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LUXURY LIVING MOVES RESIDENTS UP IN THE SKY

THE HIGH LIFE

DUCKS AND GEESE AND SWANS, OH MY! WATERFOWL DIVE AND DABBLE IN SPRING WATERS

BAREKNUCKLED BASEBALL BATTER UP FOR A POLITE BUT GNARLY GAME

Inside This Issue

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TRAVEL

See where our readers are taking their trips with Great Lakes Bay!

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Wish yo were he u re! Pac k us in We want to your suitcase. see the with you. world Submit y ou www.grea r photo online at tlak or mail to esbaymag.com, 1311 Bay City Straits Dr, MI 48706

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Briana Autran, Great Lakes Bay, and Deb Autran overlook the Hoover Dam scenery.

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Great Lakes Bay enjoys the company of sit-by-me statues in Saint John, New Brunswick, Canada, with Evelyn Kramer, Laura Larson, Bonnie Vanderberg, Mary Ann Dietrich, Sherry Clements, Patti Peltier, Nona Reinsch, and Mary Lou Whateley.

3. Dolores Porte and Great Lakes Bay Business soak up the sun in Quito, Ecuador.

Going somewhere in the Great Lakes Bay Region? Don’t forget to grab a photo of you and Great Lakes Bay! April 2017 | Great Lakes Bay 5


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APRIL 2017 VOLUME 14 | ISSUE 4

22

LIVING IT UP Luxury and location draw residents to vertical spaces BY KIMBERLY BONE

INSIDE THIS ISSUE:

family (Insert p. 33)

April 2017 | Great Lakes Bay 7


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he character of the Great Lakes Bay Region is made great by the many unique downtown destinations in our community. From Frankenmuth to Mount Pleasant and Saginaw to Bay City, our community provides many great options for us to live, work, and play. The downtowns of our region provide a strong sense of place and are an important contribution to the success of our future. When plans were announced for THE H™ Residence in downtown Midland, the vision to create upscale residential condominiums was the perfect fit for a world-class city. THE H Residence is the realization of Shaheen Development’s pursuit of urban residential living with unmatched architecture and design. Timeless building materials coupled with state-ofthe-art technology and sustainability make THE H Residence smart and beautiful. THE H Hotel will offer fullservice amenities to the homeowners of THE H Residence, including use of

the pool and spa, fitness facility, housekeeping services, and more. The main floor of THE H Residence will feature the Northwood Gallery, Midland Visitors Center, and Gratzi, an iconic Italian restaurant, which will open at the end of this year. I had the privilege to visit the building and walk through the recently completed residential models. These homes are stunning. The rooftop garden features indoor and outdoor entertaining space with an outdoor fireplace and kitchen exclusively for the use of residential owners. These fine residences will be well received by the discerning homeowner looking for nearby entertainment, dining, shopping, recreation, and luxury. THE H Residence is a $25 million urban development located at the corner of Ashman and Main streets. Equally as impressive as the architecture are the developer’s commitment and strong belief in Midland’s future as a thriving downtown. Shaheen Development has always had a reputation for delivering high quality. This development exceeds even the highest standards.THE H Residence will be a landmark and an exclusive address for the city of Midland and the Great Lakes Bay Region for a very long time. To learn more about THE H Residence, please visit www.hresidence.com. Matt Felan President & CEO Great Lakes Bay Regional Alliance

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Life 13 A GENTLEMAN’S GAME

Players throw off their gloves for the sport of vintage base ball

16 NUMBERS 18 FLORA & FAUNA Waterfowl

20 APRIL CALENDAR

Taste 33 IT’S EASY BEING GREEN

Midland’s fast-food scene takes a healthy turn

35 DINING OUT GUIDE

A&E 42 PEOPLE PICS

Pictures of people partying, volunteering, and contributing to a good cause

43 SPONSORED EVENTS Local events sponsored by Great Lakes Bay magazine 43 EVENTS

33

A comprehensive listing of regional events

Departments 5 TRAVEL 11 CONTRIBUTORS 11 EDITOR’S NOTE 48 THE BACK STORY

Great Lakes Bay Magazine,Volume 14, Issue 4 April 2017 (ISSN 1550-8064) is published monthly by The F.P. Horak Company, 1311 Straits Dr, Bay City MI 48706. Periodicals postage pending at Bay City MI. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to Great Lakes Bay Magazine, P.O. Box 925, Bay City MI 48707. Copyright © 2017 The F.P. Horak Company. All rights reserved. Reproduction in whole or part without permission is prohibited.

April 2017 | Great Lakes Bay 9


FROM THE EDITOR CONTRIBUTORS

The View from Here

L

iving tall is at an all-time “high.” From young professionals who are making their marks— and moving to the city and to downtown apartments—to down-sizers who are ready for cozier surrounds with amenities at their doorstop, more people are exploring ways to live vertically. Whether your living space is 900 square feet or 1,700 square feet, in new construction or converted buildings, the region’s latest breed of innovative downtown apartments, condos, and lofts are high-end and high-fashion, all designed with luxury details (including rooftop gardens, balconies, and terraces to make the most

of the view). “Up there” dwellers love the option of walking in their neighborhoods—downtown micro communities dotted with cafes, bars, coffee houses, galleries, and retail shops. When residents are headed out the door for things to do, there’s the direct route or the circuitous route, which may include through the park, down the hill and past the farmers market, or perhaps just an elevator ride to the lobby bar for a martini. (What’s your pleasure? Shaken or stirred?) And when there’s an event going on—at the Dow Event Center, First Merit Bank Event Park, or Temple Theatre, at the Friendship Shell, State Theatre, or along the Saginaw River waterfront, or near the Tridge—rather than driving and finding parking, taking a stroll to the venue makes for an enjoyable evening’s entertainment. And for some residents, these downtown spaces may be all about location—close to work, close to shopping, or close enough to go home for lunch. In this our home issue’s feature story, “Living It Up,” page 22, it’s all about tall wonders. Sit back and peruse these pages to see how people are enjoying the high life.

KIMBERLY BONE of Saginaw is the marketing and communications specialist for Kettering University and a freelance writer and graphic designer.

RACHEL COHEN is pursuing her degree in English education at the University of Michigan. She writes on topics ranging from interior design to community lifestyle.

Mimi Bell Editor in Chief mimi@greatlakesbaymag.com JEN W. O’DEAY is the arts & entertainment coordinator for Great Lakes Bay magazine and a marketing communications writer who adores her family, good coffee, and Thoreau.

April 2017 | Great Lakes Bay 11


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LIFE WHO AND WHAT INSPIRES US

A Gentleman’s Game Players throw off their gloves for the sport of vintage base ball. BY JEN W. O’DEAY | PHOTOS BY DOUG JULIAN

Profile 13 | Numbers 16 | Flora & Fauna 18 | Calendar 20 April 2017 | Great Lakes Bay 13


LIFE / PROFILE

“S

quints” is at the ready as catcher, “Ducky” is pitching, and “Britches” is on first base. The field for this baseball game is just that, a field—no stadium, no tickets, no stands (or even bleachers). The players who’ve come bareknuckled and ready-to-win are predominantly men, wearing wool uniforms and knickers— but no cleats, no helmets, and no baseball gloves. The team captains have met and agreed upon home rules for the game. There will be no swearing or spitting, and foul territory will be left of the trees. With the tally girl ready to keep score and batboys delivering up wooden weapons of home-run destruction, spectators give a mighty “Huzzah!” of three cheers, and this game of baseball is underway. This game of vintage base ball, that is. “We do have a bit of a hard time getting people to understand the game,” says Richard Curry, manager of the Saginaw Old Golds Base Ball Club. Both a nostalgic throwback and hardcore sporting event, every nine-inning vintage base ball game that takes place April through September is played according to the rules and regulations of community-formed baseball teams circa the late 19th century (1840s-1900). Teams play in historically accurate uniforms

14 Great Lakes Bay | April 2017

The Bay City Independents take on the Greenfield Village La-De-Dahs in a 2016 vintage base ball state tournament

with baseballs the same size as today’s regulation ones but with a different core material; bases are at the same modern standard of 90 feet apart. The Mighty River Hogs (founded in Midland County in 2000), Bay City Independents (founded in 2003), and Saginaw Old Golds (founded in 2005) make up the vintage base ball clubs of the Great Lakes Bay Region, and each adheres closely to the way the game of base ball was played in times of old, when “you were unmanly if you even thought about wearing a [baseball] glove,” Curry says. “Gnarled fingers were a fact of life.” On over 20 vintage base ball teams in Michigan, and nearly 300 across the United States, men ages 21 and older and a handful of women play the sport with respect to a code of the past that emphasizes sportsmanship. For example, when the runner gets to first base,

the runner and the fielder make the call, safe or out. And if the umpire must make a call from behind home plate? “Nobody argues with the arbiter (umpire),” says Jack B. Tany, president of the Saginaw County Sports Hall of Fame and Saginaw Old Golds player. “It’s a gentleman’s game.” It’s also a game ripe in camaraderie. As did teams in the 1800s, home vintage base ball teams of today host after-game spreads where players from both teams, along with spectators, gather for food and drinks. Jayme Johnson, founder and captain of the Bay City Independents, says camaraderie is a large draw for people to the game, along with the general sense of nostalgia. “It takes you back to the days when it (baseball) was a game—before you had to buy tickets,” Johnson says.


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LIFE / NUMBERS

Great Lakes Bay Region tidbits, trivia, and conversation starters

BY JEN W. O’DEAY

25 2,000,000

Researchers at the University of Essex in England found that volunteers of a study who were shown bright shades of color before taking mental agility tests scored up to 25 percent higher than participants who were exposed to dull, dreary shades of gray. Consider a trip to Rebel Magnolia (7677 Gratiot Rd,Thomas Township, 989401-3239) for vivid and colorful spring décor to get your brain test-taking ready.

To baseball enthusiasts, spring means one thing: opening day. The Great Lakes Loons played their inaugural game on April 13, 2007, in front of more than 324,000 fans.

Join the more than 2 million spectators who have since graced the stands on April 6, 2017, at Dow Diamond (825 E Main St, Midland, 989-837-2255) for the Loons’ Opening Day Celebration as the team takes on the Lansing Lugnuts.

63 80,000,000

True or false: Someone successfully survived going over Niagara Falls in a barrel? It’s true, and a Bay City woman named Annie Edison Taylor was the first person to do so. On October 24, 1901, the 63-year-old widow took the plunge—and lived to tell about it.

In celebration of its new location, Tri-City Brewing Company (4170 Shrestha Dr, Bay City, 989-894-4950) crafted Annie’s Old Ale in recognition of the close-to-home barrel rider.

It’s the season of the Easter Bunny—and chocolate. An estimated more than 80 million pieces of candy are consumed each Easter weekend. Concerned about the approximate 150 grams of sugar per each 250-gram, chocolaty treat? Venture out on April 15 to Nature’s Eggs Extravaganza at Chippewa Nature Center (400 S Badour Rd, Midland, 989-631-0830) for candy-free hunts and games.

31,350 12

The average American drives approximately 11,000 miles per year, equaling about 627,000 miles during a lifetime and requiring 31,350 gallons of gasoline— enough to fill three large oil tankers. This April 22, celebrate Earth Day with a swap of four wheels for two, and ride bikes along the nonmotorized Great Lakes Bay Regional Trails (www.facebook.com/ greatlakesbaytrails). 16 Great Lakes Bay | April 2017

With a wingspan between ¼ and 12 inches, butterflies can reach a 12-mile-per-hour flight speed. There are around 24,000 species of these insects known globally. Enjoy the winged beauties up-close at Dow Gardens Butterflies in Bloom (1809 Eastman Ave, Midland, 989-631-2677) through April 16.


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LIFE / FLORA & FAUNA

This male canvasback duck swimming near ice will migrate through the Saginaw Bay area to breeding grounds in southern Canada

Waterfowl JEANNE HENDERSON, INTERPRETIVE NATURALIST 400 S Badour Rd, Midland, 989-631-0830 www.chippewanaturecenter.org

18 Great Lakes Bay | April 2017

A

s the temperature begins to warm, thousands of ducks, geese, and swans migrate to the abundant wetlands of the Great Lakes Bay Region, signaling the arrival of spring. As soon as the ice breaks up, you can bet there will be waterfowl floating and diving in the open waters. Some species use our wetlands as a rest stop on a longer journey; others make our lakes and marshes their homes for the breeding season that follows the end of winter. How can ducks keep warm blood circulating to their legs and feet while standing on ice? Through their internal plumbing, blood enters their


Lesser scaup ducks (male on left) dive on freshwater lakes and ponds for clams, insects, snails, or aquatic plants

Divers and Dabblers Thirty waterfowl species live or migrate through the Saginaw Bay area. When you watch ducks, you will notice that their behavior groups them into divers or dabblers. Divers dive headfirst underwater, swimming for food such as fish, crustaceans, snails, or clams. They bob up in a different location from where they started. In order to take flight, they first have to skitter along the water surface to build up speed, flapping their wings fast until they can take off. Canvasback, lesser scaup, and merganser ducks are a few diver species.

A male northern pintail duck flaps its wings while landing next to its mate that is feeding in tipped-up posture in the background

legs at their normal body temperature and becomes cooler as it goes down the main artery to the toes. On the return trip back up, the outer veins constrict, shunting the blood to larger central veins close to the artery. Heat transfers from the warm artery to the cool vein so that the venous blood re-enters the body at nearly normal temperature. Scales covering the legs protect the arteries and veins, while the skin between the toes remains flexible for standing and swimming. To minimize exposure, ducks will tuck in their bill, close their eyes, lift one leg into their warm body, and alternate their standing leg. Physical adaptations allow ducks, geese, and swans to live successfully in aquatic habitats. Curved wings shaped like an airfoil enable lift as air passes over and under them when the bird flies. Strong breast muscles power flight. Many air spaces within their bones make the birds lightweight yet strong. The rounded body shape helps them stay buoyant on the water surface and for riding on waves. Waterfowl use their webbed feet to push water efficiently, much like scuba divers with flippers. Many layers of contour body feathers cover the down feathers next to the bird’s skin, similar to wearing a coat over a shirt, trapping warm body heat between the layers. Ducks waterproof feathers by spreading them with oil from glands at the base of their tails. Another unique feature of waterfowl is their eyes. Waterfowl have a wide angle of vision—about 270°—due to eyes that are on the sides of their head. And they can do something we can’t do. They sleep with one eye open, keeping watch for predators.

Dabblers dip their heads into shallow water to eat aquatic plants and invertebrates. You can see their tail end sticking up from the water. Dabblers use ridges on the sides of their bill to strain food from the water as they feed. Dabblers take flight by bounding straight up like a rocket, flapping as they go. Mallard, northern pintail, and blue-winged teal ducks are common dabbler species. Follow the Saginaw Bay Birding Trail signs to explore the best places to see waterfowl. Starting at the Discovery Preserve in Bay City, go east along M-25 to find eight natural areas on the journey to Port Austin. Or go northwest to find 11 stops, ending at Tawas Point State Park. Midland County’s Whiting Overlook Park and Chippewa Nature Center wetlands are hotspots worth visiting also. April 2017 | Great Lakes Bay 19


LIFE / CALENDAR

APRIL 2017 WEDNESDAY SUNDAY MONDAY TUESDAY THURSDAY

FRIDAY

751 1

SATURDAY

Candy-less Egg Hunt Enjoy the Easter Bunny and indoor fun at Mid-Michigan Children’s Museum.

2

3

4

5

10

11

12

Jungle Jack Hanna’s Into the Wild The conservationist’s hands-on approach is live at Temple Theatre.

16

8

13

15

Fireside Chats Midland County Historical Society ventures down “Memory Lane.”

17

18

Nature’s Eggs Extravaganza Join in for games, family fun, and a hunt for a holiday treat at Chippewa Nature Center.

23

7

Opening Day Celebration: Great Lakes Loons See the parade at Dow Diamond before the first pitch.

Of Mice & Men Join the audience at Pit & Balcony Theatre for one of the presentations of Steinbeck’s classic.

9

6

19

20

21

Youth Choirs Spring Concert Over 100 young singers at Midland Center for the Arts celebrate the end of winter.

24

30

25

26

22

Experience Earth Day Dow Gardens Get dirty planting Poinsettia Display trees and more with Witness the Chippewa Nature dramaticgreen-living display. Center’s Throughevent. 12/30. learning

27

28

29

Bringin’ Back the ’80s Festival Don big hair, get to Frankenmuth, and party like a big hair band. Through 4/29.

For more information on these and other events, see A & E, page 41, or visit www.greatlakesbaymag.com 20 Great Lakes Bay | April 2017


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Living It Up Luxury and location draw residents to vertical spaces. BY KIMBERLY BONE | PHOTOS BY DOUG JULIAN

A

rich, vibrant downtown draws businesses, the arts, and a sense of community to urban centers. It has also influenced the surge of two book-ended generations, baby boomers and millennials, choosing downtown apartments and condos over traditional beyond-citylimits dwellings. According to U.S. Census Bureau statistics, in the United States, there are over 10,000 boomers retiring every day, and more than 83 million millennials are becoming the fastest growing segment of the real-estate market. Though on the surface these two groups could not be more different, it turns out both are choosing the ease, amenities, and walkability of downtown dwellings over suburban sprawl. Three properties in the Great Lakes Bay Region are on the forefront of this housing trend, offering one-of-a-kind spaces and opulent features for residents to live the high life.


FEATURE

Left: The striking outline of Mill End’s Lofts transforms the Bay City skyline Above: High-end features and modern, sleek design complement a picturesque view of Bay City’s waterfront Right: Amenities line the street just below Mill End residents’ upper-level patios

MILLION DOLLAR VIEW Mill End Lofts, a centerpiece of downtown Bay City, is a sleek, mixed-use building. The building’s first floor houses commercial space, with a restaurant, hair salon, and other convenient services. The upper levels have 24 residential units, which all feature a private terrace with views of the Saginaw River and Wenonah Park. The in-the-sky patios allow residents to overlook many of Bay City’s riverfront events with an ideal viewing of the Fourth of July fireworks displays, River Roar, Tall Ships celebration, and more. And when concerts are hosted at a park on the river, tenants need only open their patio doors to enjoy the music. With the building’s orientation over Water Street, loft-dwellers also have front-row seats to check out numerous street fairs, art shows, and the daily hustle and bustle of downtown.

Inside, the lofts include one- and two-bedroom units, ranging in size from approximately 900-1,600 square feet. Each apartment features modern design and high-end finishes, such as granite countertops and shiny stainless steel appliances in custom-built kitchens, specialty tiles in the bathrooms, and spacious walk-in closets. The nearly 10-foot-tall ceilings, open floorplans, and emphasis on natural light give an airy feel throughout the home. The lofts are modern in design, but historical touches from the original Mill End store throughout the building, including the vintage elevator doors and red paneling in common areas, lend uniqueness to the structure’s design aesthetic. Residents can take a quick walk and enjoy everything Bay City’s downtown has to offer, from numerous restaurants and coffee shops to art galleries, Delta College Planetarium, and some of the best antique stores in the area. April 2017 | Great Lakes Bay 23


Above: Open spaces leave plenty of options for luxurious décor Left: The H Residence condo-owners can be guests in their own homes with amenities such as room service from The H Hotel Right: The corner of Ashman and Main streets in Midland is home to a new high-rise of extravagant living

UP ON THE ROOFTOP The H Residence in downtown Midland is one of the latest urban condo development projects in the region. “The upper levels of the structure house 10 residential condo units and a beautiful rooftop garden terrace that features entertainment space and a full kitchen for residents’ use,” says Jan Hauck, Century 21 Signature Realty broker. The garden terrace overlooks Main Street in the downtown area and Chippewassee Park, with breathtaking views of the Tridge and Midland Area Farmers Market. Luscious green plants, outdoor grilling space, and comfortable lounge furniture will make the rooftop the ideal space for warm-weather entertaining, relaxation, and a birds-eye view of Midland’s many downtown events and festivals. 24 Great Lakes Bay | April 2017

The units, which range in size from 1,700-3,200 square feet, will be purchased unfinished, and buyers will then finish the spaces to their exact specifications. This will include determining the final floorplan and all design features. Owners will create their perfect living space with two to three bedrooms, up to 4.5 bathrooms, a full laundry room, and at least one private balcony. Custom-design features and finish options, including specialty wood flooring and architectural flourishes, are all determined by individual buyers. Many other upscale conveniences await owners of the condos. Residents will be able to use all the complimentary services and features enjoyed by guests at The H Hotel, including concierge service to set up dry cleaning and laundry services; housekeeping; access to a 24-hour business center, pool, and fitness center; and even transportation to the airport. Condo-holders can also order room service and have meals and snacks delivered to their door from the hotel.


FEATURE

April 2017 | Great Lakes Bay 25


LAP OF LUXURY Downtown Saginaw’s historic Bancroft Building has served as a hotel and as public housing, and it has been built, rebuilt, and remodeled many times. Now, it has been reborn again, housing 152 lavish apartments above retail space that includes a coffee house, wine bar, non-profit art gallery, and an upcoming bourbon bar. “We are a very unique property. The apartments are not at all cookiecutter,” says Lisa Comer, Bancroft Luxury Apartments regional manager. “There are more than 18 different floorplans to choose from, and each features high-end finishes.” The apartments have white custom kitchen cabinetry with stainless steel appliances and granite countertops. The units are painted in warm, inviting hues and have richly stained wide-plank, laminate wood flooring throughout the main living spaces. Touches such as bright white crown molding and six-paneled doors pop on the neutral background and lend to the sense of extravagance. 26 Great Lakes Bay | April 2017

“Most of our residents are working professionals,” says Comer, “so we strive to make life at the Bancroft as easy as possible. We have onsite laundry, secured off- and on-street parking, a 24-hour fitness center, a business center with complimentary Wi-Fi, and even dry cleaning drop-off service twice a week.” Residents can also order room service from Bancroft Coffee & Tea or the Bancroft Wine & Martini Bar, located just down the stairs, and mix and mingle with their neighbors at the outdoor fire pit, grill, and picnic area. The Bancroft is just a quick walk away from the Temple Theatre, Dow Events Center, and FirstMerit Bank Event Park. As the Great Lakes Bay Region continues to reinvest in and reinvent its urban areas, the interest in luxurious nearby dwellings grows, too. Both baby boomers and millennials are more and more often choosing every day to live it up downtown.


FEATURE

Left: An opulent welcoming area sets the tone for residents’ living spaces Right: With nearby hotspots such as the popular Bancroft Wine & Martini Bar, located right downstairs, Bancroft apartmentdwellers don’t have far to go for entertainment and leisure Below: Bancroft Luxury Apartments overlook downtown Saginaw

April 2017 | Great Lakes Bay 27


SPECIAL ADVERTISEMENT: Car Guide

The 2017 Envision, 2017 Enclave, and 2017 Encore are all available at Garber Buick.

5925 State St | Saginaw Township | 989-497-4444 | www.garberbuick.com

T

he Great Lakes Bay Region is the proud home of the oldest Buick dealership in the nation, dating back to 1907, thanks to founder Guy S. Garber, who saw the vehicle as the way of the future. Founded on principles that placed customer service at No. 1, Garber Buick continues that legacy, currently ranked in the top 1 percent of all Buick dealers in the United States for customer satisfaction and No. 8 in the country for Buick retail sales out of over 3,000 dealers. Garber Buick has also earned General Motor’s prestigious Dealer of the Year Award for the past three consecutive years. “Garber’s mission statement, ‘We are only doing our job properly when we create an

experience for which the customer returns to do business with us again,’ is truly the driving force behind the dealership’s success,” says Rich Perdue, general manager. He emphasizes the key to Garber Buick’s success is its loyal employees, both past and present, who have created a culture of award-winning service. “Our dedicated professional staff knows the product thoroughly and works closely with each customer to find the perfect fit for their individual or family’s vehicle needs. Complete customer satisfaction is our top priority,” Perdue says. Perdue adds, “GM has given Buick all the latest and greatest in technology,” which has made Buick a pillar in the General Motors

retail line-up and has resulted in steady market share growth. Exceptional customer service, in combination with the unparalleled comfort and quality of Buick, has led to thousands of happy Buick owners all across our region. In addition, Garber Buick continuously gives back to the local community through programs such as the Drive Your Community Scholarship program, which was created last year and awarded $20,000 to local youths who volunteer to make our community better, which has always been Garber Buick’s goal. This year’s deadline to apply is May 31; visit www.garberbuick.com/driveyourcommunity to apply today.


