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HOMETOWN FICTION OH, SUZIE Q MICHIGAN CITIES COME ALIVE

A BREAKFAST NOOK STEPS BACK IN TIME

family Inside This Issue

the value of

Higher Education COLLEGES AND UNIVERSITIES ELEVATE THE QUALITY OF LIFE FOR THE REGION

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August 2017

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TRAVEL

See where our readers are taking their trips with Great Lakes Bay!

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Ricky Garcia-Decker and Great Lakes Bay soak up the sun in Playa Sucia, Puerto Rico.

2. Steve, Debbie, Bret, Amanda, Bryce, and Rylie Neuman, and Great Lakes Bay enjoy their family vacation at Walt Disney World.

3. Bill Jamrog, Amy Jamrog, Dave Siefert, Beth Siefert, John Gallagher, Claire Gallagher, and Great Lakes Bay pose for a photo at Panama City Beach in Florida.

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Wish you re! wereyohur e suitcase. Pack us in We want to see the world with you. line at Submit your photo on g.com, ma ay esb ak atl gre www. s Dr, ait Str or mail to 1311 6 70 48 MI ty Ci Bay

Going somewhere in the Great Lakes Bay Region? Don’t forget to grab a photo of you and Great Lakes Bay! August 2017 | Great Lakes Bay 5


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AUGUST 2017 VOLUME 14 | ISSUE 8

22 THE VALUE OF

HIGHER EDUCATION Colleges and universities elevate the quality of life for the region. BY SCOTT MERROW

INSIDE THIS ISSUE:

family (Insert p. 33)

August 2017 | Great Lakes Bay 7


Sponsored Message

T

he team at Great Lakes Bay Health Centers believes that everyone deserves access to quality health care. They put that belief into action at health centers throughout Michigan. There are now 26 sites (both stand-alone offices and integrated services at partner agencies) in five counties – Saginaw, Bay, Huron, Lapeer, and Shiawassee. Sites range from primary care offices in two Saginaw high schools to mobile dental buses. Formerly Health Delivery, Inc., Great Lakes Bay Health Centers changed its name in October 2016 to reflect its presence in the region and to highlight its services. No one is turned away based on their ability to pay at Great Lakes Bay Health Centers. Overseen by a nonprofit board that includes both community leaders and patients, each location is a federally qualified community health center that strives to serve people from all backgrounds. Great Lakes Bay Health Centers accepts Medicaid, Medicare, and most private insurance coverage, and it serves the uninsured with an income-based sliding fee scale. Great Lakes Bay Health Centers began as a small migrant health clinic in 1969 providing health care to farm workers.

Today, Great Lakes Bay Health Centers makes up the second largest of the 42 Michigan Health Center organizations. Several of GLBHC’s sites are designated as Patient-Centered Medical Homes. This philosophy is transforming care through coordination and communication. These medical homes lead to higher quality care and lower costs. Partnerships are formed between individual patients and their personal clinicians. Each patient is part of a provider-led team that coordinates treatments across the health care system. Services at Great Lakes Bay Health Centers include: • Comprehensive dental care • Primary medical care • Behavioral health services • Eye care • Laboratory and pharmacy • Obstetric/gynecological and midwifery care • Community health workers • Substance abuse screening and treatment • HIV prevention and treatment • Transportation and interpretation • Care management • Insurance assistance • Migrant farm worker care You can learn more about Great Lakes Bay Health Centers by visiting its website at www.greatlakesbayhealth.org. One-hour tours are available monthly at the Janes Street Saginaw and Bayside Bay City Centers. See the schedule on the website. Matt Felan President & CEO Great Lakes Bay Regional Alliance

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Life 13 HOMETOWN FICTION

Michigan cities come alive in a local professor’s novels

16 NUMBERS 18 FLORA & FAUNA

Great Egrets

20 AUGUST CALENDAR

Taste 61 OH, SUZIE Q

A local breakfast nook takes a step back in time

63 DINING OUT GUIDE

A&E 69 EVENTS

A comprehensive listing of regional events

70 PEOPLE PICS

Pictures of people partying, volunteering, and contributing to a good cause

71 SPONSORED EVENTS Local events sponsored by Great Lakes Bay magazine

Departments 5 TRAVEL

61

11 CONTRIBUTORS 11 EDITOR’S NOTE 76 THE BACK STORY

Great Lakes Bay Magazine,Volume 14, Issue 8 August 2017 (ISSN 1550-8064) is published monthly by The F.P. Horak Company, 1311 Straits Dr, Bay City MI 48706. Periodicals postage pending at Bay City MI. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to Great Lakes Bay Magazine, P.O. Box 925, Bay City MI 48707. Copyright © 2017 The F.P. Horak Company. All rights reserved. Reproduction in whole or part without permission is prohibited.

August 2017 | Great Lakes Bay 9


6

reasons

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A top-notch education.

Personal attention.

Delta is one of the nation’s leading community colleges. Known for innovation, community leadership, teaching excellence and caring about each student every step of the way.

Delta has 13,000 students – each with personal attention. Classes are small and students have the resources and support they need to succeed. Resources like free tutoring, free writing and presentation support, counseling services, veteran services and academic advising.

Delta College is recognized as one of the nation’s 50 best community colleges by the philanthropic Aspen Institute.

Flexible scheduling that fits your life.

Save thousands. Delta costs less than half that of a public university, but you get the same great education. Plus, consider this:

Delta offers 5,000 classes – days, evenings and weekends – so students can create a schedule that works best for them.

Delta has $1 million in local scholarships available, half of Delta’s students get financial assistance and payment plans are available.

So many possibilities. Delta offers 150 programs. There are certificate, associate’s and transfer options in occupational and liberal arts fields. 62% of Delta graduates went on to get a bachelor’s. 36% of those went on to achieve a master’s, doctorate or higher degree.

Plus, there are online classes and “blended” classes that only require occasional campus visits.

6

Transfer seamlessly. Delta has 145 transfer agreements with other colleges and universities to make sure your credits go with you. 95% of grads said they were happy with the way their credits transferred. The MTA (Michigan Transfer Agreement) guarantees 30 credits transfer anywhere in Michigan.

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FROM THE EDITOR CONTRIBUTORS

Root, Root, Root.

T

wo state universities, one community college, and one private university—within miles of one another—make this region unbelievably rich in higher ed opportunities. (And that isn’t even counting the one private four-year college and one community college in the adjoining counties.) College towns, let alone an entire college region, generate intellectual and cultural sparks. They draw the college-age crowd that is looking for the college experience for the first time and the retiree crowd that is looking to recreate that horizon-broadening experience. Fans, whether rooting for the Cardinals, the Pioneers, the Timberwolves, or the Chips, are united by college sports. On-campus attractions, such as concerts, lecture series, film series, auto shows, art exhibits, international events, and more, are open to all comers, not just to undergrad or grad students. In “The Value of Higher Education” (page 22), we learn that college towns boost local economies, according to a recent report from Brookings Institution and The Wall Street Journal. Journal senior editor Bob Davis, in an article based on the report’s findings, asks us to consider colleges as a major community employer. With four colleges sited in our region, collectively, higher education is one of our biggest regional employers. And the product of colleges—educated students— is a magnetic attraction for businesses of all kinds, those located here and those looking for a place to locate. College and university business spin-offs include top-shelf executive-level talent and entry-level talent, a premier quality of life, cultural enrichment, and a place where lifelong learning occurs naturally. Diverse campuses and international student bodies promote more tolerant towns. Football brings harmony to these towns every autumn Saturday. When you consider our definition of economic development—attracting an activity that brings new money into a community—higher education is perhaps the quintessential incubator. The Great Lakes Bay Region is richer—in so many ways—because of U!

JILL ARMENTROUT of Birch Run worked for 15 years as a newspaper journalist. She now works as fund development coordinator at Great Lakes Bay Health Centers.

PATI LaLONDE is a freelance writer living in Bay City. She enjoys gardening, cooking, walking, and her four grandsons.

Mimi Bell Editor in Chief mimi@greatlakesbaymag.com SCOTT MERROW is a proud Saginaw native and Saginaw Valley State University graduate. He resides in West Branch with his wife and two boys.

August 2017 | Great Lakes Bay 11


/

Hope close to home.

“I trust the surgeons at CMU Health.” When Bay City business owner James Trischler learned he needed surgery for liver cancer, he was grateful for surgical oncologist Elizabeth Paulus, M.D., and the team at the CMU Health Department of Surgery. “My care from Dr. Paulus and her staff before and after surgery was excellent. Everyone went out of their way to help with everything I needed.” The surgeons of CMU Health in Saginaw offer multidisciplinary care and an unwavering commitment to quality and the patients they serve. Talk to your primary care doctor about the benefits of working with a surgical oncologist, who uses surgery to diagnose and treat cancer.

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LIFE WHO AND WHAT INSPIRES US

Hometown Fiction Michigan cities come alive in a Delta College professor’s novels. BY MIKE THOMPSON | PHOTOS BY DOUG JULIAN

Profile 13 | Numbers 16 | Flora & Fauna 18 | Calendar 20 August 2017 | Great Lakes Bay 13


LIFE / PROFILE

I

n American Poet: A Novel, readers will find themselves riding and walking in Saginaw’s Old Town area near the courthouse, in the Grove across from Hoyt Park, and even out State Street near the Red Horse tavern. Local highlights come from a Delta College professor of English and creative writing, Jeff Vande Zande, who created the novel five years ago. The protagonist is a young man who is “coming of age,” aiming to find his place in life. He takes a special interest in the Saginaw-born-and-bred poet Theodore Roethke (1908-1963), whose childhood home at 1805 Gratiot Road in Saginaw is now a museum in honor of the arts. At one point, for example, the lead character is hanging out with a new pal from an open-mic poetry event. They toke some weed and pound some brews at Hamilton Street Pub. With his buzz, he sneaks back to South Niagara Street on the summer evening to relieve himself. Then he opts to walk all the way to Saginaw Township—and fateful events occur along Court Street. Some book readers may identify with the places in Saginaw. Others not so much. Still, how often do we grab a novel from a book store, or from a library, and find ourselves in our hometown? And with a photo of the riverfront’s Bean Bunny grain elevator placed symbolically on the cover? Vande Zande, 47, grew up in Marquette, the son of a literature professor at Northern

14 Great Lakes Bay | August 2017

Local author Jeff Vande Zande has written fiction novels based on Michigan cities such as Saginaw, Gaylord, and Detroit

Michigan University. Similar to American Poet’s narrator, he did not immediately opt to follow his father’s career footsteps. He was approaching age 30 when he joined the Delta faculty near the turn of the millennium. American Poet, which won the Stuart and Vernice Gross Literature Award, is not his first novel, although it may make an ideal introductory read for a potential Saginaw fan. Previous novels are based in Michigan cities, ranging from Bay City to Gaylord. His latest, Detroit Muscle, is rooted in the Motor City. Vande Zande lives with his family in Midland. “All of the books are based in Michigan,” he says, which explains the Midwest view that Theodore Roethke also maintained with frequent adult visits back to Saginaw. Prior to writing his novels,Vande Zande started with poetry. In fact, American Poet began when he took note of the Roethke

home in southwest Saginaw and imagined himself “shouting from the rooftop” for common folks to look beyond shallow activities and to pay more credence to pure poetry. Nominated twice for the Pushcart Prize in 1999 for poetry,Vande Zande aims to reach us beyond his poems and his novels. While he continues to creatively write, he concentrates foremost on his role as a Delta College professor. “Writing can be kind of lonely,” he explains, “but in teaching, you are with people, affecting people’s lives.” Students should not feel they are on Easy Street, no more than on Court Street or on Hamilton Street. “Writing is hard, like chemistry or physics,”Vande Zande tells his pupils. “If you think it’s easy, then you are not really doing the work of writing.”


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LIFE / NUMBERS

Great Lakes Bay Region tidbits, trivia, and conversation starters

BY JEN W. O’DEAY

1,000,000 3

In 1919, Samuel Bert, known as “King Sammie,” began selling the first snow cones at the State Fair of Texas. By the early 1950s, his stand at the state fair was selling an estimated 1 million snow cones per year. Enjoy cool history and the sweet treat at Nancy’s Cajun Snow at Downtown Saginaw Farmers Market (507 S Washington Ave, Saginaw, 989-7582500, ext 228).

Here’s the buzz, coffee enthusiasts: According to Scientific American, drinking at least three cups of caffeinated coffee a day may help protect against basal cell carcinoma, the most common form of skin cancer. Drink to your health with a blended cold brew from Live Oak Coffeehouse (711 Ashman St, Midland, 989-423-1800), and enjoy caffeinated benefits from each coffeeslush sip.

70 80

Clothing is our first line of defense against the sun’s ultraviolet rays, with sunscreen thereafter. A wide-brimmed hat (3 inches or greater) covers more than 70 percent of the face and also protects the scalp, tops of ears, and back of the neck from sunburn.

U.S. Climate Data states average high temperatures around 80 degrees during the month of August in Michigan, just slightly less than the average of 83 degrees during July.

Find your protective, stylish sunhat at Ferne Boutique (922 Washington Ave, Bay City, 989-778-1222).

When temperatures get hot, cool off for free at Celebration Square Splash Park (Saginaw, www.saginaw-mi.com). Enjoy a three-section, zero-depth splash pad with water fountains, showers, water misters, and dumping buckets.

1881 25

Although disputed, the first ice cream sundae possibly came to be in 1881. George Hallauer asked the owner of Ed Berner’s Ice Cream Parlor to top his ice cream with chocolate sauce. Berner went on to sell the concoction, but only on Sundays. Stop by J&B Sundaes Ice Cream Shoppe (6165 Dixie Hwy, Bridgeport, 989-443-1418) for undisputed enjoyment. Open seven days a week in the summer. 16 Great Lakes Bay | August 2017

August 25 is National Banana Split Day. With 33,000 bananas, 2,500 gallons of ice cream, and 150 gallons of chocolate syrup, a 4.5-mile banana split was made in Selinsgrove, Pennsylvania, to gain a place in the Guinness Book of World Records. Indulge in the banana-based dessert at Tony’s Restaurant (8781 Main St, Birch Run, 989-624-5860), and prepare for towering and tasty proportions.


Nathan Duvall (‘17, BFA Sculpture and Functional Art) pouring molten aluminum as part of a workshop in the Sculpture and Functional Art studio at KCAD.

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LIFE / FLORA & FAUNA

An egret displays its 55-inch wingspan landing among bulrushes and cattails Photo by Audrey A. Diadiun

Great Egrets JEANNE HENDERSON, INTERPRETIVE NATURALIST 400 S Badour Rd, Midland, 989-631-0830 www.chippewanaturecenter.org

18 Great Lakes Bay | August 2017

I

n marshes around the Saginaw Bay, you may notice a white bird standing motionless. The brightest white you can imagine covers the four-foottall body of a Great Egret, a relative of the Great Blue Heron. With spindly black legs and bright yellow bill, it stalks prey by standing, waiting, and peering into the water. Its patience is remarkable, but if nothing appears, the egret walks slowly to force prey to move. When an egret catches a fish in its daggerlike bill, it swallows the fish headfirst. Its carnivorous diet includes crayfish, dragonfly and damselfly nymphs, whirligig beetles, and giant water bugs. In wet meadows, an egret hunts snakes, lizards, frogs, and occasionally small mammals.


The curve in the neck is due to the sixth cervical vertebrae being elongated so that the upper part can be retracted or extended

An egret typically flies with a curved neck and legs stretched out behind

Symbol of Conservation

Great Egrets arrive in April to establish colonies on forested islands or swamps adjacent to the Great Lakes. The first record of nesting egrets in Michigan was in 1954. In 2009, over 500 pairs were counted in the last colonial waterbird census. Colonies may vary from a few occupied nests to almost 100, often sharing the site with Great Blue Herons or Double-crested Cormorants. They build platform nests made of sticks high in the treetops. Established colonies occur in the Saginaw Bay on Little Charity Island and the Confined Disposal Facility Island. Older colonies exist on islands in the Detroit River and Pointe Mouillee State Game Area. During courtship, long plumes known as “aigrettes� grow from their shoulders and extend beyond the tail. Plumes stand up during courtship displays at the nest site. Bare parts become more vibrantly-colored: the bill turns bright orange-yellow and the skin at the base of the bill changes to bright lime green. Once incubation begins, these colors fade to yellow and the plumes reduce in length and number. Both sexes look alike. Three to four eggs are incubated over 26 days by both parents. Chicks hatch asynchronously and parents take turns feeding regurgitated food to the young. Older chicks may peck on or steal food from younger siblings. Those that survive will fledge at 51 days, ready to face the world on their own. In August, juvenile Great Egrets disperse from their natal site to many wetlands around the region.You may see congregations of five to 30 birds foraging during the day or roosting in trees at night. Get outside to spot these white beauties before they migrate south.

Overhunting almost decimated the populations in the early 1900s when plume hunters killed egrets of many species for the millinery trade to adorn ladies hats. Protection by the federal Migratory Bird Act in 1918, along with the Clean Air Act and Clean Water Act in the 1970s, helped populations rebound.

•

The National Audubon Society, established in 1905, adopted the Great Egret as its symbol to represent conservation efforts on behalf of birds and their environments throughout the United States. Threats to continued survival include destruction of wetlands and nest trees by development: water pollution, dumping of trash, and tires and vehicles along shorelines. Egrets face predators such as raccoons and snakes that steal eggs and owls that prey on youngsters in nests. Egrets that visit aquaculture ponds or fish hatcheries are in danger of getting shot or harassed. August 2017 | Great Lakes Bay 19


LIFE / CALENDAR

AUGUST 2017 SUNDAY MONDAY

TUESDAY 1 Saginaw County Fair Chesaning invites everyone for cotton candy, Ferris wheel rides, entertainment, and more. Through August 5.

6

7

8

WEDNESDAY 2

I Love the ’90s Party like it’s 1990 at Soaring Eagle Casino & Resort with popular recording artists from the decade.

9

14

15

16

Midland County Fair All ages will amaze at the grandstand, midway, and more. Through August 19.

20

FRIDAY 4

Tropical Rock Night Hop on board the Princess Wenonah for an island-inspired musical tour.

10

11

Summer Music Fest Polka or waltz around Heritage Park to Polish-, German-, and Slovenian-inspired tunes. Through August 12.

Bay County Fair & Youth Exposition Livestock, live music, and carnival treats await fairgoers in Bay City.

13

THURSDAY 3

17

22

23

End of Summer Bash Party in Freeland with the kids to celebrate back-toschool season.

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24 24th Annual Midland Folk Music Festival The Woodstockesque celebration features music and dancing. Through August 27.

Hop Riot Beer & Wine Fest Craft brew and vino give reason for cheers in Bay City’s Wenonah Park.

12

Slithering Snakes Chippewa Nature Center gets families into nature to look for serpents slinking through the grass.

18

19 Linwood Pickle Festival From dill to sweet and cornhole to games, there’s fun for all at this celebration of vinegar and brine. Through August 21.

Mushroom Hunt Where are there morels, chanterelles, and more in the GLBR? Find out in Mount Pleasant.

21

SATURDAY 7515

25

26

Dirty Dog Trail Run Take man’s best friend for a rousing jaunt through Midland’s City Forest.

31

Summer Adult Art Class Funnel inspiration to your paint brush from the beauty of Dow Gardens.

For more information on these and other events, see A & E, page 69 or visit www.greatlakesbaymag.com 20 Great Lakes Bay | August 2017


• • • • • • • •

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FEATURE

the value of higher

EDUCATION Colleges and universities elevate the quality of life for the region. BY SCOTT MERROW | PHOTO BY DOUG JULIAN


Delta College

August 2017 | Great Lakes Bay 23


FEATURE

G

o to college. Get a degree. Find a good job. This mantra has become dogma for generations of high school graduates. Colleges are often viewed—and rightfully so—as institutions that help individuals achieve success through the education and training they provide; however, colleges should also be appreciated for how they so positively influence the communities they reside in—no attendance required.

Economic impact

Colleges are the springboard that hurls fledgling adults headlong into the career of their dreams. Its the blackboard that nontraditional students use to rewrite their future through continued education that helps them advance in their career or change vocation. Beyond the invaluable education they provide, colleges give local communities a significant economic boost, raise the skill level of the area’s workforce, have a cultural affect, and give back to the community by promoting student volunteerism. The Great Lakes Bay Region is blessed to have a range of community colleges and universities that have helped shape the region into what it is today and will continue to define what the region is to become well into the future. Located within a 60-mile radius, Central Michigan University (CMU), Saginaw Valley State University (SVSU), Delta College, and Northwood University provide the region with an economic impact, workforce training and development, arts and culture, and philanthopic opportunities that all Great Lakes Bay Region residents benefit from.

According to Pew Research Center, the percentage of the population that changes residence annually has reduced by half since the mid-’80s, meaning more people are remaining in their hometown—or at least within their home region—following college graduation. Indeed, SVSU has over 42,000 alumni, 85 percent of which work and reside within the state, and more than half reside in East Central Michigan. This is significant because research has shown that education level causes higher earnings. In fact, on average, those who have at least a bachelor’s degree earn nearly double what those with only a high school diploma earn annually. Further, though wealthier individuals tend to save a higher percentage of their income, they also spend more than less wealthy individuals, meaning they provide a greater economic impact overall. Another aspect of this is the jobs that these institutions provide for their communities. Beyond faculty and administration, these colleges and universities

24 Great Lakes Bay | August 2017

Photo courtesy of Northwood University


Central Michigan University Photo by Doug Julian


Photo courtesy of Northwood University

Saginaw Valley State University Photo by Doug Julian

Delta College Photo by Doug Julian


FEATURE

also employ personnel for maintenance, janitorial services, and food services. CMU alone employs approximately 2,600 faculty and staff. That’s equivalent to employing the entire town of Vassar. Additionally, SVSU reports that 85 percent of its employees reside within the four-county region of Bay, Isabella, Midland, and Saginaw, and 62 percent ($108 million) of university expenses are spent within the region.

Beyond Delta’s contribution to workforce building, SVSU is renowned for its nursing, education, and technical communication programs; Northwood boasts a world-class business school; and CMU’s College of Medicine places an emphasis on educating and training medical professionals to provide care for underserved populations. All of which translates into a well-rounded workforce within the region.

Workforce building

Cultural impact

The Great Lakes Bay Region could be categorized as a blue collar or working class region as a result of the prevalence of the automotive industry. However, as Bob Dylan so eloquently stated: “The times they are a-changin’.” Many jobs in the region that once required only a high school diploma now require qualifications such as a degree or vocational certificate; this is largely due to equipment being more technical and requiring more proficiency than the equipment that our fathers and grandfathers used on the job. Manufacturing in the region is on the rise, but it can only grow if there is a workforce qualified to fill available positions. In fact, Kathy Conklin, executive director of Great Lakes Bay Manufacturer’s Association, states that around 1,000 CNC operators alone will be needed over the next several years to fill available positions for the region’s manufacturers. Delta College has become a regional leader in providing vocational training to help area residents achieve the necessary accreditation to hold certain manufacturing positions. The community college launched a STEM diversity initiative in 2012, and offers over 170 degree and certificate programs to help residents gain education and training that helps keep the region’s manufacturers competitive in the global marketplace.

If knowledge is power, then the region’s colleges empower us through their robust library systems. SVSU’s Melvin J. Zhanow Library serves as a centerpiece on the SVSU campus. CMU’s library system is anchored by the Charles V. Park Library and features the Clarke Historical Library, which among its various bibliographic endeavors has worked to preserve Michigan’s newspapers for over 50 years. Beyond the physical stacks of books, periodicals, and reference materials that provide a wealth of knowledge, all of the region’s libraries offer access to countless online databases containing peer-reviewed research materials. Never before has so much “power” been available at the click of a mouse. What constitutes culture is very subjective; however, the region’s colleges offer something for everyone over the calendar year. Whether it’s Delta’s annual AIDS Walk to raise funds for and promote awareness about the disease, Northwood’s Youth Leadership Program that provides Midland ninth-graders the opportunity to learn about leadership and team building, SVSU’s various exhibits at the Marshall M. Fredericks Sculpture Museum or University Art Gallery, or CMU’s annual ACE Women of Excellence Award Reception that honors campus leaders, you are sure to find an event on the campus calendar to pique your interest.

August 2017 | Great Lakes Bay 27


FEATURE

Central Michigan University Photo by Doug Julian

Saginaw Valley State University Photo by Doug Julian

Giving back As if these institutions don’t do enough for the region, they all also highly encourage students and faculty alike to volunteer within the community. Beyond encouraging volunteerism, many programs actually require a minimum amount of community service before degree completion. Volunteerism enhances civic engagement, strengthens student and faculty connections to the community, and makes a significant contribution to local economies. According to the Association for Research on Nonprofit Organizations and Voluntary Action, in the United States, volunteers produce services worth on average $150 billion annually. Many volunteers provide their time and services to organizations that in turn help the most underserved of the population. These organizations often don’t have the budgets to hire the skilled workers that volunteerism

28 Great Lakes Bay | August 2017

affords them, meaning they couldn’t serve the populations they do without the help of volunteers.

