drydock Beer Garden Dec. 5, 5-11 p.m., Drydock Beer Garden, Bay City, allevents.in/bay%20city/ december

Winter Coverland 2019 Dec. 6, 6 p.m. to 2 a.m., Crowne Pub, Bay City, allevents.in/org/excellencymusic

“The Snow Queen” Dec. 6, 8:30-11 p.m., Bay City Players, Bay City, allevents.in/org/bay-cityplayers

Make Your Macaroons Workshop Dec. 6, noon, Frankenmuth Farmers Market, Frankenmuth, frankenmuthfarmersmarket. org Nature Art Show and Sale Dec. 7, 8 a.m. to 5 p.m., free, Chippewa Nature Center, Midland, chippewanaturecenter.org/ nature-art-show-sale

Saginaw Bay Symphony Orchestra Dec. 10, $70, Temple Theatre, Saginaw, saginawtheater.com/category_ dates Full Moon Stroll Dec. 12, 5:30 p.m., Chippewa Nature Center, Midland, eventful.com/ midland_mi/events/fullmoon-stroll

David Dyer Dec. 7, 8:30-10 p.m., State Theatre, Bay City, allevents.in/org/thecomedy-series

The Black and White Affair Dec. 13, 7:30-10:30 p.m., Studio 23/The Arts Center, Bay City, hallevents.in/org/ studio-23-the-arts-center

Reindeer at Wirt Library Dec. 10, 6-8 p.m., Alice and Jack Wirt Public Library, Bay City, allevents.in/org/ bay-county-library-systemchildrens-page

Midnight on Main Dec. 31, midnight, Dow Diamond, Midland, downtownmidland.com/ eventdetails/midnight-onmain


Charles Addams: Friends and Family October 4, 2019 - January 4, 2020

GIVE THE GIFT OF FINE DINING! Get FREE Bonus Gift Cards! Purchase $250 Purchase $1000 or more in Gift Cards

or more in Gift Cards

& Get $50 FREE & Get $50 FREE in Promotional Gift Cards

in Promotional Gift Cards

for every $250 spent. for every $200 spent. Charles Addams The Skier 1940 Pen, ink, wash on Whatman board

1126 N. Michigan Ave. Saginaw, MI 48602 www.saginawartmuseum.org | (989)754-2491

Gift Cards redeemable at all Mainstreet Ventures Restaurant Group locations. www.mainstreetventuresinc.com

R


play / SEEN HERE

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MIDLAND COUNTRY CLUB

1. Brandon Rytlewski, Chewey and Jessica Sczepanski 2. Rachel, Abby and Tim Peters 3. Trish Hadley, Bree Wilson and Tonya Linda 4. Tegan Kareus, Misa Halpern, Abby Chapman and Maddie Dollard

dinner on main

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DOWNTOWN MIDLAND

1. Sara Marlin, Brooke Baiardi and Jenna Bowerman 2. Brad Duling and Kaliegh Staddard 3. Sage Alexander and Helena Wielen 4. Matt and Kathleen Davis, Dr. George Kikano, and Vicki Kea

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halloween event: midtown movie palooza

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CENTRAL MIDDLE SCHOOL

1. J.R. Bornemann and Sydney Freeman 2. Becky Salgat, Claudia Marsh and Emily Anderson 3. Zion Lang and Emma Massey 4. Adam, Becky, Avery, Emerson Salgat and Bowen Jaynes

baysail event

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WENONAH PARK, DOWNTOWN BAY CITY

1. Mary Lou Beneke, Yvonne Brantley, Shirley Roberts and Dave Roberts 2. Lisa Steffen, Shelly King and Tim Conklin 3. Sheryl MacNowski, Vanessa Masters, Lori Luedere and Jane Spyhalski 4. Mark Montei and Jan Stafford

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WRAP UP Little-known facts about Christmas “Jingle Bells” was never intended to be a Christmas carol staple. James Lord Pierpont’s song “One Horse Open Sleigh” was performed at his church’s 1857 Thanksgiving concert. It wasn’t until 1859 that the title was changed to “Jingle Bells” and became a Yuletide favorite. (Good Housekeeping, Snopes)

Larry Silverberg, a professor of mechanical and aerospace engineering at North Carolina State University who is a Santa math specialist, said the jolly old elf’s sleigh would have to travel 5.08 million miles per hour to deliver presents to 75 million households. (Popular Science)

Hard to believe, but the same person who gave us “The Legend of Sleepy Hollow” and the Headless Horseman – Washington Irving – established the foundation for the Santa we know today, flying over treetops in a wagon, smoking his pipe and delivering presents. (The Fact File)

Even though all the reindeer have malesounding names, they are likely all female as male reindeer lose their antlers in November, while the females keep theirs longer. (Live Science)

The search for the Michigan Capitol Christmas tree begins eight months before the holiday. This year the Michigan Department of Technology, Management and Budget began looking for a tree in May. (MLive)

Up until 1889, first families would decorate the White House with wreaths, ribbons and other ornaments. President Benjamin Harrison placed the first Christmas tree in the White House in the Oval Room, as it was called, in 1889, and decorated it with candles and toys for the grandkids.

(Mental Floss)

(Bronner’s CHRISTmas Wonderland)

(White House History)

People often travel to the Upper Peninsula town of Christmas, Michigan, so their cards and gifts will bear a Christmas postmark. (Grandpa Shorter’s Gifts)

The classic circus train box of animal crackers had a string handle on top. It wasn’t for kids to carry the box – it was used to hang the box on a branch as an edible Christmas tree decoration.

Bronner’s CHRISTmas Wonderland in Frankenmuth is the world’s largest yearround Christmas store at 2.2 acres. Some 100,000 lights illuminate the store’s Christmas Lane every night, and the electric bill averages $1,250 a day.

Midland is home to the Charles W. Howard Santa School, founded in 1937 and the longest continuous Santa school in the world. Santas from around the world learn techniques – including how to control a “flying” sleigh – during the three-day curriculum. (Charles W. Howard Santa School)

The first artificial Christmas trees were made in the 1800s of goose feathers that were dyed green, attached to wire branches and wrapped around a dowel “trunk.” (University of Illinois Extension Office)

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The Great Lakes Bay Region Does Better With Garber. “For nearly five decades I have volunteered my time and energy for area nonprofits, civic and social agencies. I am a believer that ‘service is the rent we pay for the space we occupy.’ People in the GLBR know Garber supports countless community projects and nonprofits, and that is why they are a perfect fit for me. Dedicated professionals from the top down who understand the importance of quality customer service. It matters where I buy my car. That’s why I buy from Garber!” Terry L. Rock - Hidden Harvest Ecumenical Food Pantry, First Presbyterian Church

®

GoGarber.com

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Great Lakes Bay Magazine December 2019  

Great Lakes Bay Magazine December 2019  

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