(L to R): Karla Lamson, office manager; Gary Ashley, sales; Craig Lang, general manager; Scott Dondineau, sales; and Charleen Lehman, accounting

1700 N Saginaw Rd | Midland | 989-839-9944 | www.garberchevrolet.com

T

he staff at Garber Chevrolet in Midland is proud of its award-winning success in the Great Lakes Bay Region. Dealership accolades include having the highest volume sales of new Chevrolets in the Great Lakes Bay Region, earning the highest customer satisfaction rating for Chevrolet dealerships in the Great Lakes Bay Region, and being recognized by Automotive News as one of the “Top 100 Best Dealerships to work for in North America” for three out of the last four years. General manager Craig Lang explains, “It’s the people at Garber Chevrolet that make the difference.” Lang adds that employee satisfaction is directly related to customer satisfaction and says, “Happy employees equal happy guests!” The employees share a “gung ho” culture of

team work, where every team member makes a contribution to our everyday success. “The culture is guided by our vision and mission statements, and values, which include honesty, empathy, respect, work ethic, integrity, and pride. It comes straight from our owner, Dick Garber, and we are all extremely proud to have his leadership.” The culture that Lang speaks of includes a consistent focus on being the best automotive sales and repair operation in every market the dealership serves and creating an experience that keeps customers returning. The outstanding service offered at Garber Chevrolet surpasses expectations. Customers report that they actually enjoy the car-buying process with Garber Chevrolet, and they often have more to say about

the staff members and their experiences than about their new vehicles. Garber Chevrolet also believes in supporting its community, and the staff is actively involved with many organizations including United Way, the American Cancer Society and breast cancer awareness, Alzheimer’s Association, American Heart Association, Midland Chamber of Commerce, Saginaw Spirit Hockey, Great Lakes Loons, The Arc of Midland, local school sponsorships, and many other organizations and causes. Garber Chevrolet thanks their loyal customers whose patronage allows it to support the Great Lakes Bay Region. If you are in the market for a new or pre-owned vehicle, visit Garber Chevrolet today, and experience the best service you can find in the Great Lakes Bay Region.


SPECIAL ADVERTISEMENT: Car Guide

Garber Chrysler Dodge Jeep Ram’s all-terrain obstacle course featuring the white 2017 Jeep Wrangler Sport, the red 2017 Grand Cherokee Trailhawk, and the blue 2017 Jeep Wrangler Sahara

5330 Bay Rd | Saginaw | 989-399-8550 | www.garberchryslerdodgejeepram.com

T

he Jeep. A stunning combination of style, technology, luxury, and capability, off or on the road. We’ve witnessed its power in movies and commercials as it climbs steep rocky terrain, crawls over the tough roots of off-road forest paths, and splashes through muddy puddles of unknown depths. But how many of us actually get to try it out? Garber Chrysler Dodge Jeep Ram has gone to great lengths to help us satisfy our urge to jump in a Jeep. The Garber Chrysler Dodge Jeep Ram dealership on Bay Road in Saginaw is home to an extensive all-terrain obstacle course that showcases the Jeep’s unstoppable capabilities. It boasts multiple extreme elevation changes and numerous unusual surfaces to crawl over, giving potential customers chances to experience the raw power most only get to witness on TV.

One of only about a dozen similar tracks in the nation, the Garber Chrysler Dodge Jeep Ram obstacle course is designed to bring out the most impressive capabilities of a trail-rated Jeep. First, there is a rock zone section of the course, where drivers experience the Jeep’s maneuverability by steering around obstacles. This is followed by an extreme side-hill situation that shows off its unsurpassed stability. The course also houses a special shift zone so drivers can experience the capabilities of the Jeep while in four-wheel low drive. There is a mogul section that mimics holes and ruts on a trail, followed by an articulation area that shows off the suspension’s independent wheel movement. The final portions of the track include a Stump Jump, showcasing the trail-rated Jeep’s ground clearance, keeping the vehicle’s undercarriage from scraping obstacles while off road and allowing for easy driving through deep snow.

With a track like this right in our backyards, why not try out a trail-rated Jeep at Garber Chrysler Dodge Jeep Ram today? At Garber Chrysler Dodge Jeep Ram, you can be assured you will receive the highest level of customer service and care, which is demonstrated by its customer satisfaction ratings. The dealership is the nation’s leading dealer in customer satisfaction, with a 100-percent rating for 20 months in a row! David Tokarsky, new car sales manager, states, “We have a staff of dedicated professionals focused on creating an enjoyable purchase experience, making sure each customer finds the vehicle that meets or exceeds their individual or family’s needs and budget.” If you’re looking for the region’s largest selection of Chrysler, Dodge, Jeep, and Ram trucks, low prices, and exceptional customer care, you’ll find it at Garber Chrysler Dodge Jeep Ram!


An exhibit honors Warrant Officer Brandon L. Bewley of Frankenmuth, a recipient of the Bronze Star Medal

1250 Weiss St | Frankenmuth | 989-652-8005 | www.michigansmilitarymuseum.com

O

ver 40 years ago, Stan Bozich began his mission of creating a lasting memorial dedicated to nurturing the memories of men and women from Michigan—men and women who led everyday lives in our local farms, offices, and factories but who also served in the military during America’s foreign wars. Today, Michigan’s Military and Space Heroes Museum (MMSHM) hosts over 700 exhibits. Unlike most other war museums that focus on the war itself, weapons, or strategies of battle, each exhibit at MMSHM honors an individual. Visitors see personal photographs of the heroes honored, old uniforms, battle souvenirs, awards earned, and more, bringing an individual story to each hero’s name. The exhibits at the museum span the SpanishAmerican War to the War on Terror and include

a section devoted solely to Medal of Honor recipients, the largest collection of Medals of Honor in the United States. The museum also honors Michigan astronauts. On April 29, 2017, MMSHM will host the Spirit of Michigan’s Own event in hopes of raising a minimum of $200,000, an amount critical to the ongoing operation of the museum to keep the memories of Michigan’s servicemen and servicewomen alive. This event will honor Bozich, the museum’s founder, and Lieutenant Colonel Charles Kettles from Ypsilanti, the nation’s most recent recipient of the Medal of Honor, who received the award on July 18, 2016, nearly 50 years after his acts of heroism in Vietnam. By purchasing a table for 10, guests will experience a full-course, plated dinner, drinks and entertainment, sponsorship recognition, an

annual museum membership, and a photo and private reception with Bozich and Kettles. All funds raised from the dinner event will be used to provide educational programming for local K-12 schools, to fund additional research into the persons and relics featured, to introduce special exhibits, to expand the collection and the Hero Next Door program, to preserve artifacts, and for endowment. If you would like to contribute to the museum and its mission to “honor, respect, and remember” all Michigan veterans, please call the museum at 989-652-8005, or remit payment to Michigan’s Own, Inc., a qualified 501(c)3 organization. Send donations to: Michigan’s Own, Inc. C/o Zehnder & Associates Attn: Nila Schiefer 516 S Main St Frankenmuth MI 48734


SPECIAL ADVERTISEMENT

MIDLAND SOLAR APPLICATIONS

Solar Panels installed by Midland Solar Applications can help business and homes go green.

Mid-Michigan’s Solar Energy Experts

2007 Austin St | Midland | 989-839-2373 | www.midlandsolarapplications.com

T

he need for clean energy has become a cornerstone of conversation and innovation across multiple industries. From the widespread implementation of wind farms across Michigan to the use of hydropower and solar power on both commercial and individual levels, clean energy is no longer a vision for the future: It is our reality. In fact, in 2016, the state of Michigan saw more solar facilities put in place than any previous year. If you have ever considered going solar for even just a portion of your home or business energy needs, then 2017 is your year to act. The cost of solar is at its lowest price ever. There are also various financing, rebate, and tax credit options, as well as REAP grants for rural use, which reduces the cost even further, depending on the location and type of solar power array.

This may also be the last year that full net metering will be available in Michigan. Some of the benefits of solar energy are well known, including the reduction of our carbon footprint and the harnessing of a free energy source. With net metering, another benefit is that while the sun is shining, solar panels are collecting energy for consumption onsite or fed to the grid for consumption elsewhere, creating a credit you can use for grid energy to consume when sun-generated energy is not available. Solar energy contributes to the economics and stability of the entire grid; the sun shines most during air-conditioning season when the demand for power is at its greatest. The proximity of the solar energy source to the actual energy user also reduces electrical distribution costs.

Solar energy benefits for individual users include that the cost of power produced is essentially zero after the system is paid for, there is never a worry about having enough fuel, and there are minimal costs associated with maintenance. A switch to solar energy causes very little disruption to daily life, with only a brief interruption of service when electrical connections are made. Add to that the near certainty that electrical rates will continue to rise, in addition to the immediate equity added to property value once solar is installed, and the decision to switch to solar is straightforward. Remember, with solar being at its lowest cost and with full net metering still available, now is the time to act. Contact Midland Solar Applications, a full service solar installer, for more information and for a quote for your home or business.


y l i fam April 2017

W h at's I n s id e:

: s e h s i D r e t t i s Your Baby d l u o h S u o Y 7 Things Know. p. 17 Reading. Picks to Get Kids

P L U S:

Top Story Teachers Share aking. p. 6 -m e h -t in tn e g A I Meet an FB

Family Fun Activity e Guid than More 147 things to do and see in the GLBR! p. 25

p. 20


4231 Shrestha Dr., Bay City, MI 48706

989-671-1000 Home of the

Bay Area Thunder and the Bay City Wolves

• • • •

Public Skating Birthday Parties Drop In Hockey SK8 Bay Figure Skating Club & Learn to Skate

• • • •

Dry Floor Rental Summer Hockey Camps Advertising Opportunities Bay County Hockey Association

www.baycounty-mi.gov/CivicArena MIDLAND CENTER FOR THE ARTS

Half-Day & Full-Day Camps Available! ME.

STILL ME.

LIFE. Irreplaceable.

Unrepeatable. Invaluable. Abortion stops a beating ♥. For options, call

1-800-57-WOMAN. www.mcfta.org/summer


y l i m a f APRIL 2017

FEATURE

17 WHAT THE BABYSITTER

WISHES YOU KNEW Plan a worry-free night out with 7 tips to keep kids and caregivers happy

6 REALLY COOL KIDS All the Way to the FBI

9 PARENTING TIPS Strong Enough

11 HODGEPODGE 13 GET OUTDOORS To the Fort

15 ARTS & CULTURE CORNER Imagination Station

25 FAMILY FUN

ACTIVITY GUIDE April - July 2017

31 COOKING WITH KIDS

Peanut Butter Chocolate Chip Pancakes

20

5 CONTRIBUTORS 5 EDITOR’S NOTE

PINT-SIZED PAGE-TURNERS

Teachers pick their favorite stories to transport young readers and listeners into adventures of wondrous learning April 2017 | Great Lakes Bay Family 3


FAMILY FUN

With more than 10 acres of beautiful tree-filled parkland, natural animal exhibits, exciting events, and colorful gardens, there is so much to explore at the Zoo! Enjoy a thrilling ride on the miniature train, take a spin on the region's only hand-carved carousel, and get nose-to-nose with amazing animals from all over the world! TAKE YOUR FAMILY ON A WILD ADVENTURE TODAY!

SPECIAL EVENTS

Celebrate Earth Day Saturday, April 22nd

Mother's Day

Sunday, May 14th

Train's 50th Birthday Party

Saturday, June 3rd

World Oceans Day Saturday, June 10th

Father's Day

Sunday, June 18th

DEAR at the Zoo

Wednesday, June 21st

Birds, Bugs, Butterflies, & Blooms Saturday, August 5th

Farm Days

Saturday, August 12th

Zoo Boo

Last 3 Weekends in October

FIND MORE EVENTS, DETAILS, & HOURS AT WWW.SAGINAWZOO.COM

ZOO CAMPS

Are you looking to give your child an unforgettable experience this summer? Then join our Zoo Camp program, where children ages 5 - 13 years old will go on a WILD adventure! There is a variety of incredible activities for any animal lover, including many behind-the-scenes experiences. Children will learn all about what it takes to be a zookeeper, a scientist, or a conservator by meeting with many of their animal friends at the Zoo! AVOID THE STAMPEDE — CALL AHEAD TO RESERVE YOUR SPACE!

OPEN

QUESTIONS? (989) 759-1408

APRIL 22nd- OCT 7th

EVERYDAY 10am - 5pm

1730 S. Washington Ave • Saginaw, MI 48601


editor’s note

PUBLISHER: Marisa Horak Belotti marisa@greatlakesbaymag.com

W

WORMS OF THE BOOKISH KIND

hile I’m not particularly fond of creepy-crawlies, I think book worms are just great. That’s because in reading—for kids and for the adults who read to them and with them—we’re given a passport to a world of adventure. Sure, experts will remind us that by reading (or being read to), children learn important skills that will last them a lifetime. That may be true, but let’s not forget that reading is just plain fun. Favorites for early readers on my bookshelf are Mr. Popper’s Penguin’s, written by Richard and Florence Atwater, with illustrations by Robert Lawson; Click, Clack, Moo: Cows That Type, written by Doreen Cronin and illustrated by Betsy Lewin (seriously, these bovines type letters to Farmer Brown and, boy, do they ever have a few demands!); and The Story of Ferdinand, written by Munro Leaf and illustrated by Robert Lawson. In “Pint-sized Page-turners” (page 20), in-the-know classroom teachers recommend books for every elementary grade level. Caterpillars, llamas, and snowmen—we can’t wait to turn the pages and see what happens next! Then, on page 31, your family is in for a yummy breakfast treat! Pancakes, peanut butter, and chocolate chips will persuade even the sleepiest heads to rise and shine! Plus, in this issue, find plenty of activities—more than 147!—that parents and children can enjoy together (page 25), from now through July. Use this issue to get your entire family reading, doing, imagining, and learning together. Why? Because family time is precious. And kids grow up too darn fast!

EDITOR IN CHIEF: Mimi Bell mimi@greatlakesbaymag.com ASSOCIATE EDITOR: Stacey Tetloff stacey@greatlakesbaymag.com ART DIRECTOR: Chad Hussle chad@greatlakesbaymag.com DESIGNER: Andrea Rousse andrea@greatlakesbaymag.com FAMILY FUN ACTIVITY GUIDE COORDINATOR: Jen W. O’Deay jen@greatlakesbaymag.com PHOTOGRAPHER: Doug Julian doug@greatlakesbaymag.com CONTRIBUTORS: Debbie Anderson, Andy Bacigalupo, Chaunie Brusie, Doug Julian, Pati LaLonde, Amanda Lorencz, Chick Moorman, Jen W. O’Deay, and Dennis Pilaske ADVERTISING SALES REPRESENTATIVE: Paul Oslund paul@greatlakesbaymag.com 989-891-1783 FOR ADVERTISING INQUIRIES: ads@greatlakesbaymag.com FOR SUBSCRIPTION INQUIRIES: Call 989-893-2083

Mimi Bell Editor in Chief mimi@greatlakesbaymag.com

Great Lakes Bay Family, Volume 4, Issue 1, April 2017 (ISSN 1550-8064) is published two times a year by The F.P. Horak Company, 1311 Straits Dr, Bay City MI 48706. Periodicals postage pending at Bay City MI. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to Great Lakes Bay Magazine, P.O. Box 925, Bay City MI 48707. Copyright © 2017 The F.P. Horak Company. All rights reserved. Reproduction in whole or part without permission is prohibited.

1311 Straits Dr Bay City MI 48706 Phone 989-893-2083 info@greatlakesbaymag.com

April 2017 | Great Lakes Bay Family 5


Grace Kendziorski

ALL THE WAY to the

FBI

6 Great Lakes Bay Family | April 2017

Grace Kendziorski learns what it takes to be an agent with America’s top law enforcement organization. BY PATI LaLONDE PHOTOS BY DOUG JULIAN

G

race Kendziorski was offered the opportunity of a lifetime when she was invited to attend the FBI National Academy Association Youth Leadership Program. She headed to the FBI Youth Academy at Quantico, Virginia, for eight days last June to learn what it takes to be an agent for the federal law enforcement agency. “My dad had gone to the adult version (FBI National Academy Association Leadership Program),” she says. “He got an email saying that a child or grandchild was eligible for


really cool kids

GRACE’S TIPS for Preparing for Your Future

INVESTIGATE AND FIND OUT WHAT MOST INTERESTS YOU. Do something you enjoy.

TALK TO PEOPLE WHO CAN HELP YOU [REACH YOUR GOALS]. They’ve already accomplished theirs.

BE AN INTERN.

You can explore new things, and internships look good on a résumé

DON’T BE AFRAID TO APPLY FOR DIFFERENT THINGS. If you don’t make it into a program, you’ll still learn from the process.

the program. I sent in an application, saying my grade point average, my activities, and what leadership means to me.” Grace spent part of each day in physical training to prepare for an almost-three-mile trek across a Marine Corps obstacle course that program participants attempt at the end of the academy. She learned management skills, bullying prevention, how to perceptively predict people’s behavior and actions, and leadership techniques, all which she says will be helpful throughout her life. Though Grace isn’t sure if she wants to pursue a career as a field agent for the FBI, she says she gained valuable knowledge and benefits from the program. “It was really cool to stay on the (Quantico Marine Corps) base and learn things,” she says. “The FBI is so prestigious. I knew I could meet a lot of different people from around the country and be able to talk to them after the program. Even though it’s over, I talk to them every day.”


Jamie A. Simon, PA-C Laurisa Cummings, LMSW Randi Price, LMSW

Donna M. Hammond, PPCNP-BC Jacquelyn D. Thering, PA-C Karen Sprague, RN, MiPCT CM

Office Hours Monday-Friday Saturday

• 8am-5pm 9:30-Done (sick visits only)

Same-day sick check appointments. Accepting new patients. Prenatal visits welcome. 248 Washington Ave, Suite A • Bay City • 989-892-5664

• • •

Designated as a BCBSM Patient Centered Medical Home Participating in National Quality Improvement Program Specializing in the Care of Newborns, Infants, Children, and Adolescents Electronic Medical Records with Web-Based Patient Portal 3875 Bay Rd, Suite 1-S • Saginaw • 989-793-9982

Child & Family Services provides the most complete counseling, employee wellness and sexual assault recovery services in the Great Lakes Bay Region.

Counseling Center - Employee Wellness Center - Sexual Assault Center Saginaw Office●-2806 Davenport●-989.790.7500 - Freeland Office●-117 S. Main, Ste. 2●-989.573.8500

Providing a healing environment through peer support for children, teens, and their families

Groups in Sag start in this fallaw .

childrensgriefglbr.org ♥ 989.495.9335


HOME R E A L E S TAT E B Y C E N T U R Y 2 1 ® S I G N AT U R E R E A LT Y

A P R IL 2 0 1 7

S a g i n aw

Midland

Frankenmuth

B ay C i t y


For all listings, visit c21signaturerealty.com

3888 PRESERVE, SAGINAW TOWNSHIP Exceptional residence in Woods Preserve. This spectacular 5 bedroom, 4.5 bath home with 4400 sq. ft. of living space is perfect in many ways. Featuring a large gourmet kitchen with granite, stainless, hardwood flooring, formal dining, den and great room with volume ceilings and fireplace.

A spacious first floor master suite, first floor laundry, finished lower level and 3 car garage. You’ll love the backyard with sprawling patio space, 2 fire pits, and private wooded yard. Call Kay for your personal showing.

$51 0 , 0 0 0

TUSCANY VILLAS, SAGINAW TOWNSHIP Enjoy carefree/barrier free living in Saginaw Township! This open floor plan includes two bedrooms, two full baths, fireplace, granite counter tops in kitchen, stainless steel appliances, a master suite with private bath and walkin closet, first floor laundry, full basement and two car garage.

$18 4 , 9 0 0

K A Y DEN A RDO kaydenardo@gmail.com 98 9. 860. 0438

Tuscany Villas offer a community garden and is pet friendly. Additional options include a third bedroom with bath, finished basement, and covered patio. Energy Star Rated! Starting at $184,900. Call Kay for your personal showing.


For all listings, visit c21signaturerealty.com

14 SLATESTONE DR CONDO, SAGINAW TWP

9 1 6 0 KE NNE DY CT, THOMAS TWP

Scenic and private carefree living is at the heart of this Slatestone condo in Saginaw Township. Featuring vaulted ceilings, 2nd floor loft, open kitchen and living room, main floor full bathroom and bedroom, and a spacious master suite, this condo has it all! This home boasts over 2,200 square feet of living space, 2 bedrooms, 2 full baths, large laundry area, beautiful windows bringing in ample natural light and an attached 2 car garage. The condo is nestled in a park light settle surrounded by matured trees and well groomed meadows. The paver patio creates a great space to enjoy the scenery and warm weather. The basement provides a 350 sq ft of finished space as well as great storage and workshop space.

Don’t miss out on this stunning craftsman style home built in 2007 and set in a quiet subdivision in Thomas Township. Quality built by Beagle Construction, this home features more than 3,500 square feet of living space plus an additional 1,500 square feet finished in the lower level! The home boasts 3 main floor bedrooms including a great master suite with large relaxing bathroom and spacious walk in closet, a 2nd floor guest suite, large living room with fireplace and floor to ceiling windows, formal dining room with built ins, separate office space with wood floor, and a stunning kitchen with wood ceiling, adjacent breakfast nook, stainless steel appliances, and granite counters. The finished basement boasts a possible 5th bedroom, or 2nd office, full bathroom, cozy family room with fireplace and corner daylight windows, full kitchen, and an exercise room. The privacy fenced backyard with patio, three car garage, and large main floor laundry room complete this amazing home.

$15 4 , 9 0 0

$439,900

36 BENTON, SAGINAW TWP

9 E MAIN STREET 401 & 404, BAY CITY

A beautiful Golfside subdivision find with character at every corner. The newly renovated kitchen shows two-tone cabinets, granite counter tops, new appliances, and a large window running the length of the kitchen. Open dining and living room concept with stone fireplace provides a great entertaining space overlooking the back deck. The great room sits adjacent to the dining area with wood beamed vaulted ceiling, large stone fireplace, and wet bar. Three large bedrooms and two full baths, updated furnace and roof, and wood fenced backyard complete this wonderful all brick ranch. Call today for your personal showing.

Experience Uptown Penthouse Living. Wake up in your spacious master suite, get ready for work in your large walk-in closet and relax on a 400 square foot balcony. With over 1,700 sq. feet of living space, Uptown Bay City has a unique Penthouse space just for you. With design and amenities like none other, the penthouse condominiums feature two bedrooms, two full and one half baths, a dream kitchen with quartz countertops, full height tile backsplash, Sub-Zero & Wolf appliances, and an open floor plan highlighting the custom kitchen cabinets. The condo also boasts 10 foot ceilings throughout with led recessed lighting, Marvin wood windows, smart home automation system controlling the Hunter Douglas Silhouette window treatments, surround sound, and lighting, and Schonbek handmade light fixtures. Residents also get to enjoy the heated secure parking garage with private storage, and snowmelt sidewalks throughout the development.

$15 9 , 9 0 0

$495,000 JAN HA UC K

jan@iknowsaginaw.com

989.798.5217

AND R EW HA U CK andrew.hauck@c21.com

989.798.2981


For all listings, visit c21signaturerealty.com

1800 CENTER AVENUE, BAY CITY

1 8 9 3 AVALO N, S AGINAW TWP

Exceptional 6 bedroom residence that includes a 2 bedroom carriage apartment with recent updates in kitchen and bath. Main house features include full sweeping front porch, formal foyer with open curving staircase, crown moldings, hardwood floors, solid wood pocket doors, butler’s pantry, Corinthian columns, multiple fireplaces, updated kitchen has commercial appliances as part of the renovation. Sunny and bright breakfast room for the morning ritual or casual family meals, Original gum wood library makes a great TV/media room or den. 3 car garage w/ 2 bedroom carriage apartment. Additional parking spaces on the property. Gated entrance.  Two oversized en suite bedrooms and guest rooms on the second floor. The landing features morning coffee bar. This is a rare opportunity to purchase a historic home in this condition. May be sold furnished.