The takeaway For such a relatively small geographic area, the Great Lakes Bay Region boasts a wealth of quality higher education institutions—from a community college to major universities. In addition to higher education, these colleges provide the region with a significant economic effect, host cultural events, offer continued education to keep the region’s workforce competitive in the global marketplace, and foster and promote philanthropic efforts from staff and students alike. Considering this, when contemplating the value of higher education, perhaps it’s time we started factoring in the value that higher education institutions have on their communities—for even those who don’t attend, surely benefit from them.


Northwood Timberwolves take on SVSU Cardinals Photo by Doug Julian

COLLEGE ATHLETICS They’re the great unifier in our region. BY SCOTT MERROW

Of course, when you think of college you likely think of college sports—such as Chippewa football or Cardinal basketball. These events invigorate the community on game day. Perhaps nothing sews a thread that connects generations and a community more than college athletics do. Delta and Northwood also provide a variety of athletic opportunities for men and women including baseball, basketball, football, and club sports, such as lacrosse. On game day, the atmosphere in a college town is more electric than a typical day. Team colors are awash in the cafés and bars. Hotel lobbies are abuzz with returning alumni who are milling about and sharing tales of when the campus was their home. Students enjoy a brief respite from their studies to cheer on their team. On game day, no one cares about each other’s differences because they understand the shared connection in showing their colors and supporting their beloved team; it’s a beautiful thing!


SPECIAL ADVERTISEMENT: Higher Education

Albion College alum Dr. Samuel Shaheen.

611 E Porter St, Albion | Director of admissions, Mandy Dubiel, 517-629-0600, adubiel@albion.edu | www.albion.edu

G

reat Lakes Bay Region native Dr. Samuel Shaheen was all set to attend the University of Michigan as an undergraduate. “I was accepted at Michigan, and I had my room deposit all set,” Shaheen recalls with a laugh. “And then I had one of those father-son conversations and he says, ‘You’re going to Albion College.’ I can tell you it was the best decision I never made.” In truth, Albion College had been Shaheen’s second choice behind the University of Michigan, but as Shaheen learned, Dad is almost always right. Shaheen did indeed graduate from Albion in 1988 with a degree in biology. And while he would go on to earn his medical degree from the University of Michigan, complete a residency at Northwestern University in Chicago, and become a renowned surgeon and real estate developer in the Great Lakes Bay Region, his love for Albion has never wavered.

“The school was remarkable in every respect,” he says. “I learned a great deal in the classroom and a great deal out of the classroom. I developed relationships and shared experiences that were unlike anything I would have gotten at a larger institution.” His commitment has continued all these years later. In the struggling downtown Albion, a community of 7,000 that has been hit hard the last decade by a changing economy, a new future is emerging in the form of a 72-room Marriott Courtyard hotel, which Shaheen committed to quickly in order to help finance and develop. The hotel, which now anchors Albion’s iconic downtown on Superior Street, is scheduled to open at the end of this year. “I thought that there was an opportunity to reinvent the city of Albion,” Shaheen says. “And I felt it was a necessity for Albion College. We knew we had to do something, and that decision was made very quickly. The college is a historic institution, and in order for Albion College to continue to recruit the best and brightest students, we really had to do

something to reinvent the community. The Superior Street corridor had to be re-established.” The hotel is perhaps the most dramatic step in that process. But, as Shaheen notes, it is hardly the first. It began with a college-led effort to open a children’s museum that recently celebrated its 10year anniversary. It continued with the renovation and re-opening of a historic downtown theater that now offers first-run movies and live events. Now, just across the street, the hotel—and an opportunity—are developing and, as Shaheen sees it, this will benefit both the town and the college. “The two are synergistic,” he said. “One can’t do it without the other.” Shaheen hopes his efforts in Albion will spur other alumni to provide similar support to the community and the college. “This could be an intersection between a great liberal arts college and a Midwestern town renaissance that is perceived by both students and community as a place that’s exciting and exhilarating,” he says.


Northwood University alum Jason Holyszko from The Holyszko Group of Wells Fargo Advisors.

4000 Whiting Dr, Midland | 800-622-9000 | www.northwood.edu

I

f you want to thrive in the business world, it pays to think like an entrepreneur. That starts with an education rooted in developing the entrepreneurial skills that businesses need today. Northwood University’s business-only curriculum is taught by professors who practice what they teach and who create an environment that mirrors the dynamic workforce our graduates thrive in. Northwood University was founded with the mission to develop the future leaders of a global, free-enterprise society. Private, nonprofit, and accredited, Northwood specializes in managerial and entrepreneurial education at its mid-Michigan residential campus. More than 20 undergraduate majors are available, in addition to Adult Degree Programs offered in multiple states, online, and through numerous community college partnerships. Northwood’s Richard DeVos

Graduate School of Management offers the DeVos MBA and online Master of Science degrees along with day, evening, and weekend programming in Michigan, Texas, and online. Jason Holyszko, managing director of investments and a financial advisor at The Holyszko Group of Wells Fargo Advisors in Saginaw Township, is a 2005 graduate who says Northwood was a natural choice. He was enticed by Northwood’s smaller size, which allowed him to get to know professors and students better, and allowed him to pursue another passion: golf. “I wanted to play golf at the collegiate level, and Northwood gave me that opportunity,” he says. Northwood is a member of the NCAA Division II Great Lakes Intercollegiate Athletic Conference. From his experience balancing study time, golf practice, tournaments, and the college

experience, Holyszko discovered his ability to adapt, giving him the confidence to feel that he can accomplish anything he puts his mind to. “It was my focus, commitment, and drive to be successful that got me through,” he says. Of his fellow alumni, Holyszko shares: “I constantly run into people who have graduated from Northwood, and they are making a big impact and difference in the region. It is great to see fellow alumni having so much success locally.” Since his time at Northwood, Holyszko has stayed connected to the university. In addition to maintaining his relationships with fellow golf team members, he mentors college students, encouraging them to absorb everything they can. He tells students, “Enjoy the journey; that is what life is all about. Your college years will be some of the best times of your life. At least, they were for me.”


SPECIAL ADVERTISEMENT: Higher Education

SVSU alumna Kimberly Wagner, MD, practices family medicine at Saginaw Valley Primary Care, located near the university in Kochville Township.

7400 Bay Rd, University Center | Office of Undergraduate Admissions, 178 Wickes Hall 989-964-4200 | admissions@svsu.edu | go.svsu.edu

K

im Wagner was a senior at Saginaw Valley State University in 2009 when she noticed construction crews laying the foundation for what is now Saginaw Valley Primary Care. The facility is located along the western edge of campus and is operated by Covenant HealthCare. Then, Wagner was about to leave the family atmosphere she enjoyed at SVSU for medical school at Michigan State University. She pointed to the under-construction health care facility and turned to her then-boyfriend to make a bold prediction: “I’m going to work there one day,” Wagner said. Less than a decade later, she has made good on that promise. Wagner began working in October 2016 as one of two doctors with Saginaw Valley Primary Care’s family physician practice.

There, she tends to SVSU students as well as members of the surrounding community. Her determination to return to the campus was inspired by the close relationships she developed as a student with members of SVSU’s family. “I do feel like [the medical center] is an extension of SVSU, even though we also see a lot of patients from around the community,” says Wagner. “It’s a nice little practice where we get to know our patients well.” The road that led Dr. Wagner to that “nice little practice” began in 2005 when the Port Huron native (then known as Kim Oberski) was awarded an academic scholarship from SVSU and earned a spot on the women’s soccer team. For the next four years, the chemistry major excelled both academically and athletically at the university. “I think I was meant to be here,” she says.

“I believe everything happens for a reason, and this happened for a reason. It feels like home here. It feels like family.” During lunch breaks, Wagner enjoys walking the nature trails that weave through SVSU’s campus, sometimes passing the same spot where she first set sights on her future workplace. She often is joined during those walks by Nick, her college sweetheart who listened to her career prediction all those years ago. Since then, they married. Wagner gave birth to their first child last year, and the couple is happily raising their family in Bay County’s Monitor Township. Wagner is an example of a talented student who, because of her experiences at SVSU, returned to the Great Lakes Bay Region—as so many SVSU alumni have done. Family practice physicians are in short supply, and Wagner fills that critical need while making a positive impact in our community.


y l i fam August 2017

W h a t's I n s id e :

L O O H C S BACK-TO G N I P P O SH

money. p. 16 e v a s to s y a w y Thrift engineer. p. 6 e m a g e n ro d g omin Meet an up-and-c chore time. p. 13 e re -f m u tr n ta r fo Tips

P L U S:

Family Fun Activity Guide More than 130 things to do and see in the GLBR! p. 21


family is where our story begins…

Join the FSZ Family today. Share a photo of this ad on social media and tag us, or bring a copy of this GLBM issue to our front desk to receive a free promotional item. You will also be entered to win a free SportsZone membership*. 5690 Midland Road, Freeland, MI 48623 989-695-2000

www.freeland-sportszone.com

* Membership is three months in length from the time it is redeemed. Non-redeemable for cash value. Membership cannot be exchanged; it is only valid for the named winner. If the selected winner is an existing member, three free months will be added to the existing account. Promotion expires on September 15, 2017. Only one winner will be drawn at random on October 1, 2017.

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y l i m a f AUGUST 2017

16 FEATURE

BACK-TO-SCHOOL SHOPPING Thrifty ways to save money as kids head back to class

6 REALLY COOL KIDS

The Business of Robotics

8 PARENTING TIPS Do As I Say

9 HODGEPODGE 10 GET OUTDOORS Hop to it

11 ARTS & CULTURE CORNER Life Imitating Art

21 FAMILY FUN

ACTIVITY GUIDE August 2017- March 2018

27 COOKING WITH KIDS

13

ALL IN THIS TOGETHER

Mexicali Taco Pizza

5 CONTRIBUTORS 5 EDITOR’S NOTE

Chores can be fun…and help make kids and families more successful.

August 2017 | Great Lakes Bay Family 3


Jennifer Schau DDS 5545 Colony Dr. North, Saginaw, MI 989-799-0675

www.jenniferschaudds.com

Braces Invisalign® (Premier Provider) Oral Cancer Screening Sleep Apnea Treatment

NEW PATIENTS WELCOME General Dentistry •Healthy Teeth for Life •Routine Cleanings •Fillings •Sealants •Emergency Dentistry •Extractions •Fluoride Treatments

Restorations •Bonding •Bridges •Crowns •Dentures •Implants

Cosmetic Dentistry •Bonding •Implants •Invisalign® •Veneers •Whitening

Ice Cream Made in the Great Lakes Bay Region Saginaw groups start this October. Groups will meet at Mid-Michigan’s Children Museum. Call 989-495-9335 to register

Ic kes e Cre a L

Co. am

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Our family owned business is a haven for ice cream lovers! We bring you truly exceptional homemade ice cream served in a fun, friendly atmosphere. Each batch of artisanal ice cream is made in our Midland store using hand- selected ingredients from the Great Lakes Region. From wholesome favorites to exotic new flavors!

Providing a healing environment through peer support for children, teens and their families grieving a death. 901 E. Ashman • Midland • (989) 698-0173 greatlakesicecreamcompany.com

childrensgriefglbr.org


editor’s note

PUBLISHER: Marisa Horak Belotti marisa@greatlakesbaymag.com EDITOR IN CHIEF: Mimi Bell mimi@greatlakesbaymag.com

F

BAG A BARGAIN

amilies are cost-cutting to help ends meet—and discovering that teaching important life skills (like being frugal) makes sense and cents. Lesson No. 1 comes with back-to-school shopping. What’s bound to be on your list? Classroom supplies, clothes, shoes, backpack, band instrument, lunch bag (buh-bye, Paw Patrol, and hello, Spider Man), sports gear, and more. In “Back-to-School Shopping” (page 16), our budget-conscious shopper scouts the best places for bargains. Buying pre-owned clothing, for example, is easy on your stash of cash and lets youngsters play a real part in “recycling.” (After all, your kids will soon outgrow those department store threads, and vintage style is trendy.) And when it comes to school extracurriculars, encourage your child to be picky, based on which might be most affordable. Some sports cost more to play because of special equipment. Track, for example, costs less than tennis or golf. Consider choir or cheerleading, if marching band or dance means an expense for instruments, uniforms, or costumes. You get the idea. Then on page 27, Mexicali taco pizza is an easy-to-prepare mash-up of two of your favorite meals. Try the recipe for a South of the Border fiesta! Plus, in this issue, find plenty of activities—more than 130!—that parents and children can enjoy together (page 21), from now through March. Use this issue to get your entire family reading, doing, imagining, and learning together. Why? Because family time is precious. And kids grow up too darn fast!

ASSOCIATE EDITOR: Allison Rosbury allison@greatlakesbaymag.com ART DIRECTOR: Chad Hussle chad@greatlakesbaymag.com DESIGNER: Andrea Rousse andrea@greatlakesbaymag.com FAMILY FUN ACTIVITY GUIDE COORDINATOR: Stacey Tetloff staceytetloff@greatlakesbaymag.com PHOTOGRAPHER: Doug Julian doug@greatlakesbaymag.com CONTRIBUTORS: Debbie Anderson, Jill Armentrout, Andy Bacigalupo, Rachel Cohen, Jenn Kirts, Pati LaLonde, Chick Moorman, Melissa Russell, Regina Simon, and Stacey Tetloff ADVERTISING SALES REPRESENTATIVE: Paul Oslund paul@greatlakesbaymag.com 989-891-1783 FOR ADVERTISING INQUIRIES: ads@greatlakesbaymag.com FOR SUBSCRIPTION INQUIRIES: Call 989-893-2083

Mimi Bell Editor in Chief mimi@greatlakesbaymag.com

Great Lakes Bay Family, Volume 4, Issue 2, August 2017 (ISSN 1550-8064) is published two times a year by The F.P. Horak Company, 1311 Straits Dr, Bay City MI 48706. Periodicals postage pending at Bay City MI. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to Great Lakes Bay Magazine, P.O. Box 925, Bay City MI 48707. Copyright © 2017 The F.P. Horak Company. All rights reserved. Reproduction in whole or part without permission is prohibited.

1311 Straits Dr Bay City MI 48706 Phone 989-893-2083 info@greatlakesbaymag.com

August 2017 | Great Lakes Bay Family 5


THE

BUSINESS OF

ROBOTICS A young entrepreneur begins his journey toward a career in engineering. BY RACHEL COHEN PHOTOS BY DOUG JULIAN

6 Great Lakes Bay Family | August 2017

R

iley Adams is your average 11-year-old; he enjoys playing games, building new things, and thinking about what he wants to be when he grows up. What sets Riley apart from his peers is his entrepreneurial enthusiasm and his drive to build a gaming empire. He calls his company “AerGamez,� and he produces drone games, with an obstacle course kit in the works.


HOME R E A L E S TAT E B Y C E N T U R Y 2 1 ® S I G N AT U R E R E A LT Y

AUGUS T 2 0 1 7

S a g i n aw

Midland

Frankenmuth

B ay C i t y


For all listings, visit c21signaturerealty.com

4243 CARMEL DR, SAGINAW TWP

11307 GEDDES, THOMAS TWP

Entertaining in this magnificent custom all brick home with an open concept leaves nothing to be desired. The great room showcases a stone fireplace, cathedral ceiling, wall of windows. The kitchen is the one we all dream of; maple w/coffee glaze cabinetry, granite counter tops, top of the line stainless appliances, sprawling island w/seating for 6, large eating area, limestone tile floor & pantry. The 1st floor master suite is your own private retreat designed for relaxing, including a gas fireplace, luxurious mas. bath, dressing area, walk-in closet, laundry and private office. This home features 7458 total sq.ft. w/5 en-suite bedrooms, 5 full baths, 2 half baths, 2 laundry rooms, formal living & dining, entertainment size family rm, workout room, craft room, and an over-sized 4 car garage with basketball court. You’ll enjoy the beautiful patio and in-ground pool on this private 2.5 acre park-like setting that is landscaped to perfection!

Nestled on 4.6 wooded acres and pond, this one of a kind home in Thomas Twp is incredible inside and out! You’ll love the open floor plan, hardwood floors, kitchen w/hickory cabinetry, new appliances, corian, large center island w/seating and pantry, dining and sitting area is a beautiful solarium. Second floor is a large, private, master retreat. A large bedroom, cathedral ceilings, glass block walk-in shower, soaking tub, walk-in closet, private office and outdoor balcony. Features include 4 bedrooms, 2.5 bath, 1st floor laundry, living, dining, family room, finished basement with an additional family room, workout area, wine cellar. Additional 36 x 28 barn with 2nd story workshop. Entertain at the pavilion, have a cozy fire by the pond, swim, play tennis, basketball or just relax and enjoy the view from your screened porch or balcony! Don’t miss out - call for your personal showing today!

$829,000

$530,000

1911 N MILLER, THOMAS TWP

3659 N GLEANER, THOMAS TWP

One of a kind home on 3 wooded acres in Thomas Twp. A stunning view from every room! Don’t wait to see this 3 bedroom, 3 bath home with 2401 sqft. You’ll love the soaring ceiling, fireplace, and wall of windows in the living room. Features include a spacious kitchen with an eating area, formal dining, large family room with fireplace, vaulted ceilings, a beautiful solarium, and a finished basement with additional living space. The 2nd floor master suite includes vaulted ceilings, fireplace, walk-in closet, master bath, balcony overlooking the back yard, and a loft/den area. You’ll feel like you’re living on a private retreat with the in ground pool, walking paths, and privacy!

Don’t wait to see this beautiful home with a private wooded setting on 10 acres in Thomas Twp. You’ll love this spacious open floor plan, entertainment size living and dining rooms, hardwood flooring, stone fireplace, updated kitchen with granite and walk-in pantry. Suite retreat! Relax in your first floor master suite with it’s own fireplace, french doors to your porch, large bath with jet tub, walk-in closet, and a sun room overlooking this secluded yard. Features include 3 bedrooms, 2.5 baths, over 2900 sq.ft, first floor laundry, and a finished family room in the walk-out lower level. Relax and enjoy the picturesque view from your wrap around porch or deck! A spectacular home!

$295,000

$359,900

K A Y DEN A RDO kaydenardo@gmail.com 989.860. 0438


For all listings, visit c21signaturerealty.com

318 W CHIP, WILLIAMS TWP

3800 MORNINGSIDE DR, SAGINAW TWP

A peaceful and serene setting is at the forefront of this beautifully built with exceptional quality and cared for and maintained beyond belief. Set in the heart of the Tri Cities on 15+ acres, Auburn gives you the convenience of being 15 miles or less to Midland, Bay City, and Saginaw Township. The home features a dual heating system with pellet boiler and two natural gas forced air furnaces, generator, city water, outbuilding with large workshop, car or boat storage and has separate forced air heating and hot and cold water. The home boasts 3 bedrooms, 3.5 baths, an open and spacious floor plan with vaulted living room and kitchen and 10 foot ceilings throughout the rest of the home. The master suite has access to the trex deck, and boasts a 200 square foot walk in closet as well as spacious master bath with custom walk in shower. The exercise room w/ sauna & family room with custom antique bar, wood ceiling, and wall of windows as well as oversized 2.5 car garage complete the home.

The spacious, open floor plan and quiet cul-de-sac location make this home special. The home features over 3,200 square feet of living space with 4 bedrooms, main floor master suite, formal living and dining rooms, and an open 2nd floor loft, plus an additional 1,700 square feet finished basement with a full bath. Updates include a fully remodeled kitchen with new cabinets with large center island, granite countertops, and stainless steel appliances, finished basement with full bathroom, additional kitchen in garage, remodeled powder room, crown moldings and white trim, great room built-ins, insulation, furnace and ac. Located in Saginaw Township’s Windemere subdivision giving convenient access to schools, shopping, and businesses. A large yard, covered deck, and the almost 1,000 sqft garage make this home a must see!

$699 , 9 0 0

$399,900

3275 S GRAHAM, SWAN CREEK TWP

9 E MAIN STREET 401 & 404, BAY CITY

Words are inadequate to describe this stately five bedroom, five full baths, 3 half bath French country estate located in Saginaw County. Set on 25 acres, this 8,000 square foot magnificently landscaped home offers 2 full kitchens, stone fireplaces from a 1700’s castle and extensive paver patios overlooking a three acre stocked lake. Additional highlights include enchanting gardens and custom built-ins throughout the home. A home for gracious living & entertaining!

Experience Uptown Penthouse Living. Wake up in your spacious master suite, get ready for work in your large walk-in closet and relax on a 400 square foot balcony. With over 1,700 sq. feet of living space, Uptown Bay City has a unique Penthouse space just for you. With design and amenities like none other, the penthouse condominiums feature two bedrooms, two full and one half baths, a dream kitchen with quartz countertops, full height tile backsplash, Sub-Zero & Wolf appliances, and an open floor plan highlighting the custom kitchen cabinets. The condo also boasts 10 foot ceilings throughout with led recessed lighting, Marvin wood windows, smart home automation system controlling the Hunter Douglas Silhouette window treatments, surround sound, and lighting, and Schonbek handmade light fixtures. Residents also get to enjoy the heated secure parking garage with private storage, and snowmelt sidewalks throughout the development.

$725,0 0 0

$495,000 JA N HA UC K

jan@iknowsaginaw.com

989.798.5217

AND R EW HAU CK andrew.hauck@c21.com

989.798.2981


For all listings, visit c21signaturerealty.com

NEW PRICE

1800 CENTER AVENUE, BAY CITY Exceptional 6 bedroom residence that includes a 2 bedroom carriage apartment with recent updates in kitchen and bath. Main house features include full sweeping front porch, formal foyer with open curving staircase, crown moldings, hardwood floors, solid wood pocket doors, butler’s pantry, Corinthian columns, multiple fireplaces, updated kitchen has commercial appliances as part of the renovation. Sunny and bright breakfast room for the morning ritual or casual family meals, Original gum wood library makes a great TV/media room or den. 3 car garage w/ 2 bedroom carriage apartment. Additional parking spaces on the property. Gated entrance.  Two oversized en suite bedrooms and guest rooms on the second floor. The landing features morning coffee bar. This is a rare opportunity to purchase a historic home in this condition. May be sold furnished.

$480 , 0 0 0

3280 LAWNDALE, SAGINAW TWP 3420 sq ft on 7 woodland acres is the setting for this lodge like home. It has 3 suites and a 4th bedroom & full bath. The expansive “L” shaped living/dining areas have vaulted ceilings & wall to wall windows to view the private natural landscape. The 2nd level family room with fireplace overlooks the living area. In additional to the generous storage in the home, a multi-use pole barn with office & 2 stalls are a short distanced from the living quarts. Home warrant offered.

$295,000

NEW PRICE

1607 4TH ST, BAY CITY

385 GOLFVIEW, SAGINAW TWP

East side Historical Arts and Crafts style 4 bed, spacious rooms, living room w/frplc, builtins, hardwood floors, french doors to formal dining, opens to outdoor deck w/stamped patio & fenced yard. Charming kitchen w/ eat in space. 1/2 bath on 1st fl. Open staircase to 3 spacious bdrms on 2nd fl and updated full bath., master on the 3rd fl. 30x12 is a completely renovated space. Updates include bath, windows, stamped patio. 3rd fl air. Front covered porch adds to your seasonal living space.

Spacious DECKHOUSE, built by Tom Catarino Builders, features an open floor plan, vaulted Mahogany beams, Cedar tongue & groove ceilings & siding. Home has passive solar. The sunroom has a circulation system under the tile floor, which stores heat, then circulates it when in Winter mode. Four bedrooms & 2.5 baths, includes the master suite. Finished basement makes for maximum living space in your new home. Extra large lot with trees adds to the privacy.

$149, 9 0 0

$299,000

L A URIE BUSH

laurie.bush@century21.com

989.326.1755

MAR K MCKNIGH T

c21markmcknight@reagan.com

989.791.9191


For all listings, visit c21signaturerealty.com

2918 NOTTINGHAM W, SAGINAW TWP One of Saginaw Township’s most desired subdivisions. The backyard has views of the park and a short walk to the association pool. This home has been completely updated but still offers all of the traditional charm. Spacious foyer, large living room with crown molding and fireplace, formal dining room, family room with fireplace and new sliding door out to patio. The kitchen has been updated with white cabinets, island and informal eating area. Stainless appliances and Corian counter tops. New home office off the kitchen. Four bedrooms on the second floor with second floor laundry. Large master bedroom has walk-in closet and master bath. Attached side load garage. This home is a rare find!

2850 N HURDS CORNER, CARO This beautiful move in condition 5 bedroom, 3 bath home with over 4000 sq. ft. of living space sits on 10 acres of river front property surrounded by nature. A pole barn, 2.5 garage with a 840 Sq. ft. bonus room above gives you all the storage you will need. The private deck with hot tub, groomed fire pit area, fishing at bridge, hunting from deer stand and children’s wooden playscape makes this a perfect staycation paradise without leaving home!

$239,900

4636 CEDAR CREST DR, SAGINAW TWP Immaculate three bedroom home. Two additional bedrooms, family room with fireplace and full bath in finished lower level with daylight windows. Spacious foyer, open floor plan, gas fireplace in living room. Large kitchen with dining area and access to deck. Master suite with walk-in closet and full bath with separate vanity area. Neutral decor throughout, 2 full baths, 1 half bath and laundry all on the first floor. 3.5 car garage, heated. Great curb appeal.