Home has a complete new exterior & interior with goals of energy efficiency & open floor plan. There are 4 bedrooms, 2 being Master Suites with large baths & walk in closets. High efficient furnace w/all new duct work. Fireplace in Living & Family rooms.  New open kitchen equipped with Stainless appliances. The EXPANSIVE deck is accessible from the kitchen & family room. Large clean & dry basement.  Additional patio in the over sized fenced yard. 2  car attached garage.

$229,900

$48 0 , 0 0 0

2257 CARROLL, BAY CITY East Side, Historical home. Lives like a country setting in Carroll Park! Grand entrance with open staircase, formal dining and living room with custom built-ins, Updated kitchen, white and bright with 2 way fireplace into the family room. Rooms are generous in size throughout. 3 en-suite bedrooms, one on 1st floor. 4 bathrooms, 1st floor laundry/mud room. 4 car garage, plus 25X50 Storage building w/ 12’ and 8’ overhead doors. 2nd floor includes sewing/office/storage room and large open landing space. Very unique offering. Priced to move.

$21 9 , 9 0 0

L AURIE BUSH

laurie.bush@century21.com

989.326.1755

385 GOLFVIEW, SAGINAW TWP Spacious DECKHOUSE, built by Tom Catarino Builders, features an open floor plan, vaulted Mahogany beams, Cedar tongue & groove ceilings & siding. Home has passive solar. The sunroom has a circulation system under the tile floor, which stores heat, then circulates it when in Winter mode. Four bedrooms & 2.5 baths, includes the master suite. Finished basement makes for maximum living space in your new home. Extra large lot with trees adds to the privacy.

$325,000

MAR K MCKNIGH T

c21markmcknight@reagan.com

989.791.9191


For all listings, visit c21signaturerealty.com

2 465 M OO N G L O W , S AG I N AW TWP Welcome to Saginaw Township’s most affordable standalone Condo development: Nova Ridge. Whether you are looking for your first home or downsizing, these well-designed 1,240 sq ft ranch-style homes feel spacious and don’t skimp on the comfort: 3 bedrooms, 2 full baths, kitchen with stainless steel appliances, granite counter tops and ceramic back splash, first floor laundry, and two-car garage. Quality built by Geiersbach Builders, the low taxes, “Energy Star” rating, and optional lawn/landscape/snow service help you make the most of your time and money! With prices starting at $139,900 ($159,900 with basement), you’ll be hard pressed to find a better value anywhere!

3 1 1 N MAIN, ES SEX VIL L E Move in ready 4 bedroom Cape Cod located in desirable Essexville location. Hardwood floors, formal dining room and sunny kitchen including major appliances. Gas log fireplace, sun room and fenced yard will make you feel right at home. Great neighborhood in walking distance to schools.

$124,900

$15 9 , 9 0 0

M OON G L O W , S AG I N AW TWP

5653 FIRETHORNE DR, MONITOR TWP

Floor Plans are basically same in either style ranch, with or without basement, 3 bedrooms, 2 full baths, master with shower - main bath with tub and shower combination, kitchen with all stainless-steel kitchen appliances included, granite counter tops in the ones with basement, ceramic tiled back splash, first floor laundry, 2 car garage with door opener, flooring and window blinds are included as well. Hallways are all wide enough for a wheelchair, doorways are 36 inches wide as well. Outside includes a landscaped yard. On the ones without basements we are offering $2000.00 paid toward closing cost until February 28, 2018

Fabulous 4 bedroom free standing condo in desirable Cortland Farms South. Enjoy views of the pond from your living room, breakfast nook or sun room. Custom cabinets in the kitchen, master suite with private bath and walk-in closet. Fireplace in the living room and a den on the main floor. Lower level has train room/workshop, great room, bedroom with private bath and tons of storage.

$289,900

$13 4 , 9 0 0 C O N N IE REPPUH N reppuhn@aol.com

989.239.2895

D ONNA T E T IL

donna.tetil@gmail.com

989.714.5675


For all listings, visit c21signaturerealty.com

2088 N ROLLING RIDGE DR, LARKIN TOWNSHIP 2008 Cobblestone lodge-craftsman style home offers traditional luxury & exceptional floor plan built with quality and attention to detail. A feeling of rich warmth radiates throughout the home. The open kitchen is a chefs dream with expansive granite counter space, large island, and state of the art stainless steel appliances. Cherry cabinetry, hardwood floor, recessed lighting, pendant lighting, and a walk-in pantry. This home features 9’ foot ceilings throughout, 2 fireplaces, office with coffered ceiling, main floor

$45 9 , 9 0 0

110 E MAIN STREET 304, MIDLAND Located within Downtown Midland’s The H Residence, Mid Century Modern Meets Mother Nature to create a warm and inviting living space. Clean lines intermingle with wonderful warm exotic woods, stone, cloth walls and upholstery. The Living space features an impressive built in bar with refrigerator drawers, wine cooler and unique backlit onyx tile backsplash. Walnut flooring, feature walls and doors intermingle with a beautiful zebra wood kitchen and closet system. The stunning master suite includes a large well-appointed bathroom leading to expansive walk in closet. Beautifully appointed laundry room with side by side quiet and energy efficient washer and steam dryer. Includes access to a beautiful covered patio with ornate limestone balustrades.

$89 5 , 0 0 0

D EN ISE F LA DEBOE

Denise@denisehasyourhome.com

989.600.9845

laundry, and a stunning finished lower level. Wrought iron staircase welcomes you into the 2 story foyer leading upstairs to 4 bdrms. Tranquil master suite boasts a graciously sized master bath and large walk in closet. Additional bdrms all have dual closets. Outside you will find nothing but privacy in the impeccably maintained backyard with inground pool, entertaining area, and abundant grass area. Certified 5+ Energy Star approved & MI GreenBuilt Certification.


For all listings, visit c21signaturerealty.com

6055 SHADBUSH, SAGINAW TWP Woods Preserve 6 bed home. Open floor plan with Cathedral ceiling. Tile floors in the kitchen & baths. 1st floor laundry. Master suite includes a gas fireplace & private bath. 3 other main floor bedrooms, plus a formal dining room. Finished basement w/family room, 2 bedrooms & a full bath. Kitchen leads to stamped patio. 3 car attached garage.

$36 9 , 9 0 0

7 6 0 6 S FO RDNE Y, S AINT C HARL ES Country living at it’s best. Built in 2013 this home has four bedrooms, 3 full and 1 half bath. First floor in-law suite. Complete with private bath and kitchen. Could be the master suite. Three other bedrooms and second floor laundry. Nice private setting with lots of trees and a pond. Free high-speed internet.

Home with 5 ACRES: $ 2 4 9,9 0 0 D IA N A BA Y

dianabay@sbcglobal.net

Home with 20 ACRES: $ 2 8 4 ,9 0 0

989.798.7898

5675 BAY, SAGINAW

5560 GRATIOT, SAGINAW

Excellent investment on Bay Rd. near SVSU. Tenants include; Bicycle Village, Game On, Jett’s Pizza, Hockey World, and more.

Excellent office building in the heart of Saginaw Twp. Gratiot Rd. visibility, multiple tenant opportunity. Class A.

37,500 SF | $3,100,000 | $82.67 PSF

15,860 SF | $ 935,000 | $58.95 PSF

9 89.921.7002 KEN KUJAWA

kenneth.kujawa@century21.com

BRIDGETTE STALLINGS BridgetteStallingsC21@gmail.com

MARK MORFORD marksmorford@yahoo.com

For all commercial listings, visit c21commercialteam.com


uniquely you

Define Life... Your Way Define Life... Your Way High ceilings, expansive windows, and High ceilings, expansive windows, and open floor plans create a canvas for your open floor plans create a canvas for your personal tastes. You have the ability to personal tastes. You have the ability to create a space that reflects your unique create a space that reflects your unique individual style and preferences. individual style and preferences. Move away from the cares and burdens of Move away from the cares and burdens of ordinary home ownership. Join us at the ordinary home ownership. Join us at the corner of urban and elegance. corner of urban and elegance. Shell spaces start from the mid $600,000’s Shell spaces start from the mid $600,000’s

DOWNTOWN MIDLAND DOWNTOWN MIDLAND

The H Residence Sales Center: The Residence Sales837-2300 Center: 117 H E. Main (989) 117 E. Main (989) 837-2300 HResidence.com HResidence.com Denise Denise Fladeboe Fladeboe

Jan Jan Hauck Hauck

Tina Tina Patnode Patnode

Matt Matt Rapanos Rapanos


parenting tips

STRONG

ENOUGH A focus on strength, not weakness, prepares kids to take on the world. BY AMANDA LORENCZ, LLMSW

E

mphasis on what someone does well rather than on weaknesses can greatly contribute to one’s success now and in the future. Learning to recognize strengths can be especially helpful with children, who are just beginning to learn about their world and everything around them. When kids know what they’re good at, they have a better understanding of themselves and what makes them perfectly unique. In turn, this pumps up their self-esteem and confidence.

Here are some tips for better supporting children as they develop their strong points.

• Become a better observer of children’s behavior. Write down the special, unique qualities and abilities that you see in them.

• Let children know when you have witnessed them using a particular talent.

• Encourage activities that will help your children AMANDA LORENCZ, LLMSW, is the group clinician at the Sexual Assault Center of Child and Family Services. As a therapist, she empowers her clients, allowing them to recognize their strength and resilience.

develop their assets.

• Make noticing and communicating children’s

capabilities a regular part of your routine to help children show their gifts to the rest of the world.

April 2017 | Great Lakes Bay Family 9


(Painting in the open air)

E N T E R TA I N M E N T

CENTER

Come for the games . . . stay for the food!

V A L L E Y L A N E S M I

June 12-17, 2017

FA M I LY

. C O M

En Plein Air Festival

VALLE Y LANE S 5021 Bay City Rd, Midland . 989.496.3940

Great Lakes Bay

•Kid’s Day •Quick Paint Events •Movie Night with Riverside Saginaw Film Festival •Arty Soil Luncheon •Many more great activities! Look for artists throughout the week painting in Saginaw, Bay City and Midland. Watch as artists capture the scene to create a plein air piece of artwork. 1126 N. Michigan Ave Saginaw, MI 48602 989.754.2491

ARCADE . BUMPER CARS . LASER MAZE . MINI GOLF


Q A

hodgepodge

&

Parents pose their most perplexing questions

Q. Dear Chick: My 15-year-old son always leaves some food or beverage behind every time he eats and drinks. He even leaves about an inch of grape juice, which he loves, in his glass. I tell my other two sons that their brother is leaving something behind each time to appease the gods. Is this kind of teasing to create a change in habits OK? ~ Concerned Teaser

A. Dear Concerned Teaser: I suggest you consider making it alright for your son to leave behind some of his food and beverage. Having to eat or drink all of what’s in front of them is asking kids to stuff themselves even if they’re no longer hungry. Thin people stop eating when they’re satisfied. Overweight people don’t recognize when they are full, or they recognize it and keep on eating anyway. It’s better to teach kids to stop when they’re full. If waste is a concern, help them learn to take smaller portions in the first place and return for seconds if they desire more. Best wishes, CHICK MOORMAN Chick Moorman, from Merrill, is an author and professional speaker who helps parents and teachers raise responsible, caring, conscious children. Reach him through www. chickmoorman.com.

pet picker

GUINEA PIGS Highly social guinea pigs communicate through squeaks, and they “popcorn,” or jump in the air, when happy. These herbivores grow up to 10 inches long, and they live about eight years.

PROs:

● Easy to handle ● Naturally stay clean; rarely need baths

CONs:

● Weekly cage cleaning and bi-weekly bedding change required

curious kids

DID YOU KNOW...

April showers bring May flowers—and worms! Locally, you’ll see earthworms (or night crawlers, angleworms, or rain worms) most often, though there are more than 6,000 species of worms in the world. Every earthworm is both male and female, breathes through its skin (they don’t have lungs), and can grow to be 14 inches long. Wow!

● Small animals potentially carry infectious diseases; not ideal for children younger than 5

April 2017 | Great Lakes Bay Family 11


Jennifer Schau DDS 5545 Colony Dr. North, Saginaw, MI 989-799-0675

www.jenniferschaudds.com

Braces Invisalign® (2017 Premier Provider) Oral Cancer Screening Sleep Apnea Treatment

Ice Cream Made in the Great Lakes Bay Region

Ic kes e Cre a L

Co. am

Great

Our family owned business is a haven for ice cream lovers! We bring you truly exceptional homemade ice cream served in a fun, friendly atmosphere. Each batch of artisanal ice cream is made in our Midland store using hand- selected ingredients from the Great Lakes Region. From wholesome favorites to exotic new flavors!

901 E. Ashman • Midland • (989) 698-0173 greatlakesicecreamcompany.com

NEW PATIENTS WELCOME General Dentistry •Healthy Teeth for Life •Routine Cleanings •Fillings •Sealants •Emergency Dentistry •Extractions •Fluoride Treatments

Restorations •Bonding •Bridges •Crowns •Dentures •Implants

Cosmetic Dentistry •Bonding •Implants •Invisalign® •Veneers •Whitening


get outdoors

TO THE FORT!

Outdoor play places are fun for the whole family. BY DENNIS PILASKE

S

pring is here, the sun holds the promise that warm weather is on the way, and everyone is anxious to get outside. My advice? Encourage your kids to head outdoors and build a fort. One of my favorite pastimes as a kid was building forts around our family farm, especially in the woods near our house. I would play for hours, letting my imagination soar in the humble structures created from the natural materials in the area. At the time, I had no idea all of the benefits reaped from constructing lean-to roofs and other structures. Fort-building encourages positive, frequent outdoor experiences, and it boosts confidence. Plus, nothing forges problem-solving skills quite like puzzling over ways to keep water from dripping on your head while daydreaming on a rainy afternoon. Kids love to create their own private places, so encourage the building of forts as a great way to enjoy nature—and just plain have fun.

FRAMING YOUR FORTRESS Kids are hardwired to know how to complete all types of projects, including creating a fort out of practically any type of material. Here are some tips as you get started helping your children with their construction project. ● Children seem to have the most fun when they can build forts of their own design with what’s on hand. ● A simple tarp draped over a cord strung between two trees can provide endless exploration and reflection time for kids.

DENNIS PILASKE

is director of interpretation at Midland’s Chippewa Nature Center. He manages adult and family programs, leading a variety of field trips and workshops that focus on Great Lakes history and traditional skills instruction.

● Sticks, logs, old Christmas trees, discarded grain bags, bales of hay, and leaves are all fair game for fort construction. ● If you and your family don’t have easy access to piles of natural materials, seek out large cardboard boxes, blankets, scrap lumber, and similar materials. Happy fort-building! April 2017 | Great Lakes Bay Family 13


We want to

share what’s

about the

great

you Great Lakes Bay Region with

anytime anywhere! www.greatlakesbaymag.com and

Check out our new website and discover local events, restaurants, and places to go. Our easy-to-navigate website features: 

Photos of people having fun at events around the region

Monthly Arts & Entertainment Guide

Dining Guide

Links to submit magazine travel photos and story ideas

A sign-up to receive a weekly event eBlast from Great Lakes Bay

And more!

Plus, learn more about becoming an advertiser or getting your Great Lakes Bay magazine subscription today!


Arts & Culture Corner

IMAGINATION STATION Coloring does more than create a pretty picture. BY DEBBIE ANDERSON

D

o you remember the excitement of opening a brand new box of crayons, smelling the wax, and sitting down for a prolonged session of coloring in your favorite coloring book? Coloring is not just a time-filler for kids. The learning and developmental benefits associated with coloring are many. It builds hand strength, motor skills, and handeye coordination. Color awareness, recognition, and decision-making are all developed through early coloring experiences, too. A current school of thought in early childhood education has turned away from the coloring book in lieu of promoting the blank page of a sketchbook for artistic expression. Kids still experience the benefits of coloring when creating their own images to fill in with crayons, paint, or colored pencil. Plus, they can find added success in completing their own creation. Whether your child’s preferred medium is the coloring book or the blank page, the coloring process provides learning benefits, starts conversations, and sparks some together time away from our electronic world.

HERE ARE SOME REASONS BEYOND LEARNING TO SET ASIDE TIME FOR COLORING. A sketchbook with blank pages allows young artists to choose and vary the creative subjects they want to explore, helping them document the world as they see it. Children can share what they are feeling by choosing colors that fit their mood.

DEBBIE ANDERSON

is assistant director of education at Midland Center for the Arts. At home, she’s head curator of a priceless collection of artwork produced by her daughter, Sydney.

A boost in self-confidence comes with completion of coloring tasks.

Patience is promoted when kids take the time and care to stay inside the lines of a coloring book or their own drawing. Suggesting ideas for kids to draw can encourage selfexpression in young sketch artists while alleviating any stress in coming up with their own concepts—and the process can turn into a fun game for the whole family.

April 2017 | Great Lakes Bay Family 15


TWO GREAT FREE FAMILY FUN EVENTS!

2017

MAY 26-28

HOT AIR BALLOON CHAMPIONSHIPS

THE WORLD’S LARGEST OLYMPIC STYLE EVENT FOR DOGS! Over 25 Fun Dog Events! Dock Diving & Disc Dog Competitions, Border Collie Sheep Herding Demos, Agility Demos & Competitions, Barn Hunt Demos, Wiener Dog Races, Upland & Waterfowl Demos

Enjoy viewing morning and late afternoon flights over downtown Frankenmuth! An awesome “Balloon Glow” event is featured each evening at River Place Shops Field. Visit with professional pilots and their crews.

MAY 27-28 FREE Admission for All!

All Dog Breeds Welcome

DOGBOWLFUN.COM

BALLOONS.BAVARIANINN.COM

925 S. Main Street, Frankenmuth MI, 1-800-600-0105


feature

R E T T I S Y B A B E H T WHAT

W

W E N K U O Y S ISHE ree n Plan a worry-f

ight out w

eep kids and ith 7 tips to k

ppy.

caregivers ha BY CHAUNIE

BRUSIE

April 2017 | Great Lakes Bay Family 17


feature

S

pending time with a babysitter can be a positive and fun experience for your children, and having one who’s just a phone call away gets you out of the house, for work or even some play of your own. To make sure he or she will come back for another day or evening, keep these sitter-approved tips in mind.

“EVEN THOUGH YOU SET THE RULES, IT HELPS TO SET THE TONE THAT WHEN YOU’RE GONE, I’M IN CHARGE.” It’s important for your children to see the babysitter you choose as an authority figure, so be sure to respect the sitter’s wishes. Call a family meeting with the babysitter before you leave to outline any special rules he has—and your expectations for the kids to follow them.

“I LOVE YOUR KIDS, BUT LET’S BE HONEST—I’M ON THE CLOCK HERE!” Uh-oh! You’re at work, and you get called into an emergency meeting that is going to keep you past your designated return

18 Great Lakes Bay Family | April 2017

time, or you hit some traffic on your way back from dinner. What do you do? Ideally, let the babysitter know ahead of time about what the plan will be for unexpected delays. Make sure you have a phone number to call her, and be sure to compensate for the extra time and inconvenience.

“LAUNDRY IS DEFINITELY A BIG NO-NO.” Although it may be tempting, don’t expect your sitter to complete a load of chores from your detailed to-do list. Instead, focus on what’s most important. And that’s probably not making sure the dishes get done or your house is cleaned while you’re out for the night and your babysitter is caring for your children. Encourage him to interact with your children and leave behind a fun-things-to-do list.

“CHILDREN WILLING TO HELP OUT WILL LET ME GET MY JOB DONE.” If you have children of different age groups, don’t be afraid to let the “big” kids help out while you’re gone. Older children tend to welcome the opportunity to make their parents proud and show off a little to the babysitter, so before you leave, give


HE T T E G R O F DON’T

E G D I FR FORM

them each a task to do, such as being in charge of cleaning up the dinner dishes or sweeping the floor.

“DON’T BE AFRAID TO ASK ME IF I’M CERTIFIED IN CPR. I’VE GOT THE CARD TO PROVE IT.”

BY CHAUNIE BRUSIE

It’s essential to leave a list of everything your babysitter might need to know to care for your children and deal with an emergency when you’re out of the house. Posting important numbers and information on the fridge or designated place is a must.

If your child has special medical needs, be sure that your babysitter is equipped to handle them. Although emergencies can happen, if your children need routine medication, such as an inhaler, it’s best to discuss a plan ahead of time to ensure your children get the proper care. Some solutions might include arranging for your sitter to get advanced training from the American Red Cross (visit www.redcross. org to find a class near you), or do a run-through with her on how to administer the medication properly. It’s important to keep in mind that your babysitter is not a doctor or nurse, but you can work together to figure out a way to meet your child’s needs. And all babysitters should attend a basic CPR and first aid class.

Cut out this handy form to share all of the details your sitter needs to know before you go. CUT HERE

Important #s and Info

“MAKING MONEY FOR A MOVIE NIGHT? IT’S A WIN-WIN.”

Mom’s Cell Phone #: __________________________

Sure, you may feel a little strange paying your babysitter to eat snacks and pop in a movie with your kids, but a night out is a rare treat—for all of you. So don’t worry about the occasional bribe or indulgence. The important thing is that everyone can relax and have fun.

Where We’ll Be: _______________________________

“A LITTLE EXTRA PAY MIGHT JUST MEAN THAT I WILL SUDDENLY BE FREE NEXT WEEKEND WHEN YOU CALL FOR A SITTER, TOO.”

________________________________________________

Dad’s Cell Phone #: ___________________________

# of Where We’ll Be: __________________________ Back-up Emergency Contact Name: Back-up Emergency Contact #: ________________________________________________ Mealtime Instructions: _______________________

What’s the going rate for babysitters these days? The rate for your babysitter will depend on how many children you have, what kind of childcare duties the sitter will be performing, and how long the sitter will be in your home. One of the best ways to figure out how much to pay a sitter is to ask other nearby families for their rates, taking into consideration weekend and holiday pay. And when in doubt, don’t be afraid to ask your potential caregivers if they have set rates.

________________________________________________ Bedtime Instructions: ________________________ ________________________________________________ Allergies: _____________________________________ ________________________________________________

Hiring a babysitter for your children can be a positive experience for the entire family. Just be sure to keep the lines of communication open, set clear expectations, and work together to focus on what’s most important for all of you: keeping your little ones safe and happy.

Medication Instructions: _____________________ ________________________________________________ Special Notes: _______________________________ ________________________________________________ CUT HERE

________________________________________________ ________________________________________________


feature

D E Z I S T N PI

S R E N R U T E G PA

O

ders rt young rea o p s n a tr to s te storie . k their favori s of wondrous learning ic p rs e h c a e re T into adventu and listeners BY STACEY

TETLOFF

ne night you can be a dastardly pirate, taking away treasure with a mighty “Aaahrrr.” The next, you visit a regal queen in the enchanted kingdom of Allarnia, bowing to her grace and joining her merry court of jesters. It’s all possible with the magic of books. Seven local teachers share their favorite grade-appropriate stories to read to or with children. With a quick trip to your local library or bookstore, you have the perfect tool to spread the joy of reading and show young readers just how far they can go with a good book and a little imagination.

20 Great Lakes Bay Family | April 2017


PRESCHOOL

Megan Roeser, a preschool teacher for the Great Start Readiness Program at North Elementary in the Birch Run School District, recommends the Llama Llama series by Anna Dewdney for helping just-starting readers with rhyming skills. The detailed illustrations are sure to keep little ones interested and engaged. It’s a staple in both Roeser’s classroom and on her own 3-year-old daughter’s bookshelf.

MORE TOP PRESCHOOL STORIES

• Pete the Cat series of books by Eric Litwin and James Dean • Owl Babies by Martin Wadell • The Kissing Hand by Audrey Penn

“Llama Llama red pajama gets two kisses from his mama, snuggles pillow soft and deep… Baby Llama goes to sleep.”

KINDERGARTEN

Bangor Lincoln Elementary, in the Bangor Township School District, kindergarten teacher Jennifer Derocher suggests The Very Hungry Caterpillar by Eric Carle as a must-read selection. The story helps with everything from math and counting to science to reading skills, including retell and comprehension. Just-starting-out readers will enjoy not only the simple text but also the beautiful pictures.

MORE TOP KINDERGARTEN STORIES • • • •

Brown Bear, Brown Bear by Bill Martin, Jr. There Was an Old Lady series by Lucille Colandro Snowmen at Night by Caralyn Buehner Click, Clack, Moo: Cows That Type by Doreen Cronin

~ Llama Llama Red Pajama, Anna Dewdney

“In the light of the moon a little egg lay on a leaf. One Sunday morning the warm sun came up … and POP, out of the egg came a tiny, very hungry caterpillar.” ~ The Very Hungry Caterpillar, Eric Carle

April 2017 | Great Lakes Bay Family 21


feature “‘What are we going to do now, Jessie?’ Benny asked his sister. ‘Well, Benny,’ answered Jessie, ‘we’ll go exploring and look for treasures.’”

“Just like Elizabeth and Sarah, Charlie has two houses, two beds, two families who love him. He’s a lucky cat.”

~ The Boxcar Children, Gertrude Chandler Warner

~ Charlie Anderson, Barbara Abercrombie

FIRST GRADE

SECOND GRADE

MORE TOP FIRST-GRADE STORIES

MORE TOP SECOND-GRADE STORIES

Alison Pratt, a first-grade teacher at Hemmeter Elementary in Saginaw Township, makes sure to read The Boxcar Children by Gertrude Chandler Warner aloud to her students every year. Pratt says that Warner’s use of vivid imagery supports children’s ability to form a mental image from a story, something that little readers need to build the strategies to develop more complex skills. Plus, Pratt says the students, “enjoy hearing how inventive and industrious the children are in the story. Students make connections to their own lives and learn a great deal about the past.”

• The Dot by Peter H. Reynolds • Babymouse! series by Jennifer and Matthew Holm • Any Story by Mo Willems

Nicole Bowen, a second-grade teacher at Meridian Elementary School in Sanford, likes to read Charlie Anderson by Barbara Abercrombie to her students to demonstrate how to make story plot predictions. The main character, Charlie, has two homes, but both families are unaware of the other or where Charlie goes in the mornings and where he comes from in the evenings. Bowen says, “This book is always a favorite in my class because a lot of my students connect with the story. Many children come from split homes and have two families that love them, just like Charlie’s two families.”

• Enemy Pie by Derek Munson • Battle Bugs series by Jack Patton • Ready, Freddy series by Abby Klein

THIRD GRADE

Lorri Feriend, a teacher for 23 years, currently teaches in a third-grade classroom at Carrollton Elementary School. A story she makes sure to read to the students each year is Mr. Peabody’s Apples by Madonna. Kids learn so many valuable life lessons from the story, from why they shouldn’t be bullies to telling the truth if they do something wrong.

MORE TOP THIRD-GRADE STORIES

• Chester’s Way by Kevin Henkes • Buzzy the Bumblebee by Denise Brennan-Nelson • Freedom on the Menu by Carole Boston Weatherford

“‘There is one more thing,’ said Mr. Peabody. ‘Now you must go and pick up all the feathers.’ ‘I don’t think it’s possible to pick up all the feathers,’ Tommy replied. ‘It would be just as impossible to undo the damage that you have done by spreading the rumor that I am a thief,’ said Mr. Peabody. ‘Each feather represents a person in Happyville. ... Next time, don’t be so quick to judge a person. And remember the power of your words.’” ~ Mr. Peabody’s Apples, Madonna

22 Great Lakes Bay Family | April 2017


FOURTH GRADE

One of Shepherd Elementary School’s fourth-grade teachers, Rachel Russell, can’t say enough about how much fun Clementine by Sara Pennypacker is to read aloud to her students. Fourth-graders will love the stories about all the crazy situations Clementine gets herself into. “This book is a riot, and even I can’t help but laugh when I read it aloud,” Russell says.

MORE TOP FOURTH-GRADE STORIES

• The Invention of Hugo Cabret by Brian Selznick • Everything on It by Shel Silverstein

“I have not had so good of a week. Well, Monday was a pretty good day, if you don’t count Hamburger Surprise at lunch and Margaret’s mother coming to get her. Or the stuff that happened in the principal’s office when I got sent there to explain that Margaret’s hair was not my fault and besides she looks okay without it, but I couldn’t because Principal Rice was gone, trying to calm down Margaret’s mother. Someone should tell you not to answer the phone in the principal’s office, if that’s a rule. Okay, fine, Monday was not so good of a day.”

FIFTH GRADE

Maryanne Lipovsky is a 16-year veteran in the classroom, and she’s currently teaching fifth grade at Adams Elementary in Midland. Though she has so many favorite stories, Out of My Mind by Sharon M. Draper is one that she always shares with students. The story’s heroine, Melody, a little girl with cerebral palsy, shows children the importance of being empathetic, humble, and open-minded. Plus, the author uses figurative and vocabulary-building words such as terse, snicker, petulant, and flail to bolster language skills.

MORE TOP FIFTH-GRADE STORIES • • • • •

The Witches by Roald Dahl Matlida by Roald Dahl Wonder by R.J. Palacio Because of Mr. Terupt by Rob Buyea Maniac Magee by Jerry Spinelli

~ Clementine, Sara Pennypacker

“Everybody uses words to express themselves. Except me. And I bet most people don’t realize the real power of words. But I do. Thoughts need words. Words need a voice.” ~ Out of My Mind, Sharon M. Draper

April 2017 | Great Lakes Bay Family 23


BUILDING O D N FFOR

Your Future OUR FUTURE

The F. P. Horak Company’s Straits Drive expansion shows our commitment to the community, to our customers and employees, and to using advanced technology in delivering print and marketing solutions. 1311 Straits Drive, Bay City, MI 48706

fphorak.com

800.735.6505


FAMILY

FUN ACTIVITY GUIDE

April - July 2017

Art and Museums Exhibit: Mingled Visions—Images from the North American Indian Collection by Edward S. Curtis. April 1 – May 21. Free admission. Forty original photogravure prints, with a popular mix of famous images, including “Geronimo.” Marshall M Fredericks Sculpture Museum, SVSU, University Center; 989-964-7125, www.marshallfredericks.org Exhibit: Small Works Juried Show. April 4 – 30. Art Reach Morey Family Gallery, Mt Pleasant; 989-773-3689, www. artreachcenter.org Exhibit: Chromatic Drawing. April 15 – May 27. Admission $9. Colored pencil drawings from artists across the United States, including members of the Colored Pencil Society of America. Highly detailed images. Alden B Dow Museum of Science and Art, Midland Center for the Arts, Midland; 989631-8250, www.mcfta.org Exhibit: 4th Congressional District Art Competition & Midland Area Schools Art Show. April 28 – May 27. Admission $9. Local artists’ pieces, including students from Midland Area Schools. Alden B Dow Museum of Science and Art, Midland Center for the Arts, Midland; 989-631-8250, www. mcfta.org Exhibit: Design Zone: Behind the Scenes. Through April 30. Admission $9. Visitors may go behind the scenes and see how video game developers, music producers, roller coaster designers, and other creative problem-solvers use math to do amazing things. Midland Center for the Arts, Midland; 989-631-8250, www.mcfta.org

Exhibit: Drawn Out: An Invitational. May 20 – September 2. Admission $9. Featuring works from across America, drawing realizes the ultimate depiction. Alden B Dow Museum of Art and Science, Midland; 989-631-8250, www.mcfta.org Exhibit: Creative Cardinals. May 26 – June 17. Free admission. Invitational exhibition of creative artwork by Saginaw Valley State University faculty and staff. Marshall M Fredericks Sculpture Museum, SVSU, University Center; 989-964-7125, www. marshallfredericks.org Exhibit: Studio School Student and Faculty Exhibitions. June 24 – July 1, July 5 – September 2. Admission $9. Featuring both student- and faculty-work of the art classes at Alden B. Dow Museum of Science and Art. Alden B Dow Museum of Science and Art, Midland; 989-631-8250, www.mcfta.org Exhibit: Oaxacan Folk Art. June 24 – September 30. Free admission. Clay and carved-wood sculptures from seven indigenous artists who use craft techniques of Oaxaca. Marshall M Fredericks Sculpture Museum, SVSU, University Center; 989-9647125, www.marshallfredericks.org

Attractions Music Time! Every Tuesday, 9:30 – 10 a.m. Admission fee/free to members. Boogie down with Music Dan. Learn songs, make friends, and get the wiggles out. Mt Pleasant Discovery Museum, Mt Pleasant; 989-3173221, www.mpdiscoverymuseum.org Toddler Time. Every Wednesday, 11 – 11:30 a.m. and 1 – 1:30 p.m. Admission.

Sing, dance, create, explore, and enjoy developmentally targeted projects. MidMichigan Children’s Museum, Saginaw; 989399-6626, www.michildrensmuseum.com Dog Days of Summer. Wednesdays, June – July. Themed, weekly gatherings. Fun for humans and four-legged friends. Imerman Dog Park, Saginaw Township; www.glbas.org Paint Time. Every Thursday, 10 – 11 a.m. Admission fee/free to members. Area is set up and ready for all ages to enjoy making and painting crafts. Mt Pleasant Discovery Museum, Mt Pleasant; 989-317-3221, www. mpdiscoverymuseum.org Children’s Story Time at Dow Gardens. Every Friday at 10 a.m. Dow Gardens, Midland; 989-631-2677, www.dowgardens. org Pretzel Rolling at Bavarian Inn Restaurant. Fridays, May – July, 6 – 9 p.m. Free event. Weekly entertainment in downtown Frankenmuth. www.frankenmuth.org Midland County Historical Society: HandsOn History Days. Friday and Saturday of the third weekend each month, 11 a.m. – 2 p.m. Family-focused, interactive, and informational drop-in programs for the community to discover and preserve local heritage. Midland Center for the Arts, Midland; 989-631-5930, www.mcfta.org Kids Fly Free. Second Saturday of each month, 9 a.m. – 12 p.m. Children ages 8 – 17 are invited to learn about aviation and experience flying for free. Jack Barstow Airport, Midland; 989-835-3231, www. eaa1093.org

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FAMILY FUN ACTIVITY GUIDE April - July 2017 Authentic Japanese Tea Ceremony. Second Saturday of each month, 2 p.m. Admission $8. Authentic formal Japanese Tea Ceremony in the Saginaw-Tokushima Friendship Garden, hosted by persons in kimono. Reservations encouraged. Japanese Cultural Center & Tea House, Saginaw; 989759-1648, www.japaneseculturalcenter.org Charlin’s Book Nook Presents “Read to Me with Brittany.” Every Sunday, 2:30 – 3:30 p.m. For children ages 2 – 10; snacks provided. Charlin’s Book Nook, Frankenmuth; 989-652-2900, www.charlinsbooknook.com Kids Eat Free Sundays at Dow Diamond. Every Sunday, April – September (home games). Admission. Kids 12 and younger receive a free hot dog, chips, and 16-ounce drink and can run the bases following the game. Dow Diamond, Midland; 989-8372255, www.loons.com Science Sundays. Every other Sunday, check online calendar to ensure, 1 p.m. $7. Themed science experiments led by a play-facilitator. Mt Pleasant Discovery Museum, Mt Pleasant; 989-317-3221, www. mpdiscoverymuseum.org Creative Kids Workshops. Weekly, times vary by topic: pottery painting; glass; mosaics; clay. Both locations. Painterly Pottery, Saginaw, 989-401-7455, and Painterly Pottery, Bay City, 989-895-1029; www.painterlypottery.com Downtown Saginaw Farmers Market. May – October, new location at SVRC Marketplace (formerly Saginaw News building) in downtown Saginaw. Produce, honey, baked goods, and vendors with locally made food choices. SVRC Marketplace, Saginaw; 989-758-2500, ext 228, www. saginawfarmersmarket.org Frankenmuth Farmers Market. Wednesdays – Saturdays, 12:30 – 5:30 p.m. Locally grown produce and vendors. 534 N Main St, Frankenmuth; 989-295-9766, www. frankenmuthfarmersmarket.org Marketplace Bay City. Indoor, year-round market. Produce, fresh fish, artisan cheeses, flowers, and vendors. 401 Center Ave, Bay City; www.marketplacebaycity.com Midland Area Farmers Market. May – October. Produce, flowers, honey, and baked goods. Near the Tridge, downtown Midland; 989-839-9901, www.macc.org

by local dental and health professionals. Meet the Easter Bunny, egg hunt, games, crafts, and prizes. Mid-Michigan Children’s Museum, Saginaw; 989-399-6626, www. michildrensmuseum.com Dow Gardens Butterflies in Bloom. April 1 – April 16, 10 a.m. – 4 p.m.; Late Night Wednesdays through April 16, 10 a.m. – 7:30 p.m. Admission $5/$1 students. Colorful butterflies from around the world; crafts, activities, and tours available. Dow Gardens, Midland; 989-631-2677, www. dowgardens.org Grandparents Play Free. April 2 and May 7, 12 – 5 p.m. Admission/free for grandparents. Mid-Michigan Children’s Museum, Saginaw; 989-399-6626, www.michildrensmuseum.com Opening Day at Dow Diamond: Great Lakes Loons vs. Lansing Lugnuts. April 6, 6:05 p.m. Parade takes place on Main Street prior to gates opening. Enjoy Family Feast Night and opening day. Dow Diamond, Midland; 989-837-2255, www.loons.com Sensory Night. April 7 and May 5, 6 – 8 p.m. Admission $5/free for members. A night for all to play in an inclusive, sensoryfriendly environment. Mt Pleasant Discovery Museum, Mt Pleasant; 989-317-3221, www. mpdiscoverymuseum.org Live Animal Encounter: A Family Discovery Day. April 8. Discover animals native to Michigan in this live animal show. Suggested for ages 4 and older. Midland Center for the Arts, Midland; 989-631-8250, www.mcfta.org Fireside Chats. April 13 (monthly, second Thursdays), 2 p.m. Free admission. Listen and learn as long-time residents share recollections. Midland County Historical Society, Midland; 989-631-8250, www.mcfta.org Great Lakes Loons vs. Fort Wayne TinCaps. April 20, 6:05 p.m. Admission $6.50. Visit website for complete schedule. Dow Diamond, Midland; 989-837-2255, www. loons.com Earth Day: Children’s Zoo Party for the Planet. April 22, 10 a.m. – 2 p.m. First 400 visitors receive free admission. Games and activities focused on protecting Earth. Children’s Zoo at Celebration Square; Saginaw; 989-759-1408, www.saginawzoo.com

Mount Pleasant Farmers Market. Thursdays (Market Park) and Saturdays (City Hall), through October 31, 7:30 a.m. – 2 p.m. Fruits, vegetables, plants, and more. Mt Pleasant; www.mt-pleasant.org

Wetland Wake-Up Day. April TBD. Get ready for spring with fun, family-focused activities; construct a migratory bird kite and enter it in the Kite Fly-Up, take part in guided hikes, build butterfly houses, and more. Bay City State Recreation Area, Bay City; 989-6670717, www.friendsofpark.org

Candy-less Easter Egg Hunt. April 1, 10 a.m. – 4 p.m. Admission. Sponsored

Tea with Fairies and Dragons. April TBD. Guests are encouraged to dress up as

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fairytale characters. Event includes tea, snacks, crafts, and games. Mt Pleasant Discovery Museum, Mt Pleasant; 989-3174903, www.mpdiscoverymuseum.org Summer Glow Nights. May – July, 8 – 11 p.m. Experience the park illuminated with LED sequence lighting, laser lights, and a glowing archway. Adventure Park at Frankenmuth; 248-429-7177, www. frankenmuthtrees.com Free Comic Book Day. May 6. Local celebration of annual, worldwide event. Meet superheroes, get illustrated as your favorite superhero, and receive a free comic book. Cashman’s Comics, Bay City; 989-895-1113, www.cashmanscomics.com Kids Discover Art Day. May 9, 9 a.m. – 2 p.m. Free. One-hour program for students K – 12 that includes a museum tour and art activity. Registration required. Marshall M Fredericks Sculpture Museum, SVSU, University Center; 989-964-7125, www. marshallfredericks.org Mother’s Day at the Zoo. May 14, 10 a.m. – 5 p.m. Free admission for moms and members; general admission for others. Crafts, activities, and a special day with mom. Children’s Zoo at Celebration Square, Saginaw, 989-759-1408, www.saginawzoo. com Fireworks Loontaculars. May 20, June 3, June 18, July 1, July 2, July 9, and July 23. Admission. Enjoy a free fireworks show after these home Loons games. Dow Diamond, Midland; 989-837-2255, www.loons.com Cemetery Tour. May 20, 1 p.m., 2 p.m., and 3 p.m. Admission $15. Discover unique information about Midland’s military veterans, graveside at the Midland Cemetery, from the Civil War to WWII. Learn about Victorian funerary customs and the significant contributions of community veterans. Midland County Historical Society, Midland; 989-631-8250, www. mcfta.org Memorial Day Parade. May 29, 11 a.m. Annual parade along South Washington Avenue to the Saginaw County Veterans Memorial Plaza at Hoyt Park. Saginaw; 989753-9168, www.prideinsaginaw.org Dahlia Hill Society Tuber Sale. May TBD, 8 a.m. – 4 p.m. Free admission. Hundreds of varieties at below retail cost: $2 each/$10 for six. Expert volunteers available to answer questions. Dahlia Hill, Midland; 989-6310100, www.dahliahill.org Great Lakes Loons vs. West Michigan Whitecaps. June 1, 7:05 p.m. For a complete schedule, visit website. Dow Diamond, Midland; 989-837-2255, www. loons.com


Bay City Independents Vintage Base Ball Club: Vintage Base Ball Games. June 10 and 24, 2 – 4 p.m. Free admission. Early19th century-style baseball: no fences or ball gloves, and an entertaining tour into bare-knuckled-style baseball. June 10: Ojibway Island, Saginaw, and June 24: Carroll Park, Bay City; 989-891-7363, www. baycitybaseball.com Science Café: Fire(Work)’d Up. June 15, 8 p.m. Free admission. Presentation of consumer and commercial fireworks, discussing how they work chemically, safety practices, and more. Followed by outdoor demonstrations, weather permitting. Alden B Dow Museum of Art and Science, Midland; 989-631-8250, www.mcfta.org Dinner Sails. June 17 and July 8, 15, and 29, 6 – 10 p.m. Tickets $70, dinner included. Climb aboard the Appledore tall ships for a delicious dinner and a sunset sail on the Saginaw Bay. BaySail, Bay City; 989-8955193, www.baysailbaycity.org Father’s Day at the Zoo. June 18, 10 a.m. – 5 p.m. Dads and members receive free admission. Enjoy special crafts and a day with dad at the zoo. Children’s Zoo at Celebration Square, Saginaw, 989-7591408, www.saginawzoo.com Summer Art Camps. June 19 – July 28, 9 a.m. – 3 p.m. $165 per child, per session. Five weeklong art camp sessions for children ages 8 – 10, 11 – 13, and 14 – 18. Registration required. Marshall M Fredericks Sculpture Museum, SVSU, University Center; 989-964-7125, www. marshallfredericks.org/summer-art-camp Midwest League’s All-Star Game. June 19 – 20, 7:05 p.m. Admission. For the second time ever, the Loons play host to the all-star game. Dow Diamond, Midland; 989-8372255, www.loons.com Jazz on Jefferson. June TBD, 4:45 – 8 p.m. Free event. A celebration along historic South Jefferson Avenue. Variety of performers, musicians, food vendors, a classic and antique car show, and architectural walking tours. Castle Museum of Saginaw County History, Saginaw; 989752-2861, www.castlemuseum.org Mid-Michigan Children’s Museum: 4th Annual Day with Dad. June TBD. Admission price includes a pancake brunch from 9 a.m. – 1 p.m., all-day admission to the museum, one free raffle ticket for hourly raffles (additional raffle tickets available for purchase), entertainment, and fun activities throughout the day. Every child leaves with a prize. MidMichigan’s Children’s Museum, Saginaw; 989399-6626, www.michildrensmuseum.com Cass River Colonial Encampment. July 15 – 16, 9 a.m. – 6 p.m. Free admission. 18thcentury encampment. Historical and battle

re-enactments, musket firing, tour military camps, and more. Frankenmuth River Place Shops, Frankenmuth; 989-652-6613, www. frankenmuthriverplace.com Stargazer Dinner Sail. July 22, 8 p.m. – 12 a.m. Tickets $80, dinner included. Relaxing evening under the stars in the Saginaw Bay from the deck of the Appledore tall ships. Learn more about the night sky from onboard astronomers. BaySail, Bay City; 989-8955193, www.baysailbaycity.org Antique Fire Muster. July 29, 8 a.m. – 12 p.m. Free admission. Parade at 10 a.m. Antique fire truck displays and pumping events. Heritage Park, Frankenmuth; 989652-3440, www.gliafaa.org Riverdays. July TBD, 7 a.m. – 10:30 p.m. Free admission. Riverboat rides, live entertainment, family and kids’ activities, mud volleyball tournament, great food, beer and wine tastings, and more. Chippewassee Park, Midland; 989-839-9661, www. midlandriverdays.com Bay City River Roar. Date TBD. Free admission. Professional powerboat racing along the Saginaw River. Visit the Kid Zone for fun and entertainment for kids of all ages, plus carnival rides and attractions. Veterans Memorial Park, Bay City; 989-684-8500, www.riverroar.com. Dow Gardens Summer Outdoor Movies. Dates TBD. Admission fee. Outdoor movies on an inflatable screen amidst the Dow Gardens. Bring a chair, blanket, and snacks. Dow Gardens, Midland; 800-362-4874, www. dowgardens.org Family Ecology Sail. Dates TBD. Tickets $35/$20 children. Learn about the Saginaw Bay ecosystems aboard the Appledore IV. Hands-on experience in weather, navigation, water quality, and more. Snacks and juice/ water included. BaySail, Wenonah Park, Bay City; 989-895-5193, www.baysailbaycity.org Le Tour de Mont Pleasant. Dates and times TBD. Free admission. A weekend of high action during the largest professional bicycle race in Michigan. Throughout Mt Pleasant; www.tourdemontpleasant.com Legends of the Saginaw Sail. Dates TBD, 11 a.m. – 2 p.m. Tickets $37/$27 children. Learn the fascinating history of the Saginaw River aboard the Appledore IV and Appledore V. A light lunch is served underway. BaySail, Wenonah Park, Bay City; 989-895-5193, www.baysailbaycity.org

Charity Child & Family Services: Strike Out Sexual Assault Bowl-a-Thon. April 7, 6:30 p.m. registration and 7 p.m. bowling. More than 200 supporters raise pledges. Proceeds

benefit the center’s continued efforts to offer no-cost services to victims of sexual violence and families. Stardust Lanes, Saginaw Township; 989-790-7500, ext 229, www. childandfamilysaginaw.org Covenant HealthCare Foundation: Covenant Kids Telethon. April 15, 12 – 5 p.m. Televised live on WNEM TV-5 from Mid-Michigan Children’s Museum. Proceeds benefit Covenant Kids and support funding for pediatric programs and equipment. For more information, call 989-583-4166, or visit www. covenantkidsmi.com Easter Breakfast. April 16, 8 – 11 a.m. Cost TBD. Pancakes, eggs, sausage, and beverages. Proceeds benefit Holy Cross Lutheran Church. Fellowship Hall, Holy Cross Lutheran Church, Saginaw; 989-793-9795, www.hcls.org Great Lakes Bay Animal Society: Annual Fast & Furriest 5K Run/Walk. April 29, 8:30 a.m. A fun-filled bonding experience for twolegged and four-legged friends. Proceeds benefit the Great Lakes Bay Animal Society. City Forest, Midland; www.glbas.org Covenant HealthCare Foundation: 8th Annual Go the Extra Mile for Covenant Kids USATF-sanctioned Half-marathon Run/ Hand Cycle, 5K Run/Walk, 1 Mile Fun Run. April 30, 8 a.m. Proceeds benefit Covenant Kids and enhance the care of children faced with hospitalization at Covenant HealthCare. Swan Valley High School, Thomas Township; www.covenantkidsrace.com Mt. Pleasant Discovery Museum: Music for the Museum. May date and time TBD. $25. Adult-only evening, live musical entertainment, hors d’ oeuvres, and beer and wine cash bar. Proceeds benefit Mt. Pleasant Discovery Museum. Mt Pleasant Discovery Museum, Mt Pleasant; 989-317-4903, www. mpdiscoverymuseum.org YWCA Great Lakes Bay Region: Riverside Art Festival. June 10 – 11. Downtown Bay City and along the Saginaw River, over 10,000 people enjoy beautiful artistry and entertainment. Over 100 artists and a KidZone. Proceeds support YWCA programs and services, including women’s economic empowerment and professional development. Downtown Bay City; 989-894-9055, www. ywcaglbr.org Valley Aero Club: Father’s Day Breakfast. June 18, 7 a.m. – 12 p.m. Free admission; fee for breakfast and plane rides. Father’s Day fly-in breakfast. Plane rides, raffle, kids train rides, and classic cars and motorcycles. Proceeds benefit the airport. James Clements Airport, Bay City; 989-684-3131 Community Village (an arm of Rescue Ministries of Mid-Michigan): Strawberry Festival. June 20, 3 – 8:30 p.m. Free