$ 259,90 0

C H RIS ERWA Y

chriserwayrealtor@gmail.com

9 8 9.233.974 8

$349,900

COL EEN HETZ N E R

coleen.hetzner@century21.com

989.295.7718


For all listings, visit c21signaturerealty.com

PENDING

2 46 5 M OONG L O W , SAG I N AW TWP

704 PLAINFIELD CT, THOMAS TWP

Welcome to Saginaw Township’s most affordable standalone Condo development: Nova Ridge. Whether you are looking for your first home or downsizing, these well-designed 1,240 sq ft ranch-style homes feel spacious and don’t skimp on the comfort: 3 bedrooms, 2 full baths, kitchen with stainless steel appliances, granite counter tops and ceramic back splash, first floor laundry, and two-car garage. Quality built by Geiersbach Builders, “Energy Star” rating, and optional lawn/landscape/ snow service help you make the most of your time and money! With prices starting at $139,900 ($159,900 with basement), you’ll be hard pressed to find a better value anywhere!

Check out this wonderful duplex in Saginaw County’s Thomas Township! It has beautiful floors, newer carpet and paint throughout. One unit has 3 bedrooms, all are a nice size and the spacious master has a walk-in closet. There is a large full bath on the second floor with another half bath on the first. The other unit has two bedrooms with a large master. Both sides are updated and clean with excellent rental history, and perfect for an owner occupant. This could be a great investment opportunity with the option to rent one side and live in the other, or have two nice rental units. This neighborhood is convenient to schools, library, shopping and dining. Contact us to see how this opportunity could work for you.

$159 , 9 0 0

$215,000

72 BENTON, SAGINAW TWP M OON GL O W , S AG I N AW TWP Floor Plans are basically same in either style ranch, with or without basement, 3 bedrooms, 2 full baths, master with shower - main bath with tub and shower combination, kitchen with all stainless-steel kitchen appliances included, granite counter tops in the ones with basement, ceramic tiled back splash, first floor laundry, 2 car garage with door opener, flooring and window blinds are included as well. Hallways are all wide enough for a wheelchair, doorways are 36 inches wide as well. Outside includes a landscaped yard.

$134 , 9 0 0

Beautiful 4 bedroom 4 bathroom home located in Saginaw Township’s premier Golfside neighborhood. This home has been updated throughout and freshly painted in nice neutral tones, with newer carpet and floor coverings. The spacious kitchen with tile flooring and granite countertops is bright and cheerful and open to the family room and a covered brick patio.The master suite has its own fireplace, full bathroom and walk-in closet to give you a perfect place to unwind. All of the bedrooms are a good size. There is a very thoughtfully designed laundry on the second floor. There are formal and informal living and dining areas making this home ideal for entertaining or family life. There are too many amenities to list. We would love to show it to you so you can see for yourself.

$225,000 C ON N IE REPPUHN

KAR EN AND ON JENIFER R IFKIN

reppuhn@aol.com

Karen@karenandon.com

jenrifkin@att.net

989.239.2895

989.798.5687

989.714.7998


For all commercial listings, visit c21commercialteam.com

1107 S. SAGINAW, MIDLAND

100 S JEFFERSON AVE, SAGINAW

New Office Construction. For Sale or Lease. Great Location in the heart of Midland.

Excellent investment in Downtown Saginaw. Landmark building with strong cash flow. Historic sky rise. Long-term tenants.

+ / - 3 ,3 0 0 S F | $15 PSF

41,208 S F | $1,195,000 | $29 PSF

3037 DAVENPORT, SAGINAW

700 WASHINGTON AVE, BAY CITY

Office building for sale on the heavily travelled corridor of Davenport Avenue in Saginaw. Easy access to Interstate 675.

Beautiful Two-story redevelopment opportunity! Join Downtown Bay City’s revitalization. Just a block away from Friendship Park and its multi-million dollar renovations! Second floor tin ballroom. 2 apartments with rooftop balcony overlooking the beautiful Downtown and Saginaw River!

4,500 SF | $225,000 | $50 PSF

20,600 S F | $224,000 | $10.87 PSF

KEN KUJAWA

kenneth.kujawa@century21.com

BRIDGETTE STALLINGS BridgetteStallingsC21@gmail.com

MARK MORFORD marksmorford@yahoo.com

9 8 9.921.7002


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State of Michigan income tax savings Current rate is 4.25% = $4,250 City of Saginaw income tax savings Current rate is 1.5% = $1,500 Property tax savings at reduced rate From 46 mills to 13 mills = $3,250 Estimated Annual Savings

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really cool kids

THINK LIKE RILEY LOOK AT THE WHOLE PICTURE

Big details don’t work until you figure out the small ones.

BE CAUTIOUS

Decide carefully who you choose to take advice from.

BE CONFIDENT After discovering an interest in building and making things, Riley noticed a flier for Midland’s Young Entrepreneurs Academy (YEA). Through YEA, he was paired with a mentor from the community. “YEA helps you walk through your idea and come up with a business plan,” Riley explains. “Now we’re making a PowerPoint presentation to help pitch our idea to investors.” He learned the importance of paying attention to the details. “You have to think about every decision you make. You don’t want things to be too complicated.” Riley’s mentor, Morgan Watson-Morris, a robotics development engineer at The Dow Chemical Company, would agree. “The simplicity of his design is quite good and I am impressed by his drive and the fact that he took the steps necessary to start this business,” Watson-Morris says of Riley’s work. Going forward, Riley has set his sights high. He hopes to continue expanding his online business to include even more drone games, as well as a new drone obstacle course. “I have ideas for everything; I just need to keep working,” he says. Riley believes the online platform will best help him to reach his target market of individuals between the ages of 18 and 25. He will consider pop-up displays or other in-person sales. His dream is to attend Massachusetts Institute of Technology in Cambridge to study engineering and robotics. Developing a successful business plan did not come easily for Riley. He worked hard to figure out each tiny detail, proving that even from a young age, hard work and a positive attitude pay off. For more information on Riley’s business, visit his website, www.aergamez.com.

You have to know how to sell your product or even the best product won’t reach the market.

MAKE A PLAN

You can’t dive in without goals and ideas.


parenting tips

DO AS I

SAY

How do you tell your child ‘no’ without feeling guilty? BY REGINA SIMON, LMSW

P

arenting is not easy, especially when you have to tell your child the word “no.” Many parents have a difficult time saying no to their children about a multitude of requests, ranging from more internet time to dyeing their hair purple. When your child was an infant and tried to walk down stairs by themselves, did you let them do it if they cried or got angry? No, because their safety was in jeopardy, even if they didn’t understand why you weren’t letting them tumble headfirst down a flight of stairs.

Remember these tips when you’re faced with telling your child ‘no’ ●

The goal of parenting is not to make you feel good; it’s to foster the development of the child.

Understand the tactics used by your child to get you to say “yes”: whining, pouting, poor attitude, bullying, guilt trips, and tantrums. Don’t let them get to you.

Think of what you’re saying yes to when you say no.

Your role is to be a parent, not your child’s friend.

You’re darned if you do and darned if you don’t, so be an effective parent. Your child is not going to like your decisions, even if you give in.

REGINA SIMON, LMSW,

has been working with Child & Family Services for five years. Her specialties include family therapy, coparenting, teenage and adolescent treatment, as well as anxiety and depression among all ages.

8 Great Lakes Bay Family | August 2017


Q A

hodgepodge

&

Parents pose their most perplexing questions

Q: Dear Chick: I have a 5-year-old son who has a very hard time losing—whether in sports, board games, or whatever. He starts crying or yelling and gets really upset. What is the best way of handling his anger and frustration? We want him to feel good about himself whether or not he wins. ~ Mother of a Winner No Matter What

A: Dear Mother of a Winner: Age 5 is too young for a child to be involved in competition. When games are frustrating to children, they may be over the child’s head. You may need to redirect here by structuring other activities that are not so frustrating. I recommend cooperative games where everyone works together to achieve the same result. Handle anger by naming it and reflecting it back to him. For example, “You seem really frustrated with this game,” or “Your tears show me you’re unhappy with the results here.” Honor his feelings and be nurturing. Focus on what your son does accomplish. Stay away from evaluative praise like “Good boy” and “Great job.” Use words that speak to accomplishments. For example, “You put three pieces in the puzzle,” and “Oh, you found where another one goes,” or “I noticed you stacked the blocks as high as your waist.” And yes, continue to view your child as a winner, no matter what. Best wishes, CHICK MOORMAN Chick Moorman, from Merrill, is an author and professional speaker who helps parents and teachers raise responsible, caring, conscientious children. Reach him through www. chickmoorman.com.

pet picker

LEOPARD GECKO Leopard geckos are one of the most popular reptile pets for many reasons, including their friendly demeanor and long life span (10+ years). As an adult, they can reach a length of 7 to 10 inches, and they can regenerate a lost tail in less than 40 days.

PROs:

● Geckos are easy to care for compared to other reptiles.

● It only takes about a week to tame your new pal and let it get used to you holding it.

CONs:

● Geckos only eat insects, so you’ll have to keep plenty of crickets and other bugs handy.

curious kids

DID YOU KNOW...

This year, on August 21, there will be a total solar eclipse, which means the moon will pass between the Earth and the sun, making the sky dark (just briefly) during the day. In Michigan, we will only see a partial eclipse, but it is very important to use eye protection if you want to look at it. Sunglasses are not strong enough to protect your eyes. Instead, try making a pinhole projector. For directions on how to make a pinhole projector, you can visit www. education.com/activity/article/pinhole_projection.

● The gecko’s delicate body makes it a better pet for older children who may not be inclined to handle it too enthusiastically.

August 2017 | Great Lakes Bay Family 9


get outdoors

HOP TO IT Let’s go frogging.

BY JENN KIRTS PHOTO COURTESY OF CHIPPEWA NATURE CENTER

N

othing captures a child’s interest like catching frogs. Late summer is a great time to visit your local pond to try your hand at this age-old childhood pastime. It takes a good mix of patience, persistence, and skill to catch a frog, but the fun of splashing in the water and the thrill of success keeps kids of all ages engaged for hours. When preparing for a frog-catching expedition, all you really need are your hands, but some people enjoy bringing along a bucket, a net, and a pair of water-worthy shoes. Choosing your location is easy, too; look for a pond or lake that has water throughout the year and vegetation for the frogs to hide in. As summer stretches into fall, I encourage you to grab your gear, invite a few friends, and see if you can find some frogs. If you move slowly and listen carefully, you may hear the deep rubber band strum of the green frogs before you see them. When it’s time to head home, be a good steward and make sure to return the frogs safely to their habitat.

TIPS FOR RESPONSIBLE FROGGING SCRUB UP. Make sure your hands are clean. Frogs can absorb lotion, soap, sunscreen, and bug spray through their skin, and it can make them sick.

GET WET. Keep your hands wet; it helps protect the frog’s skin.

SCOOP IT. If the frog is in the water, scoop from beneath it. If it’s on land, come from above.

CUP IT. When holding a large, strong frog, wrap your JENN KIRTS is director

of programs at Midland’s Chippewa Nature Center. She enjoys gardening, camping, and spending time exploring outdoors with her family.

10 Great Lakes Bay Family | August 2017

thumb and first finger around its waist just above its legs. When holding a smaller frog, cup it in your hands.

OBSERVE. If you’d like to observe the frogs in a bucket, fill it with water deep enough so they can’t touch the bottom. This way, they won’t hop out.


Arts & Culture Corner

LIFE IMITATING ART

Encourage your child to actively participate while visiting art museums. BY DEBBIE ANDERSON

H

ands-on museums are exciting places where kids are encouraged to touch everything in sight. These are great places for exploratory learning. On the other end of the spectrum are those intimidating, parental nightmares—art museums. Parents worry: What if my kid touches something they shouldn’t? Will they be bored and annoy the adults in the museum? As a museum professional and a parent, I have had the same intimidating thoughts. If you’re hoping to take your child to an art museum, try these creative

DEBBIE ANDERSON

is assistant director of education at Midland Center for the Arts. At home, she’s head curator of a priceless collection of artwork produced by her daughter, Sydney.

solutions. Before you do, be sure to know the photography policy of the institution you are visiting. Be a Part of the Art is a game we created for our 3-year-old. The goal is to imitate people in paintings, sculptures, or photographs. Even for younger children, a basic imitation is quickly mastered. Encourage careful observation of facial expressions, body posing, and gestures. If allowed by the museum, snap a photo and show your children what they looked like with the work of art. The experience becomes a scavenger hunt to find works that can be imitated. Whether you are at your local museum or The Louvre, simply ask your child questions in front of a work of art. For example: If you were in this picture, what would you hear? Smell? Feel? What do you notice first? These activities have enhanced my family’s museum trips, relaxed my apprehensions, and turned my daughter into a more patient museum-goer than me.

August 2017 | Great Lakes Bay Family 11


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feature

S I H T N I ALL

R E H T E G O T F Chores c

m

ke kids and fa

nd help ma an be fun‌a

ccessful. ilies more su

amilies that play together, stay together, but working as a team is just as important. Chores teach children of all ages key life lessons and help the household run smoothly. Parents need a plan and patience to make chores part of the family routine, but the reward is a happy, efficient family. Although it is best to be consistent with encouraging children to help during their earlier

ENTROUT

BY JILL ARM

years, experts say it is never too late to work on these values.

IT’S A PROCESS

Kylie Rymanowicz, a certified family life educator with Michigan State University Extension in Saginaw, says many parents who attend her parenting classes ask about ageappropriate chores. August 2017 | Great Lakes Bay Family 13


feature “Yes, it is easier to do it yourself than have your 2-year-old help fold the laundry, but that practice is what helps them learn responsibility and being part of the family,” she says. “You have to allow them to try and complete a task. Focus on the process and not the product.” Parents are often surprised by what their children can do, even at young ages, Rymanowicz adds. Unfortunately, fewer parents see the value in chores today. “It has such value—for them to practice life skills in a safe environment where they can learn and grow,” states Rymanowicz. “How many kids go away to college and can’t do laundry or the dishes? [After having performed chores] they learn to solve problems and take responsibility for themselves and the group. We don’t give kids enough credit.”

ACTIVITIES FOR ALL AGES

Ages 2-3 – Put toys away, dress themselves, and help put away clean silverware. Make it fun by marking tasks on a chore chart with stickers when completed. Whoever has the most stickers at the end of the week gets an award. Ages 4-5 – Help feed pets, make their bed, and clear the table. Make it fun by playing Go Fish with a basket of clean socks. Divide socks among players and leave a pile to draw from. The player with the most pairs wins. Ages 6-7 – Wipe tables and counters, put laundry away, and vacuum floors. Make it fun by turning a bucket into a personalized cleaning caddy filled with sponges and dust rags. Single socks can be childsized dusters. Ages 7-9 – Load and unload the dishwasher, and help prepare meals and their own lunches. Make it fun by letting them help plan the weekly menus. Ages 10-11 – Change their bedding, clean the kitchen or bathrooms, and mow the lawn. Make it fun by setting a timer after dinner to do a “10-Minute Tidy” with everyone picking up clutter. Ages 12 and older – Wash the car, babysit younger siblings, and help shop for groceries with a list. Make it fun by cranking up music and having a cleaning party.

14 Great Lakes Bay Family | August 2017


MAKE IT LAST

Amanda Schoch of Merrill and her husband, Scott, are parents of four children, ages 12, 7, 5, and 4. All the children do chores in the house and on their farm—from washing dishes and putting away clean laundry, to pulling weeds and helping build a rabbit cage.

KEEP ON TRACK A visual list of chores helps keep kids accountable and motivated to complete jobs. Parents searching online (especially on Pinterest) will find hundreds of creative ways to keep track. One classic is putting Popsicle sticks in a jar, with the sticks labeled with must-do daily chores

“We are teaching them to appreciate what we have and take care of it so it lasts,” says Amanda. “This helps keep our family happy, healthy, and moving in the right direction.” Remember to give step-by-step instructions that are specific to each task so kids can learn to master skills, such as time management and teamwork.

Make chores a habit in your home. and can-do weekly chores. You can also use labeled clothes pins with tasks that can be moved from a “To Do” side to a “Done” side. Certified family life educator Kylie Rymanowicz believes that giving praise and encouragement is important, and

BY JILL ARMENTROUT

charts help track expectations and make chores a habit. She doesn’t recommend paying children to do chores, however. “I believe the motivation should be that helping is being part of the family and doing what is right. The reward can be doing something special as a family,” she says.


feature

SHOPPIN Thrifty ways to save money as kids head back to class. BY PATI LaLONDE

C

onsignment and resale shops abound throughout the area and are stocked with good quality and sought-after brands—clothing, footwear, coats, hats, and every other item the best-dressed kid needs to head back to class. According to www.IBISWorld.com, a website that specializes in market data,

16 Great Lakes Bay Family | August 2017

trends, and forecasts, secondhand and consignment shops are a $12 billion a year business with expected 3.3 percent annual growth. “It is like going on a little adventure; you never know what you will find,” says Colleen Maillette, manager of the retail division of Do-All, Inc. “[Resale store shopping] is becoming a trend. More and more people are shopping resale and not going to department stores. You can get name brand for far less.”

“You can probably save 85 to 90 percent off retail,” adds Sam Baker, manager of Under the Rainbow. “We have seen an increase as people try to find ways they can save money, as well as divert resources from landfills. People are beginning to see they can get quality items in thrift stories.” From clothing to computers to musical instruments, back-to-school shopping doesn’t have to exceed your budget; all it takes is a little homework.


NG CLOTHING ON A SHOESTRING

What better way to defuse the stress of back-to-school shopping than poking around a resale or consignment shop, saving you a lot of green—not to mention teaching the kids the value of a dollar. “We have just about everything [for back to school],” says Maillette, noting that most of the merchandise donated to the stores is like-new or new with tags. The same is true at Under the Rainbow. “The reputation [of a resale store] is starting to change, especially in our store,” says Baker. “We do a good job

making sure what goes out to the floor is in tip-top shape.” Many of these types of stores not only offer bargains but help out a nonprofit, as well. The Cat’s Meow supports the retail training for people with disabilities at Do-All, Inc., while Under the Rainbow supports Saginaw’s Underground Railroad, which helps victims of domestic violence. Those sending children off to parochial schools need to look no further than their school for uniforms. All Saints Elementary School in Bay City offers parents the chance to swap uniforms throughout the year. Nouvel Elementary School in Saginaw Township runs its own version of a “Swap Shop,” where parents can find items as low as $10. “Parents can swap out used clothes for some that are in the store,” says Jenny Sprague, administrative professional secretary at Nouvel Elementary. “We have a bunch of different skirts, shirts, and pants. They can [also] purchase new items through us at a discounted rate.”

Midland School Academy also offers a uniform swap for students. In fact, says office manager Ann Dearrington, the staff hosts a back-to-school night at the beginning of the year for parents to pick up what they need. Another option for deal-seekers is rummage sales. You could shop and sell—and maybe break even. On any given weekend, clothing, accessories, shoes, and more can be found for pennies on the dollar. Check out www. mom2momsalesmichigan.com and www. yardsales.net for sales all around the state. 

GIGABYTES ON THE CHEAP

Pretty much everyone needs a computer, a little item that can set the budget back $300 to over $1,000, depending on the model. But, says Scott Briggs, one of the owners of Computers To Go, a used computer will do the same job for a whole lot less than a new one. Although a used device may show a little wear and tear, savvy shoppers can

August 2017 | Great Lakes Bay Family 17


feature

find a laptop with four to eight gigabytes of RAM and a 500 to 1000 gigabyte hard drive for considerably less than a newer model. “[Used computers] are good for homework and surfing the net,” says Briggs. He and business partner John Levy offer a one-year warranty and tech support for the used computers. “We test our hard drives to make sure there aren’t any viruses, spy wear, etc.,” Briggs continues. “We go through and make sure everything works.”  

MAKING MUSIC

Let’s not forget music activities. While the school provides the uniforms, it’s up to the students to supply the instrument, which in some cases can run into triple digits. Natalie Martinez, owner of Herter Music Center, offers used instruments

18 Great Lakes Bay Family | August 2017

for 40 to 50 percent off new and a rentto-own program. Just like the computers, used instruments may be a little bit worn, but they can still play beautiful music. With the rent-to-own option, the child can try it out for at least two months and return it any time during the 36-month rental. 

BE A SPORT

Those who play pool, bowl, or throw darts, skip this part. Outside of those three sports, Play It Again Sports has used equipment for everything else. The savings are nothing to sneeze at for items such as baseball bats, cleats, gloves, and hockey skates. Employees clean up the gear as much as they can. “Hockey skates get black marks on the blade holder and kinks in the toe

cap,” says employee, Mike Powell. “But none of that will take away from how it works.”

PENCILS? CHECK. PENS? CHECK. PAPER? CHECK.

No matter where you live in the Great Lakes Bay Region, there is a Staples or Office Max a short drive away. Parents should start checking out websites and newspaper inserts in July to find out what is on sale and when. Check out the Staples website at www.staples.com, and click on shop deals or sign up for email alerts. Office Depot’s website, www.officedepot. com, has a special page just for school supplies. Parents can also sign up for sale notices.


BAY CITY

KNOW WHERE TO GO

Glad Rags, 814 Columbus Ave, 989-892-5859 The Cat’s Meow, 810 Washington Ave, 989-391-9335, and 1465 W Center Rd, Essexville, 989-894-0712

MIDLAND Just for Kids, Midland Towne Center, 1531 Washington St, 989-835-3971 Shelterhouse Resale Shop, 1830 S Saginaw Rd, 989-486-8776 Twice Is Nice Resale Boutique, 123 McDonald St, 989-839-9151 What Goes Around Comes Around, 3128 S Jefferson Ave, 989-631-2212

MOUNT PLEASANT Thrift Shop Isabella Child, 307 S Mission, Ste C, 989-773-9544

SAGINAW Greeks R Us (used clothing store), 2203 E Genesee Ave, 989-7554925 Once Upon a Child, 2936 Tittabawassee Rd, 989-791-0029 Style Encore, 2830 Tittabawassee Rd, 989-249-0055 Under the Rainbow, 5647 State St, 989-249-1924 Upstairs Resale Shop, 1500 Gratiot Rd, 989-793-1076

COMPUTERS Computers To Go, 2463 Tittabawassee Rd, Saginaw Township, 989-793-9500, and in the Midland Mall, 989-631-6900 SAMSA Tech Shop, 973 S Saginaw Rd, Midland, and 5560 Gratiot Rd, Ste D, Saginaw Township, 989-790-0507 TechKnowledge, 973 Saginaw Rd, Midland, 989-832-4101  

PROM AND HOMECOMING DRESSES Becca’s Closet, 801 N Washington Ave, Bay City, and 3115 Mackinaw Rd (inside Arthur Hill High School), Saginaw, 989-751-6211 Dance Again Formal Dress Consignment Boutique, 902 Meridian Rd, Mt Pleasant, 989-330-0789

UNIFORM SWAPS All Saints Elementary School, 715 14th St, Bay City, 989-892-4371 Midland School Academy, 4653 Bailey Bridge Rd, Midland, 989-496-2404 Nouvel Elementary School, 2136 Berberovich Dr, Saginaw Township, 989-792-2361

MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS Herter Music Center, 901 Washington Ave, Saginaw, 989-893-4545

SPORTS GEAR

Play It Again Sports, 4230 Miller Rd, Flint, 810-515-1659


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TODAY family

TINY PLANT INVADERS

April 2017

Wh at's Ins ide:

Dishes: Your Babysitter ould 7 Things You Sh Know. p. 17 ing. to Get Kids Read

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SUBSCRIPTION IS $18,

Top Story Picks Teachers Share p. 6 t-in-the-making. Meet an FBI Agen

EVER WONDER WHERE BUGS OVERWINTER?

IT’S THEIR JAM

MODERN DAY CURE ROCKS OUT FOR WORSHIP

Family Fun Activity Guide More than 147 things to do and see in the GLBR! p. 25

p. 20

MEMORY LANE

Nostalgia brings more than reminiscing to urban redevelopment. p. 30 BIG BOX BYPASS

Small business support yields advantages for shoppers and shopkeepers. p. 26

FEAR-FREE SUCCESS Know what you’re afraid of to avoid career path roadblocks. p. 24

DON’T BE DUMB.

Be in the habit of improving yourself. p. 20

timeless trends

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FAMILY

FUN ACTIVITY GUIDE

August – March 2018

Arts and Museums Exhibit: Studio School Student and Faculty Exhibitions. Through September 2. Admission $9. Featuring both student- and faculty-work of the art classes at Alden B. Dow Museum of Science and Art. Alden B Dow Museum of Art and Science, Midland Center for the Arts, Midland; 989-631-8250, www.mcfta.org Exhibit: Drawn Out: An Invitational. Through September 2. Admission $9. Drawings which realize the ultimate depiction, uniting the artist with the mark-making surface. Alden B Dow Museum of Art and Science, Midland Center for the Arts, Midland; 989-631-8250, www.mcfta.org Exhibit: Great Lakes Bay En Plein Air: Juried Class and Open Class. Through September 2. Admission $5. Graphic arts are on display. Saginaw Art Museum, Saginaw; 989-754-2491, www.saginawartmuseum.org Exhibit: Laura’s Little House: The Story of Laura Ingalls Wilder. Through September 5. Monday – Friday, 10 a.m. – 7 p.m. Admission. Explore the life, experiences, and books written by Laura Ingalls Wilder at a historical hands-on exhibit for children of all ages. Frankenmuth Historical Association Museum, Frankenmuth; 989-652-9701, www. frankenmuthmuseum.org Exhibit: Lochs and Follies: The Picturesque in Scotland. Through September 17. Admission $5. Graphic arts. Saginaw Art Museum, Saginaw; 989-7542491, www.saginawartmuseum.org Exhibit: Pre-automotive Design: The Horse and Carriage Prints of Louis Vallet. Through September 24. Admission.