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FAMILY FUN ACTIVITY GUIDE April - July 2017 admission. Signature strawberry shortcake $5. A family-fun event with live music, food tent, homemade baked goods, games, and prizes for children. Proceeds benefit activity funds for senior citizens of Community Village. Grounds of Community Village, Saginaw Township; 989-792-5442, www. communityvillage.org 16th Annual Drop Everything and Read (DEAR) at the Zoo. June 21, 10 a.m. – 3 p.m. Admission fee. Features a free book for every child, animal-themed booth activities, author visits, storytelling, and amphitheater programs. Children’s Zoo at Celebration Square, Saginaw; 989-759-1408, www. saginawzoo.com Beach Wellness Day. June TBD. All-day fun in the sun. Volleyball teams compete on the shores of the Saginaw Bay; 5K, 10 K Walk/ Run and Kids’ Fun Run; car show, music, and concessions. Proceeds benefit the park. Bay City State Recreation Area, Bay City; 989667-0717, www.friendsofpark.org Party on McCarty. June – August, dates TBD. Entertainment begins at 5:30 p.m. Free event/$5 parking donation. Live entertainment, food vendors, and a beer and wine tent. Bring seating. Proceeds benefits improvements and opportunities for the kids who participate at the Saginaw Township Soccer Complex. Saginaw Township Soccer Association, Saginaw Township; 989-2951945, www.saginawsoccer.org VolkslÃufe (The People’s Race). July 3 – 4. Spaghetti dinner, live music, and fireworks on July 3. A 5, 10, and 20 K run, 5K walk, and 2K youth run on July 4. Heritage Park, Frankenmuth; 989-652-6106, www. volkslaufe.org Frankenmudder. July 15, 7 a.m. registration. Three-mile, boot-camp-style mud run, featuring challenging obstacles involving running, climbing, crawling, and swimming. Proceeds benefit Michigan’s Military and Space Heroes Museum. Heritage Park, Frankenmuth; 989-652-8005, www. michigansmilitarymuseum.com CAN Council Great Lakes Bay Region: 5th Annual Ducky Derby. Date TBD. Free admission. Family fun, inflatables, and children’s activities. Duck race down the Kawkawlin River for prizes. Proceeds benefit CAN Council child abuse prevention education programs and services for Saginaw and Bay counties. Behind Castaways Bar & Grille, Bay City; 989-671-1345 or 989-7527226, www.cancouncil.org

Expos Spring Art and Craft Show. April 8, 9 a.m. – 3 p.m. Admission $2/free for 10 and younger. Soaps, lotions, candles, purses, jewelry, clothing, pet treats and accessories,

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gourmet sampling, wood crafts, spring décor, and more. Horizons Conference Center, Saginaw Township; 989-781-9165, www. keepsakecollectionshows.com 3rd Annual Fly Fishing, Kayak & Canoe Swap Meet. April 15, 10 a.m. – 3 p.m. Admission $3, free for younger than 18. Birch Run Expo Center, Birch Run; www. birchrunexpos.com Super Duper Garage Sale. April 22, 9 a.m. – 3 p.m. Admission $3. Over 150 garage sales in one room. Birch Run Expo Center, Birch Run; www.birchrunexpos.com Mid-Michigan Super Mom2Mom Sale. April 22, 9 a.m. – 1 p.m. Admission $3. Strollers welcome. Shop gently used baby/children’s clothing, toys, baby gear, furniture, and maternity clothing all at garage sale-style prices. Birch Run Expo Center, Birch Run; www.birchrunexpos.com Birch Run Motorcycle Swap Meet. April 23, 10 a.m. – 4 p.m. Admission $7. Free parking. Birch Run Expo Center, Birch Run; 989-6244665, www.birchrunexpos.com Quilters Squared Quilt Show. April 28 – 29, 10 a.m. – 5 p.m. Admission $3. Annual springtime quilt show. Join the Midland Quilters Squared Quilt Guild at the Carriage House at Heritage Park. Midland County Historical Society, Midland; 989-631-8250, www.mcfta.org Scholastic Book Fair. May 2, 12 – 7 p.m., May 3, 10 a.m. – 7 p.m., and May 4, 9 a.m. – 1 p.m. Free admission. Find the perfect books to read together. Birch Run Expo Center, Birch Run; 989-624-4665, www. birchrunexpos.com Keepsake Collection Arts and Craft Show. June 16, 12 – 6 p.m., June 17, 10 a.m. – 6 p.m., June 18, 11 a.m. – 5 p.m., and July 28 – 30 (11 a.m. – 5 p.m.). Juried show and ample merchandise. Zehnder Park, Frankenmuth; 989-652-6106, www. keepsakecollectionshows.com

Festivals Osterbrunnen: Easter Celebration. April 1 – April 30. Frankenmuth mirrors the over 200-year-old Osterbrunnen German tradition of decorating Easter fountains. Downtown Frankenmuth; 989-652-6106, www. frankenmuth.org Zehnder’s Ragtime Festival. April 26, 6 p.m., April 27, 7 p.m., and April 28 – 29, 11:30 a.m. and 6 p.m. Featured pianist and emcee Bob Milne brings a variety of ragtime performers to the stage. Lunch and dinner concerts, vaudeville night, Friday night picnic and sing-a-long, and meet the artists. Reservations required. Zehnder’s Restaurant, Frankenmuth; 800-863-7999, ext 450, www. zehnders.com

58th Annual Shepherd Maple Syrup Festival. April 27 – 30. Meals $5/$3 children ages 5 – 12/free for children 5 and younger. Family-oriented festival with famous pancakes, sausage, and homemade maple syrup. Other activities include amusement rides, laser tag, queen pageant, arts and crafts, tractor pulls, bingo, and more. Throughout the village of Shepherd; 989-828-6486, www. shepherdmaplesyrupfest.org Frankenmuth Sale Fest. May 18 – 19, 9 a.m. Community-wide garage sales. Maps available at McDonald’s Restaurant in Frankenmuth or the Frankenmuth Chamber of Commerce. Around Frankenmuth; 989652-6106, www.frankenmuth.org Balloons over Bavaria. May 26 – 29. Free admission. Balloon launches, including Balloon Glow events each evening at River Place field, competitions, family-friendly activities, and Memorial Day recognition. Frankenmuth River Place Shops; 989-6527200, www.michiganfairsandfestivals.com Frankenmuth River Place Dog Bowl. May 27 – 28, 10 a.m. – 6 p.m. Free admission. A high energy event that showcases dogs running, jumping, diving, and retrieving. Best costume contest, fashion show, disc dog competitions, and more. Frankenmuth River Place Shops, Frankenmuth; 989-652-6613, www.frankenmuthriverplace.com Summer Art Fair. June 3 – 4, 10 a.m. – 5 p.m. Free admission. Always held outdoors on the first full weekend in June, rain or shine. Features works of over 100 artist booths along with food vendors, street musicians, artist demonstrations, and a children’s activity corner. Midland Center for the Arts, Midland; 989-631-8250, www.mcfta.org Frankenmuth Bavarian Festival. June 8 – 11. Admission; Sunday free. Sing and dance to Bavarian music played by costumed German bands. Taste the hearty Bavarian foods, plump bratwurst, barbecued chicken, and homemade pretzels. Harvey Kern Pavilion in Heritage Park, Frankenmuth; 877879-8919, www.frankenmuth.org Music from the Marsh. June – September, Saturdays, 7 p.m. A touring, cultural performing arts series on the outdoor lawn stage near the visitor center. Bay City State Recreation Area, Bay City; 989-667-0717, www.friendsofpark.org Art Reach of Mid Michigan’s 2015 Festival of Banners. June – October. Free. A community art event where people and groups of all ages promote art by creating large, colorful banners that are hung throughout the community of Mount Pleasant. Art Reach, Downtown Mt Pleasant; 989-773-3689, www. artreachcenter.org


Art & Garden Festival. June dates TBD, 10 a.m. – 3 p.m. Free admission. Over 35 art and gardening vendors, demonstrations and presentations, a silent auction, and homemade strawberry shortcake. Proceeds benefit the care and maintenance of the Lucille E. Andersen Memorial Rose Garden. Andersen Enrichment Center, Saginaw; 989759-1362, www.saginaw-mi.com Annual Bridgeport Bridge Fest. June dates TBD. Free admission. Parade, old-time car show, carnival, live music and entertainment tents, and more. Downtown Bridgeport; 989777-6831, www.bridgefestmi.com Free Fishing Festival. June dates TBD. Family fishing derby, youth fishing clinic, kid’s “kasting contest,” Michigan fisheries exhibits and presentations, crafts, and water safety. Designed to get your family hooked on fishing. Bay City State Recreation Area, Bay City; 989-667-0717, www.friendsofpark.org Greek Festival. June dates TBD. Free admission. Enjoy Greek food and pastries, music, dancing, vendors, and much more. St Demetrios Greek Orthodox Church, Saginaw Township; 989-793-8822 Bay City Fireworks Festival. July TBD. Daily admission $1 into Veterans Memorial Park/$5 for Wenonah Park. Fireworks display each of the first two nights, with the largest displays on the third grand finale night. Carnival midway, dozens of vendors, and local and regional entertainment in Wenonah Park right up until the fireworks begin. Bay City; www.baycityfireworksfest.net Annual Saginaw Chippewa Tribal National Pow-wow. Dates TBD. Native American dancing, singing, food, and crafts. Saginaw Chippewa Campground, Mt Pleasant; 989-775-4000, www.sagchip.org Auburn Cornfest. Dates TBA. Auburn; 989662-4001, www.auburncornfest.org Chesaning Showboat Music Festival. Dates TBA. Michigan’s oldest music festival features family fun and entertainment for young, old, and in-between. Chesaning Showboat Amphitheater, Chesaning; 989845-3055, www.gobop.com KCQ Free Country Music Fest. Date TBD. Free event. Featuring some of country music’s hottest stars out of Nashville. Ojibway Island, Saginaw; 989-752-8161, www.98fmkcq.com Mount Pleasant Annual Summer Festival. Dates TBD. Outdoor festival with live music, carnival, children’s parade, fireworks, food and beverage pavilion, vendors, raffles, and a Sunday classic car show. Mt Pleasant; 989-773-3378, www. mtpleasantwow.com

Munger Potato Festival. July TBD. Familyfun activities, with figure-eight derby, live music, carnival, and infamous potato bratwurst. 50 E Munger Rd, Munger; 989274-3813, www.mungerpotatofest.com

Tickets start at $34. Venezuelan guest pianist Gabriela Martinez joins MSO to perform this enduring favorite with panache and poetry. Midland Center for the Arts, Midland; 989631-8250, www.mcfta.org

Saginaw Bay Waterfowl Festival. Date TBD. Free admission. Michigan’s state championship duck- and goose-calling tournament, waterfowl stamp collection, arts and crafts show, carvings, parent-youths canoe race, dog retrieving, and more. Bay City State Recreation Area, Bay City; 989667-0717, www.friendsofpark.org

The Friends of Celtic Culture presents: Tannahil Weavers. May 6, 7:30 p.m. Admission $20. Premier Celtic group performs enthusiastic and foot-stomping lively music to reflective ballads. State Theatre, Bay City; 989-892-2660, www. statetheatrebaycity.com

Music, Theater & Film Beauty and the Beast. April 1 – 2, 7:30 p.m. Tickets $28 – $43/$18 – $33 students. Disney’s musical returns to stage, featuring loved tunes such as “Be Our Guest,” “Something There,” and “Beauty and the Beast.” Midland Center for the Arts, Midland; 989-631-8250, www.mcfta.org Be Our Guest Experience. April 2, 1 p.m. Admission $9. Prior to matinee performances, cupcakes, beverages, and opportunity to meet Belle in person. Ticket to performance not included. Midland Center for the Arts, Midland; 989-631-8250, www.mcfta.org Midland Symphony Orchestra Season Preview. April 7, 7:30 p.m. Admission $38/$15 students. Sneak peek of next season’s highlights. Audience is welcomed on stage after performance for reception. Midland Center for the Arts, Midland; 989-631-8250, www.mcfta.org Jungle Jack Hanna’s Into the Wild. April 9, 3 p.m. Admission $20 – $55. Respected ambassador between human and animal worlds, author, television personality, conservationist, and director emeritus of the Columbus Zoo and Aquarium brings his hands-on approach to the stage. Temple Theatre, Saginaw; 877-754-7469, www. templetheatre.com Youth Choirs Spring Concert. April 19, 7 p.m. Admission $8. Over 100 young musicians of Midland’s premier choral program for young singers. One-hour, familyfriendly show. Midland Center for the Arts, Midland; 989-631-8250, www.mcfta.org Earth’s Dinosaur Zoo Live. April 25. Admission. Interactive theatrical performance and life-like dinosaurs; suggested for ages 5 and older. Midland Center for the Arts, Midland; 989-631-8250, www.mcfta.org Men of Music Spring Show. April 28, 8 p.m. Admission $15. Including costumed skits, wholesome family fun, and the 50-voice Men of Music. Midland Center for the Arts, Midland; 989-631-8250, www.mcfta.org Midland Symphony Orchestra: Tchaikovsky and Grieg. April 29, 7:30 p.m.

My Fair Lady. May 11 – 13, 18 – 20, 8 p.m., and May 14 and 21, 3 p.m. Admission $22/$20 seniors/$10 students. Suitable for ages 8 and older. Enjoy this winner of six Tony Awards, frolicking dances, and classics “I Could Have Danced All Night” and “With a Little Bit of Luck.” Bay City Players, Bay City; 989-893-5555, www.baycityplayers.com Dorothy in Wonderland. June 15 – 17, 7:30 p.m. Admission $14/$10 students. Dorothy, Lion, Scarecrow, and Tin Man end up in Wonderland with Alice and the wicked Red Queen. Midland Center for the Arts, Midland; 989-631-8250, www.mcfta.org Camerata June Concert. June 25, 7 p.m. Admission $13. The human voice and music from the Renaissance to contemporary choral. Memorial Presbyterian Church, 1310 Ashman St, Midland; 989-631-8250, www. mcfta.org Jazz in the Garden. July 5, 12, 19, and 26, 7 p.m. Free admission to summer concert series. Bring your own chair. Andersen Enrichment Center & Lucille E Andersen Memorial Rose Garden, Saginaw; 989-7591362, www.saginaw-mi.com PRIDE Friday Night Live Concerts. July 14 – August 29. Free concert series; music changes weekly from blues to rock ’n’ roll to oldies and more. Children’s games, food vendors, and adult refreshments. Morley Plaza, Saginaw; 989-753-9168, www. prideinsaginaw.org Wednesday Free Concerts. June – July, Wednesdays, 7:30 p.m. Free event. A charming slice of American history, The Chemical City Band, operating since 1910, performs for the community. Nicholas Guenther Band Shell, Central Park, Midland; 989-837-6930, www.cityofmidlandmi.gov/ recreation Concert in the Park Series. June – August, Wednesdays, 7 p.m. Series of free concerts in the park. Tittabawassee Township Park, Freeland; 989-695-9512, www. tittabawassee.org Tunes by the Tridge. June – August, Thursdays, 7 – 9 p.m. Free event. Families bring blankets and lawn chairs to this 10-

April 2017 | Great Lakes Bay Family 29


FAMILY FUN ACTIVITY GUIDE April - July 2017 week concert series and spend Thursday evenings listening to great music near the Tridge. City of Midland Parks and Recreation, downtown Midland; 989-837-6930, www. downtownmidland.com Frankenmuth Women’s Club Presents: Free Concerts in the Park. June – August, Sundays, dates TBD. Free admission. Bring your chair or blanket. Concessions available. Memorial Park Band Shell, Frankenmuth; 989-652-4985, www. frankenmuthwomensclub.com Fridays at the Falls. July – August, Fridays, dates TBD. Free admission. Weather permitting. Third Street Waterfall Park, Bay City; 989-893-3573, www.downtownbaycity.com Lawn Chair Film Festival. July – August, Sundays, at dusk. Free. Bring lawn chairs or blankets and pack snacks, though some are available onsite, and enjoy classics to kid movies, plus live music. Old Town Saginaw, www.lawnchairfilmfestival.org Young People’s Summer Series. Dates TBD. Free admission. A series of concerts for the young and young-at-heart throughout the summer months at Wenonah Park. Wenonah Park, Bay City; 989-893-0343, www. bayartscouncil.org Wednesdays in the Park. Dates TBD. A series of free, outdoor concerts throughout the summer months at Wenonah Park. Bring a lawn chair or blanket. Wenonah Park, Bay City; 989-893-0343, www.bayartscouncil.org Dow Gardens Wednesday Lunchtime Concerts. Dates TBD. Admission fee. Listen to music during lunchtime in the dappled shade of the Birch Grove. Chairs, blankets, and picnics are welcome. Dow Gardens, Midland; 800-362-4874, www. dowgardens.org

Nature Spring Exploration Days. April 1 – 9, Monday – Saturday, 8 a.m. – 5 p.m., and Sundays and holidays, 12 – 5 p.m. Free admission. All ages welcome, younger than 18 with adult. Enjoy spring break from school at this indoor program that includes a variety of self-guided, hands-on exploration stations. Experiments, fun facts, crafts, and scavenger hunts. Chippewa Nature Center, Midland; 989-631-0830, www.chippewanaturecenter. org Families in Nature: Vernal Pools. April 8, 1 – 2 p.m. Free. All ages welcome, younger than 18 with adult. Program series for families. Outdoor program exploring vernal pools that appear each spring as snow melts and rain falls and wetland species, using dippers, nets, and pans. Chippewa Nature Center, Midland; 989-631-0830, www. chippewanaturecenter.org

30 Great Lakes Bay Family | April 2017

Nature’s Eggs Extravaganza. April 15, 10 a.m., 10:30 a.m., 11 a.m., and 11:30 a.m. Cost $10/$8 CNC members. Register by April 12. For children ages 3 to 12. Each child makes a personalized hunt bag and ventures into the woods to find eggs. Games, activities, and family fun. Chippewa Nature Center, Midland; 989-631-0830, www. chippewanaturecenter.org Experience Earth Day. April 22, 10 a.m. – 4 p.m. Free. All ages welcome, younger than 18 with adult. Celebrate the 47th Earth Day by planting a young tree or shrub, learning about invasive plants, building a bird house, and discovering ways to live a green lifestyle. Chippewa Nature Center, Midland; 989-6310830, www.chippewanaturecenter.org Port Crescent Hawk Watch. May 6, 8 a.m. – 6 p.m. Cost $40/$32 CNC members. Register by April 30. Ages 15 and older welcome, younger than 18 with adult. Journey with experienced trip leaders to Port Crescent State Park along the Saginaw Bay Birding Trail, a 3.5-mile walk. Transportation provided; participants should bring lunch, beverages, and snacks. Chippewa Nature Center, Midland; 989-631-0830, www. chippewanaturecenter.org   Spring Wildflower Walk. May 7, 2 – 3 p.m. Free. All ages welcome, younger than 18 with adult. Walk the Beech Maple Woods in search of Dutchman’s breeches, trout lily, bloodroot, spring beauty, and many others. Meet at the big red oak by the Sugarhouse. Chippewa Nature Center, Midland; 989-631-0830, www. chippewanaturecenter.org Families in Nature: Birds on the Move. May 13, 1 – 2 p.m. Free. All ages welcome, younger than 18 with adult. Outdoor program series for families. Investigate birds, play migration games, and go on a hike. Chippewa Nature Center, Midland; 989-631-0830, www. chippewanaturecenter.org   Discovering the Homestead Farm. May 28 – September 4, Sundays, 1 – 5 p.m. Free. All ages welcome, younger than 18 with adult. Step back in time and enjoy a family-friendly afternoon at the Homestead Farm. Kids of all ages can help with chores, play traditional games, and visit the farm animals. Chippewa Nature Center, Midland; 989-631-0830, www.chippewanaturecenter.org Spring at the Wigwam. June 4, 2 – 4 p.m. Free. All ages welcome, younger than 18 with adult. Drop-in program. Explore how Woodland Native Americans lived, and try traditional skills. Chippewa Nature Center, Midland; 989-631-0830, www. chippewanaturecenter.org Families in Nature: Frogs & Pollywogs. June 10, 1 – 2 p.m. Free. All ages welcome, younger than 18 with adult. Outdoor program

series for families. Use dippers and nets to catch pollywogs, see metamorphosis, and discover frog species and aquatic habitats. Chippewa Nature Center, Midland; 989-6310830, www.chippewanaturecenter.org The Great Nature Race: Going Geocaching. June 11, 11 a.m. – 3 p.m. Free. All ages welcome, younger than 18 with adult. Search CNC property on National Trails Day in search of geocaches and/or learn how. Coordinates provided. Chippewa Nature Center, Midland; 989-631-0830, www.chippewanaturecenter.org Summer Exploration Days. June 21 – August 28, Monday – Saturday, 8 a.m. – 5 p.m., and Sundays and holidays, 12 – 5 p.m. Free. All ages welcome, younger than 18 with adult. Self-guided, indoor program; variety of hands-on exploration stations. Themes change bi-weekly. June 21 – July 3: Birds; July 5 – 17: Mammals; July 19 – 31: Insects; August 2 – 14: Amphibians; August 16 – 28: Reptiles. Chippewa Nature Center, Midland; 989-631-0830, www. chippewanaturecenter.org Butterfly Count. July 8, 9 a.m. – 5 p.m. Free. All ages welcome, younger than 18 with adult. Join list of participants by July 6. Annual event at CNC since 1988. Beginner and experienced lepidopterists are invited to record butterflies. Wear long pants to count off-trail. Chippewa Nature Center, Midland; 989-631-0830, www. chippewanaturecenter.org Families in Nature: River Ramble. July 8, 1 – 2 p.m. Free. All ages welcome, younger than 18 with adult. Outdoor program series for families. Explore what lives in the river, including clams, crayfish, and caddisflies. Wear sturdy shoes and clothing that can get wet; lifejackets provided. Chippewa Nature Center, Midland; 989-631-0830, www. chippewanaturecenter.org Wednesday Wanderings: Dragonflies and Damselflies. July 12, 2 – 3:30 p.m. Free. All ages welcome, younger than 18 with adult. Photographic introduction to these insects, followed by an outdoor venture to wetlands with aerial nets to view them. Chippewa Nature Center, Midland; 989-631-0830, www.chippewanaturecenter.org   In Search of Snakes. July 29, 9 – 11 a.m. Free. All ages welcome, younger than 18 with adult. Hike CNC property, looking and listening for nature’s amazing legless reptiles. Chippewa Nature Center, Midland; 989-6310830, www.chippewanaturecenter.org Turtle Time. July 29, 1 – 2 p.m. Free. All ages welcome, younger than 18 with adult. Drop-in program. Visit CNC’s eastern box turtle, and learn about other Michigan turtles. Chippewa Nature Center, Midland; 989-6310830, www.chippewanaturecenter.org  


cooking with kids

PEANUT BUTTER CHOCOLATE CHIP PANCAKES A breakfast treat packs a protein punch. BY ANDY BACIGALUPO PHOTO BY DOUG JULIAN

1.

Blend flour, sugar, baking powder, baking soda, and ½ cup peanut butter in a medium bowl.

2. In a large bowl, whisk together milk, butter, egg yolks, and vanilla. 3. Slowly stir flour mixture into wet batter, mixing well.

These pancakes are as fun to make as they are to eat. They’re a great way to start the whole family’s day. 1 cup all-purpose flour ½ cup sugar 2 teaspoons baking powder ¼ teaspoon baking soda ½ cup plus 1 tablespoon peanut butter, divided 1¼ cups milk ½ stick unsalted butter, melted and cooled 2 large eggs (separate yolks from whites—you’ll use both in this recipe)

4. In a separate bowl, beat egg whites until stiff peaks form, and then fold into batter.*

5. Stir in chocolate chips. 6. Preheat a griddle to medium heat. Spoon ¼ cup batter at a time onto the hot griddle. 7. Cook until top of pancake is dotted with bubbles, and then flip over and cook other side until lightly browned. 8. In a large bowl, whisk egg whites, whipping cream, brown sugar, 1 tablespoon peanut butter, and butterscotch flavoring until stiff peaks form. Do not over-whip. Serve on each pancake. *Any of your favorite boxed pancake mixes can be used in place of this recipe. Just remember to add the peanut butter and chocolate chips to the batter.

2 teaspoons vanilla ½ cup semisweet chocolate chips 2 cups heavy whipping cream ¼ cup brown sugar 1 teaspoon butterscotch flavoring

ANDY BACIGALUPO

is the culinary arts instructor at Midland’s Windover High School. He has been featured on The Dr. Oz Show and the Cooking Channel, and has worked with The White House and Michelle Obama on her Chefs Move! to Schools program.

April 2017 | Great Lakes Bay Family 31


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TASTE RESTAURANTS, RECIPES & GREAT FOOD

It’s Easy Being Green Midland’s fast-food scene takes a healthy turn. BY RACHEL COHEN | PHOTOS BY DOUG JULIAN

CREAMY CRUNCH AVOCADO TOAST

Green Gourmet 33 | Dining Out Guide 35 April 2017 | Great Lakes Bay 33


TASTE / RESTAURANT PROFILE TOP:

Greek mushroom sandwich

CENTER:

Strawberry-almond smoothie bowl

BOTTOM:

Potato, onion, and red pepper veggie frittata

G

ourmet Cupcake Shoppe owner Carrie Fisher has had the idea to open a healthy eatery for years, waiting for the perfect time to turn the dream into a reality. “Everyone is always busy and running around, but that doesn’t mean you have to eat unhealthy, processed food,” Fisher says. “We use locally sourced ingredients and fresh fruits and vegetables [to prepare our food]. We avoid anything processed or from a can.” Green Gourmet Café’s plant-based menu has a multitude of options for the health-conscious eater, including entrées that kids won’t be able to turn down. With minimal animal proteins and always highquality, affordable ingredients, eating something good for you has never been so easy or so quick. Imagine dessert for breakfast, and you’ll picture Green Gourmet’s delicious smoothie bowl. With vegan, vegetarian, and gluten-free options, this $4.95 selection is both healthy and sweet. Made with fresh, seasonal fruit and topped with house-made granola and nutrient-packed seeds, the thick, creamy smoothie bowls are ready to eat with a spoon. Green Gourmet’s homemade soups rotate based on in-season ingredients. In the spring, café-goers might sample the garden-fresh asparagus soup that Fisher swears is one of her menu favorites. In the fall, diners can try harvest vegetable, butternut squash, or tomato bisque for $3.95. Try a bowl with the herbed, made-from-scratch croutons for an extra pop of flavor and a little crunch. One of the most popular options to order is the $8.95 make-ityour-own-way entrée bowl. Start with your choice of quinoa, soba noodles, or greens, and add up to five hot or cold vegetables. Customize even more with extras including almonds, candied pecans, or hummus, plus your choice of sauce or dressing. Make your bowl East Asian by adding sesame-ginger dressing or take a trip down to Mexico with avocado-garlic sauce. Other top sauce picks include peanut sriracha, berry balsamic, and smoky southwest. Sandwiches and salads are also available, and Fisher adds menu items to make sure there’s something for everyone. “We (Green Gourmet) wanted to offer options for people on vegetarian or vegan diets or with food allergies. Everyone should be able to eat a clean, healthy diet,” Fisher says. Green Gourmet Café, 1908 S Saginaw St, Ste E, Midland, 989-4868433, www.facebook.com/GreenGourmetCafe. Hours: Monday – Friday (7 a.m. – 6 p.m.) and Saturday (10 a.m. – 6 p.m.).

34 Great Lakes Bay | April 2017


TASTE / DINING OUT

Dining Out Asian Asian Noodle: 200 Center Ave, Bay City, 989-316-2380. Filipino and Far East fare. Noodle soup, lumpia spring rolls, sautéed noodles, and pan-fried fish. Basil Thai Bistro: 225 W Wackerly St, Midland, 989-486-9390. Curry, noodles, fried rice, stir-fry dishes, and fresh fruit tapioca drinks. Blossoms Asian Bistro: 4124 Wilder Rd, Bay City, 989-778-1155. Asian fusion flavors, made-to-order dishes, and fresh ingredients. Malaysian fried noodles, sushi, coconut shrimp tacos, and hibachi meals. Chan’s Garden: 215 Third St, Bay City, 989-892-8861. Variety of Asian and Chinese dishes. Weekly specials. Takeout available. Chan’s Garden Restaurant: 1951 N Center Rd, Saginaw Township, 989-790-9188. Affordable Chinese fare. Favorites include orange chicken, Mongolian beef, rice noodles, and egg rolls. Takeout and delivery available. Forbidden City Chinese Restaurant: 4024 Bay Rd, Saginaw Township, 989-792-0303. Authentic cuisine, including Forbidden City Chicken and moo shu pork. Familysized dinners and takeout available. Fuji Sushi: 1512 Joe Mann Blvd Midland, 989-839-6868. Noodles, rolls and sushi, sashimi, and hibachi entrées. Fusion 1 Café: 813 Saginaw St, Bay City, 989-891-0551. Fresh, contemporary international cuisine. Thursday night is Sushi Extravaganza. Demonstrations and cooking classes offered. Genji Japanese Steakhouse & Sushi Bar: Two locations: 2929 S Saginaw Rd, Midland, 989-495-6000, and 3870 Bay Rd, Saginaw Township, 989-497-9900. Chefs prepare meals directly in front of patrons for tables of up to eight. Large selection of wines and imported beers. Ghengis Khan Mongolian BBQ: 5010 Bay City Rd, Midland, 989-496-

2288. Buffet-style dining and createyour-own stir-fry using many types of meats, vegetables, and sauces. Full bar. Golden Buffet: 979 S Saginaw Rd (in Eastlawn Food Court), Midland, 989633-9888. Lunch and dinner buffets with meat and seafood dishes, soups, and desserts. Hello Sushi: 2575 Tittabawassee Rd, Saginaw Township, 989-7900022. Sushi, sashimi, rolls, traditional bento box meals, noodle dishes, and Japanese specialties. Daily specials and carryout. Hokkaido Japanese Steak & Sushi: 1818 Lawndale Rd, Saginaw Township, 989-791-1688. Open for lunch and dinner. Hibachi, sushi and sashimi, noodles and fried rice, and bento options from the wok. Mochi and tempura ice cream, cheesecake, and banana desserts. Hunan Restaurant: 3109 Bay Plaza Dr, Saginaw Township, 989-792-0303. Favorites include general chicken, Mongolian beef, and crabmeat with corn soup. Takeout available. Jade Garden: 3211 Bay Rd, Saginaw Township, 989-793-6997. Made-to-order Chinese dishes, appetizers, and soups, including the popular egg drop.

These listings have no relationship to advertising in Great Lakes Bay magazine. without MSG. Famous Chinese chicken salad and a variety of chicken, beef, shrimp, and vegetarian entrées.

Dine in, takeout, delivery, and catering. Soups, salads, sandwiches, burgers, and popular chicken fajita pizza.

Pi’s Asian Express: 5015 Eastman Ave, Midland, 989-832-8000 Chinese, Korean, Thai, Japanese, and Vietnamese appetizers and entrées. Carryout.

Grampa Tony’s: Two locations: 1108 Columbus Ave, Bay City, 989-893-4795, and 4330 E Wilder Rd, Bay City, 989-684-7314. Family dining. Homemade pizza, steak sandwiches, and baked pasta specialties. Late-night dining, takeout, and spirits.

Pi’s Chinese Restaurant: 1815 S Saginaw Rd, Midland, 989-832-5848. Affordable authentic fare like the favorite Hunan sesame chicken. Daily lunch and dinner buffet. Sushi ‘N’: 7395 Gratiot Rd, Thomas Township, 989-401-7557. Sushi, sashimi, cooked and vegetarian selections, and rolls, including the Golden California.

Indian Kabob N Curry House: 4070 Bay Rd, Saginaw Township, 989-4974400. Homemade Indian cuisine includes vegetable curry, samosa, paneer, and spicy favorites. Shahi Indian Cuisine: 4624 State St, Saginaw Township, 989-401-8310. Fresh, authentic Indian cuisine. Lamb, chicken, and goat dishes.

Italian

The Mandarin House Chinese Restaurant: 3000 Center Ave, Essexville, 989-893-9499. Full menu of chicken, beef, pork, vegetarian, and seafood cuisine, soups, appetizers, and hot buffet.

B&C Pizza: Three locations: 476 N Tuscola Rd, Bay City, 989-892-1519; 4787 Fashion Square Mall, Saginaw Township, 989-791-2777; and 608 State St, Bay City, 989-686-4600. Chicagostyle pizzas cut into squares.

Midori Sushi and Martini Lounge: 105 E Broadway, Mt Pleasant, 989-7757723. High-end martinis, sushi, and Asian-fusion fare.

Brooklyn Boyz Pizzeria & Italian Eatery: 612 E Midland St, Bay City, 989-894-5560. New Yorkstyle pizzeria. Lunch and dinner.

Panda House Chinese Restaurant: 1010 N Niagara St, Saginaw, 989-755-5394. Fine dining. Takeout available. Specialty entrées include string bean chicken. Live piano music Friday and Saturday evenings.

Café Cremosi: 108 N Linn St, Bay City, 989-316-9018. Italian cuisine at reasonable prices. Featuring pasta with Cremosi sauce, a white wine, lemon-butter crème sauce, pizza, and fresh ingredients. Full bar, outside deck, and live music.

Pasong’s Cafe: 114 N Michigan Ave, Saginaw, 989-791-5008. Fresh, made-to-order authentic cuisine

G’s Pizzeria: 1005 Saginaw St, Bay City, 989-891-9400, and 3823 Bay Rd, Saginaw Township, 989-401-4774.

Isabella’s at Soaring Eagle Casino & Resort: 6800 Soaring Eagle Blvd, Mt Pleasant, 989-7755399. Breakfast, lunch, and dinner, including appetizers, soups, salads, entrées, and desserts. Create your own pasta masterpiece. MaMa Mia’s Pizzeria: 16535 Gratiot Rd, Hemlock, 989-642-6420. Pizzas topped with special fourcheese blend and baked in a brick oven. Nino’s Family Restaurant: 1705 Columbus Ave, Bay City, 989-893-0691. Authentic Italian fare, including custom pastas, pizzas, and tiramisu. Strolling musicians on the weekend. Takeout, delivery, catering, and full bar. Nino’s Neighbor: 1623 Columbus Ave, Bay City, 989-460-2792. Open during warm weather months. Healthy Italian cuisine; gluten-free and vegan options. Grilled margherita pizza, antipasto salad, garlic knots, tomato bisque, and pesto-topped salmon. Outdoor seating available. Old Town Pizzeria: 417 Hancock St, Saginaw, 989-392-6468. Authentic pizza by the whole pie or slice, pizza muffins, and calzones for takeout or dine-in. Handmade dough, real mozzarella, and fresh toppings. Pizza Dude: 4328 N Saginaw Rd, Midland, 989-486-9670. Italian eatery. Old-style, brick oven pizza, calzones, and bread rings stuffed with pasta or meatballs. Pizza Sam’s: 102 W Main St, Midland, 989-631-1934. Soups, sandwiches, gyros, Coney Island hot dogs, specialty pizzas, nachos, and desserts. Takeout available.

April 2017 | Great Lakes Bay 35


TASTE / DINING OUT

Bagel sandwiches, fresh-squeezed juice, and smoothies.

Spencer’s Route 46: 5530 Gratiot Rd, Saginaw Township, 989-793-4500. Escargot, portobella mushrooms, calamari, seafood ravioli, poached salmon, and pan-fried walleye. Extensive wine list. Live jazz music.

Maria’s Mexican Restaurant: 6090 State St, Saginaw Township, 989-799-6300. Lunch and dinner. Quesadillas, tacos, enchiladas, tostadas, burritos, homemade tamales, chimichangas, and taco salad. Breakfast served.

Dawn of a New Day Coffeehouse & Café: 210 S Washington Ave, Saginaw, 989-284-3549. Fair trade organic coffee, specialty drinks, soups, and sandwiches. Music Friday nights. Wi-Fi.

Villa D’Alessandro: 801 E Wackerly St, Midland, 989-631-3821. Fare prepared from family recipes. Extensive list of wines to pair with entrées. Authentic desserts. Outdoor dining in summer.

Tex-Mex Grille: 4101 Wilder Rd (in the Bay City Mall Food Court), Bay City, 989-686-8396. Homemade “Tex-Mex” food, enchiladas, tacos, tostadas, burritos, rice, beans, and tamales. Catering available.

Espresso Express Coffee House: 916 N Water St, Bay City, 989-893-8898. Seattle-style brewed espresso beverages at their finest. Hot and cool drinks.

Mediterranean

Breakfast & Lunch

Yasmeen’s Mediterranean Foods: 3545 Bay Rd, Saginaw Township, 989-791-3082. Specialty store offers baklava, couscous, beans, spices, olives, olive oil, cheeses, and vegetarian foods. Tabouli, hummus, baba ghanoush, meat pies, and grape leaves available.

Centro Grille: 4882 Gratiot Rd, Saginaw Township, 989-498-4010. Breakfast and lunch. Freshly roasted coffee, pastries, homemade soups, desserts, salted caramel brownie, and cinnamon crunch muffin.

Mexican Coco Loco Mexican Grill & Bar: Two locations: 3593 Center Ave, Essexville, 989-891-9917, and 4002 Bay Rd, Saginaw Township, 989-791-1111. Authentic lunch and dinner entrées and combinations. Fresh chips and salsa. Cuatro Amigos: 310 E Midland St, Bay City, 989-686-8630. Original recipe combination dinners and lunch specials. El Paso Grill: 4880 Gratiot Rd, Saginaw Township, 989-401-6599. Puffy tacos and shredded beef burrito with potatoes are favorites. Primarily takeout. El Patron: 1900 S Saginaw Rd, Midland, 989-633-9800. Authentic Mexican cuisine, including a buffet.

Mornin’ at Maggie’s Omelette Shoppe: 819 Saginaw St, Bay City, 989-892-3142. Breakfast and lunch creations, including frittatas, French toast, waffles, egg-white omelets, homemade soups, sandwiches, and vegetarian specials. Rudy’s Red Lion Diner: 201 Center Ave, Bay City, 989-893-2266. Omelets, burgers, comfort food, and milkshakes. Stacker Grill: 4312 N Saginaw Rd, Midland, 989-631-8646. Breakfast and lunch fare, including pancakes, omelets, salads, and steak sandwiches.

Coffee Houses Bancroft Coffee & Tea Café: 101 S Washington Ave, Saginaw, 989-776-0011. Coffee and tea house with a historical 1920s ambiance. Bancroft Blend coffee, espresso, steamers, and chai. Breakfast and lunch.

Entre Amigos: 2600 N Saginaw Rd, Midland, 989-832-6348. Authentic choices include lunch specialties, combination dinners, fajitas, vegetarian combinations, steak, chicken, and desserts.

Brewtopia: 810 Saginaw St, Bay City, 989-893-0872. Fresh coffees, teas, lattes, cappuccinos, frappes, smoothies, muffins, cookies, and cinnamon rolls. Light lunch menu. Wi-Fi. Entertainment Thursday through Saturday.

Los Cabos: 7467 Gratiot Rd, Thomas Township, 989-781-2255. Mexican staples, along with a full American and Mexican breakfast menu. Weekend breakfast buffet. Daily lunch buffet.

Coffee Chaos: 6201 Jefferson Ave, Midland, 989-835-6401. Hot, chilled over ice, and frozen coffee drinks. Freshly baked, preservative-free muffins and cookies. Drive-up, Wi-Fi, and TVs.

Los Cuatro Amigos: 4570 Bay Rd, Saginaw Township, 989-799-1700. Original recipe combination dinners and lunch specials.

Common Grind: 2903 Pierce Rd, Ste 110, Kochville Township. Specialty coffee shop with organic espresso beans roasted fresh daily.

36 Great Lakes Bay | April 2017

Espresso Milano: 137 Ashman St, Midland, 989-832-3222. Coffees, smoothies, espresso, tea, muffins, cookies, scones, and peanut butter bars. Locals love the mudslide, a frozen coffee milkshake. Wi-Fi. The Fix: 5 E Main St, Bay City, 989-439-1250. Specializing in craft coffee and vegan options. Doughnuts, pastries, and organic fair trade coffee and tea sourced independently out of Chicago. Frankenmuth Kaffee Haus: 500 S Main St, Frankenmuth, 989-6525252. Gourmet coffee, teas, espresso treats, pastries, sandwiches, and wraps. Flavor-of-the-month coffee. Grounds for a Better World: 4951 Eastman Rd, Midland, 989-8391024, and 2020 Dow Center (Dow employees only), 1116 S Saginaw Rd, Midland, 989-633-3300. Espressobased and gourmet-brewed coffees, teas, frappes, smoothies, chocolates, and homemade baked goods. Harless & Hugh Coffee: 1003 Washington Ave, Bay City, 989-3274007. Specialty coffees made to order, tea made using authentic teasteeping methods, and mochas. The Harvest Coffeehouse & Beanery: 626 S Main St, Frankenmuth, 989-652-2203. Freshroasted flavored blends and origin coffees, specialty drinks, cakes, pies, and cheesecake. Books, live music, local art, and Wi-Fi. Journeys Coffee House: Two locations: 201 E Main St, Midland, 989-486-8585, and 1550 S Poseyville Rd (Messiah Lutheran Church), Midland, 989-835-7143. Coffee, smoothies, baked goods, and gelato. Kaya Coffee House: 1029 S University Ave, Mt Pleasant, 989772-9016. Fair trade, organic coffee, tea, and espresso drinks, and freshly made sandwiches, salads, soups, and Thai-style red curry.

Morning Emporium Coffee House: 2125 N Center, Saginaw Township, 989-790-5888. More than 40 Torani flavors, espresso, cappuccino, latte, hot/cold chai tea, and smoothies. Bulk coffees for purchase. The Mug@Wirt: 500 Center Ave (Alice & Jack Wirt Public Library), Bay City, 989-460-3596. Flavored coffees and teas, homemade treats, and lunch menu. Red Eye Caffé: 205 N Hamilton St, Saginaw, 989-793-1411. Freshly brewed coffees, white chocolate mochas, cookies, and muffins. Livemusic entertainment, local poetry, and artwork.

Casual Dining American Kitchen Restaurant: 207 Center Ave, Bay City, 989402-1366. Meatloaf, chicken and dumplings, and gourmet grilled cheese sandwiches. Burgers, brunch, and bloody mary bar. Annabelle’s Own: 579 E. Isabella Rd, Midland, 989-835-5344. Comfort food with a few twists. Diverse menu, homemade soups, daily specials, award-winning Five Cheese Macaroni and Cheese. Anschutz Café: 212 E Saginaw St, Breckenridge, 989-842-9924. Pancakes, prime rib, wet burritos, nachos, and grilled beef medallions (weekend special). Bare Bones BarBQ & Pizza: 807 Columbus Ave, Bay City, 989-8926830. Charcoal-grilled barbecue. Lunch, dinner, and family meals. Takeout, delivery, and catering available. Bavarian Inn: 713 S Main St, Frankenmuth, 800-228-2742. The No. 1 choice of most visitors remains the allyou-can-eat chicken dinners. German specialties and other entrées available. Bergers Family Restaurant: 6387 Westside Saginaw Rd, Bay City, 989686-0224. Family owned since 1928. Serves specialty of fresh seafood, hot German potato salad, burgers, and fruit and cream pies. Big Drew’s Family Grill: 265 W Saginaw St, Hemlock, 989-3010255. Mexican meals, pizza, burgers, wings, steak sandwiches, Coney dogs, and breakfast served anytime. Big John Steak & Onion: 3300 Holland Ave, Saginaw, 989-754-5012. Serving the original 100 percent ribeye steak sandwich since 1972. Subs, salads, and Big John “Red Sauce.”


The Bringer Inn: 516 W Genesee Ave, Saginaw, 989-753-1462. Homemade breakfast, lunch, and dinner. Daily specials include barbecue chicken and freshly roasted turkey dinners. Create your own omelets. The Bus Stop Bar and Grille: 10014 Dixie Hwy, Birch Run, 989244-6350. Pub-style menu and fish fry Friday nights with cod, shrimp, and lake perch. Live entertainment on Saturday nights. Café American Restaurant/ Coffee Bar: 1525 Washington St, Midland, 989-633-9665. (A second location inside the Midland Mall Food Court.) Gourmet salads, burgers, soups, and sandwiches. Café Zinc: 111 W Main St, Midland (inside The H Hotel), 989-839-0500. French bistro offers breakfast, lunch, and dinner. European-style breads and tartlets, tortes, and dessert specialties. Terrace dining in summer. Camille’s on the River: 506 W Broadway St, Mt Pleasant, 989-7730259. Comfort food classics with an upscale twist that use regional and seasonal flavors. Martini lounge. Castaways: 3940 Boy Scout Rd, Bay City, 989-686-3558. Dock your boat on the Kawkawlin River and enjoy food and spirits inside or dockside. Lunch and dinner. Chuck’s Market Restaurant: 108 S Adams St, Bay City, 989-8930541. Breakfast, lunch, and dinner; daily specials. Country breakfast, quarter-pound cheeseburger, nachos, and hot turkey sandwich. Court Street Grill: 100 S Michigan Ave, Saginaw, 989-401-4004. Serves breakfast, lunch, and dinner. Cousins Take Out and Catering: 1202 N Washington Ave, Saginaw. Catfish, rib tips, African whiting box dinners, Slaw Daddy and Grand Daddy slaw boxes, and hush puppies. Crêpes Et Amis (Crêpes and Friends): 130 Townsend St, Midland, 989-486-3120. Urban café, locally roasted coffee, savory and sweet crêpes: Good Morning Paris (ham and brown sugar); Strawberry Cheesecrêpe. daVinci’s Restaurant: 524 N Main St, Frankenmuth, 989-6522629. Italian and American fare. Daily specials. Strombolis, pasta dishes, Chicago-style deep-dish pizza, salads, and sandwiches.