Comprised entirely of prints by 19th-century French artist Louis Vallet; examines the development of the carriage, 1400 to 1895, before it was replaced by the automobile in 1896. Saginaw Art Museum, Saginaw; 989754-2491, www.saginawartmuseum.org Exhibit: Oaxacan Folk Art: Seven Artists, Seven Voices. Through September 30. Free admission. Clay and carved-wood sculptures from seven indigenous artists who use craft techniques of Oaxaca. Marshall M Fredericks Sculpture Museum, SVSU, University Center; 989-964-7125, www.marshallfredericks.org Exhibit: Floating World. October 6 – December 16. Karen LaMonte explores the beauty of kimono making in this exhibit. Kimonos are sculpted in rusted iron, cast bronze, ceramic, and cast glass. Marshall M Fredericks Sculpture Museum, SVSU, University Center; 989-964-7125, www. marshallfredericks.org Exhibit: Chinese Folk Pottery: The Art of the Everyday. January 20 – May 19. Contemporary folk pottery produced within the diversity of ethnic minorities and Han people across China from three perspectives: production values, functions, and aesthetics. The pottery pieces were collected through research trips between 1995 and 2009. Marshall M Fredericks Sculpture Museum, SVSU, University Center; 989-964-7125, www.marshallfredericks.org

Attractions Daily Pretzel Rolling. Every day, 2:30 – 3:15 p.m. (not available on Easter, Thanksgiving, Christmas Eve, and Christmas Day). Cost $4.99. Learn proper pretzel-rolling methods, and eat your fresh-out-of-the-oven

finished product. Two-hour advance notice and prepayment required. Bavarian Inn Restaurant, Frankenmuth; 989-652-9941, www.bavarianinn.com Animal Antics. Mondays, 3:30 – 4:30 p.m. Learn about a different animal each week through a craft, story, and themed play activities. Mt Pleasant Discovery Museum, Mt Pleasant; 989-773-3689, www. mpdiscoverymuseum.org Loony Tunes. Tuesdays, 10:15 – 10:45 a.m. Boogie down with Music Dan and learn songs and dance movers. Mt Pleasant Discovery Museum, Mt Pleasant; 989-773-3689, www. mpdiscoverymuseum.org Toddler Time. Every Wednesday, 11 – 11:30 a.m. and 1 – 1:30 p.m. Admission. Sing, dance, create, explore, and enjoy developmentally targeted projects. MidMichigan Children’s Museum, Saginaw; 989399-6626, www.michildrensmuseum.com Dow Gardens Children’s Garden Story Time. Fridays, 10 – 11 a.m. Admission fee. Dow Gardens, Midland; 989-631-2677, www. dowgardens.org Midland County Historical Society: Handson History Days. Friday and Saturday of the third weekend each month, 11 a.m. – 2 p.m. Family-focused, interactive, and informational drop-in programs for the community to discover and preserve local heritage. Midland Center for the Arts, Midland; 989-631-5930, www.mcfta.org Kids Fly Free. Second Saturday of each month, 9 a.m. – 12 p.m. Ages 8 – 17 fly free and learn about aviation. Jack Barstow Airport, Midland; 989-835-3231, www.eaa1093.org

August 2017 | Great Lakes Bay Family 21


FAMILY FUN ACTIVITY GUIDE August 2017 – March 2018 Authentic Japanese Tea Ceremony. Second Saturday of each month, 2 p.m. Admission $8. Authentic formal Japanese Tea Ceremony in the Saginaw-Tokushima Friendship Garden, hosted by persons in kimono. Reservations encouraged. Japanese Cultural Center & Tea House, Saginaw; 989759-1648, www.japaneseculturalcenter.org Humane Society of Bay County Feline Adoption Events. Last Saturday of each month. 989-893-0451, www. humanesocietybc.org Science Sundays. Every other Sunday, 1 p.m. Cost $7. Themed science experiments led by a play facilitator. Mount Pleasant Discovery Museum, Mt Pleasant; 989-3173221, www.mpdiscoverymuseum.org Johnny Panther Quests Ecotours. Yearround, guided, customized boat tours through various bodies of water; photography, birding, adventure, relaxation. Groups of one to 10. Johnny Panther Quest Ecotours; 810-66533859, www.jpqat.com Downtown Saginaw Farmers Market. Through October. Produce, honey, baked goods, and vendors with locally made food choices. 507 S Washington St, Saginaw; 989-758-2500, ext 228, www. saginawfarmersmarket.org Frankenmuth Farmers Market. Wednesdays – Saturdays, 12:30 – 5:30 p.m. Locally grown produce. 534 N Main St, Frankenmuth; 989-295-9766, www. frankenmuthfarmersmarket.org Marketplace Bay City. Indoor, year-round market. Produce, fresh fish, artisan cheeses, and flowers. 401 Center Ave, Bay City; www. marketplacebaycity.com Midland Area Farmers Market. Through October. Produce, flowers, honey, and baked goods. Near the Tridge, downtown Midland; 989-839-9901, www.macc.org Mount Pleasant Farmers Market. Through October, Thursdays (Market Park) and Saturdays (City Hall), 7:30 a.m. – 2 p.m. Fruits, vegetables, plants, and more. Mt Pleasant; www.mt-pleasant.org Wildlife Drive. Through September 30, sunrise to one hour before sunset. Free admission. A 6.5-mile, self-guided, one-way auto route. Shiawassee National Wildlife Refuge, Saginaw; 989-777-5930, www.fws.gov Birds, Bugs, Butterflies, and Blooms. August 5, 10 a.m. – 5 p.m. Enjoy the beautiful sights of summer. Children’s Zoo at Celebration Square, Saginaw; 989-759-1408, www.saginawzoo.com Great Lakes Loons. August 5, 7:05 p.m. Admission starting at $6.50. Fireworks immediately follow the game between the Loons and Fort Wayne TinCaps. Dow

22 Great Lakes Bay Family | August 2017

Diamond, Midland; loons.com, 989-837-2255, www.loons.com

Lansing Lugnuts. Dow Diamond, Midland; 989-837-2255, www.loons.com

Grandparents Play Free. August 6, 12 p.m. – 5 p.m. Admission/free for grandparents and members. Bring grandma, grandpa, and the entire family to the zoo for a day of fun-filled adventure with the animals. Children’s Zoo at Celebration Square, Saginaw; 989-759-1408, www.saginawzoo.com

Great Lakes Loons. August 17, 7:05 p.m. Admission starting at $6.50. It’s $1 Family Feast Night at Dow Diamond. Plus, watch as the Great Lakes Loons take on the Lansing Lugnuts. Dow Diamond, Midland; 989-8372255, www.loons.com

Great Lakes Loons. August 6, 2:05 p.m. Admission: starting at $6.50. Take in a ballgame as the Great Lakes Loons face off against the Fort Wayne TinCaps. Kids 12 and under can enjoy Kids Eat Free Sundays with a free hot dog, chips, and drink before running the bases after the game. Dow Diamond, Midland; 989-837-2255, www.loons.com Martial Arts Class. August 8, 6 p.m. Free. Join in for a free martial arts lesson, learning about the traditions of this time-honored practice. West Midland Family Center, Shepherd; 989-832-3256, www.wmfc.org Carnival Day. August 9, 10 a.m. – 12 p.m. A recreational carnival just for kids comes to Freeland. Bounce houses and more offer hours of fun. Tittabawassee Township Park, Freeland; 989-695-9512, www.facebook.com/ freelandparks Be Greater Kids Adventure. August 10, 6 p.m. $15/team. Maximum five member pers team, ages 5 – 12 and one member over 18. A two-hour adventure race takes kids ages 5 – 12 through the Greater Midland Community Center neighborhood to face challenges and checkpoints. Open to the first 200 teams. Greater Midland Community Center, Midland; www.greatermidland.org Farm Days. August 12, 10 a.m. – 2 p.m. $5/free for members. Celebrate Michigan agriculture with barnyard animal friends, games, and activities. Children’s Zoo at Celebration Square, Saginaw; 989-759-1408, www.saginawzoo.com Saturdays on the Saginaw River Tour. August 12, 10 a.m. – 12 p.m. A leisurely twohour river tour features a guide to explore various topics, which vary by date. Bay City Boat Lines, Bay City; 855-891-2628, www. baycityboatlines.com Great Lakes Loons. August 14, 7:05 p.m. Admission starting at $6.50. Cheer on the Loons as they take the field against the Lansing Lugnuts. Dow Diamond, Midland; 989-837-2255, www.loons.com Great Lakes Loons. August 15, 7:05 p.m. Admission starting at $6.50. The Loons host the Lansing Lugnuts. Dow Diamond, Midland; 989-837-2255, www.loons.com Great Lakes Loons. August 16, 7:05 p.m. Admission starting at $6.50. Head out to the ballfield and marvel at a Fireworks Loontaculars show after the Loons play the

Kids and Culture. August 19, 10 a.m. – 12 p.m. Free. Art Reach of Mid-Michigan provides hands-on activities for children to learn about culture and more. Mt Pleasant Discovery Museum, Mt Pleasant; 989-7733689, www.mpdiscoverymuseum.org Impact Saginaw Family Fun Day. August 20, 1 – 4 p.m. Free. Music, inflatables, activities, and games offer fun for all ages. Huntington Event Park, Saginaw; 989-7591320, www.doweventcenter.com Great Lakes Loons. August 22, 7:05 p.m. Admission starting at $6.50. It’s a battle of bats between the Great Lakes Loons and Lansing Lugnuts. Dow Diamond, Midland; 989-837-2255, www.loons.com End of Summer Bash. August 23, 10 a.m. – 12 p.m. Free. Bring the kids out for one last day of celebration before summer is over. Tittabawassee Township Park, Freeland; 989695-9512, www.facebook.com/freelandparks Great Lakes Loons. August 23, 7:05 p.m. Admission starting at $6.50. The Great Lakes Loons and Lansing Lugnuts take the field. Dow Diamond, Midland; 989-837-2255, www. loons.com Great Lakes Loons. August 24, 7:05 p.m. Admission starting at $6.50. Enjoy $1 Family Feast Night as the Great Lakes Loons take on the Lansing Lugnuts. Dow Diamond, Midland; 989-837-2255, www.loons.com Dirty Dog Trail Run. August 26, 9 a.m. $10 – $40. A 10K run, 5K run, and 1-mile walk host runners of all skill levels and their dogs. City Forest, Midland; 989-492-4002 Farmer Bill’s 8 Family Fun Weekends. September through October, weekends. Jump in the bounce house, pet the animals, ride the wagon, and make your way through the corn maze. Warmbier Farms, Auburn; 989-662-7002, www.warmbierfarms.com Papa’s Corn Maze. September through October. Challenge yourself in the 5-acres corn maze in Mount Pleasant. Papa’s Pumpkin Patch and Country Market, Mt Pleasant; 989-773-4345, www. papasfamilyfarm.com Trebuchet Pumpkin Catapulting. September through late October, weekends, 1 – 5 p.m. Free. Watch as giant pumpkins are launches across the farm. Johnson’s Giant Pumpkin Patch, Saginaw; 989-752-3133, www.johnsonsgiantpumpkins.net


Saturdays on the Saginaw River Tour. September 2, 10 a.m. – 12 p.m. $20 adults/$10 children. Enjoy a family-friendly, leisurely river tour with a guide. Topics vary. Snack bar available on board. Bay City Boat Lines, Bay City; 855-891-2628, www. baycityboatlines.com Great Lakes Loons. September 3, 2:05 p.m. Admission starting at $6.50. Run the bases after the Great Lakes Loons take on the Lake County Captains. Plus, enjoy Kids Eat Free Sunday with a free hot dog, chips, and drink. Dow Diamond, Midland; 989-837-2255, www. loons.com Grandparents Play Free. September 3, 12 p.m. – 5 p.m. Admission/free for grandparents and members. Bring grandma, grandpa, and the entire family to the zoo for a day of funfilled adventure with the animals. Children’s Zoo at Celebration Square, Saginaw; 989759-1408, www.saginawzoo.com Kids and Culture. September 16, 10 a.m. – 12 p.m. Free. Art Reach of Mid-Michigan provides hands-on activities for children to learn about culture and more. Ziibiwing Cultural Center, Mt Pleasant; 989-773-3689, www.artreachcenter.org Community Colors Run. September 17, 3 – 5 p.m. Go mad with color at Northwood University. Jog or walk your way through the beautiful Midland campus while being showered in neon colors to support United Way and middle school athletics. Northwood University, Midland; www.greatermidland.org/races River of Time. September 22 – 24, times vary. Free. Join the annual event on the banks of the Saginaw River in Veterans Memorial Park as re-enactors from all over the country dress, work, and live as people did from eras in Michigan’s past. Veterans Memorial Park, Bay City; www.riveroftime.org Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation International: Walk to Cure Diabetes. October 1, 8:30 a.m. Family-friendly event raises funds to support the Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation International’s mission to find a cure for Type 1 diabetes. Bay City Community Center, Bay City; 248-936-1292, www.michiganeast.jdrf.org Brückeläufe Half Marathon Bridge Race. October 7, 7:30 a.m. A half marathon and 5K race are sponsored by the Frankenmuth Jaycees. The race crosses 13 bridges over 13.1 miles. Heritage Park, Frankenmuth; 989928-2238, www.frankenmuth.org Zoo Boo. October 14, 15, 21, 22, 28, and 29, 12 – 5 p.m. Admission. Put on your costumes and make your way through the not-so-scary zoo. Children’s Zoo at Celebration Square, Saginaw; 989-7591408, www.saginawzoo.com Kids and Culture. October 21, 10 a.m. – 12 p.m. Free. Art Reach of Mid-Michigan

provides hands-on activities for children to learn about culture and more. Central Michigan University Museum of Cultural and Natural History, Mt Pleasant; 989-773-3689, www.artreachcenter.org Tri-to-Finish Turkey Trot. November, 9 a.m. $10 – $30. USATF-sanctioned 10K and 5K races. St Peter Lutheran School, Hemlock; 989-205-5838, www.tritofinish.com Kids and Culture. November 18, 10 a.m. – 12 p.m. Free. Art Reach of Mid-Michigan provides hands-on activities for children to learn about culture and more. Veterans Memorial Library, Mt Pleasant; 989-773-3689, www.artreachcenter.org Chesaning Christmas Candlelight Walk. November 24 – November 25, 12 – 9 p.m. Free. Historic Chesaning is alive with the season. Enjoy live music and free horsedrawn carriage rides. Peruse the displays of gingerbread houses and find holiday fun for all ages. Stop in to say “hello” to Santa, too, at the Festival of Trees. Chesaning; 989-8453055 Holiday Celebration and Candlewalk. November 24, 6 p.m. Free. Start the Christmas season with hot chocolate and cookies. Candlewalk begins after the 6:30 p.m. ceremony. Frankenmuth River Place Shops, Frankenmuth; 989-652-6106, www. frankenmuthriverplace.com Santa’s Village: The North Pole USA. November 24 – December 18. $10/$5 ages 5 and younger/free for younger than 2. The North Pole opens in Chesaning with displays, Santa, and more. Saginaw County Fairgrounds, Chesaning; www.santa. saginawcountyfair.org Santa House and Northern Star Train. November 28 – December 22, 1:30 – 4: 430 p.m. and 6 – 9 p.m. Tell Old Saint Nick what you want for Christmas, and hop on the Northern Star Train for a tour of Midland. Santa House, Midland; www. midlandfoundation.org/santa-house Kids and Culture. December 16, 10 a.m. – 12 p.m. Free. Art Reach of Mid-Michigan provides hands-on activities for children to learn about culture and more. Ziibiwing Cultural Center, Mt Pleasant; 989-773-3689, www.artreachcenter.org Nature’s New Year’s Eve. December 31, 7 – 8 p.m. Free. All ages welcome; younger than 18 with adult. Venture out for some family fun this New Year’s Eve to play games, watch for nocturnal animals, and enjoy a light snack with sparkling juice. Chippewa Nature Center, Midland; 989-631-0830, www. chippewanaturecenter.org New Year’s Eve Party. December 31, time TBD. Admission fee. A night filled with dancing, games, kiddy cocktails, and more as the countdown to midnight begins. Mt

Pleasant Discovery Museum, Mt Pleasant; 989-317-4903, www.mpdiscoverymsueum.org Dow Gardens Poinsettia Display. December TBD. Admission $5/free for 5 and younger. Walk through the gardens to the Dow Garden Conservatory, filled with a dramatic poinsettia display. Dow Gardens, Midland; 989-6312677, www.dowgardens.org Breakfast with Santa at the TrombleyCentre House. TBD. Sit down to breakfast with Santa himself. Seating is limited, reservations are required, and no highchairs are available. Tickets must be purchased in advance in the Historical Museum of Bay County’s store; no sales at the door. Trombley-Centre House, Bay City; 989-8935733, www.bchs.museum.org Bringing Back the Ice. TBD. Sledding, ice skating, hockey, cookies, and hot cocoa at the warming house. Check the website for complete details. Hoyt Park, Saginaw; www. prideinsaginaw.org 6th Annual Glow Night. March TBD. Two sessions, times TBD. Glow sticks, black lights, glowing exhibits, crafts, and games. Advance ticket purchase is recommended. Mt Pleasant Discovery Museum, Mt Pleasant; 989-317-4903, www.mpdiscovermuseum.org Annual Indoor Candy-Free Egg Hunt Day. March TBD, 10 a.m. – 4 p.m. Admission fee. Indoor egg hunt and gallery play. MidMichigan Children’s Museum, Saginaw; 989399-6626, www.michildrensmuseum.com

Charitable Events Pulse5 Foundation’s Run for Your Heart. September 9, 7:45 a.m. – 1 p.m. Run for Your Heart is more than a road race; it’s an opportunity to create a healthy and vibrant community while fighting heart disease. Race through the Children’s Zoo at Celebration Square, several parks, and along the Saginaw River. No strollers please. All racers receive a performance shirt and a medal. MCVI, Saginaw; 989-754-7283 Underground Railroad: 4th Annual Paws 4 Hope Walk ’n’ Roll. October, 10 a.m. – 3 p.m. Family- and pet-friendly events, K9 fun walk and run, scavenger hunts, games, prizes, and more. Proceeds benefit Paws 4 Hope, the pet accommodations of the Underground, Inc. emergency shelter. Frankenmuth River Place Shops, Frankenmuth; 989-860-9313, www. undergroundrailroadinc.org READ Association of Saginaw County: 16th Annual Book Fair. December, 10 a.m. – 8 p.m. All-time favorites along with the latest children, adult, and family book titles. A percentage of the proceeds will benefit the READ Association. Greenhouse Children’s Book Store (inside the Antique Warehouse), Zilwaukee; 989-755-8402, www. readinsaginaw.org

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FAMILY FUN ACTIVITY GUIDE August 2017 – March 2018 READ Association of Saginaw County: 13th Annual Books for Breakfast. March, 9 – 11:30 a.m. $3/free for 1 and younger. Allyou-can-eat pancake breakfast and literacy activities promote family reading time. Bring a canned good donation to benefit Hidden Harvest and the East Side Soup Kitchen for a chance to win additional books. Proceeds benefit the READ Association of Sagianw County. Hunger Solution Center, Saginaw; 989-755-8402, www.readinsaginaw.org Unlocking Hope. TBD. Free admission. Hair, massage, facial, and nail services provided for varying fees, silent auction, and drawings. Proceeds benefit Child & Family Services of Saginaw. Ana Luis Salon & Day Spa, Saginaw Township; 989-799-8900, www. analuisdayspa.com

Expos Saginaw County Fair. August 1 – 5. Admission. Youth exhibits, 4H exhibits, a midway, and grandstand events will “wow” crowds of all ages. Saginaw County Fairgrounds, Chesaning; 989.845.2143, www. saginawcountyfair.org Art Walk Central. August 3 – 31. Art Reach of Mid-Michigan invites everyone to a juried art competition that takes place throughout the city of Mount Pleasant. State and national artists display their work throughout the city, from paintings to photography. Community art events will also be scheduled. Mt Pleasant; 989-773-3689, www.artreachcenter.org Mid-Michigan Super Mom2Mom Sale. August 12, 9 a.m. – 1 p.m. $3. Shop gently used clothing, toys, baby gear, furniture, and maternity clothing at garage sale-style prices. Birch Run Expo Center, Birch Run; 989-6244665, www.birchrunexpos.com Midland County Fair. August 13 – 19. Admission. Entertainment, live shows, midway with games and prizes, and more await all ages. Midland County Fairgrounds, Midland; 989.845.2143, midlandfair.com Keepsake Collection Arts and Craft Show. August 18 – 20, 12 – 6 p.m. Friday, 10 a.m. – 6 p.m. Saturday, and 11 a.m. – 5 p.m. Sunday. Artists bring their creations to Frankenmuth for a juried show, and merchandise is available for purchase. Zehnder Park, Frankenmuth; 989-681-4023, www.frankenmuth.org

Zehnder Park, Frankenmuth; 989-681-4023, www.frankenmuth.org Super Duper Garage Sale. October 14, 9 a.m. – 3 p.m. $3. Over 150 garage sales are in one room. There are good finds for all ages. Birch Run Expo Center, Birch Run; 989-624-4665, www.birchrunexpos.com Wood Carving Show. October 22, 10 a.m. – 4 p.m. $3 adults/$5 couples/$6 families. See all the beautiful pieces of wooden art at the 30th annual exhibition, hosted by the Wood Carving Guild of Frankenmuth. Frankenmuth Chamber of Commerce and Convention & Visitors Bureau, Frankenmuth; 989-332-6385

24th Annual Midland Folk Music Festival. August 24 – 27, times vary. $5 members/$10 nonmembers. Workshops, dancing, and family-friendly folk music feature local, regional, and national artists. Camping available. Midland County Fairgrounds, Midland; 989-280-6910, www. folkmusicsociety.org

Mid-Michigan Super Mom2Mom Sale. November 18, 9 a.m. – 1 p.m. $3. Shop gently used clothing, toys, baby gear, furniture, and maternity clothing at garage sale-style prices. Birch Run Expo Center, Birch Run; 989-624-4665, www. birchrunexpos.com

Frankenmuth Auto Fest. September 8 – 10, times vary. Admission varies. Come to Frankenmuth and enjoy a weekend of entertainment and fun for all ages, plus over 2,500 classic cars, street rods, and muscle cars. Heritage Park, Frankenmuth; 989-6526964, www.frankenmuth.org

Nature Art Show & Sale. December 2, 8 a.m. – 5 p.m. Free. All ages welcome. Artists offer photography, wood carvings, copper sculpture, books, baskets, pottery, and more. Chippewa Nature Center, Midland; 989-631-0830, www. chippewanaturecenter.org

Hemlock Sawdust Days Festival. September 15 – 17. Free admission. Saturday parade at 10:30 a.m., followed by food, family-friendly activities, and more. Hemlock; 989-642-8242, www. hemlocksawdustdays.com

Festivals Art Reach of Mid-Michigan’s Art in Nature Festival of Banners. Through November. Free. A community art event. Large, colorful banners hang throughout the community of Mount Pleasant. Art Reach, downtown Mt Pleasant; 989-773-3689, www. artreachcenter.org NativeFest. August 1. Cradleboard workshop and more celebrate Native American culture. Ziibiwing Center of Anishinabe Culture and Lifeways, Mt Pleasant; 989-775-4750, www. sagchip.org/ziibiwing Saginaw Bay Waterfowl Festival. August 5 – 6, all day. An annual event features a duck and goose calling tournament, wildflife arts and craft show, and recreation expo, plus much more. There is fun for the entire family. Bay City State Recreation Area, Bay City; 989-684-3020, www.friendsofpark.org

Yoder’s Quilt Auction and Flea Market. September 1 – 2, 8 a.m. – 5 p.m. $1 per vehicle. Over 500 booths of crafts, including a quilt auction in a barn, are available. Clare; 989-386-2872

Bay County Fair & Youth Exposition. August 8 – 12, 12 – 10 p.m. Free admission; $5 parking. The 152nd Bay County Fair & Youth Exposition presents a fun-filled family outing with everything from livestock animals to midway rides and the grandstand. Bay County Fairgrounds, Bay City; 989-895-3744, www.baycountyfair.com

Keepsake Collection Arts and Crafts Show. September 8 – 10, 12 – 6 p.m. Friday, 10 a.m. – 6 p.m. Saturday, and 11 a.m. – 5 p.m. Sunday. Artists bring their creations to Frankenmuth for a juried show, and merchandise is available for purchase.

Summer Music Fest. August 10 – 12, 1 p.m. (gates open at 12:30 p.m.). $18 on 8/10/$20 on 8/11 – 12. Join in a celebration of Polish, German, and Slovenian musical styles. Heritage Park, Frankenmuth; 800-386-3378, www.frankenmuth.org

24 Great Lakes Bay Family | August 2017

Linwood Pickle Festival. August 19 – 21, Friday: 5 – 7 p.m., Saturday: 8 a.m. – 2 a.m., Sunday: 8 a.m. – 5 p.m. Free. Softball, cornhole, music, food, games, and pickles are available for all ages to enjoy. Linwood Bicentennial Park, Linwood; 989-307-8442, www.linwoodpicklefestival.org

River of Time: Living History Encampment. September 22 – 24. Free admission. Campsites feature Native Americans through WWII. Veterans Memorial Park, Bay City; 989-893-5733, www. riveroftime.org Zonta Applefest. September 23. Free admission and parking. Arts, crafts, games, cider, apples, and food vendors. Papa’s Pumpkin Patch and country Market, Mt Pleasant; 989-773-4345, www. papasfamilyfarm.com Japan Festival. Free. September TBD. Japanese cultural demonstrations, games, sushi sampling, and Japanese performing arts. Japanese Cultural Center, Saginaw; 989759-1648, www.japaneseculturalcenter.org Scarecrow Festival. October 14 – October 15, 10 a.m. – 9 p.m. (7p.m. Sunday). Free. The whole family will enjoy the straw bale maze, face painting, pumpkin catapult, pumpkin painting, trick-or-treating, and more. Frankenmuth River Place Shops, Frankenmuth; 989-652-6613 www.frankenmuthriverplace.com 32nd Annual Boar’s Head Christmas Festival. December TBD. A live nativity is acted out through song. Bethlehem Lutheran Church, Saginaw; 989-755-1144, www. bethlehemsaginaw.org Mount Pleasant Christmas Celebration. December TBD. Free admission. Pancake breakfast, carolers, hayrides, sing-alongs, parade, and Santa. Downtown Mt Pleasant; 989-779-5349, www.downtownmp.com


27th Annual Zehnder’s Snowfest. January TBD. Snow and ice sculptures, children’s area, fireworks, warming tent, food, competitions, and more. Downtown Frankenmuth; www.zehnders.com Ice Blast Festival. February TBD. Enjoy live music, entertainment, and kids’ activities at a Saginaw Spirit game. Dow Event Center, Saginaw; 989-497-7747, www.saginawspirit. com Michigan’s Free Fishing Weekend Winter Festival. February TBD. Free admission. Ice fishing derby, snow angel contest, wildlife workshops, and free fishing. Bay City State Park, Bay City; 989-684-3020, www. friendsofpark.org Made in Michigan Film Festival. February TBD. Fun-filled film festival with shorts, comedies, and full-length feature. Look for family night. Bronner Performing Arts Center, Frankenmuth; 810-881-1022, www. madeinmichiganfilmfestival.org Bay City St. Patrick’s Day Parade. March TBD. An annual celebration marches through Bay City. Bay City; 989-686-6834, www. stpatparadebaycity.org

Music, Theater & Film Dow Gardens Wednesday Lunchtime Concerts. Through August 23, 12 – 1:30 p.m. Admission $5. Listen to music during lunchtime in the dappled shade of the Birch Grove. Chairs, blankets, and picnics are welcome. Dow Gardens, Midland, 800-3624874, www.dowgardens.org PRIDE Friday Night Live Concerts. Through August 25. Free concert series; music changes weekly from blues to rock ‘n’ roll to oldies and more. Children’s games, food vendors, adult refreshments. Morley Plaza, Saginaw; 989-753-9168, www. prideinsaginaw.org Music from the Marsh. Through September, 7 p.m. A touring, cultural performing arts series on the outdoor lawn stage near the visitor center. Bay City State Recreation Area, Bay City; 989-667-0717, www. friendsofpark.org Young People’s Summer Series. August 2, 9, 16, and 23, 11:30 a.m. Free admission. A series of shows for the young and youngat-heart throughout the summer months. Rain site is the State Theatre. August 2: Jedi Interactive Training Show; August 9: Wixie & Harrington; August 16: Richard Paul, comedic ventriloquist; August 23: Cameron Zcara, comedic magician; August 30: Rick & Dayna’s Playground. Wenonah Park, Bay City; 989892-2660, www.statetheatrebaycity.com The Outsiders. August 3 – 5, 7:30 p.m. $14 adults/$10 students. A Greaser on the wrong side of life is caught up in battles between the rich kids and his tough, underprivileged

“greaser” family and friends. As these young people try to find themselves and each other, the sadness of sophistication begins to reach them, and their battles reach a resolution. Midland Center for the Arts, Midland; 989631-8250, www.mcfta.org

Wee Stroll. August 11, 9:30 a.m. Ages 6 months to 2 years; must be accompanied by adult. Introduce children to the natural world around them. Chippewa Nature Center, Midland; 989-631-0830, www. chippewanaturecenter.org

The Blarney Castle Christmas Show. November 25, 7:30 p.m. $20. The Kalamazoo band Blarney Castle plays traditional and folk music to celebrate the season. State Theatre, Bay City; 989-8922660, www.statetheatre.com

Families in Nature: Slithering Snakes. August 12, 1 – 2 p.m. All ages welcome; younger than 18 with adult. Head out on the trail sand look for snakes, learning what makes this animal so special. Chippewa Nature Center, Midland; 989-631-0830, www. chippewanaturecenter.org

Holiday Harmonies by the Sweet Adelines 2017. December 9, 3 p.m. $15. A nonprofit worldwide ladies barbershop organization performs four-part harmony music. State Theatre, Bay City; 989-892-2660, www. statetheatre.com Heron Valley. March 16, 7:30 p.m. $20. An energetic, young traditional band from Scotland has enthusiasm for the music they play: folk, county, and bluegrass. State Theatre, Bay City; 989-892-2660, www. statetheatre.com

Nature Summer Exploration Days. Through August 28, Monday – Saturday, 8 a.m. – 5 p.m., and Sunday and holidays, 12 – 5 p.m. Free. All ages welcome, younger than 18 with adult. Self-guided, indoor program; variety of hands-on exploration stations. Themes change bi-weekly. August 2 – 14: Amphibians; and August 16 – 28: Reptiles. Chippewa Nature Center, Midland; 989-631-0830, www. chippewanaturecenter.org Discovering the Homestead Farm. Every Sunday through September 4, 1 – 5 p.m. Free. All ages welcome, younger than 18 with adult. Step back in time and enjoy a familyfriendly afternoon at the Homestead Farm. Kids of all ages can help with chores, play traditional games, and visit the farm animals. Chippewa Nature Center, Midland; 989-6310830, www.chippewanaturecenter.org Wildlife Safari. August 2, 10 a.m. – 12 p.m., Free. Wildlife Safari brings animals of the wild to Freeland. Kids will have a chance to learn all about the animals and their habitats. Tittabawassee Township Park, Freeland; 989695-9512, www.facebook.com/freelandparks Bat Hike. August 3, 8:30 p.m. Ages 9 and older; younger than 18 with adult. Spend an evening with bats and listen to the sounds of bat echolocation. Bring a flashlight. Chippewa Nature Center, Midland; 989-631-0830, www. chippewanaturecenter.org Hanging out with Hummingbirds. August 5, 8:30 – 1:30 a.m. Ages 9 and older; younger than 18 with adult. Look for and learn about ruby-throated hummingbirds and their habitats in Michigan. Chippewa Nature Center, Midland; 989-631-0830, www. chippewanaturecenter.org

Nature Exploration. August 16, 10 a.m. – 12 p.m. Free. Kids can enjoy nature, up-close and personal, on this free nature exploration day. Tittabawassee Township Park, Freeland; 989-95-9512, www.facebook.com/ freelandparks Moth Night. August 24, 8:30 – 10 p.m. Ages 9 and older; younger than 18 with adult. Attract moths to learn about them. Wear dark clothing and bring a flashlight. Chippewa Nature Center, Midland; 989-631-0830, www. chippewanaturecenter.org Slithering Snakes at Discovery Preserve. August 31, 2 – 3 p.m. All ages welcome; younger than 18 with adult. Learn all about snakes and how beneficial they are to the ecosystem. Discovery Preserve, Bay City; 989-631-0830, www.chippewanaturecenter.org Nature at Night. October 27 – October 28, 6 – 8:30 p.m. Free. All ages welcome; younger than 18 with adult. Kids and parents will marvel at the natural sights that come alive in the darkness. Chippewa Nature Center, Midland; 989-631-0830, www. chippewanaturecenter.org Families in Nature: Fungi and Falling Leaves. October 14, 1 – 2 p.m. Free. All ages welcome; younger than 18 with adult. Explore the wonders of one of the most colorful times of the year, exploring and experimenting with colors in nature. Chippewa Nature Center, Midland; 989-631-0830, www. chippewanaturecenter.org Full Moon Stroll. November 4, 6:30 – 8 p.m. Free. Ages 9 and over; younger than 18 with adult. The Beaver Moon marks a time when traps were set before swamps froze to start a supply of winter furs. Look for signs of the beaver and other wildlife near our ponds and rivers. Wear dark clothing and bring a flashlight. Chippewa Nature Center, Midland; 989-631-0830, www. chippewanaturecenter.org Giving Thanks to Nature. November 24, 2 – 3:30 p.m. Free. All ages welcome; younger than 18 with adult. Start a new family tradition on Black Friday in the great outdoors. Take a leisurely stroll on the trails to appreciate nature. Chippewa Nature Center, Midland; 989-631-0830, www. chippewanaturecenter.org

August 2017 | Great Lakes Bay Family 25


FAMILY FUN ACTIVITY GUIDE August 2017 – March 2018 Michigan’s Great Pioneer Railway. November 29, 7 – 8 p.m. Free. Ages 12 and older; younger than 18 with adult. Join a ride of the rails back in time to explore the history of the Flint & Pere Marquette Railroad, which opened in 1867 in Midland. Chippewa Nature Center, Midland; 989-631-0830, www. chippewanaturecenter.org Full Moon Stroll. December 3, 7:30 – 9 p.m. Free. Ages 9 and older; younger than 18 with adult. Start a stroll after sunset. Bundle up if it’s cold as you look and listen for

nocturnal wildlife moving under the moonlight. Chippewa Nature Center, Midland; 989-6310830, www.chippewanaturecenter.org Maple Syrup Day. March TBD. Free. All ages welcome; younger than 18 with adult. Crafts, activities, and demonstrations at the Visitor Center, Homestead Farm, Log Schoolhouse, Sugarhouse, and Sugarbush. Catch a hay wagon ride, and see sap boiled into pure maple syrup. Chippewa Nature Center, Midland; 989-631-0830, www. chippewanaturecenter.org

It’s Coming . . . Child & Family Services provides the most complete counseling, employee wellness

Back-to-School is almost here. No need to fret.

and sexual assault recovery services in the Great Lakes Bay Region.

Online Research for School Projects Downloadable Materials Online Learning Tools Knowledgeable Staff Comfortable Study Spaces And Books . . . Lots and Lots of Books

Counseling Center - Employee Wellness Center - Sexual Assault Center

www.saginawlibrary.org

Saginaw Office●-2806 Davenport●-989.790.7500 - Freeland Office●-117 S. Main, Ste. 2●-989.573.8500

Saginaw Art Museum Family Saturday

Your home is your biggest investment. We’ll keep it your brightest.

free art activity!

•August 19, 2017- 1pm-3pm •September 16, 2017- 1pm-3pm •October 21, 2017- 1pm-3pm Join the Saginaw Art Museum for exhibition themed art activities! “Family Saturday” activities are free of charge to children ages 15 & under, and is free with regular admission for anyone over 15. Children must be accompanied by an adult and RSVP is encouraged. All art materials supplied by the museum. RSVP to Registrar, Lauren Grotkowski, at 989.754.2491!

Call us for qualified, courteous home electrical service. From small circuit repair to major lighting upgrades.

631.6252 R e s i d e n t i a l

s e R v i c e


cooking with kids

MEXICALI TACO PIZZA

Make your meal a fiesta.

BY ANDY BACIGALUPO PHOTO BY DOUG JULIAN

Dough

1¼ cups warm water 1¼-ounce package active dry yeast 1¼ teaspoons sugar 2 cups bread flour ½ cup wheat flour 1 teaspoon salt 2 tablespoons olive oil 1 tablespoon cornmeal

Directions

In a mixing bowl, add water, yeast, and sugar, and mix for 2 minutes. Let rest for 5 minutes after mixing. Slowly add flours, salt, and oil. Mix thoroughly. Let dough rest for a few minutes. Turn dough out onto a lightly floured table, and roll out into a round shape. Transfer the crust onto a lightly greased pizza pan, sprinkled with cornmeal.

Toppings

1 pound cooked ground beef 1¼ cups salsa ½ cup Monterey Jack cheese ½ cup cheddar cheese ¼ cup sliced black olives ¼ cup fresh cilantro, chopped 1 avocado, sliced ½ cup shredded romaine lettuce ¼ cup diced fresh tomatoes To taste: salt, pepper, cumin

To assemble

Preheat oven to 450°F. Spread pizza round with salsa. Spread evenly with ground beef, cheeses, olives, and salt, pepper, and cumin. Bake for 20 to 24 minutes until the crust is golden brown. When pizza is done, garnish with cilantro and avocado, spreading evenly. Add romaine lettuce and diced tomatoes in middle of pizza.

ANDY BACIGALUPO

is the culinary arts instructor at Midland’s Windover High School. He has been featured on The Dr. Oz Show and the Cooking Channel, and has worked with The White House and Michelle Obama on her Chefs Move! to Schools program.

August 2017 | Great Lakes Bay Family 27


ss e cc u S

! E R E H S N HAPPE Is there any greater investment?

Enroll now!

All Saints Central Catholic Elementary School (Preschool-5th) 989.892.4371 All Saints Central Catholic Middle School and High School (6th-12th) 989.892.2533

www.ascbaycity.org


TASTE RESTAURANTS, RECIPES & GREAT FOOD

Oh, Suzie Q

A local breakfast nook takes a step back in time. BY PATI LaLONDE | PHOTOS BY DOUG JULIAN

BBQ PULLED PORK

Susie Q’s 61 | Dining Out Guide 63 August 2017 | Great Lakes Bay 61


TASTE / RESTAURANT PROFILE TOP:

French dip

CENTER:

Corned beef hash

BOTTOM:

Reuben sandwich

S

uzanne Schneider and her staff pride themselves on serving up the freshest meals possible; that’s why meals shouldn’t be expected in minutes. Each and every item coming out of the kitchen is fresh and made to order. It was no easy feat turning the long-empty restaurant at the corner of Bay City’s 38th Street and Broadway back into a family-friendly restaurant. Purchased by Alwilda Jones, it was up to her daughter, Suzanne Schneider, to turn the former Paul’s and Gavord’s restaurants into an inviting atmosphere. Rolling up her sleeves, Schneider got down to business. It wasn’t long before a theme emerged—a red-and-white motif that harkens back to another time, to a place where saddle shoes and poodle skirts could be the outfit of the day, and Richie and the Fonz might be sitting at the next table. “Once we started putting the diner together with the red-and-white checkered floor, the Coke stuff, it just came together,” Schneider says. “Everything in here is Coke [themed]. We are across the street from Coke (Coca-Cola Bottling Co.), the valances are Coke, there is a Coke bench. It’s the red-and-white ’50s look.” It wasn’t just a cosmetics redo. Schneider, who has been in the restaurant business for 20 years, had the kitchen and bathrooms redone, and added a smoker and barbecue pit out back. Once completed, Schneider knew she needed a name to match. It was Schneider’s niece, Danielle Reno, who came up with the name, Suzie Q’s. Schneider added “Breakfast Nook.” The nook opened last March. Schneider, waitress Elizabeth Jajo, and chef Erick Hanoff serve breakfast, lunch, and dinner seven days a week. Take, for example, the corned beef and hash for $7.49.* The corned beef is flavored with a special seasoning, and before it is smoked on site, the hash browns are made from freshly cut French fries, sliced into bite-sized pieces. “We’ve been told it’s the best in town by quite a few people,” Jajo says. “Not many people do homemade corned beef anymore.” Plus, she says, that same corned beef makes one fine Reuben sandwich. Another mouth-waterer is the slow-cooked prime rib French dip sandwich. The meat is smoked with its own seasoning blend to medium rare, covered in mozzarella cheese, and served on Barney’s Bakery hoagie buns with a side of house-made au jus for $10. Schneider also suggests steak and eggs any time of the day. The sixounce sirloin comes with two eggs, hash browns or American fries, and choice of toast for $8.99. Fish fries—featuring perch, cod, and walleye—are served on Fridays, and barbecue pulled pork, ribs, and chicken are available always. Suzie Q’s Breakfast Nook, 2410 38th St (corner of Broadway), Bay City, 989402-1792. Hours: 8 a.m. - 8 p.m. on weekdays, and 8 a.m. - 9 p.m. on weekends. *Prices are subject to change.

62 Great Lakes Bay | August 2017


TASTE / DINING OUT

Dining Out Asian Asian Noodle: 200 Center Ave, Bay City, 989-316-2380. Filipino and Far East fare. Noodle soup, lumpia spring rolls, sautéed noodles, and pan-fried fish. Basil Thai Bistro: 225 W Wackerly St, Midland, 989-486-9390. Curry, noodles, fried rice, stir-fry dishes, and fresh fruit tapioca drinks.  Blossoms Asian Bistro: 4124 Wilder Rd, Bay City, 989-778-1155. Asian fusion flavors, made-to-order dishes, and fresh ingredients. Malaysian fried noodles, sushi, coconut shrimp tacos, and hibachi meals. Chan’s Garden: 215 Third St, Bay City, 989-892-8861. Variety of Asian and Chinese dishes. Weekly specials. Takeout available.  Chan’s Garden Restaurant: 1951 N Center Rd, Saginaw Township, 989790-9188. Affordable Chinese fare. Favorites include orange chicken, Mongolian beef, rice noodles, and egg rolls. Takeout and delivery available. Forbidden City Chinese Restaurant: 4024 Bay Rd, Saginaw Township, 989-792-0303. Authentic cuisine, including Forbidden City Chicken and moo shu pork. Familysized dinners and takeout available.  Fuji Sushi: 1512 Joe Mann Blvd Midland, 989-839-6868. Noodles, rolls and sushi, sashimi, and hibachi entrées. Fusion 1 Café: 813 Saginaw St, Bay City, 989-891-0551. Fresh, contemporary international cuisine. Thursday night is Sushi Extravaganza. Demonstrations and cooking classes offered.  Genji Japanese Steakhouse & Sushi Bar: Two locations: 2929 S Saginaw Rd, Midland, 989-4956000, and 3870 Bay Rd, Saginaw Township, 989-497-9900. Chefs prepare meals directly in front of patrons for tables of up to eight. Large selection of wines and imported beers.

Ghengis Khan Mongolian BBQ: 5010 Bay City Rd, Midland, 989-4962288. Buffet-style dining and createyour-own stir-fry using many types of meats, vegetables, and sauces. Full bar. Golden Buffet: 979 S Saginaw Rd (in Eastlawn Food Court), Midland, 989633-9888. Lunch and dinner buffets with meat and seafood dishes, soups, and desserts. Hello Sushi: 2575 Tittabawassee Rd, Saginaw Township, 989-7900022. Sushi, sashimi, rolls, traditional bento box meals, noodle dishes, and Japanese specialties. Daily specials and carryout. Hokkaido Japanese Steak & Sushi: 1818 Lawndale Rd, Saginaw Township, 989-791-1688. Open for lunch and dinner. Hibachi, sushi and sashimi, noodles and fried rice, and bento options from the wok. Mochi and tempura ice cream, cheesecake, and banana desserts. Hunan Restaurant: 3109 Bay Plaza Dr, Saginaw Township, 989-792-0303. Favorites include general chicken, Mongolian beef, and crabmeat with corn soup. Takeout available.  Jade Garden: 3211 Bay Rd, Saginaw Township, 989-793-6997. Made-toorder Chinese dishes, appetizers, and soups, including the popular egg drop. The Mandarin House Chinese Restaurant: 3000 Center Ave, Essexville, 989-893-9499. Full menu of chicken, beef, pork, vegetarian, and seafood cuisine, soups, appetizers, and hot buffet.  Maru Sushi Midland: 715 E Main St, Midland, 989-633-0101. Japanese cuisine. Lunch, dinner, coffee and drinks. Sushi bar and hibachi grill, daily specials, happy hour from 2:30 – 5:30 p.m., Monday – Saturday. Midori Sushi and Martini Lounge: 105 E Broadway, Mt Pleasant, 989775-7723. High-end martinis, sushi, and Asian-fusion fare.  Panda House Chinese Restaurant: 1010 N Niagara St, Saginaw, 989-

These listings have no relationship to advertising in Great Lakes Bay magazine.

755-5394. Fine dining. Takeout available. Specialty entrées include string bean chicken. Live piano music Friday and Saturday evenings.

with Cremosi sauce, a white wine, lemon-butter crème sauce, pizza, and fresh ingredients. Full bar, outside deck, and live music.

Pasong’s Cafe: 114 N Michigan Ave, Saginaw, 989-791-5008. Fresh, madeto-order authentic cuisine without MSG. Famous Chinese chicken salad and a variety of chicken, beef, shrimp, and vegetarian entrées.

G’s Pizzeria: 1005 Saginaw St, Bay City, 989-891-9400, and 3823 Bay Rd, Saginaw Township, 989-4014774. Dine in, takeout, delivery, and catering. Soups, salads, sandwiches, burgers, and popular chicken fajita pizza.

Pi’s Asian Express: 5015 Eastman Ave, Midland, 989-832-8000. Chinese, Korean, Thai, Japanese, and Vietnamese appetizers and entrées. Carryout. Pi’s Chinese Restaurant: 1815 S Saginaw Rd, Midland, 989-832-5848. Affordable authentic fare like the favorite Hunan sesame chicken. Daily lunch and dinner buffet. Sushi ‘N’: 7395 Gratiot Rd, Thomas Township, 989-401-7557. Sushi, sashimi, cooked and vegetarian selections, and rolls, including the Golden California.

Indian Kabob N Curry House: 4070 Bay Rd, Saginaw Township, 989-4974400. Homemade Indian cuisine includes vegetable curry, samosa, paneer, and spicy favorites. Shahi Indian Cuisine: 4624 State St, Saginaw Township, 989-4018310. Fresh, authentic Indian cuisine. Lamb, chicken, and goat dishes. 

Italian B&C Pizza: Three locations: 476 N Tuscola Rd, Bay City, 989-892-1519; 4787 Fashion Square Mall, Saginaw Township, 989-791-2777; and 608 State St, Bay City, 989-686-4600. Chicago-style pizzas cut into squares. Brooklyn Boyz Pizzeria & Italian Eatery: 612 E Midland St, Bay City, 989-894-5560. New York-style pizzeria. Lunch and dinner.  Café Cremosi: 804 E Midland St, Bay City, 989-316-9018. Italian cuisine at reasonable prices. Featuring pasta

Grampa Tony’s: Two locations: 1108 Columbus Ave, Bay City, 989-893-4795, and 4330 E Wilder Rd, Bay City, 989-684-7314. Family dining. Homemade pizza, steak sandwiches, and baked pasta specialties. Late-night dining, takeout, and spirits. Isabella’s at Soaring Eagle Casino & Resort: 6800 Soaring Eagle Blvd, Mt Pleasant, 989-775-5399. Breakfast, lunch, and dinner, including appetizers, soups, salads, entrées, and desserts. Create your own pasta masterpiece. MaMa Mia’s Pizzeria: 16535 Gratiot Rd, Hemlock, 989-642-6420. Pizzas topped with special four-cheese blend and baked in a brick oven.  Nino’s Family Restaurant: 1705 Columbus Ave, Bay City, 989-8930691. Authentic Italian fare, including custom pastas, pizzas, and tiramisu. Strolling musicians on the weekend. Takeout, delivery, catering, and full bar. Nino’s Neighbor: 1623 Columbus Ave, Bay City, 989-460-2792. Open during warm weather months. Healthy Italian cuisine; gluten-free and vegan options. Grilled margherita pizza, antipasto salad, garlic knots, tomato bisque, and pesto-topped salmon. Outdoor seating available. Pizza Dude: 4328 N Saginaw Rd, Midland, 989-486-9670. Italian eatery. Old-style, brick oven pizza, calzones, and bread rings stuffed with pasta or meatballs.  Pizza Sam’s: 102 W Main St, Midland, 989-631-1934. Soups, sandwiches, gyros, Coney Island hot dogs, specialty pizzas, nachos, and desserts. Takeout available.

August 2017 | Great Lakes Bay 63


TASTE / DINING OUT Spencer’s Route 46: 5530 Gratiot Rd, Saginaw Township, 989793-4500. Escargot, portobella mushrooms, calamari, seafood ravioli, poached salmon, and panfried walleye. Extensive wine list. Live jazz music. Villa D’Alessandro: 801 E Wackerly St, Midland, 989-631-3821. Fare prepared from family recipes. Extensive list of wines to pair with entrées. Authentic desserts. Outdoor dining in summer.