The Dogg Houze: 2903 Pierce Rd, Kochville Township, 989-401-7477. Coney dogs, subs, wraps, and stuffed pitas called Hanis. Specials include the Saginaw Coney with marinara and meat, and the Flintstone Coney with nacho meat, mustard, and onion. Duece’s Char House: 432 Tuscola Rd, Bay City, 989-893-5881. Breakfast, lunch, and dinner. Salad bar with famous cheese spread and liver pâté. Garden Restaurant in the Midland Resort and Convention Center: 1500 W Wackerly St, Midland, 989-698-0662. Breakfast, lunch, and dinner menus. Sunday brunch. Gimmicks Grill & Bar: 5021 Bay City Rd, Midland, 989-4963940. Classic American cuisine. Full bar, extensive beer selection, wine, and martinis. Enjoy a game of bowling or miniature golf. GO! Salads. 139 Ashman St, Midland, 989-633-9055. Soup and build-your-own salad bar restaurant with non-GMO ingredients; iced tea bar with five fresh-brewed selections. Heather’s: 205 3rd St, Bay City, 989-402-1116. Vegan, vegetarian, and meat-based dishes for breakfast and lunch. Huron Fish Co: 505 Gratiot Ave, Saginaw, 989-792-2224. Fish and seafood takeout dinners, including famous whitefish. Jack’s Deli & Stretch’s Curve: 618 S Henry, Bay City, 989-893-6931. Home of the health nut salad with raspberry yogurt dressing. Soups, sandwiches, and burgers. J.J. Jamokes: 1354 Mertz Rd, Caro, 989-673-3333. House specials include prime rib, stuffed sole, and famous deep-fried pickles. Dine viewing gardens and a waterfall frequented by local wildlife. Kathleen’s: 4519 N River Rd (at Apple Mountain), Freeland, 989781-6789. Salads, sandwiches, and house favorites like Cajun chicken, penne, and fish and chips. Krzysiak’s House Restaurant: 1605 Michigan Ave, Bay City, 989894-5531. Authentic Polish food in a fun, ethnic atmosphere. Lunch and dinner buffets. Takeout menu. La Crêpe du Jour: 925 S Main St (inside The River Place), Frankenmuth, 989-652-2925. Twenty-five varieties of fresh sweet and savory crepes.

Legends Diner: 6800 Soaring Eagle Blvd, Mt Pleasant, 888-7324537. Breakfast, lunch, and dinner. Burgers, dogs, sandwiches, malts, floats, and banana splits. Levi’s Food and Spirits: 5800 Brockway, Saginaw Township, 989-793-6670. Grandma Rita’s chili, Reuben sandwiches, and fish dinners. Breakfast served all day. Linwood Corner Restaurant: 44 N Huron Rd, Linwood, 989-6975141. Daily specials include prime rib, cod, and chicken livers. Little Bambinos: 120 W Saginaw St, Merrill, 989-643-5414. Homecooked American and Italian fare for breakfast, lunch, and dinner. Lumber Barons: 804 E Midland St, Bay City, 989-891-0100. Pub plates, salads, pizza, and light plates. Dinner features fish and chips, filet mignon, New York strip, sirloin, and pretzelcrusted pork tenderloin. Children’s menu. The Malt Shop: 228 W Broad St, Chesaning, 989-845-6696. Broasted chicken dinners, Coney dogs, burgers, malts, and ice cream. The Maple Grille: 13105 Gratiot Rd, Hemlock, 989-233-2895. Farmto-table restaurant serves produce, meats, and fish from local sources. The Mean Rooster Diner: 1411 S Wenona St (in Meats & Mooore), Bay City, 989-893-5413. Homemade soups, sandwiches, pasta, gourmet pizzas, burgers, and hot dogs. Memory Lane Café: 1122 Tittabawassee Rd (inside Antique Warehouse), Kochville Township, 989-755-4343. Sandwiches, salads, soups, and desserts. Mountain Town Station: 506 W Broadway St, Mt Pleasant, 866381-5022. Steakhouse, brewery, and wine shop. Fine micro-brews and a selection of over 300 wines. Wi-Fi. Mussel Beach: 3540 State Park Dr, Bay City, 989-686-0575. Breakfast, lunch, and dinner, including original stuffed burgers. Ice cream and desserts. Takeout available. Nbakade Family Restaurant: 5665 E Pickard Rd (inside Soaring Eagle Waterpark & Hotel), 989-817-4806. Quiche, salads, sandwiches, burgers, mahi mahi, and New York strip. Nikki’s: 104 W Johnson St, Zilwaukee, 989-754-3737. Specializes

in barbecued pulled pork and deli sandwiches. Old Town Drive-In: 807 S Granger (at Gratiot), Saginaw, 989-799-4162. Burgers, Coney dogs, fries, shakes, and root beer. Eat in your car or on ’50s-style diner stools. Takeout and catering. Oscar & Joey’s Road House: 12027 Dixie Hwy, Birch Run, 989-6249349. Prime rib, char-grilled rib-eyes, burgers, and pan-seared walleye New Orleans. Wild game available upon request. Lunch specials. Perry’s Schuch Hotel & Restaurant: 301 N Hamilton St, Saginaw, 989-799-2539. Veal tortellini, prime rib, and all-you-caneat fish on Fridays. The Pit at BARTS: 804 E Midland St, Bay City, 989-891-0100. Open pit Southern-style barbecue. Quarry Grill at Bucks Run: 1559 S Chippewa Rd, Mt Pleasant, 989-779-9973. Champagne chicken, steak, gourmet burgers, and crowd favorite, venison chili. All-you-can-eat lake perch (Thursdays). Riverside Family Restaurant: 8295 Midland Rd, Freeland, 989695-5563. Homemade entrées, sandwiches, soups, desserts, and award-winning pies, including coconut cream. Shirlene’s Cuisine: 1716 Wackerly St, Midland, 989-631-8750. Fifty-plus item soup and salad bar includes peas & peanuts, creamy cucumber salad, Waldorf salad, Mandarin salad, homemade chutney, and daily soups. Showboat Restaurant: 242 W Broad St, Chesaning, 989-845-2830. Breakfast, lunch, and dinner. Soups, sandwiches, fresh lake perch, liver and onions, signature prime rib, and orange ginger chicken. Full bar. Siniikaung Steak & Chop House: 6800 Soaring Eagle Blvd, Mt Pleasant, 989-775-5106. Aged prime beef, chops, and seafood entrées. Slo’ Bones BBQ Smokehaus: 175 E Jefferson St, Frankenmuth, 989-262-8681. Ribs, wings, and slider sandwiches. Southern flavors with local touches. Live bands on weekends. State Street: 715 E Main St, Midland, 989-837-6174. Coffee bar and restaurant with sophisticated comfort food, craft beer, and wine. Free Wi-Fi.

April 2017 | Great Lakes Bay 37


TASTE / DINING OUT Stock Pot Diner and Catering: 1007 Washington Ave, Bay City, 989893-9332. Breakfast menu, Greek fare, and turkey jerky sandwich. SugarHigh Café: 525 S Main St, Frankenmuth, 989-502-5009. Bubble teas, paninis, grilled cheese, Kern’s brats, hot dogs, ice cream, sorbet, and SugarHigh Bakery gourmet cupcakes. Sullivan’s Black Forest Brew Haus & Grill: 281 Heinlein, Frankenmuth, 800-890-6877. Fish and chips, steaks, seafood, burgers, and deep-dish pizza. One dozen handcrafted beers. Live entertainment Friday and Saturday evenings. Sure Shot BBQ: 1135 S Mission St, Mt Pleasant, 989-400-4488. Pulled-pork nachos and “gut buster” sandwich. T. Dub’s: 565 S Main St, Frankenmuth, 989-652-3809, Upscale pizzas use infused dough and hand-cut vegetables. Specialty sandwiches. Unusual combinations make up 11 variations of omelets. Tony’s Restaurant: 1029 Gratiot Rd, Saginaw, 989-792-1113; 112 S Saginaw, St Charles, 989-8656950; 2612 State St, Saginaw, 989-793-1801; 2525 E Genesee, Saginaw, 989-753-4321; 7340 Gratiot Rd, Shields, 989-781-2111; 2111 S Saginaw, Midland, 989-8398560; 234 N Center Rd, Saginaw Township, 989-793-1631; 4880 Fashion Square Blvd, Saginaw Township, 989-249-8669. Steak sandwiches loaded with your favorite toppings and boat-sized banana splits. Tony’s Take-Out: 2331 S Michigan, Saginaw, 989-793-6250. Chicken strip baskets, pizza, steak sandwiches, catfish, smelt, perch, and cod fish dinners, and soups to go.

sandwiches, burgers, fish tacos, and gluten-free fare. Z-Chef’s Café: 730 S Main St (inside Zehnder’s Restaurant), Frankenmuth, 800-863-7999. Gourmet pastas, rotisserie chicken, meat-carving station, hand-tossed pizzas, and salads. Zef’s Coney Island: 201 Third St, Bay City, 989-402-1220. Specializing in authentic Coney Island-style hot dogs. Breakfast, lunch, and dinner daily. Zehnder’s: 730 S Main St, Frankenmuth, 800-863-7999. Worldwide attraction, 10-dining room German restaurant serves famous all-you-can-eat family-style chicken dinners, along with seafood, steaks, baked goods, and European desserts.

Deli Artigiano: 815 Saginaw St, Bay City, 989-391-4200. Locally owned artisan cheese shop. Small-batch, handmade, and imported cheeses. Gourmet jellies, dried fruits, and cured meats. Amazing Deli: 134 E Main St, Midland, Midland, 989-837-7278. Sandwiches, subs, salads, and soups await you at a place true to its name. Carryout and delivery available. The Bagel Café and Deli: 7395 Gratiot Rd, Thomas Township, 989-401-1108. Bagels, pastries, breakfast sandwiches, salads, and lunch classics. Cortland Cooler Café: 5395 Midland Rd (located at Bayne’s Apple Valley Farm), Freeland, 989695-9139. Wraps, sandwiches, chili in a bread bowl, and signature cider slushes. August through January.

and subs. Freshly made, homemade soups available daily and may be served in a warm bread bowl.

Design the perfect cake for your occasion. Decorated cookies and a full line of cake and candy-making supplies.

Intermission Deli: 2128 Bay St, Saginaw, 989-790-6777. Subs, sandwiches, and soups with fresh ingredients. Favorites include the Intermission Delight (#18) and Veggie Supreme (#24).

Pâtisserie: 2715 Bay Rd, Saginaw, 989-921-2253. European-style desserts, fresh-baked breakfast pastries, 18 specialty cakes, nine varieties of cheesecake, custombaked celebration cakes, gourmet coffee, dips, and spreads.

Pannini’s Deli: 3585 Bay Rd, 989-799-6038, Saginaw (located inside Discount Health Foods). Sandwiches, smoothies, and baked goods. Glutenfree foods and soy milk always available. Souper Café: Two locations: 4093 N Euclid, Bay City, 989-671-1900; 5789 State St, Saginaw Township, 989-791-6600. Chicken noodle, broccoli cheddar, chili, and potato and bacon chowder soups. Salads and sandwiches. Third Street Deli and Coffee House: 305 S Mable (M-13), Pinconning, 989-879-1236. Gourmet sandwiches, salads, soups, coffees, and hot and cold specialty beverages. Wine and beer available. Wanigan Eatery: 1905 S Wenona St, Bay City, 989-892-8303. Housed in a historic Bay City building and decorated with lumbering artifacts and photos. Sandwiches, salads, homemade soups, and sweet treats. Water Front Market: 925 N Water St, Bay City, 989-891-1330. Sandwiches made from fresh-baked artisan breads and with prime Dietz & Watson deli meats. Soups and Coney dogs. River view.

Desserts Crème de la Crème Cupcakes: 201 ½ E Broadway St, Mt Pleasant, 989-444-2928. Flavors of the day change daily.

Petit 4 Pastry: 1600 Woodside Ave, Essexville, 989-891-0735. Cookies, doughnuts, breads, tortes, tarts, and cheesecakes. Special order cakes and catering available. SugarHigh Bakery: 925 S Main St, Ste G1, Frankenmuth, 989-652-2400. Forty flavors of gourmet cupcakes, Italian gelato, cookies, cake pops, and specialty cakes. SugarRush Candy Shop: 925 S Main St, Ste G3, Frankenmuth, 989652-2578. Forty flavors of Ashby’s Michigan-made ice cream, candied almonds, fudge, and candies. St. Laurent Bros: 1101 N Water St, Bay City, 989-893-7522. One-hundred percent natural peanut butter, handdipped chocolates, candies, dried fruits, and chocolates. Sweet Boutique: 816 Washington Ave, Bay City, 989895-5000. Pastries, homemade chocolates and confections, and retail specialty candies. Sweet Creations: www. sweetcreationsmi.com. Specialty and wedding cakes, gourmet cupcakes and cookies, custom cake pops, and cutout sugar cookies. Tummy Ache Candy Store: 1116 N Johnson St, Bay City, 989-891-7669. Homemade and nostalgic candy. Homemade “puppy chow,” popcorn balls, snow cones, and ice cream treats.

Crossroads Deli: 2205 Jefferson Ave (inside the Midland Community Center), Midland, 989-832-8580. Homemade gourmet sandwiches, soups, salads, smoothies, and desserts. Delivery, carry out, curbside pick-up, and catering.

Cops and Doughnuts Clare City Bakery: 421 McEwan St, Clare, 989-386-2241 and 706 E Midland St, Bay City, 989-892-3932. Old police department-themed bakery. Cake and glazed doughnuts, long johns, and specialties like the Bacon Squealer and Felony Fritter.

Uptown Grille: 3 E Main St, Bay City, 989-439-1557. Upscale bistro serving breakfast and lunch. Sweet potato pancakes, banana bread French toast, sandwiches, burgers, salads, and soups.

Fralia’s: 422 Hancock St, Saginaw, 989-799-0111. Soups, salads, sandwiches, and baked goods using all-natural ingredients. Specialties include gourmet flank steak sandwich, grilled goat cheese salad, and carrot cake. Local delivery.

The Gourmet Cupcake Shoppe: 915 Washington Ave, Bay City, 989-402-1700; 1908 S Saginaw Rd, Midland, 989-631-4103; 4370 Bay Rd, Saginaw Township, 989-4014012. Cupcakes made with natural ingredients; more than 15 flavors daily.

Bradley’s Bistro: 216 Federal Ave, Saginaw, 989-752-1400. Farm-to-table restaurant with seasonal and locally sourced foods. Lunch and dinner. Salads, house-made dressings, Bulgogi steak sandwich, and soba noodles with Swiss chard pesto. Vegetarian and gluten-free dishes available.

Wise Guys: 405 E Main St, Midland, 989-486-9588. Soups,

Intermission Deli: 111 3rd St, Bay City, 989-893-5010. Sandwiches

Mary’s Creative Cakery: 7494 Gratiot Rd, Shields, 989-781-7747.

Fireside Grille: 8400 S Genuine Rd, Shepherd, 989-828-6315. Signature

Turkey Roost: 2273 S Huron Rd, Kawkawlin, 989-684-5200. Homemade “Thanksgiving every day” since 1955, complete with stuffing, mashed potatoes, and gravy. Breakfast options, lunch and dinner turkey plates, hot turkey sandwiches, pie by the slice, and other desserts.

38 Great Lakes Bay | April 2017

VanillaBean Bake Shop: 318 S Saginaw Rd, Midland, 989-633-9540. Cakes, cupcakes, cookies, chocolates, cake pops, and other sweets.

Fine Dining


international dishes, pasta, chicken, fish, and steak.

Saloon & Eatery

Golden Glow Ballroom Restaurant: 2950 S Graham Rd, Thomas Township, 989-781-2120. Chicago-style individual pizza, seafood, chicken, pork, steak, salads, sandwiches, burgers, and pasta.

2nd Street Sports Pub: 274 Meyers St, Freeland, 989-695-6501. Appetizers, soups, sandwiches, burritos, burgers, steak, and pasta for lunch and dinner. Outdoor patio seating.

Heatherfields Chop House (Bay Valley Hotel and Resort): 2470 Old Bridge Rd, Bay City, 989-6863500. Entrées include char-grilled steaks, blackened salmon, and chicken fettuccine. Sunday brunch. Jake’s Old City Grill: 100 S Hamilton at Court, Saginaw, 989-797-8325. Steaks, chops, seafood, poultry, pasta, and vegetarian entrées. Comprehensive martini and wine bar. Montague Inn: 1581 S Washington Ave, Saginaw, 989752-3939. Housed in a historic mansion, entrées include salmon turban, pecan pork tenderloin, and Indian specialties. Open Thursday – Saturday for dinner. Old City Hall: 814 Saginaw St, Bay City, 989-892-4140. Historic dining room offers appetizers like Thai lettuce wrap and elegant entrées. Extensive wine list. Imported and domestic beer. Real Seafood Co.: 199 Uptown Dr, Bay City, 989-456-3463. Contemporary seafood restaurant; locally sourced ingredients. Lunch and dinner; sautéed Lake Superior whitefish, pasta, steak, sandwiches, and gluten-free options. The Riverfront Grille: One Wenonah Park Place, Bay City (inside the DoubleTree Hotel), 989-891-6000. Breakfast, lunch, and specialty dinner entrées daily. Full bar and wine list. Shari’s at the Willard-Hillton: 1506 W Beaver Rd, Auburn, 989-662-6621. Louis Mason’s 1800 hotel thrives today as a gourmet restaurant. Extensive wine list and specialty cocktails complement artfully presented food. Table: 111 W Main St, Midland (inside H Hotel), 989-633-6099. Exquisitely prepared entrées like duck breast, scallops, and veal. Wines and dinner cocktails. European-style breads tartlets, tortes, and Napoleons. Willow Tree Restaurant of Saginaw: 4787 Fashion Square Mall, Saginaw Township, 989-790-9400. Casual atmosphere. Fresh appetizers, salads, soups, sandwiches and wraps, pastas, entrées, and desserts.

Aurora Buffet: 6800 Soaring Eagle Blvd, Mt Pleasant (inside Soaring Eagle Casino & Resort), 888-732-4537. Lunch and dinner buffet, soup and salad bar, carving station, and dessert bar. Every Tuesday is “BOGO Buffet”: buy one lunch or dinner buffet at regular price and get one free. Bancroft Wine & Martini Bar: 101 S Washington Ave, Saginaw, 989-776-0011. A 1920s-style lounge. Wine, martinis, Prohibition-era cocktails, craft beers, small plates, salads, and cheese boards. Beer and Brats, Inc.: 4562 N Eastman Rd, Midland, 989-835-9238. Variety of beer, homemade brats, Sammi Rae Root Beer on tap, and outdoor space for playing horseshoes and cornhole. Bar Oxygen: 111 Main St (located inside H Hotel), Midland, 989-8390500. Wine, beer, martini, and specialty cocktail menu, with 150+ liquors. Bar menu. Happy hour. Live music Friday nights. Bier Garten: 8 State Park Dr, Bay City, 989-684-1331. Daily themedspecials. Quarter-off happy hour daily. Big E’s Sports Grill: 810 Cinema Dr, Midland, 989-794-8585. Nachos served on a 22-inch pizza tray. Weekend breakfast menu and bloody mary bar. The Boulevard Lounge: 316 S Saginaw Rd, Midland, 989-8325387. Breakfast seven days a week. Complete lunch and dinner menus, including appetizers, available. Brady’s Sports Bar & Diner: 512 E Midland St, Bay City, 989-8942207. Full menu. Homemade chips, hot sauce, barbecue sauce, and salsa. Breakfast buffet Saturday and Sunday. Brass Café and Saloon: 128 S Main St, Mt Pleasant, 989-772-0864. New American cuisine in a dining room housed in two turn-of-thecentury shopfronts. Cardinal’s Nest Tavern. 2903 Pierce Rd, Saginaw, 989-401-7888. New York-style pizza, custom order salads, Italian hero sandwich, Fish Fry Fridays, and 32 draft beers.

Cass River Yacht Club: 6154 Dixie Hwy, Bridgeport, 989-7776460. Locally famous “broaster” chicken, homemade soups, pizza, and daily specials. Catering and free hall rental. Creekside Bar & Grille: 9387 Gratiot Rd, Thomas Township, 989781-0050. Signature grilled pizza, Creek Crust (cheese bread sticks), burgers and sliders, special family recipe chicken burger, and more. Coonan’s Irish Hub: 1004 N Johnson, Bay City, 989-402-1177. Guinness stew, Irish fries, Reuben sandwiches, burgers, specialty hot dogs, and full bar. Diamond Jim’s: 101 E Main St, Midland, 989-486-3343. Soup, salad, and sandwich bar during lunch features four soups. Happy hour. Dinner menu. Farmers Home Tavern: 215 W Saginaw St, Hemlock, 989-642-2546. Famous burgers, other menu items, cold beer, and beverages served in a friendly, family-owned tavern. Flannigan’s Pub & Grill: 7734 Gratiot Rd, Shields, 989-781-2320. Irish dishes and American fare like Irish egg rolls, loaded burgers, and Irish nachos. TVs. Dine on the deck. Frankenmuth Brewery Co: 425 S Main St, Frankenmuth, 989-2628300. Microbrewery and restaurant offering appetizers, sandwiches, and dinner entrées with pretzel bread. Freshly brewed beers on tap. Gabby’s Pub and Grill: 3002 S Graham Rd, Thomas Township, 989-781-0101. Haddock, Gabby burger, smothered chicken, and microbrews. Gatsby’s Saloon & Eatery: 203 Center Ave, Bay City, 989922-5556. Pizza, steak, salmon, pastas, and sandwiches served in a ’20s-themed atmosphere. Premium liquors, beers, and wines. The Governor’s Quarters: 1304 S Wenona St, Bay City, 989-8936111. Large selection of craft brews (bottled and on tap), hard ciders, and spirits. Burger baskets: “Judicial Indiscretion”(half-pound, homemade Coney sauce, onion, pickled jalapeños, cheddar cheese). Harvey’s Grill and Bar: Two locations: 3055 Tittabawassee Rd, Saginaw Township, 989-401-4424, and 4000 E Wilder Rd, Bay City, 989-6863304. Traditional food with a twist and the coldest drafts found in Michigan.

Hamilton Street Pub: 308 S Hamilton St, Saginaw, 989-790-8119. Food, drinks, and entertainment. Dine in or order takeout. John’s Bar: 1476 S Tuscola Rd, Munger, 989-659-2951. Diner offers burgers, soups, and famous steak sandwiches. Latitude 43 Grill & Bar: 1013 N Henry St, Bay City, 989-391-9868. Appetizers, salads, burgers, pasta, chicken, sandwiches, steaks, chops, seafood, and side dishes. Highdefinition TVs. Mac’s Bar: 118 N Michigan Ave, Saginaw, 989-792-6227. A 1930s Art deco-style bar and restaurant. Innovative cuisine from local farms, including organic, vegan, and vegetarian options. Live jazz musicians. Merl’s Tavern: 304 Shattuck Rd, Saginaw, 989-751-5140. Sports, trivia, music. Daily food specials: subs, soups, salads, French dip, Coney dogs, and brats. Michigan on Main: Inside Bavarian Inn, 713 S Main St, Frankenmuth, 989-652-9941. Michigan-inspired menu and craft beers. Whitefish from Lake Superior and pork produced in Frankentrost. Menu changes to accommodate local, seasonal availability. Midland Brewing Company: 5011 N. Saginaw Rd, Midland, 989-2597210. Locally-sourced menu options, rustic-chic atmosphere. Sausages, burgers, soft-baked pretzels, unique “Beeramisu” dessert. Wide range of craft beers, Mug Club option, homebrewed root beer. Midland Street Jacks Grill & Lounge: 605 E Midland St, Bay City, 989-892-5741. Snacks, appetizers, kids’ meals, desserts, Tex-Mex entrées, salads, subs, and burgers. Lunch specials. Full bar. Mulligan’s Pub: 109 Center Ave, Bay City, 989-893-4555. Salads, daily soups, gourmet sandwiches, Mexican dishes, and steaks. Lunch and dinner specials. Premium liquors and beers. Takeout. O’s Pub and Grill. 123 E Midland Rd, Auburn, 989-266-3148. Family friendly dining with burgers, sandwiches, daily lunch specials, microbrew beers, and fish Fridays with cod, perch, and shrimp dinners. Private dining available for groups up to 40. O’Kelly’s Sports Bar & Grille: 2000 S Mission St, Mt Pleasant, 989775-3751. Pub food includes wings and

April 2017 | Great Lakes Bay 39


TASTE / DINING OUT burgers topped with onion rings. Drink specials. Large projector screens. One Twenty South: 120 S University, Mt Pleasant, 989-8174433. Specializing in craft cocktails and tapas. Drink an acai mojito or grapefruit caipirinha; eat a charcuterie board or coffee-crusted fillet. Oscar’s Restaurant and Entertainment: 140 E Main St, Midland, 989-837-8680. Deli and chicken sandwiches, burgers, entrée salads, daily soups, and desserts. Variety of beer, wine, and cocktails. Prost! Wine Bar & Charcuterie: 576 S Main St, Frankenmuth, 989652-6981. Rustic chic atmosphere and full bar. Charcuterie with artisanal cheeses as shared plates, pre-built or design-your-own, paninis, and farmto-table dishes. Rainmakers: 3325 Davenport (inside Ramada Inn), Saginaw, 989-793-7900. Small plate items, Rainmaker martini, nacho nights, happy hour events, and weekend entertainment. The Rathskeller: 600 E Midland St, Bay City, 989-892-0621. Full menu, daily specials, and drinks. Catch the game on one of 24 TVs. Rustic Inn Steak House & Saloon: 133 N Saginaw St, St Charles, 989-865-6466. Lodge-style atmosphere features more than 50 North American big game mounts. Entrées, sandwiches, and homemade soups.