Mediterranean Yasmeen’s Mediterranean Foods: 3545 Bay Rd, Saginaw Township, 989-791-3082. Specialty store offers baklava, couscous, beans, spices, olives, olive oil, cheeses, and vegetarian foods. Tabouli, hummus, baba ghanoush, meat pies, and grape leaves available.

Mexican Coco Loco Mexican Grill & Bar: Two locations: 3593 Center Ave, Essexville, 989-891-9917, and 4002 Bay Rd, Saginaw Township, 989-7911111. Authentic lunch and dinner entrées and combinations. Fresh chips and salsa. Cuatro Amigos: 310 E Midland St, Bay City, 989-686-8630. Original recipe combination dinners and lunch specials. El Paso Grill: 4880 Gratiot Rd, Saginaw Township, 989-401-6599. Puffy tacos and shredded beef burrito with potatoes are favorites. Primarily takeout. El Patron: 1900 S Saginaw Rd, Midland, 989-633-9800. Authentic Mexican cuisine, including a buffet. Entre Amigos: 2600 N Saginaw Rd, Midland, 989-832-6348. Authentic choices include lunch specialties, combination dinners, fajitas, vegetarian combinations, steak, chicken, and desserts.      Los Cabos: 7467 Gratiot Rd, Thomas Township, 989-781-2255. Mexican staples, along with a full American and Mexican breakfast menu. Weekend breakfast buffet. Daily lunch buffet. Los Cuatro Amigos: 4570 Bay Rd, Saginaw Township, 989-799-1700. Original recipe combination dinners and lunch specials.

64 Great Lakes Bay | August 2017

Maria’s Mexican Restaurant: 6090 State St, Saginaw Township, 989-7996300. Lunch and dinner. Quesadillas, tacos, enchiladas, tostadas, burritos, homemade tamales, chimichangas, and taco salad. Breakfast served. Tex-Mex Grille: 4101 Wilder Rd (in the Bay City Mall Food Court), Bay City, 989-686-8396. Homemade “Tex-Mex” food, enchiladas, tacos, tostadas, burritos, rice, beans, and tamales. Catering available.

Breakfast & Lunch Mornin’ at Maggie’s Omelette Shoppe: 819 Saginaw St, Bay City, 989-892-3142. Breakfast and lunch creations, including frittatas, French toast, waffles, egg-white omelets, homemade soups, sandwiches, and vegetarian specials.  Rudy’s Red Lion Diner: 201 Center Ave, Bay City, 989-893-2266. Omelets, burgers, comfort food, and milkshakes. Stacker Grill: 4312 N Saginaw Rd, Midland, 989-631-8646. Breakfast and lunch fare, including pancakes, omelets, salads, and steak sandwiches.

Coffee Houses Bancroft Coffee & Tea Café: 101 S Washington Ave, Saginaw, 989-7760011. Coffee and tea house with a historical 1920s ambiance. Bancroft Blend coffee, espresso, steamers, and chai. Breakfast and lunch. Brewtopia: 810 Saginaw St, Bay City, 989-893-0872. Fresh coffees, teas, lattes, cappuccinos, frappes, smoothies, muffins, cookies, and cinnamon rolls. Light lunch menu. Wi-Fi. Entertainment Thursday through Saturday.  Coffee Chaos: 6201 Jefferson Ave, Midland, 989-835-6401. Hot, chilled over ice, and frozen coffee drinks. Freshly baked, preservative-free muffins and cookies. Drive-up, Wi-Fi, and TVs. Common Grind: 2903 Pierce Rd, Ste 110, Kochville Township. Specialty coffee shop with organic espresso beans roasted fresh daily. Bagel sandwiches, fresh-squeezed juice, and smoothies.  Dawn of a New Day Coffeehouse & Café: 210 S Washington Ave,

Saginaw, 989-284-3549. Fair trade organic coffee, specialty drinks, soups, and sandwiches. Music Friday nights. Wi-Fi. Espresso Express Coffee House: 916 N Water St, Bay City, 989-8938898. Seattle-style brewed espresso beverages at their finest. Hot and cool drinks. Espresso Milano: 137 Ashman St, Midland, 989-832-3222. Coffees, smoothies, espresso, tea, muffins, cookies, scones, and peanut butter bars. Locals love the mudslide, a frozen coffee milkshake. Wi-Fi.  The Fix: 5 E Main St, Bay City, 989439-1250. Specializing in craft coffee and vegan options. Doughnuts, pastries, and organic fair trade coffee and tea sourced independently out of Chicago. Frankenmuth Kaffee Haus: 500 S Main St, Frankenmuth, 989-6525252. Gourmet coffee, teas, espresso treats, pastries, sandwiches, and wraps. Flavor-of-the-month coffee.   Grounds for a Better World: 4951 Eastman Rd, Midland, 989839-1024, and 2020 Dow Center (Dow employees only), 1116 S Saginaw Rd, Midland, 989-633-3300. Espresso-based and gourmet-brewed coffees, teas, frappes, smoothies, chocolates, and homemade baked goods. Harless & Hugh Coffee: 1003 Washington Ave, Bay City, 989-3274007. Specialty coffees made to order, tea made using authentic teasteeping methods, and mochas. The Harvest Coffeehouse & Beanery: 626 S Main St, Frankenmuth, 989-652-2203. Freshroasted flavored blends and origin coffees, specialty drinks, cakes, pies, and cheesecake. Books, live music, local art, and Wi-Fi.

Dirty Chai, coffee-caramel crème brûlée, Cheeky Cheesecake, or French press and Pellegrino for Two. Morning Emporium Coffee House: 2125 N Center, Saginaw Township, 989-790-5888. More than 40 Torani flavors, espresso, cappuccino, latte, hot/cold chai tea, and smoothies. Bulk coffees for purchase. The Mug@Wirt: 500 Center Ave (Alice & Jack Wirt Public Library), Bay City, 989-460-3596. Flavored coffees and teas, homemade treats, and lunch menu. Red Eye Caffé: 205 N Hamilton St, Saginaw, 989-793-1411. Freshly brewed coffees, white chocolate mochas, cookies, and muffins. Livemusic entertainment, local poetry, and artwork.

Casual Dining 3rd & Johnson Market & Eatery: 1023 N Johnson St, Bay City, 989971-1456. Breakfast, lunch, dinner, and take ’n’ bake meals. Locallysourced ingredients and seasonal, weekly menus. Salads, sandwiches, handmade pasta, and chicken and biscuits. American Kitchen Restaurant: 207 Center Ave, Bay City, 989-402-1366. Meatloaf, chicken and dumplings, and gourmet grilled cheese sandwiches. Burgers, brunch, and bloody mary bar.  Anschutz Café: 212 E Saginaw St, Breckenridge, 989-842-9924. Pancakes, prime rib, wet burritos, nachos, and grilled beef medallions (weekend special). Annabelle’s Own: 579 E Isabella Rd, Midland, 989-835-5344. Comfort food with a few twists. Diverse menu, homemade soups, daily specials, award-winning Five Cheese Macaroni and Cheese.

Journeys Coffee House: Two locations: 201 E Main St, Midland, 989-486-8585, and 1550 S Poseyville Rd (Messiah Lutheran Church), Midland, 989-835-7143. Coffee, smoothies, baked goods, and gelato.

Bare Bones BarBQ & Pizza: 807 Columbus Ave, Bay City, 989-892-6830. Charcoal-grilled barbecue. Lunch, dinner, and family meals. Takeout, delivery, and catering available.

Kaya Coffee House: 1029 S University Ave, Mt Pleasant, 989772-9016. Fair trade, organic coffee, tea, and espresso drinks, and freshly made sandwiches, salads, soups, and Thai-style red curry.

Bavarian Inn: 713 S Main St, Frankenmuth, 800-228-2742. The No. 1 choice of most visitors remains the all-you-can-eat chicken dinners. German specialties and other entrées available.

Live Oak Coffeehouse: 711 Ashman St, Midland, 989-423-1800. Handcrafted coffee drinks and baked goods, live entertainment. Try the

Bergers Family Restaurant: 6387 Westside Saginaw Rd, Bay City, 989686-0224. Family owned since 1928. Serves specialty of fresh seafood, hot


German potato salad, burgers, and fruit and cream pies. Big Drew’s Family Grill: 265 W Saginaw St, Hemlock, 989-301-0255. Mexican meals, pizza, burgers, wings, steak sandwiches, Coney dogs, and breakfast served anytime.  Big John Steak & Onion: 3300 Holland Ave, Saginaw, 989-7545012. Serving the original 100 percent rib-eye steak sandwich since 1972. Subs, salads, and Big John “Red Sauce.” The Bringer Inn: 516 W Genesee Ave, Saginaw, 989-753-1462. Homemade breakfast, lunch, and dinner. Daily specials include barbecue chicken and freshly roasted turkey dinners. Create your own omelets. The Bus Stop Bar and Grille: 10014 Dixie Hwy, Birch Run, 989-2446350. Pub-style menu and fish fry Friday nights with cod, shrimp, and lake perch. Live entertainment on Saturday nights.  Café American Restaurant/Coffee Bar: 1525 Washington St, Midland, 989-633-9665. (A second location inside the Midland Mall Food Court.) Gourmet salads, burgers, soups, and sandwiches.  Café Zinc: 111 W Main St, Midland (inside The H Hotel), 989-839-0500. French bistro offers breakfast, lunch, and dinner. European-style breads and tartlets, tortes, and dessert specialties. Terrace dining in summer.  Camille’s on the River: 506 W Broadway St, Mt Pleasant, 989-7730259. Comfort food classics with an upscale twist that use regional and seasonal flavors. Martini lounge. Castaways: 3940 Boy Scout Rd, Bay City, 989-686-3558. Dock your boat on the Kawkawlin River and enjoy food and spirits inside or dockside. Lunch and dinner.  Chuck’s Market Restaurant: 108 S Adams St, Bay City, 989-893-0541. Breakfast, lunch, and dinner; daily specials. Country breakfast, quarterpound cheeseburger, nachos, and hot turkey sandwich. Court Street Grill: 100 S Michigan Ave, Saginaw, 989-401-4004. Serves breakfast, lunch, and dinner. Cousins Take Out and Catering: 1202 N Washington Ave, Saginaw. Catfish, rib tips, African whiting box dinners, Slaw Daddy and Grand Daddy slaw boxes, and hush puppies.

Crêpes et Amis (Crêpes and Friends): 130 Townsend St, Midland, 989-486-3120. Urban café, locally roasted coffee, savory and sweet crêpes: Good Morning Paris (ham and brown sugar); Strawberry Cheesecrêpe. daVinci’s Restaurant: 524 N Main St, Frankenmuth, 989-652-2629. Italian and American fare. Daily specials. Strombolis, pasta dishes, Chicagostyle deep-dish pizza, salads, and sandwiches.  The Dogg Houze: 2903 Pierce Rd, Kochville Township, 989-401-7477. Coney dogs, subs, wraps, and stuffed pitas called Hanis. Specials include the Saginaw Coney with marinara and meat, and the Flintstone Coney with nacho meat, mustard, and onion. Duece’s Char House: 432 Tuscola Rd, Bay City, 989-893-5881. Breakfast, lunch, and dinner. Salad bar with famous cheese spread and liver pâté. Garden Restaurant in the Midland Resort and Convention Center: 1500 W Wackerly St, Midland, 989698-0662. Breakfast, lunch, and dinner menus. Sunday brunch.  Gimmicks Grill & Bar: 5021 Bay City Rd, Midland, 989-496-3940. Classic American cuisine. Full bar, extensive beer selection, wine, and martinis. Enjoy a game of bowling or miniature golf. Green Gourmet Café: 1908 S Saginaw, Ste E, Midland, 989-4868433. Lunch, dinner. Seasonal menu of soups, salads, sandwiches, smoothie and grain bowls. Fresh, local ingredients. Vegetarian, vegan, gluten-free options. Homemade bread. GO! Salads: 139 Ashman St, Midland, 989-633-9055. Soup and build-your-own salad bar restaurant with non-GMO ingredients; iced tea bar with five fresh-brewed selections. Huron Fish Co: 505 Gratiot Ave, Saginaw, 989-792-2224. Fish and seafood takeout dinners, including famous whitefish.  Jack’s Deli & Stretch’s Curve: 618 S Henry, Bay City, 989-893-6931. Home of the health nut salad with raspberry yogurt dressing. Soups, sandwiches, and burgers. Kathleen’s: 4519 N River Rd (at Apple Mountain), Freeland, 989781-6789. Salads, sandwiches, and

house favorites like Cajun chicken, penne, and fish and chips. Krzysiak’s House Restaurant: 1605 Michigan Ave, Bay City, 989894-5531. Authentic Polish food in a fun, ethnic atmosphere. Lunch and dinner buffets. Takeout menu. La Crêpe du Jour: 925 S Main St (inside The River Place), Frankenmuth, 989-652-2925. Twenty-five varieties of fresh sweet and savory crepes.  Legends Diner: 6800 Soaring Eagle Blvd, Mt Pleasant, 888-7324537. Breakfast, lunch, and dinner. Burgers, dogs, sandwiches, malts, floats, and banana splits.  Levi’s Food and Spirits: 5800 Brockway, Saginaw Township, 989-793-6670. Grandma Rita’s chili, Reuben sandwiches, and fish dinners. Breakfast served all day. Linwood Corner Restaurant: 44 N Huron Rd, Linwood, 989-697-5141. Daily specials include prime rib, cod, and chicken livers.    Little Bambinos: 120 W Saginaw St, Merrill, 989-643-5414. Homecooked American and Italian fare for breakfast, lunch, and dinner.  Lumber Barons: 804 E Midland St, Bay City, 989-891-0100. Pub plates, salads, pizza, and light plates. Dinner features fish and chips, filet mignon, New York strip, sirloin, and pretzel-crusted pork tenderloin. Children’s menu.  The Malt Shop: 228 W Broad St, Chesaning, 989-845-6696. Broasted chicken dinners, Coney dogs, burgers, malts, and ice cream. The Maple Grille: 13105 Gratiot Rd, Hemlock, 989-233-2895. Farmto-table restaurant serves produce, meats, and fish from local sources. The Mean Rooster Diner: 1411 S Wenona St (in Meats & Mooore), Bay City, 989-893-5413. Homemade soups, sandwiches, pasta, gourmet pizzas, burgers, and hot dogs.  Memory Lane Café: 1122 Tittabawassee Rd (inside Antique Warehouse), Kochville Township, 989-755-4343. Sandwiches, salads, soups, and desserts.  Mountain Town Station: 506 W Broadway St, Mt Pleasant, 866-3815022. Steakhouse, brewery, and wine shop. Fine micro-brews and a selection of over 300 wines. Wi-Fi. 

Mussel Beach: 3540 State Park Dr, Bay City, 989-686-0575. Breakfast, lunch, and dinner, including original stuffed burgers. Ice cream and desserts. Takeout available. Nbakade Family Restaurant: 5665 E Pickard Rd (inside Soaring Eagle Waterpark & Hotel), 989-817-4806. Quiche, salads, sandwiches, burgers, mahi mahi, and New York strip. Nikki’s: 104 W Johnson St, Zilwaukee, 989-754-3737. Specializes in barbecued pulled pork and deli sandwiches. Old Town Drive-In: 807 S Granger (at Gratiot), Saginaw, 989-799-4162. Burgers, Coney dogs, fries, shakes, and root beer. Eat in your car or on ’50s-style diner stools. Takeout and catering. Oscar & Joey’s Road House: 12027 Dixie Hwy, Birch Run, 989-624-9349. Prime rib, char-grilled rib-eyes, burgers, and pan-seared walleye New Orleans. Wild game available upon request. Lunch specials.  Perry’s Schuch Hotel & Restaurant: 301 N Hamilton St, Saginaw, 989-799-2539. Veal tortellini, prime rib, and all-you-caneat fish on Fridays. The Pit at BARTS: 804 E Midland St, Bay City, 989-891-0100. Open pit Southern-style barbecue. Quarry Grill at Bucks Run: 1559 S Chippewa Rd, Mt Pleasant, 989-7799973. Champagne chicken, steak, gourmet burgers, and crowd favorite, venison chili. All-you-can-eat lake perch (Thursdays). Riverside Family Restaurant: 8295 Midland Rd, Freeland, 989-695-5563. Homemade entrées, sandwiches, soups, desserts, and award-winning pies, including coconut cream. Shirlene’s Cuisine: 1716 Wackerly St, Midland, 989-631-8750. Fifty-plus item soup and salad bar includes peas & peanuts, creamy cucumber salad, Waldorf salad, Mandarin salad, homemade chutney, and daily soups. Showboat Restaurant: 242 W Broad St, Chesaning, 989-845-2830. Breakfast, lunch, and dinner. Soups, sandwiches, fresh lake perch, liver and onions, signature prime rib, and orange ginger chicken. Full bar. Siniikaung Steak & Chop House: 6800 Soaring Eagle Blvd, Mt Pleasant, 989-775-5106. Aged prime beef, chops, and seafood entrées. 

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TASTE / DINING OUT Slo’ Bones BBQ Smokehaus: 175 E Jefferson St, Frankenmuth, 989-262-8681. Ribs, wings, and slider sandwiches. Southern flavors with local touches. Live bands on weekends. State Street: 715 E Main St, Midland, 989-837-6174. Coffee bar and restaurant with sophisticated comfort food, craft beer, and wine. Free Wi-Fi. Stock Pot Diner and Catering: 1007 Washington Ave, Bay City, 989-8939332. Breakfast menu, Greek fare, and turkey jerky sandwich. SugarHigh Café: 525 S Main St, Frankenmuth, 989-502-5009. Bubble teas, paninis, grilled cheese, Kern’s brats, hot dogs, ice cream, sorbet, and SugarHigh Bakery gourmet cupcakes. Sullivan’s Black Forest Brew Haus & Grill: 281 Heinlein, Frankenmuth, 800-890-6877. Fish and chips, steaks, seafood, burgers, and deepdish pizza. One dozen handcrafted beers. Live entertainment Friday and Saturday evenings. Sure Shot BBQ: 1135 S Mission St, Mt Pleasant, 989-400-4488. Pulled-pork nachos and “gut buster” sandwich. T. Dub’s: 565 S Main St, Frankenmuth, 989-652-3809, Upscale pizzas use infused dough and hand-cut vegetables. Specialty sandwiches. Unusual combinations make up 11 variations of omelets. Tony’s Restaurant: 1029 Gratiot Rd, Saginaw, 989-792-1113; 112 S Saginaw, St Charles, 989-865-6950; 2612 State St, Saginaw, 989-7931801; 2525 E Genesee, Saginaw, 989-753-4321; 7340 Gratiot Rd, Shields, 989-781-2111; 2111 S Saginaw, Midland, 989-839-8560; 234 N Center Rd, Saginaw Township, 989-793-1631; 4880 Fashion Square Blvd, Saginaw Township, 989-2498669. Steak sandwiches loaded with your favorite toppings and boat-sized banana splits.  Tony’s Take-Out: 2331 S Michigan, Saginaw, 989-793-6250. Chicken strip baskets, pizza, steak sandwiches, catfish, smelt, perch, and cod fish dinners, and soups to go.  Turkey Roost: 2273 S Huron Rd, Kawkawlin, 989-684-5200. Homemade “Thanksgiving every day” since 1955, complete with stuffing, mashed potatoes, and gravy.

66 Great Lakes Bay | August 2017

Breakfast options, lunch and dinner turkey plates, hot turkey sandwiches, pie by the slice, and other desserts. Uptown Grille: 3 E Main St, Bay City, 989-439-1557. Upscale bistro serving breakfast and lunch. Sweet potato pancakes, banana bread French toast, sandwiches, burgers, salads, and soups. Wise Guys: 405 E Main St, Midland, 989-486-9588. Soups, sandwiches, burgers, fish tacos, and gluten-free fare. Z-Chef’s Café: 730 S Main St (inside Zehnder’s Restaurant), Frankenmuth, 800-863-7999. Gourmet pastas, rotisserie chicken, meat-carving station, hand-tossed pizzas, and salads.  Zef’s Coney Island: 201 Third St, Bay City, 989-402-1220. Specializing in authentic Coney Island-style hot dogs. Breakfast, lunch, and dinner daily. Zehnder’s: 730 S Main St, Frankenmuth, 800-863-7999. Worldwide attraction, 10-dining room German restaurant serves famous all-you-can-eat family-style chicken dinners, along with seafood, steaks, baked goods, and European desserts. 

Deli Artigiano: 815 Saginaw St, Bay City, 989-391-4200. Locally owned artisan cheese shop. Small-batch, handmade, and imported cheeses. Gourmet jellies, dried fruits, and cured meats. Amazing Deli: 134 E Main St, Midland, Midland, 989-837-7278. Sandwiches, subs, salads, and soups await you at a place true to its name. Carryout and delivery available. The Bagel Café and Deli: 7395 Gratiot Rd, Thomas Township, 989401-1108. Bagels, pastries, breakfast sandwiches, salads, and lunch classics. Cortland Cooler Café: 5395 Midland Rd (located at Bayne’s Apple Valley Farm), Freeland, 989-695-9139. Wraps, sandwiches, chili in a bread bowl, and signature cider slushes. August through January. Crossroads Deli: 2205 Jefferson Ave (inside the Midland Community Center), Midland, 989-832-8580.

Homemade gourmet sandwiches, soups, salads, smoothies, and desserts. Delivery, carry out, curbside pick-up, and catering. Fralia’s: 422 Hancock St, Saginaw, 989-799-0111. Soups, salads, sandwiches, and baked goods using all-natural ingredients. Specialties include gourmet flank steak sandwich, grilled goat cheese salad, and carrot cake. Local delivery. Intermission Deli: 111 3rd St, Bay City, 989-893-5010. Sandwiches and subs. Freshly made, homemade soups available daily and may be served in a warm bread bowl. Intermission Deli: 2128 Bay St, Saginaw, 989-790-6777. Subs, sandwiches, and soups with fresh ingredients. Favorites include the Intermission Delight (#18) and Veggie Supreme (#24). Pannini’s Deli: 3585 Bay Rd, 989-7996038, Saginaw (located inside Discount Health Foods). Sandwiches, smoothies, and baked goods. Gluten-free foods and soy milk always available.  Souper Café: Two locations: 4093 N Euclid, Bay City, 989-671-1900; 5789 State St, Saginaw Township, 989791-6600. Chicken noodle, broccoli cheddar, chili, and potato and bacon chowder soups. Salads and sandwiches. Third Street Deli and Coffee House: 305 S Mable (M-13), Pinconning, 989-879-1236. Gourmet sandwiches, salads, soups, coffees, and hot and cold specialty beverages. Wine and beer available. Wanigan Eatery: 1905 S Wenona St, Bay City, 989-892-8303. Housed in a historic Bay City building and decorated with lumbering artifacts and photos. Sandwiches, salads, homemade soups, and sweet treats. Water Front Market: 925 N Water St, Bay City, 989-891-1330. Sandwiches made from fresh-baked artisan breads and with prime Dietz & Watson deli meats. Soups and Coney dogs. River view. 

Desserts

and 706 E Midland St, Bay City, 989892-3932. Old police departmentthemed bakery. Cake and glazed doughnuts, long johns, and specialties like the Bacon Squealer and Felony Fritter. The Gourmet Cupcake Shoppe: 915 Washington Ave, Bay City, 989-4021700; 1908 S Saginaw Rd, Midland, 989-631-4103; 4370 Bay Rd, Saginaw Township, 989-401-4012. Cupcakes made with natural ingredients; more than 15 flavors daily. Mary’s Creative Cakery: 7494 Gratiot Rd, Shields, 989-781-7747. Design the perfect cake for your occasion. Decorated cookies and a full line of cake and candy-making supplies. Pâtisserie: 2715 Bay Rd, Saginaw, 989-921-2253. European-style desserts, fresh-baked breakfast pastries, 18 specialty cakes, nine varieties of cheesecake, custombaked celebration cakes, gourmet coffee, dips, and spreads. Petit 4 Pastry: 1600 Woodside Ave, Essexville, 989-891-0735. Cookies, doughnuts, breads, tortes, tarts, and cheesecakes. Special order cakes and catering available. SugarHigh Bakery: 925 S Main St, Ste G1, Frankenmuth, 989-652-2400. Forty flavors of gourmet cupcakes, Italian gelato, cookies, cake pops, and specialty cakes. SugarRush Candy Shop: 925 S Main St, Ste G3, Frankenmuth, 989652-2578. Forty flavors of Ashby’s Michigan-made ice cream, candied almonds, fudge, and candies. St. Laurent Bros: 1101 N Water St, Bay City, 989-893-7522. One-hundred percent natural peanut butter, handdipped chocolates, candies, dried fruits, and chocolates. Sweet Boutique: 816 Washington Ave, Bay City, 989-895-5000. Pastries, homemade chocolates and confections, and retail specialty candies.  Sweet Creations: Specialty and wedding cakes, gourmet cupcakes and cookies, custom cake pops, and cut-out sugar cookies. Visit www. sweetcreationsmi.com

Crème de la Crème Cupcakes: 201 ½ E Broadway St, Mt Pleasant, 989444-2928. Flavors of the day change daily.

Tummy Ache Candy Store: 1116 N Johnson St, Bay City, 989-891-7669. Homemade and nostalgic candy. Homemade “puppy chow,” popcorn balls, snow cones, and ice cream treats.

Cops and Doughnuts City Bakery: 421 McEwan St, Clare, 989-386-2241

VanillaBean Bake Shop: 318 S Saginaw Rd, Midland, 989-633-9540.


Cakes, cupcakes, cookies, chocolates, cake pops, and other sweets.

Fine Dining Bradley’s Bistro: 216 Federal Ave, Saginaw, 989-752-1400. Farmto-table restaurant with seasonal and locally sourced foods. Lunch and dinner. Salads, house-made dressings, Bulgogi steak sandwich, and soba noodles with Swiss chard pesto. Vegetarian and gluten-free dishes available. Fireside Grille: 8400 S Genuine Rd, Shepherd, 989-828-6315. Signature international dishes, pasta, chicken, fish, and steak. Golden Glow Ballroom Restaurant: 2950 S Graham Rd, Thomas Township, 989-781-2120. Chicago-style individual pizza, seafood, chicken, pork, steak, salads, sandwiches, burgers, and pasta. Heatherfields Chop House (Bay Valley Hotel and Resort): 2470 Old Bridge Rd, Bay City, 989-686-3500. Entrées include char-grilled steaks, blackened salmon, and chicken fettuccine. Sunday brunch. Jake’s Old City Grill: 100 S Hamilton at Court, Saginaw, 989797-8325. Steaks, chops, seafood, poultry, pasta, and vegetarian entrées. Comprehensive martini and wine bar. Old City Hall: 814 Saginaw St, Bay City, 989-892-4140. Historic dining room offers appetizers like Thai lettuce wrap and elegant entrées. Extensive wine list. Imported and domestic beer. Real Seafood Co: 199 Uptown Dr, Bay City, 989-456-3463. Contemporary seafood restaurant; locally sourced ingredients. Lunch and dinner; sautéed Lake Superior whitefish, pasta, steak, sandwiches, and gluten-free options. The Riverfront Grille: One Wenonah Park Place, Bay City (inside the DoubleTree Hotel), 989-891-6000. Breakfast, lunch, and specialty dinner entrées daily. Full bar and wine list. Shari’s at the Willard-Hillton: 1506 W Beaver Rd, Auburn, 989-662-6621. Louis Mason’s 1800 hotel thrives today as a gourmet restaurant. Extensive wine list and specialty cocktails complement artfully presented food.  

Table: 111 W Main St, Midland (inside H Hotel), 989-633-6099. Exquisitely prepared entrées like duck breast, scallops, and veal. Wines and dinner cocktails. European-style breads tartlets, tortes, and Napoleons.

Brady’s Sports Bar & Diner: 512 E Midland St, Bay City, 989-8942207. Full menu. Homemade chips, hot sauce, barbecue sauce, and salsa. Breakfast buffet Saturday and Sunday.

Willow Tree Restaurant of Saginaw: 4787 Fashion Square Mall, Saginaw Township, 989790-9400. Casual atmosphere. Fresh appetizers, salads, soups, sandwiches and wraps, pastas, entrées, and desserts.

Brass Café and Saloon: 128 S Main St, Mt Pleasant, 989-772-0864. New American cuisine in a dining room housed in two turn-of-the-century shopfronts.

Saloon & Eatery 2nd Street Sports Pub: 274 Meyers St, Freeland, 989-695-6501. Appetizers, soups, sandwiches, burritos, burgers, steak, and pasta for lunch and dinner. Outdoor patio seating. Aurora Buffet: 6800 Soaring Eagle Blvd, Mt Pleasant (inside Soaring Eagle Casino & Resort), 888-7324537. Lunch and dinner buffet, soup and salad bar, carving station, and dessert bar. Every Tuesday is “BOGO Buffet”: buy one lunch or dinner buffet at regular price and get one free. Bancroft Wine & Martini Bar: 101 S Washington Ave, Saginaw, 989-7760011. A 1920s-style lounge. Wine, martinis, Prohibition-era cocktails, craft beers, small plates, salads, and cheese boards.  Beer and Brats, Inc: 4562 N Eastman Rd, Midland, 989-8359238. Variety of beer, homemade brats, Sammi Rae Root Beer on tap, and outdoor space for playing horseshoes and cornhole.  Bar Oxygen: 111 Main St (located inside H Hotel), Midland, 989-8390500. Wine, beer, martini, and specialty cocktail menu, with 150+ liquors. Bar menu. Happy hour. Live music Friday nights.  Bier Garten: 8 State Park Dr, Bay City, 989-684-1331. Daily themedspecials. Quarter-off happy hour daily. Big E’s Sports Grill: 810 Cinema Dr, Midland, 989-794-8585. Nachos served on a 22-inch pizza tray. Weekend breakfast menu and Bloody Mary bar. The Boulevard Lounge: 316 S Saginaw Rd, Midland, 989-8325387. Breakfast seven days a week. Complete lunch and dinner menus, including appetizers, available.  

Cardinal’s Nest Tavern: 2903 Pierce Rd, Saginaw, 989-401-7888. New York-style pizza, custom order salads, Italian hero sandwich, Fish Fry Fridays, and 32 draft beers. Cass River Yacht Club: 6154 Dixie Hwy, Bridgeport, 989-777-6460. Locally famous “broaster” chicken, homemade soups, pizza, and daily specials. Catering and free hall rental. Creekside Bar & Grille: 9387 Gratiot Rd, Thomas Township, 989-781-0050. Signature grilled pizza, Creek Crust (cheese bread sticks), burgers and sliders, special family recipe chicken burger, and more. Coonan’s Irish Hub: 1004 N Johnson, Bay City, 989-402-1177. Guinness stew, Irish fries, Reuben sandwiches, burgers, specialty hot dogs, and full bar. Diamond Jim’s: 101 E Main St, Midland, 989-486-3343. Soup, salad, and sandwich bar during lunch features four soups. Happy hour. Dinner menu. Farmers Home Tavern: 215 W Saginaw St, Hemlock, 989-642-2546. Famous burgers, other menu items, cold beer, and beverages served in a friendly, family-owned tavern.  Flannigan’s Pub & Grill: 7734 Gratiot Rd, Shields, 989-781-2320. Irish dishes and American fare like Irish egg rolls, loaded burgers, and Irish nachos. TVs. Dine on the deck.  Frankenmuth Brewery Co: 425 S Main St, Frankenmuth, 989-2628300. Microbrewery and restaurant offering appetizers, sandwiches, and dinner entrées with pretzel bread. Freshly brewed beers on tap.

sandwiches served in a ’20s-themed atmosphere. Premium liquors, beers, and wines. The Governor’s Quarters: 1304 S Wenona St, Bay City, 989-893-6111. Large selection of craft brews (bottled and on tap), hard ciders, and spirits. Burger baskets: “Judicial Indiscretion” (half-pound, homemade Coney sauce, onion, pickled jalapeños, cheddar cheese). Harvey’s Grill and Bar: Two locations: 3055 Tittabawassee Rd, Saginaw Township, 989-401-4424, and 4000 E Wilder Rd, Bay City, 989-686-3304. Traditional food with a twist and the coldest drafts found in Michigan. Hamilton Street Pub: 308 S Hamilton St, Saginaw, 989-790-8119. Food, drinks, and entertainment. Dine in or order takeout.  John’s Bar: 1476 S Tuscola Rd, Munger, 989-659-2951. Diner offers burgers, soups, and famous steak sandwiches. Latitude 43 Grill & Bar: 1013 N Henry St, Bay City, 989-391-9868. Appetizers, salads, burgers, pasta, chicken, sandwiches, steaks, chops, seafood, and side dishes. Highdefinition TVs. Mac’s Bar: 118 N Michigan Ave, Saginaw, 989-772-0864. A 1930s Art deco-style bar and restaurant. Innovative cuisine from local farms, including organic, vegan, and vegetarian options. Live jazz musicians. Merl’s Tavern: 304 Shattuck Rd, Saginaw, 989-751-5140. Sports, trivia, music. Daily food specials: subs, soups, salads, French dip, Coney dogs, and brats. Michigan on Main: Inside Bavarian Inn, 713 S Main St, Frankenmuth, 989-652-9941. Michigan-inspired menu and craft beers. Whitefish from Lake Superior and pork produced in Frankentrost. Menu changes to accommodate local, seasonal availability. 

Gabby’s Pub and Grill: 3002 S Graham Rd, Thomas Township, 989781-0101. Haddock, Gabby burger, smothered chicken, and microbrews.

Midland Brewing Company: 5011 N Saginaw Rd, Midland, 989-2597210. Locally-sourced menu options, rustic-chic atmosphere. Sausages, burgers, soft-baked pretzels, unique “Beeramisu” dessert. Wide range of craft beers, Mug Club option, homebrewed root beer.

Gatsby’s Saloon & Eatery: 203 Center Ave, Bay City, 989-922-5556. Pizza, steak, salmon, pastas, and

Midland Street Jacks Grill & Lounge: 605 E Midland St, Bay City, 989-892-5741. Snacks, appetizers,

August 2017 | Great Lakes Bay 67


TASTE / DINING OUT kids’ meals, desserts, Tex-Mex entrées, salads, subs, and burgers. Lunch specials. Full bar. Mulligan’s Pub: 109 Center Ave, Bay City, 989-893-4555. Salads, daily soups, gourmet sandwiches, Mexican dishes, and steaks. Lunch and dinner specials. Premium liquors and beers. Takeout. O’s Pub and Grill: 123 E Midland Rd, Auburn, 989-266-3148. Family friendly dining with burgers, sandwiches, daily lunch specials, microbrew beers, and fish Fridays with cod, perch, and shrimp dinners. Private dining available for groups up to 40. O’Kelly’s Sports Bar & Grille: 2000 S Mission St, Mt Pleasant, 989-7753751. Pub food includes wings and burgers topped with onion rings. Drink specials. Large projector screens. One Twenty South: 120 S University, Mt Pleasant, 989-8174433. Specializing in craft cocktails and tapas. Drink an acai mojito or grapefruit caipirinha; eat a charcuterie board or coffee-crusted fillet. Oscar’s Restaurant and Entertainment: 140 E Main St, Midland, 989-837-8680. Deli and chicken sandwiches, burgers, entrée salads, daily soups, and desserts. Variety of beer, wine, and cocktails.  Prost! Wine Bar & Charcuterie: 576 S Main St, Frankenmuth, 989-6526981. Rustic chic atmosphere and full bar. Charcuterie with artisanal cheeses as shared plates, pre-built or design-your-own, paninis, and farmto-table dishes. Rainmakers: 3325 Davenport (inside Ramada Inn), Saginaw, 989-7937900. Small plate items, Rainmaker

martini, nacho nights, happy hour events, and weekend entertainment.

humidor offers more than 80 varieties of cigars.

than 200 wine selections and a wine tasting bar.

The Rathskeller: 600 E Midland St, Bay City, 989-892-0621. Full menu, daily specials, and drinks. Catch the game on one of 24 TVs.

Stadium Sports Pub and Grill: 7255 S Three Mile Rd (located inside Bay City Country Club), Bay City, 989684-1618. Open to the public. Big screen TVs.

Washington Street Irish Pub and Grill: 112 Washington Ave, Bay City, 989-895-8221. Burgers, sandwiches, fish, steak, handdipped onion rings, pizza, and homemade lunch specials every day.

Rustic Inn Steak House & Saloon: 133 N Saginaw St, St Charles, 989-865-6466. Lodgestyle atmosphere features more than 50 North American big game mounts. Entrées, sandwiches, and homemade soups. Rusty Saw Smokehouse BBQ: 804 E Midland St, Bay City, 989-3322948. Located inside Lumber Barons Brewery. Slow-smoked brisket, ribs, pulled pork, chicken, and burgers. Made-from-scratch side dishes include dirty rice, cornbread, and Carolina slaw. The Savoy Grill: 127 S Franklin St, Saginaw, 989-755-5171. Upscale American diner fare including turkey pesto ciabatta, steak chicken pesto pasta, and Val’s hot beef sandwich. Breakfast available. Scottish Inn: 630 Gratiot Ave, Saginaw, 989-799-1949. Beer and cocktails. Soups, salads, sandwiches, and burgers. Nicknamed the “Plaid Palace,” locals love the crab cheese appetizer and Reuben sandwich.  Sporty’s Wing Shack and Smokehouse: 4502 N Huron Rd, Pinconning, 989-879-6050, and 9620 Gratiot Rd, Saginaw, 989-401-6973. Wings (try the smokin’ cherry sauce favorite!) and burgers piled high. Draft beers. The Stables Martini & Cigar Bar: 805 E John St, Bay City, 989-8910100. Cozy seating areas for small groups. Live entertainment. Walk-in

Stein Haus: 1108 N Water St, Bay City, 989-891-2337. Imported beers and microbrews on draft. Choose bottles or glasses of wine from the extensive wine (and reserve) list. Sullivan’s Food & Spirits: 5235 Gratiot Rd, Saginaw Township, 989-799-1940. Famous for its fish and chips. Full menu. Signature corned beef and cabbage served occasionally throughout the year.  Tavern 101 Restaurant: 101 Center Ave, Bay City, 989-778-1431. Italianand Mediterranean-influenced cuisine. Signature flatbreads, pastas, wine, spirits, and selection of 50 beers on tap.  Tiffany’s Food & Spirits: 56 S Main St, Frankenmuth, 989-6526881. Pizzas, seafood, pastas, and PastaPitzas. Keep your specialty drink glass as a souvenir. Patio dining in summer.

Water Lily Lounge: 6800 Soaring Eagle Blvd, Mt Pleasant (inside Soaring Eagle Casino & Resort), 888-732-4537. Appetizers, sandwiches, and thin crust pizzas. Live entertainment Fridays and Saturdays. Food available until 11 p.m., Sunday – Thursday, and until 1 a.m., Friday and Saturday. Whichcraft Taproom: 124 Ashman St, Midland, 989-8323395. Dips, spreads, cheese plates, paninis, Greek hot dogs, and Mediterranean platters. Whine: 337 E Wackerly St, Midland, 989-835-5222. Wine bar with wines from across the world, craft beers, cocktails, and specialty liquors paired with small plates. 

Timbers Bar & Grill: 6415 State St, Saginaw Township, 989-790-2345. Rustic cabin-type setting. Steaks, pastas, nachos, salads, soup in a bread bowl, and sandwiches. Weekly specials. Full bar.

Winston’s Pub in the Midland Resort and Convention Center: 1500 W Wackerly St, Midland, 989-698-0663. Variety of foods and large selection of beer and cocktails. Weekday happy-hour specials. Live entertainment, games, and TVs. 

VNO New Age Restaurant & Wine Warehouse and Bay City Grill & Bar: 510 Midland St, Bay City, 989-460-0117. Serves small plates, including smoked salmon dip, calamari, escargot, and more than 25 wine selections by the glass or bottle; retail space includes more

Zorba’s Greek and American Cuisine: 617 S Harrison St, Saginaw, 989-792-1959. Saganaki (flaming cheese), gyros, dolmades, baklava, and chicken Avgolemeno (egg lemon) soup. Wings and burgers. Beer, liquor, and wine.


A&E WHAT TO DO, WHERE TO BE

GREAT LAKES LOONS

People Pics 70 | Sponsored Events 71 | What To Do 71 August 2017 | Great Lakes Bay 69


A&E / PEOPLE PICS 2

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READ Association of Saginaw County’s Books for Breakfast SAGINAW

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DETAILS: Nearly 300 people attended the all-you-can-eat pancake breakfast and participated in literacy activities that promote family reading time. Part of the proceeds benefit the READ Association of Saginaw County. photos by Doug Julian

1. Theotis Essex, Tyler Essex, and Takesha Essex 2. Ken Horn and Sue Smith 3. Terri Oginsky and Jay Tillman 4. Sara Larsen and Kathy Rogers

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Chefs for Shelterhouse MIDLAND

1 4 DETAILS: Guests spent the evening enjoying signature dishes, hors d’oeuvres, and desserts made by local chefs. Proceeds from the event support victims of domestic and sexual violence by providing shelter, counseling, and advocacy. photos by Doug Julian

1. Leslie Perry and Tracie Taberski 2. Haley Hammond, Isabel Orvosh, Andy Bacigalupo, Beth Chlupac, and Kaytlin Delong 3. Kylie Zellner, Sandy Dumbrowski, and Nicole Lazzara 4. Missie Freier and Kathy Klopfenstein

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THINGS TO DO / A&E

Sponsored Events Covenant HealthCare Foundation: Red Carpet 2017Par 3 Challenge, Crumpets & Croquet, Red Carpet Premiere, and Premier Golf Classic

Par 3 Challenge: Thursday, August 10, offers 18 chances at winning 18 prizes including a golf trip to Pebble Beach, a Harley Davidson motorcycle, $10,000, and more.

Premier Golf Classic: Friday, August 11: Play like a PGA golf professional. Breakfast and practice on the range begin at 8 a.m. with a 9:30 a.m. shotgun start. A dinner and awards banquet will follow.

Crumpets & Croquet: Thursday, August 10: Enjoy summer refreshments on the lawn, lunch, and a round of croquet.

Event proceeds support Covenant HealthCare Foundation initiatives.

Red Carpet Premiere: Thursday, August 10: Nibble on gourmet food, play blackjack, and participate in auctions, raffles, and door prizes from 5:30 – 11 p.m. Dress is snappy casual.

Arts and Museums Exhibit: Studio School Student and Faculty Exhibitions. Through September 2. Admission $9. Featuring both student- and faculty-work of the art classes at Alden B. Dow Museum of Science and Art. Alden B Dow Museum of Art and Science, Midland Center for the Arts, Midland; 989-6318250, www.mcfta.org Exhibit: Drawn Out: An Invitational. Through September 2. Admission $9. Drawings which realize the ultimate depiction, uniting the artist with the markmaking surface. Alden B Dow Museum of Art and Science, Midland Center for the Arts, Midland; 989-631-8250, www. mcfta.org Exhibit: Great Lakes Bay En Plein Air: Juried Class and Open Class. Through September 2. Admission $5. Graphic arts are on display. Saginaw Art Museum, Saginaw; 989-754-2491, www. saginawartmuseum.org Exhibit: Laura’s Little House: The Story of Laura Ingalls Wilder. Through September 5. Monday – Friday, 10 a.m. – 7 p.m. Admission. Explore the life, experiences, and books written by Laura Ingalls Wilder at a historical hands-on exhibit for children of all ages. Frankenmuth Historical Association Museum,

Frankenmuth; 989-652-9701, www. frankenmuthmuseum.org Exhibit: Lochs and Follies: The Picturesque in Scotland. Through September 17. Admission $5. Graphic arts. Saginaw Art Museum, Saginaw; 989-754-2491, www. saginawartmuseum.org Exhibit: Pre-automotive Design: The Horse and Carriage Prints of Louis Vallet. Through September 24. Admission. Comprised entirely of prints by 19th-century French artist Louis Vallet; examines the development of the carriage, 1400 to 1895, before it was replaced by the automobile in 1896. Saginaw Art Museum, Saginaw; 989-7542491, www.saginawartmuseum.org Exhibit: Oaxacan Folk Art: Seven Artists, Seven Voices. Through September 30. Free admission. Clay and carved-wood sculptures from seven indigenous artists who use craft techniques of Oaxaca. Marshall M Fredericks Sculpture Museum, SVSU, University Center; 989-964-7125, www. marshallfredericks.org

Attractions Daily Pretzel Rolling. Every day, 2:30 – 3:15 p.m. (not available on Easter, Thanksgiving, Christmas Eve, and Christmas Day). Cost $4.99. Learn proper pretzelrolling methods, and eat your

When: Thursday, August 10, and Friday, August 11 Where: Apple Mountain, Freeland For information and tickets: Call 989-583-7604, or visit www. covenanthealthcarefoundation.com

fresh-out-of-the-oven finished product. Two-hour advance notice and prepayment required. Bavarian Inn Restaurant, Frankenmuth; 989-652-9941, www.bavarianinn.com Coffee and Crafts. Second Tuesday of each month, 6:30 p.m. Price varies according to craft; cost includes coffee, sweet treat, and craft supplies. Dawn of a New Day Coffee House and Café, Saginaw; 989-780-0113 Mid-Michigan Young Onset Parkinson’s Support Group Meeting. Meets the third Tuesday of each month. Held inside the Area Agency on Aging, 1615 S Euclid, Bay City; 800-852-9781, www.parkinsonsmi.org Toddler Time. Every Wednesday, 11 – 11:30 a.m. and 1 – 1:30 p.m. Admission. Sing, dance, create, explore, and enjoy developmentally targeted projects. Mid-Michigan Children’s Museum, Saginaw; 989-399-6626, www. michildrensmuseum.com Uncorked Series. Every first and third Thursday, 5:30 – 7 p.m. Free event. New kind of happy hour in the Saints & Sinners Lounge. Complimentary snack, cash bar, and a variety of themes to think and drink creatively about. Midland Center for the Arts, Midland; 989-631-5930, www. mcfta.org

Music in the Café Second Thursdays. Every second Thursday, 7 – 9 p.m. $5. The café night brings fabulous performance, casual spontaneity, and an evening of music. The White Crow Conservatory of Music, Saginaw; 989-790-2118, www.whitecrowconservatory. blogspot.com Friday FUN Nights. Fridays, May – July, 6 – 9 p.m. Free event. Weekly entertainment in downtown Frankenmuth. www. frankenmuth.org Dow Gardens Children’s Garden Story Time. Fridays, 10 – 11 a.m. Admission fee. Dow Gardens, Midland; 989-6312677, www.dowgardens.org City Hall Tour. Second Friday of each month through December 8, 11 a.m. – 12:30 p.m. Cost $1. Bay County Historical Museum, Bay City; 989-893-5733, www. bchsmuseum.org Midland County Historical Society: Hands-on History Days. Friday and Saturday of the third weekend each month, 11 a.m. – 2 p.m. Familyfocused, interactive, and informational drop-in programs for the community to discover and preserve local heritage. Midland Center for the Arts, Midland; 989-631-5930, www. mcfta.org

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Tai Chi with Jim Bush. Every Saturday, 10 a.m. $5. The White Crow Conservatory of Music, Saginaw; 989-790-2118, www. whitecrowconservatory.blogspot.com Kids Fly Free. Second Saturday of each month, 9 a.m. – 12 p.m. Ages 8 – 17 fly free and learn about aviation. Jack Barstow Airport, Midland; 989-835-3231, www.eaa1093.org Authentic Japanese Tea Ceremony. Second Saturday of each month, 2 p.m. Admission $8. Authentic formal Japanese Tea Ceremony in the SaginawTokushima Friendship Garden, hosted by persons in kimono. Reservations encouraged. Japanese Cultural Center & Tea House, Saginaw; 989-759-1648, www.japaneseculturalcenter.org Humane Society of Bay County Feline Adoption Events. Last Saturday of each month. 989-893-0451, www. humanesocietybc.org Science Sundays. Every other Sunday, 1 p.m. Cost $7. Themed science experiments led by a play facilitator. Mount Pleasant Discovery Museum, Mt Pleasant; 989-3173221, www.mpdiscoverymuseum.org Johnny Panther Quests Ecotours. Year-round, guided, customized boat tours through various bodies of water; photography, birding, adventure, relaxation. Groups of one to 10. Johnny Panther Quest Ecotours; 810-6653-3859, www.jpqat.com Downtown Saginaw Farmers Market. Through October. Produce, honey, baked goods, and vendors with locally made food choices. 507 S Washington Ave, downtown Saginaw; 989-758-2500, ext 228, www. saginawfarmersmarket.org

fish, artisan cheeses, and flowers. 401 Center Ave, Bay City; www. marketplacebaycity.com Midland Area Farmers Market. Through October. Produce, flowers, honey, and baked goods. Near the Tridge, downtown Midland; 989839-9901, www.macc.org Mount Pleasant Farmers Market. Through October, Thursdays (Market Park) and Saturdays (City Hall), 7:30 a.m. – 2 p.m. Fruits, vegetables, plants, and more. Mt Pleasant; www.mt-pleasant.org Wildlife Drive. Through September 30, sunrise to one hour before sunset. Free admission. A 6.5-mile, self-guided, one-way auto route. Shiawassee National Wildlife Refuge, Saginaw; 989-777-5930, www.fws.gov Loony Tunes. August 1, 8, 15, 22, and 29, 10:15 – 10:45 a.m. Boogie down with Music Dan and learn songs and dance movers. Mt Pleasant Discovery Museum, Mt Pleasant; 989-773-3689, www. mpdiscoverymuseum.org Tropical Rock Night aboard the Princess Wenonah. August 4, 7 – 10 p.m. $45. Detroit-area Caribbean Blue Band brings their tropical rock and Jimmy Buffettinspired playlist to the Princess Wenonah for Bay City Boat Lines’ annual river party. Includes catered buffet dinner; cash bar available. Bay City Boat Lines, Bay City; 855-891-2628, www. baycityboatlines.com Great Lakes Loons. August 5, 7:05 p.m. Admission starting at $6.50. Fireworks immediately follow the game between the Loons and Fort Wayne TinCaps. Dow Diamond, Midland; loons.com, 989-837-2255, www.loons.com

Frankenmuth Farmers Market. Wednesdays – Saturdays, 12:30 – 5:30 p.m. Locally grown produce. 534 N Main St, Frankenmuth; 989-295-9766, www. frankenmuthfarmersmarket.org

Science Sunday with Dillon. August 6, 13, 20, and 27, 1 – 2 p.m. Admission. View a live science demonstration and learn about how various things work. Mt Pleasant Discovery Museum, Mt Pleasant; 989-773-3689, www. mpdiscoverymuseum.org

Marketplace Bay City. Indoor, year-round market. Produce, fresh

Great Lakes Loons. August 6, 2:05 p.m. Admission starting at

72 Great Lakes Bay | August 2017

$6.50. Take in a ball game as the Great Lakes Loons face off against the Fort Wayne TinCaps. Kids 12 and under can enjoy Kids Eat Free Sundays with a free hot dog, chips, and drink before running the bases after the game. Dow Diamond, Midland; 989-837-2255, www. loons.com

Rock Night with Jedi Mind Trip. August 11, 7 – 10 p.m. $45. Jedi Mind Trip rocks out on the Princess Wenonah. Admission includes catered dinner; cash bar will also be available. Bay City Boat Lines, Bay City; 855-891-2628, www. baycityboatlines.com

Animal Antics. August 7, 14, 21, and 28, 3:30 – 4:30 p.m. Learn about a different animal each week through a craft, story, and themed play activities. Mt Pleasant Discovery Museum, Mt Pleasant; 989-773-3689, www. mpdiscoverymuseum.org

Farm Days. August 12, 10 a.m. – 2 p.m. $5/free for members. Celebrate Michigan agriculture with barnyard animal friends, games, and activities. Children’s Zoo at Celebration Square, Saginaw; 989-759-1408, www. saginawzoo.com

Great Lakes Loons. August 7, 7:05 p.m. Admission starting at $6.50. Cheer on the Great Lakes Loons as they face off against the Fort Wayne TinCaps in the third of a four-game series. Dow Diamond, Midland; 989-837-2255, www. loons.com

Saturdays on the Saginaw River Tour. August 12, 10 a.m. – 12 p.m. A leisurely two-hour river tour features a guide to explore various topics, which vary by date. Bay City Boat Lines, Bay City; 855-891-2628, www. baycityboatlines.com

Great Lakes Loons. August 8, 7:05 p.m. The Great Lakes Loons wrap up a four-game series against the Fort Wayne TinCaps. Dow Diamond, Midland; 989-837-2255, www.loons.com

Pines Summer Concert Series. August 13, 6:30 – 8 p.m. Ages 6-17: $5/$1. Free for children 5 and younger. A new musical series features Michigan-based musicians who perform their original works. Dow Gardens, Midland; 989-631-2677, www. dowgardens.com

Carnival Day. August 9, 10 a.m. – 12 p.m. A recreational carnival just for kids comes to Freeland. Bounce houses and more offer hours of fun. Tittabawassee Township Park, Freeland; 989695-9512, www.facebook.com/ freelandparks Roanoke Free Concert. August 9, 6:30 – 9 p.m. Free. Folk and Americana music fill the air for an evening of entertainment. Tittabawassee Township Park, Freeland; 989-695-9512, www. facebook.com/freelandparks Be Greater Kids Adventure. August 10, 6 p.m. $15/team. Maximum five member pers team, ages 5 – 12 and one member over 18. A two-hour adventure race takes kids ages 5 – 12 through the Greater Midland Community Center neighborhood to face challenges and checkpoints. Open to the first 200 teams. Greater Midland Community Center, Midland; www. greatermidland.org

Great Lakes Loons. August 14, 7:05 p.m. Admission starting at $6.50. Cheer on the Loons as they take the field against the Lansing Lugnuts. Dow Diamond, Midland; 989-837-2255, www. loons.com Great Lakes Loons. August 15, 7:05 p.m. Admission starting at $6.50. The Loons host the Lansing Lugnuts. Dow Diamond, Midland; 989-837-2255, www. loons.com Great Lakes Loons. August 16, 7:05 p.m. Admission starting at $6.50. Head out to the ballfield and marvel at a Fireworks Loontaculars show after the Loons play the Lansing Lugnuts. Dow Diamond, Midland; 989837-2255, www.loons.com Mushroom Hunt. August 17, 9:30 a.m. – 12 p.m. Join Sister Marie Kopin from the


THINGS TO DO / A&E

Michigan Mushroom Hunters Club guide participants as they learn about and search a variety of mushrooms that can be found in Isabella County. Wear comfortable hiking shoes and layered outdoor wear. Bring a whistle, bug spray, jackknife, paper grocery bag with handles, and a basket for picking. Meridian Park, Mt Pleasant; 989317-4083, www.isabellacounty.org Great Lakes Loons. August 17, 7:05 p.m. Admission starting at $6.50. It’s $1 Family Feast Night at Dow Diamond. Plus, watch as the Great Lakes Loons take on the Lansing Lugnuts. Dow Diamond, Midland; 989-837-2255, www. loons.com Heritage Series. August 17, 8 p.m. $5. Ric Mixter, maritime videographer and historian, takes the audience on a tour from Alpena to ports around the Great Lakes. Midland County Historical Society, Midland; 989631-8250, www.facebook.com/ MidlandCountyHistoricalSociety Neil Diamond Tribute Night. August 18, 7 – 10 p.m. $45. David James, with Marty Viers and the Music Doctors, covers Neil Diamond favorites aboard the Princess Wenonah. Catered dinner included in admission; cash bar also available. Bay City Boat Lines, Bay City; 855-891-2628, www. baycityboatlines.com Kids and Culture. August 19, 10 a.m. – 12 p.m. Free. Art Reach of Mid-Michigan provides handson activities for children to learn about culture and more. Mt Pleasant Discovery Museum, Mt Pleasant; 989-773-3689, www. mpdiscoverymuseum.org Floating Sip and Swirl. August 19, 1 – 4 p.m. $60. Studio 23 professionals guide passengers on the Princess Wenonah as they create their own paintings. Appetizers included in admission; cash bar available. Bay City Boat Lines, Bay City; 855-891-2628, www.baycityboatlines.com Science Sunday with Dillon. August 20, 1 – 2 p.m. Admission. View a live science demonstration and learn about how various

things work. Mt Pleasant Discovery Museum, Mt Pleasant; 989-7733689, www.mpdiscoverymuseum.org

Dow Gardens, Midland; 800-3624874, www.dowgardens.org

Impact Saginaw Family Fun Day. August 20, 1 – 4 p.m. Free. Music, inflatables, activities, and games offer fun for all ages. Huntington Event Park, Saginaw; 989-7591320, www.doweventcenter.com

Charitable Events

Great Lakes Loons. August 22, 7:05 p.m. Admission starting at $6.50. It’s a battle of bats between the Great Lakes Loons and Lansing Lugnuts. Dow Diamond, Midland; 989-837-2255, www. loons.com End of Summer Bash. August 23, 10 a.m. – 12 p.m. Free. Bring the kids out for one last day of celebration before summer is over. Tittabawassee Township Park, Freeland; 989-695-9512, www. facebook.com/freelandparks Great Lakes Loons. August 23, 7:05 p.m. Admission starting at $6.50. The Great Lakes Loons and Lansing Lugnuts take the field. Dow Diamond, Midland; 989-8372255, www.loons.com Great Lakes Loons. August 24, 7:05 p.m. Admission starting at $6.50. Enjoy $1 Family Feast Night as the Great Lakes Loons take on the Lansing Lugnuts. Dow Diamond, Midland; 989-837-2255, www.loons.com Journey down the River with the Rock Show. August 25, 7 – 10 p.m. $45. A Journey tribute band rocks out on the Princess Wenonah on a tour of the Saginaw River. Admission includes a catered dinner; cash bar available. Bay City Boat Lines, Bay City; 855891-2628, www.baycityboatlines. com Dirty Dog Trail Run. August 26, 9 a.m. $10 – $40. A 10K run, 5K run, and 1-mile walk host runners of all skill levels and their dogs. City Forest, Midland; 989-492-4002 Summer Adult Art Classes. August 29. Relaxed, informal educational atmosphere for novice to experienced artists. Outdoor classes take place in a different location throughout the gardens.

Party on McCarty. Thursdays, 5 p.m. Entertainment begins at 5:30 p.m. Free event/$5 parking donation. Live entertainment, food vendors, and a beer and wine tent. Bring seating. Proceeds benefit improvements and opportunities for the kids who participate at the Saginaw Township Soccer Complex. Saginaw Township Soccer Association, Saginaw Township; 989-295-1945, www. partyonmccarty.com Covenant HealthCare Foundation: Red Carpet 2017: Par 3 Challenge, Crumpets & Croquet, Red Carpet Premiere, and Premier Golf Classic. August 10 – 11. Golf and enjoy premier events to support Covenant HealthCare Foundation initiatives. Apple Mountain, Freeland; 989-583-7604, www. covenanthealthcarefoundation.com

Expos Saginaw County Fair. August 1 – 5. Admission. Youth exhibits, 4H exhibits, a midway, and grandstand events will “wow” crowds of all ages. Saginaw County Fairgrounds, Chesaning; 989.845.2143, www. saginawcountyfair.org Art Walk Central. August 3 – 31. Art Reach of Mid-Michigan invites everyone to a juried art competition that takes place throughout the city of Mount Pleasant. State and national artists display their work throughout the city, from paintings to photography. Community art events will also be scheduled. Mt Pleasant; 989-773-3689, www. artreachcenter.org Bay County Fair & Youth Exposition. August 8 – 12, 12 – 10 p.m. Free admission; $5 parking. The 152nd Bay County Fair & Youth Exposition presents a fun-filled family outing with everything from livestock animals to midway rides and the grandstand. Bay County Fairgrounds, Bay City; 989-8953744, www.baycountyfair.com

Midland County Fair. August 13 – 19. Admission. Entertainment, live shows, midway with games and prizes, and more await all ages. Midland County Fairgrounds, Midland; 989.845.2143, www. midlandfair.com Keepsake Collection Arts and Craft Show. August 18 – 20, 12 – 6 p.m. Friday, 10 a.m. – 6 p.m. Saturday, and 11 a.m. – 5 p.m. Sunday. Artists bring their creations to Frankenmuth for a juried show, and merchandise is available for purchase. Zehnder Park, Frankenmuth; 989-681-4023, www. frankenmuth.org

Festivals Lawn Chair Film Festival. Through August, at dusk. Free. Bring lawn chairs or blankets, pack snacks, and enjoy classics to kid movies—and live music, too. Old Town Saginaw, www. lawnchairfilmfestival.org Art Reach of Mid-Michigan’s Art in Nature Festival of Banners. Through November. Free. A community art event. Large, colorful banners hang throughout the community of Mount Pleasant. Art Reach, downtown Mt Pleasant; 989773-3689, www.artreachcenter.org NativeFest. August 1. Cradleboard Workshop. Ziibiwing Center of Anishinabe Culture and Lifeways, Mt Pleasant; 989-775-4750, www. sagchip.org/ziibiwing Hop Riot Beer & Wine Fest. August 5, 1 – 5 p.m. $25. Breweries and wineries from around Michigan meet in Bay City for a beer and wine festival complete with live music. Admission includes five drink tickets, early entry at 12 p.m., and Hop Riot T-shirt. Wenonah Park, Bay City; 989-892-2660, www.facebook. com/hopriotfest Saginaw Bay Waterfowl Festival. August 5 – 6, all day. An annual event features a duck and goose calling tournament, wildlife arts and craft show, and recreation expo, plus much more. There is fun for the entire family. Bay City State Recreation Area, Bay City; 989-6843020, www.friendsofpark.org

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THINGS TO DO / A&E

Summer Music Fest. August 10 – 12, 1 p.m. (gates open at 12:30 p.m.). $18 (8/10)/$20 (8/11-12). Join in a celebration of Polish, German, and Slovenian musical styles. Heritage Park, Frankenmuth; 800-386-3378, www.frankenmuth. org Linwood Pickle Festival. August 19 – 21: Friday, 5 – 7 p.m.; Saturday, 8 a.m. – 2 a.m.; Sunday, 8 a.m. – 5 p.m. Free. Softball, cornhole, music, food, games, and pickles are available for all ages to enjoy. Linwood Bicentennial Park, Linwood; 989-307-8442, www. linwoodpicklefestival.org 24th Annual Midland Folk Music Festival. August 24 – 27, times vary. $5 members/$10 nonmembers. Workshops, dancing, and family-friendly folk music feature local, regional, and national artists. Camping available. Midland County Fairgrounds, Midland; 989-280-6910, www. folkmusicsociety.org

Music, Theater & Film Dow Gardens Wednesday Lunchtime Concerts. Through August 23, 12 – 1:30 p.m. Admission $5. Listen to music during lunchtime in the dappled shade of the Birch Grove. Chairs, blankets and picnics are welcome. Dow Gardens, Midland, 800-3624874, www.dowgardens.org Concert in the Park Series. Through August, 7 p.m. Series of free concerts in the park. Tittabawassee Township Park, Freeland; 989-695-9512, www. tittabawassee.org Wednesday Free Concerts. Through August, 7:30 p.m. Free event. A charming slice of American history, The Chemical City Band, operating since 1910, performs for the community. Nicholas Guenther Band Shell in Central Park, Midland; 989-8376930, www.cityofmidlandmi.gov/ recreation Jazz in the Garden. Through August, 7 p.m. Free admission to summer concert series. Bring your

74 Great Lakes Bay | August 2017

own chair. Andersen Enrichment Center & Lucille E. Andersen Memorial Rose Garden, Saginaw; 989-759-1362, www.saginaw-mi.com Tunes by the Tridge. Through August, 7 – 9 p.m. Free event. Families bring blankets and lawn chairs to this 10-week concert series, and spend Thursday evenings listening to great music near the Tridge. City of Midland Parks and Recreation, downtown Midland, 989-837-6930, www. downtownmidland.com PRIDE Friday Night Live Concerts. Through August 25. Free concert series; music changes weekly from blues to rock ‘n’ roll to oldies and more. Children’s games, food vendors, adult refreshments. Morley Plaza, Saginaw; 989-753-9168, www. prideinsaginaw.org Music from the Marsh. Through September, 7 p.m. A touring, cultural performing arts series on the outdoor lawn stage near the visitor center. Bay City State Recreation Area, Bay City; 989-6670717, www.friendsofpark.org Young People’s Summer Series. August 2, 9, 16, 23 and 30, 11:30 a.m. Free admission. A series of shows for the young and youngat-heart throughout the summer months. Rain site is the State Theatre. August 2: Jedi Interactive Training Show; August 9: Wixie & Harrington; August 16: Richard Paul, comedic ventriloquist; August 23: Cameron Zcara, comedic magician; August 30: Rick & Dayna’s Playground. Wenonah Park, Bay City; 989-892-2660, www. statetheatrebaycity.com Alex & Straight Eight Free Concert. August 2, 6:30 – 9 p.m. Free. A family-friendly concert in the fresh air. Tittabawassee Township Park, Freeland; 989695-9512, www.facebook.com/ freelandparks I Love the ’90s: The Party Continues Tour. Wednesday, August 2, 7 p.m. $16 – $53. Catch TLC, Naughty by Nature, Biz Markie, Tone Loc, Rob Base, and C+C Music Facotry on stage. Soaring Eagle Casino

& Resort, Mt Pleasant; www. soaringeaglecasino.com

695-9512, www.facebook.com/ freelandparks

Wednesdays in the Park. August 9, 16, 23, and 30, 7 p.m. A series of free, outdoor concerts throughout the summer months. Bring a lawn chair or blanket. Rain site is the State Theatre. August 9: Four Freshmen play Beach Boyand doo-wop- inspired music; August 16: “Hotel California”; August 23: Elvis tribute artist Jake Slater; August 30: Phil Dirt and the Dozers. Wenonah Park, Bay City; 989-892-2660, www. statetheatrebaycity.com

Nature

The Outsiders. August 3 – 5, 7:30 p.m. $14 adults/$10 students. A Greaser on the wrong side of life is caught up in battles between the rich kids and his tough, underprivileged “greaser” family and friends. As these young people try to find themselves and each other, the sadness of sophistication begins to reach them, and their battles reach a resolution. Midland Center for the Arts, Midland; 989-631-8250, www.mcfta.org Brad Paisley Concert. August 12, 7 p.m. Special guests Dustin Lynch, Chase Bryant, and Lindsay Ell join country music legend Brad Paisley for an outdoor concert. Soaring Eagle Casino & Resort, Mt Pleasant; www. soaringeaglecasino.com Jesus and Music Free Concert. August 16, 6:30 – 9 p.m. Free. Praise and worship music fill the park in Freeland. Tittabawassee Township Park, Freeland; 989695-9512, www.facebook.com/ freelandparks Summer Breeze: The O’Jays. August 19, 7 p.m. $52 – $67. The O’Jays, a Rock and Roll Hall of Fame-inducted group, bring their R&B sound to Saginaw. Temple Theatre, Saginaw; 989-754-7469, www.templetheatre.com Honesty & the Liars Free Concert. August 23, 6:30 – 9 p.m. Honesty & the Liars get the audience up and dancing with a variety of music. Tittabawassee Township Park, Freeland; 989-

Summer Exploration Days. Through August 28, Monday – Saturday, 8 a.m. – 5 p.m., and Sunday and holidays, 12 – 5 p.m. Free. All ages welcome, younger than 18 with adult. Self-guided, indoor program; variety of handson exploration stations. Themes change biweekly. August 2 – 14: Amphibians; and August 16 – 28: Reptiles. Chippewa Nature Center, Midland; 989-631-0830, www. chippewanaturecenter.org Discovering the Homestead Farm. Every Sunday through September 4, 1 – 5 p.m. Free. All ages welcome, younger than 18 with adult. Step back in time and enjoy a family-friendly afternoon at the Homestead Farm. Kids of all ages can help with chores, play traditional games, and visit the farm animals. Chippewa Nature Center, Midland; 989-631-0830, www.chippewanaturecenter.org Wildlife Safari. August 2, 10 a.m. – 12 p.m., Free. Wildlife Safari brings animals of the wild to Freeland. Kids will have a chance to learn all about the animals and their habitats. Tittabawassee Township Park, Freeland; 989695-9512, www.facebook.com/ freelandparks Bat Hike. August 3, 8:30 p.m. Ages 9 and older; younger than 18 with adult. Spend an evening with bats and listen to the sounds of bat echolocation. Bring a flashlight. Chippewa Nature Center, Midland; 989-631-0830, www.chippewanaturecenter.org Hanging out with Hummingbirds. August 5, 8:30 – 1:30 a.m. Ages 9 and older; younger than 18 with adult. Look for and learn about ruby-throated hummingbirds and their habitats in Michigan. Chippewa Nature Center, Midland; 989-631-0830, www. chippewanaturecenter.org Adventures for Women: Going Geocaching. August 6, 2 – 4 p.m. Ages 15 and older; younger than


THINGS TO DO / A&E

18 with adult. Geocaches are small containers hidden in nature that can be found using GPS units and coordinates. Join the scavenger hunt at the nature center as you explore the property in a new way. Chippewa Nature Center, Midland; 989-631-0830, www. chippewanaturecenter.org Saginaw Bay by Voyageur Canoe. August 8, 6 – 10 p.m. Join an exciting adventure paddling the Saginaw Bay in a 29-foot voyageur canoe, a fiberglass reproduction of the birch bark canoes used by voyageurs to haul loads of goods in the 18th and 19th centuries. Chippewa Nature Center, Midland; 989-631-0830, www. chippewanaturecenter.org Families in Nature: Slithering Snakes. August 12, 1 – 2 p.m. All ages welcome; younger than 18 with adult. Head out on the trail sand look for snakes, learning what makes this animal so special. Chippewa Nature Center, Midland; 989-631-0830, www. chippewanaturecenter.org

Nature Exploration. August 16, 10 a.m. – 12 p.m. Free. Kids can enjoy nature, up-close and personal, on this free nature exploration day. Tittabawassee Township Park, Freeland; 989-95-9512, www. facebook.com/freelandparks Moth Night. August 24, 8:30 – 10 p.m. Ages 9 and older; younger than 18 with adult. Attract moths to learn about them. Wear dark clothing and bring a flashlight. Chippewa Nature Center, Midland; 989-631-0830, www. chippewanaturecenter.org Slithering Snakes at Discovery Preserve. August 31, 2 – 3 p.m. All ages welcome; younger than 18 with adult. Learn all about snakes and how beneficial they are to the ecosystem. Discovery Preserve, Bay City; 989-631-0830, www. chippewanaturecenter.org

Networking Saginaw County Chamber of Commerce: Business after

Hours. August 10, 5 p.m. Kokomo’s Family Fun Center, Kochville Township; 989-757-2112, www. saginawchamber.org

Mount Pleasant Area Chamber of Commerce: Business after Hours. August TBD, 5 – 7 p.m. Mt Pleasant; 989-772-2396, www. mt-pleasant.net

Midland Area Chamber of Commerce: Business after Hours. August 16, 4:30 – 6:30 p.m. RE/ MAX of Midland, 5915 Eastman Ave, #200, Midland; 989-839-9522, www. macc.org

Bay Area Chamber of Commerce: Eye Opener Breakfast. No August event. 989893-4567, www.baycityarea.com

Bay Area Chamber of Commerce: Business after Hours. August 17, 5 – 7 p.m. Members only. Covenant HealthCare (Covenant MedExpress), 2919 E. Wilder Rd, Bay City; 989-893-4567, www. baycityarea.com Great Lakes Bay Regional Hispanic Business Association. August 22. Location TBD, Saginaw; 989-753-1999, www.glbrhba.org Mount Pleasant Area Chamber of Commerce: Business over Breakfast. August TBD. Location TBD, Mt Pleasant; 989-772-2396, www.mt-pleasant.net

Midland Area Chamber of Commerce: Wake Up! Midland. No August event. 989-839-9522, www.macc.org Saginaw Area Chamber of Commerce: Percolator Breakfast. No August event. 989-752-7161, www. saginawchamber.org Want your event featured here in Great Lakes Bay? Email arts, entertainment, and community events to events@ greatlakesbay.com. Send date, time, cost, and contact information for your event by the first day of the month, three months prior to the event date.

Listen to Mid-Michigan’s...

Playing Lite Favorites from Billy Joel, Fleetwood Mac, Elton John, Phil Collins, Rod Stewart, and more!


THE BACK STORY

A Matter of Outline BY NANCY SAJDAK MANNING

S

eamstresses construct figure-controlling, front-lacing corsets in the new 1922 four-story Modart Corset Company building at Lapeer and Second in Saginaw. The airy, efficient workroom with ventilation, heating, and sprinkler systems is lit by widespread windows and overhead lighting near work stations. The workplace was created after the infamous March 25, 1911, Triangle Shirtwaist Factory fire in New York City that killed 146 workers and led to U.S. labor reforms and safety laws. Modart explains its mission in this excerpted October 1920 Chicago Tribune ad: What Does the Future Hold? Will you retain your youthful figure lines or as the years roll by will you gradually lose them? The difference between a youthful and prematurely mature figure is after all only a matter of outline.… To recreate good figures through scientific corsetry is the reason for the existence of Modart Corset. The Modart business was founded by Leonard T. Jennings (1908) as the LaFrance Corset Company and renamed the Modart Corset Company in 1909. Modart operated at various Saginaw locations and sold its products nationwide. In 1932, a former business partner repurchased Modart and changed the name to LeMonde Corset Company. LeMonde continued producing products under the Modart name until closing in 1969, after decades of relaxed-style fashions and women routinely choosing to manage their figures through diet, exercise, and pantyhose/tights. In 1948, two former Modart employees opened The Corset Shop in Saginaw. Since 2008, the 69-year-old business, renamed Corset Shop Intimates, 5901 State Street, has been owned/managed by Linda Hancock. The shop is an accredited/ insurance-recognized post-mastectomy boutique that also offers custom-fit bras, comfortable “shapewear,” high-quality and bridal lingerie, and more—even celebrity-influenced waist shapers and corsets for clubbing and daily use. Photo and historical assistance courtesy of The Castle Museum, Saginaw.

76 Great Lakes Bay | August 2017


The Human Element at Work

COMMITTED TO COMMUNITY

At Dow we are committed to the success of our communities. When we invest in the places that we live and work, we invest in our future. Whether we support events and organizations or roll up our sleeves and volunteer, we work to bring together our employees, friends and neighbors to build a better community in the Great Lakes Bay Region. www.dow.com


The Great Lakes Bay Region Does Better with Garber. “As a local business owner, I believe in working with other local businesses to help keep our community strong. Garber has been committed to the Great Lakes Bay Region for over 100 years, and that earns my business. I also believe in exceptional customer service, and that's what I get with Garber. Both the sales and service departments are outstanding and go the extra mile for their customers. It matters where I buy my car. That’s why I buy from Garber!” Dr. Michael J. Dense, Shields Chiropractic

GoGarber.com GoGarber.co om

Great Lakes Bay Magazine August 2017  
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