Rusty Saw Smokehouse BBQ: 804 E Midland St, Bay City, 989-3322948. Located inside Lumber Barons Brewery. Slow-smoked brisket, ribs, pulled pork, chicken, and burgers. Made-from-scratch side dishes include dirty rice, cornbread, and Carolina slaw. The Savoy Grill: 127 S Franklin St, Saginaw, 989-755-5171. Upscale American diner fare including turkey pesto ciabatta, steak chicken pesto pasta, and Val’s hot beef sandwich. Breakfast available. Scottish Inn: 630 Gratiot Ave, Saginaw, 989-799-1949. Beer and cocktails. Soups, salads, sandwiches, and burgers. Nicknamed the “Plaid Palace,” locals love the crab cheese appetizer and Reuben sandwich. Sporty’s Wing Shack and Smokehouse: 4502 N Huron Rd, Pinconning, 989-879-6050, and 9620 Gratiot Rd, Saginaw, 989-401-6973. Wings (try the smokin’ cherry sauce favorite!) and burgers piled high. Draft beers. The Stables Martini & Cigar Bar: 805 E John St, Bay City, 989891-0100. Cozy seating areas for small groups. Live entertainment. Walk-in humidor offers more than 80 varieties of cigars. Stadium Sports Pub and Grill: 7255 S Three Mile Rd (located inside Bay City Country Club), Bay City, 989684-1618. Open to the public. Big screen TVs. Stein Haus: 1108 N Water St, Bay City, 989-891-2337. Imported

beers and microbrews on draft. Choose bottles or glasses of wine from the extensive wine (and reserve) list. Sullivan’s Food & Spirits: 5235 Gratiot Rd, Saginaw Township, 989-799-1940. Famous for its fish and chips. Full menu. Signature corned beef and cabbage served occasionally throughout the year. Tavern 101 Restaurant: 101 Center Ave, Bay City, 989-7781431. Italian- and Mediterraneaninfluenced cuisine. Signature flatbreads, pastas, wine, spirits, and selection of 50 beers on tap. Tiffany’s Food & Spirits: 56 S Main St, Frankenmuth, 989-6526881. Pizzas, seafood, pastas, and PastaPitzas. Keep your specialty drink glass as a souvenir. Patio dining in summer. Timbers Bar & Grill: 6415 State St, Saginaw Township, 989-790-2345. Rustic cabin-type setting. Steaks, pastas, nachos, salads, soup in a bread bowl, and sandwiches. Weekly specials. Full bar. VNO New Age Restaurant & Wine Warehouse and Bay City Grill & Bar: 510 Midland St, Bay City, 989-460-0117. Serves small plates, including smoked salmon dip, calamari, escargot, and more than 25 wine selections by the glass or bottle; retail space includes more than 200 wine selections and a wine tasting bar.

Washington Street Irish Pub and Grill: 112 Washington Ave, Bay City, 989-895-8221. Burgers, sandwiches, fish, steak, hand-dipped onion rings, pizza, and homemade lunch specials every day. Water Lily Lounge: 6800 Soaring Eagle Blvd, Mt Pleasant (inside Soaring Eagle Casino & Resort), 888-732-4537. Appetizers, sandwiches, and thin crust pizzas. Live entertainment Fridays and Saturdays. Food available until 11 p.m., Sunday – Thursday, and until 1 a.m., Friday and Saturday. Whichcraft Taproom: 124 Ashman St, Midland, 989-832-3395. Dips, spreads, cheese plates, paninis, Greek hot dogs, and Mediterranean platters. Whine: 337 E Wackerly St, Midland, 989-835-5222. Wine bar with wines from across the world, craft beers, cocktails, and specialty liquors paired with small plates. Winston’s Pub in the Midland Resort and Convention Center: 1500 W Wackerly St, Midland, 989-698-0663. Variety of foods and large selection of beer and cocktails. Weekday happy-hour specials. Live entertainment, games, and TVs. Zorba’s Greek and American Cuisine: 617 S Harrison St, Saginaw, 989-792-1959. Saganaki (flaming cheese), gyros, dolmades, baklava, and chicken Avgolemeno (egg lemon) soup. Wings and burgers. Beer, liquor, and wine.

The Arc Stroll, Roll, and 5k Run/Walk Saturday, June 10

LOCATION: Chippewa Nature Center, 400 S. Badour Rd., Midland ■ Competitive Walk begins at 9am ■ Official timing by Miller Race Management ■ Competitive Run begins at 9:10am ■ Pre-registration now open/ends 06-01-17 ■ Fun Walk begins at 9:15am ■ Register now at thearcofmidland.org or ■ Flat run, no hills 989-631-4439 to reserve T-shirt

Medals, awards, music, prizes, fun!

Let us make your outdoors beautiful!

3500 Wadsworth Rd • Saginaw • (989) 752-5625 • www.abelegreenhouse.com


A&E WHAT TO DO, WHERE TO BE

BEAUTY AND THE BEAST, MIDLAND CENTER FOR THE ARTS

People Pics 42 | Sponsored Events 43 | What To Do 43 April 2017 | Great Lakes Bay 41


A&E / PEOPLE PICS 2

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St. Mary’s of Michigan Foundation 22nd Annual Cornette Ball SAGINAW TOWNSHIP

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DETAILS: Attendees of the black-tie event honored 2016 Spirit of St. Vincent Award recipient Dr. Ernie Balcueva. photos by Doug Julian

1. Dave and Leah Poskar 2. Mohd Kanjwal and Asma Taj 3. David and Joan Payne, Kathleen McGraw, and the Rev. Randy Kelly 4. Erin Wenz, Mike Wenz, Tammi Peck, and Randy Peck

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A Chocolate Affair SAGINAW TOWNSHIP

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DETAILS: An evening of fabulous food, drinks, live music, and chocolate desserts helped Delta College raise funds for the Possible Dream Program. photos by Doug Julian

1. Jaime Zheng and Alison Ginter 2. David Garza, Destiny Flores, Roscoe Conklin, Chloe Rinearson, and Isabel Rueda 3. James Neal and Jeff Dukes 4. Sue Sulfridge and Janie Gugino 42 Great Lakes Bay | April 2017


THINGS TO DO / A&E

Sponsored Events Shelterhouse of Midland: Chefs for Shelterhouse

Spend an evening enjoying the signature dishes, hors d’oeuvres, and desserts of local chefs, along with a silent auction. Tickets are $50. Shelterhouse provides services to those affected by domestic violence and sexual assault in Midland and Gladwin counties. Proceeds from the event support victims of domestic and sexual violence by providing shelter, counseling, and advocacy. When: Thursday, April 20, 5 – 8 p.m. Where: Great Hall Banquet and Convention Center, Midland For information and tickets: Call 989-835-6771, or visit www. shelterhousemidland.org/chefs

Junior Achievement of North Central Michigan: 20th Annual Business Hall of Fame

Help honor an elite selection of local business leaders who have demonstrated excellence through their contributions to business and the community, in addition to serving as outstanding role models, especially for local youths. Tickets are $125 per attendee or $225 per couple.

Arts and Museums Exhibit: Contemporary Masters of Marine Painting. Through April 2. Admission $9. Exhibits of work from a who’s who of masterful painters, many notable members of the American Society of Marine Artists. Alden B Dow Museum of Science and Art, Midland Center for the Arts, Midland; 989-6318250, www.mcfta.org Exhibit: Sarah Gottlieb: October Waves. Through April 2. Admission $9. Forty large-scale photographs that are character studies of the power and beauty of waves. Alden B Dow Museum of Science and Art, Midland Center for the Arts, Midland; 989-631-8250, www. mcfta.org Exhibit: Water, Rain, and Fog. Through April 2. Admission $9. Invitational exhibition featuring artists from across America who revel in the complex difficulty posed by artistically representing liquid and water. Alden B Dow Museum of Science and Art, Midland Center for the Arts,

Event proceeds benefit Junior Achievement of North Central Michigan and its programs. When: Thursday, April 28, 5:30 p.m. Where: Curtiss Hall, Saginaw Valley State University, University Center For information and tickets: Call 989-631-0162, or visit www. janorthcentralmi.org

Great Lakes Bay Animal Society: 5th Annual Fast & Furriest 5K Run/Walk

Bring your four-legged pals to a fun-filled bonding experience and exercise event. This 5K run/walk is sure to please people and dogs alike. Cost is $25 if pre-registered or $40 on the day of the event. Proceeds benefit the Great Lakes Bay Animal Society as it continues to provide high-quality care for animals in transition to their forever homes. When: Saturday, April 29, 8:30 a.m. Where: City Forest, Midland For event information, preregistration and information: Visit www. runsignup.com or www.glbas.org

Midland; 989-631-8250, www. mcfta.org

Museum, Saginaw; 989-754-2491, www.saginawartmuseum.org

Exhibit: Design Zone: Behind the Scenes. Through April 30. Admission $9. Visitors may go behind the scenes and see how video game developers, music producers, roller coaster designers, and other creative problem-solvers use math to do amazing things. Midland Center for the Arts, Midland; 989-631-8250, www.mcfta.org

Exhibit: Small Works Juried Show. April 4 – 30. Art Reach Morey Family Gallery, Mt Pleasant; 989-773-3689, www.artreachcenter.org

Exhibit: Mingled Visions—Images from the North American Indian Collection by Edward S. Curtis (1868-1952). Through May 20. Free admission. Includes 40 photographs taken between 1868 and 1952. Marshall M Fredericks Sculpture Museum, SVSU, University Center; 989-964-7125, www.marshallfredericks.org Exhibit: The Work of Brian Rutenberg—Camellia. Through June 3. Admission. Rutenberg’s huge paintings using oil paint on linen. Abstract style, sweeping brush strokes. Saginaw Art

Exhibit: Bachelor of Fine Arts Exhibition. April 10 – May 5. Reception: April 13, 4 – 7 p.m. Free admission. Featuring artwork by the Bachelor of Fine Arts majors. Serves as completion of their undergraduate program. University Art Gallery, SVSU, University Center; 989-964-4159, www.svsu.edu/artgallery Exhibit: Chromatic Drawing. April 15 – May 27. Admission $9. Colored pencil drawings from artists across the United States, including members of the Colored Pencil Society of America. Highly detailed images. Alden B Dow Museum of Science and Art, Midland Center for the Arts, Midland; 989-631-8250, www.mcfta.org Exhibit: 4th Congressional District Art Competition & Midland Area Schools Art Show. April 28 – May

27. Admission $9. Local artists’ pieces, including students from Midland Area Schools. Alden B Dow Museum of Science and Art, Midland Center for the Arts, Midland; 989-631-8250, www.mcfta.org

Attractions Daily Pretzel Rolling. Every day, 2:30 – 3:15 p.m. (not available on Easter, Thanksgiving, Christmas Eve, and Christmas Day). Cost $4.99. Learn proper pretzel-rolling methods, and eat your fresh-out-ofthe-oven finished product. Two-hour advance notice and prepayment required. Bavarian Inn Restaurant, Frankenmuth; 989-652-9941, www. bavarianinn.com Coffee and Crafts. Second Tuesday of each month, 6:30 p.m. Price varies according to craft; cost includes coffee, sweet treat, and craft supplies. Dawn of a New Day Coffee House and Café, Saginaw; 989-780-0113 Mid-Michigan Young Onset Parkinson’s Support Group

April 2017 | Great Lakes Bay 43


THINGS TO DO / A&E

Meeting. Meets the third Tuesday of each month. Held inside the Area Agency on Aging, 1615 S Euclid, Bay City; 800-852-9781, www.parkinsonsmi.org Toddler Time. Every Wednesday, 11 – 11:30 a.m. and 1 – 1:30 p.m. Admission. Sing, dance, create, explore, and enjoy developmentally targeted projects. Mid-Michigan Children’s Museum, Saginaw; 989-399-6626, www. michildrensmuseum.com Uncorked Series. Every first and third Thursday, 5:30 – 7 p.m. Free event. New kind of happy hour in the Saints & Sinners Lounge. Complimentary snack, cash bar, and a variety of themes to think and drink creatively about. Midland Center for the Arts, Midland; 989-631-5930, www. mcfta.org Music in the Café Second Thursdays. Every second Thursday, 7 – 9 p.m. $5. The café night brings fabulous performance, casual spontaneity, and an evening of music. White Crow Conservatory of Music, Saginaw; 989-790-2118, www.whitecrowconservatory. blogspot.com/ Dow Gardens Children’s Garden Story Time. Fridays, 10 – 11 a.m. Admission fee. Dow Gardens, Midland; 989-631-2677, www. dowgardens.org City Hall Tour. Second Friday of each month, 11 a.m. – 12:30 p.m. $1. Bay County Historical Museum, Bay City; 989-893-5733, www. bchsmuseum.org Midland County Historical Society: Hands-on History Days. Friday and Saturday of the third weekend each month, 11 a.m. – 2 p.m. April: Handicrafts in the Bradley Home. Family-focused, interactive, and informational dropin programs for the community to discover and preserve local heritage. Midland Center for the Arts, Midland; 989-631-5930, www. mcfta.org Tai Chi with Jim Bush. Every Saturday, 10 a.m. $5. White Crow Conservatory of Music, Saginaw; 989-790-2118, www.

44 Great Lakes Bay | April 2017

whitecrowconservatory.blogspot. com/ Kids Fly Free! Second Saturday of each month, 9 a.m. – 12 p.m. Ages 8 – 17 fly free and learn about aviation. Jack Barstow Airport, Midland; 989-835-3231, www. eaa1093.org Authentic Japanese Tea Ceremony. Second Saturday of each month, 2 p.m. Admission $8. Authentic formal Japanese Tea Ceremony in the SaginawTokushima Friendship Garden, hosted by persons in kimono. Reservations encouraged. Japanese Cultural Center & Tea House, Saginaw; 989-759-1648, www.japaneseculturalcenter.org Humane Society of Bay County Feline Adoption Events. Last Saturday of each month. 989-8930451, www.humanesocietybc.org Charlin’s Book Nook Presents Read to Me with Brittany. Every Sunday, 2:30 – 3:30 p.m. Ages 2 – 10; snacks provided. Charlin’s Book Nook, Frankenmuth; 989-6522900, www.charlinsbooknook.com Science Sundays. Every other Sunday, 1 p.m. $7. Themed science experiments led by a play facilitator. Mt Pleasant Discovery Museum, Mt Pleasant; 989-3173221, www.mpdiscoverymuseum. org Candy-less Easter Egg Hunt. April 1, 10 a.m. – 4 p.m. Admission. Sponsored by local dental and health professionals. Meet the Easter Bunny, egg hunt, games, crafts, and prizes. MidMichigan Children’s Museum, Saginaw; 989-399-6626, www. michildrensmuseum.com Grandparents Play Free. April 2, 12 – 5 p.m. Admission/ free for grandparents. MidMichigan Children’s Museum, Saginaw; 989-399-6626, www. michildrensmuseum.com Opening Day Celebration: Great Lakes Loons vs. Lansing Lugnuts. April 6, 6:05 p.m. Parade takes place on Main Street prior to gates opening. Enjoy Family Feast Night and the first game of

baseball season. Dow Diamond, Midland; 989-837-2255, www. loons.com Fireside Chats. April 13 (monthly, second Thursdays), 2 p.m. Free admission. Listen and learn as long-time residents share recollections. Midland County Historical Society, Midland; 989631-8250, www.mcfta.org Great Lakes Loons vs. Fort Wayne TinCaps. April 20, 6:05 p.m. Admission $6.50. Visit website for complete schedule. Dow Diamond, Midland; 989-837-2255, www.loons.com Zehnder’s Red Hat Days. April 24 – 26, 12 p.m. Admission $48. Day includes shopping at the “Red Hat Shopper’s Corner,” luncheon, glass of wine, dessert, table favor, musical entertainment, discounts, and door prizes. Zehnder’s of Frankenmuth, Frankenmuth; 989652-0400, www.zehnders.com

Charitable Events Saginaw County Sexual Violence Prevention Team: Walk a Mile in Her Shoes. April 6, 5 p.m. registration and 6 p.m. walk. Cost $20. This national event is designed to promote awareness and offer a perspective from the woman’s point of view. Locally, the community is invited to “walk a mile” in stiletto shoes. Shoes provided or bring your own. Proceeds benefit prevention and educational opportunities in Saginaw County. SVSU, University Center; 989-399-0007, ext 106, www.undergroundrailroadinc.org Northwood University: NU Style Show Design Competition “Historic Hemlines.” April 7, time TBD. Annual, themed, student-run fashion show featuring inspirational ideas. Proceeds benefit Northwood University’s fashion merchandising and management program. Northwood University, Midland; www.northwood.edu 11th Annual Cardinal Cabaret Auction. April 8, 5 – 9 p.m. Tickets $55/$100 couples/$450 per table. Dinner and auction. Proceeds

benefit degree completion scholarships for student-athletes. Curtiss Hall, SVSU, University Center; 989-964-7306, www. svsucardinals.com/cardinalcabaret Easter Breakfast. April 16, 8 – 11 a.m. Cost TBD. Pancakes, eggs, sausage, and beverages. Proceeds benefit Holy Cross Lutheran Church. Fellowship Hall, Holy Cross Lutheran Church, Saginaw; 989-793-9795, www.hcls. org Shelterhouse of Midland: Chefs for Shelterhouse. April 20, 5 – 8 p.m. Tickets $50. An evening of signature dishes, hors d’oeuvres, and desserts by local chefs, plus a silent auction. Proceeds benefit the services of Shelterhouse. Great Hall Banquet and Convention Center, Midland; 989-835-6771, www. shelterhousemidland.org/chefs Covenant HealthCare Foundation: Covenant Kids Telethon. April 25, 12 – 5 p.m. Live event at the Mid-Michigan Children’s Museum, televised on WNEM TV-5. Proceeds benefit Covenant Kids and support funding for pediatric programs and equipment. For more information, call 989-583-7600, or visit www. covenantkidsmi.com CAN Council Great Lakes Bay Region: 14th Annual Dine & Unwind (previously Wines around the World). April 28, 5:30 – 9 p.m. Tickets $75. Food and wine connoisseurs are invited to savor the delights of the region’s finest restaurants, expertly paired with wines. Proceeds benefit CAN Council programs and services. DoubleTree by Hilton Hotel Bay City–Riverfront, Bay City; 989-6711345, www.cancouncil.org Junior Achievement of North Central Michigan: 20th Annual Business Hall of Fame, SaginawBay County Area. April 28, 5:30 p.m. Program begins at 6:30 p.m. Tickets $125/$225 couple. Honor local business leaders who are role models for youths. Proceeds benefit Junior Achievement of North Central Michigan and its programs. Curtiss Hall, SVSU, University Center; 989-631-0162, www.janorthcentralmi.org


THINGS TO DO / A&E

Catholic Diocese of Saginaw: Bishop’s Charity Ball. April 28. Horizons Conference Center, Saginaw Township. For information, call 989-797-6693 Bringin’ Back the ’80s Festival. April 28, 6 p.m. – 12 a.m., and April 29, 4 p.m. – 12 a.m. Admission. Bring back hair-teasing and all the trends of the 1980s with live music and festivities. Proceeds benefit cancer-related causes, including the American Cancer Society and Hospice for Hope. Heritage Park, Frankenmuth; 989-652-8008, www.80sfest.org Great Lakes Bay Animal Society: 5th Annual Fast & Furriest 5K Run/Walk. April 29, 8:30 a.m. Preregisteration$25/$40 day of event. A fun-filled bonding experience for two-legged and fourlegged friends. Proceeds benefit the Great Lakes Bay Animal Society. City Forest, Midland; www.glbas.org YMCA of Saginaw and Tritofinish: 8th Annual Go the Extra Mile for Covenant Kids USATF-sanctioned Halfmarathon Run/Hand Cycle, 5K Run/Walk, 1 Mile Fun Run. April 30, 8 a.m. Entry fee $10 – $60. Proceeds benefit Covenant Kids and enhance the care of children faced with hospitalization at Covenant HealthCare. Swan Valley High School, Thomas Township; www.covenantkidsrace.com

Expos Spring Art and Craft Show. April 8, 9 a.m. – 3 p.m. Admission $2/ free for ages 10 and younger. Soaps, lotions, candles, purses, jewelry, clothing, pet treats and accessories, gourmet sampling, wood crafts, spring décor, and more. Horizons Conference Center, Saginaw Township; 989-781-9165, www.keepsakecollectionshows.com Quilters Squared Quilt Show. April 28 – 29, 10 a.m. – 5 p.m. Admission $3. Annual springtime quilt show. Join the Midland Quilters Squared Quilt Guild at the Carriage House at Heritage Park. Midland County Historical Society, Midland; 989-631-8250, www. mcfta.org

Festivals Osterbrunnen: Easter Celebration. Through April 30. Frankenmuth mirrors the over 200-year-old Osterbrunnen German tradition of decorating Easter fountains. Downtown Frankenmuth; 989-652-6106, www. frankenmuth.org Banff Mountain Film Festival World Tour. April 7 – 8, 7 – 10 p.m. Cost $15. For ages 15 and older; younger than 18 with adult. Each year, Banff Centre hosts the Banff Mountain Film Festival, celebrating the spirit of adventure and mountains. The top films go on tour, and Chippewa Nature Center hosts one of the tour stops. See some of the best mountain films of 2016. Bullock Creek Auditorium, Midland; 989-6310830, www.chippewanaturecenter.org Zehnder’s Ragtime Festival. April 26, 6 p.m., April 27, 7 p.m., and April 28 – 29, 11:30 a.m. and 6 p.m. Featured pianist and emcee Bob Milne brings a variety of ragtime performers to the stage. Lunch and dinner concerts, vaudeville night, Friday night picnic and sing-a-long, and meet the artists. Reservations required. Zehnder’s Restaurant, Frankenmuth; 800-863-7999, ext 450, www.zehnders.com

Music, Theater & Film WHEELZ 104.5 Comedy Night: Comedian Heywood Banks (as Heard on the Bob and Tom Show). April 1, 7 p.m. Admission $22. Heywood Banks appeals to kids, college students, businessmen, grandparents, and beyond. State Theatre, Bay City; 989-892-2660, www. statetheatrebaycity.com Of Mice & Men. April 1, 7:30 p.m., and April 2, 3 p.m. Admission $18. The time-honored story of two drifters, George and Lennie, and friendship takes the stage. Pit & Balcony Community Theatre, Saginaw; 989-754-6587, www. pitandbalconytheatre.com

Beauty and the Beast. April 1 – 2, 7:30 p.m. Tickets $28 – $43/$18 – $33 students. Disney’s musical returns to stage, featuring loved tunes such as “Be Our Guest,” “Something There,” and “Beauty and the Beast.” Midland Center for the Arts, Midland; 989-631-8250, www.mcfta.org Be Our Guest Experience. April 2, 1 p.m. Admission $9. Prior to matinee performances, cupcakes, beverages, and an opportunity to meet Belle in person. Ticket to performance not included. Midland Center for the Arts, Midland; 989631-8250, www.mcfta.org Assassins. April 5 – 8, 7:30 p.m., and April 9, 3 p.m. Admission $15/$13 seniors and students. This musical shows the lives of nine individuals who assassinated, or tried to, the president of the United States. Saginaw Valley State University, University Center; 989-964-4261, www.svsu.edu/ theatre Brantley Gilbert “The Devil Don’t Sleep” Tour. April 6, 7 p.m. Tickets $34.75 – $39.75. Country rock artist Brantley Gilbert with special guests Luke Combs, Tucker Beathard, and Brian Davis. Dow Event Center, Saginaw; 989-759-1320, www. doweventcenter.com Midland Symphony Orchestra Season Preview. April 7, 7:30 p.m. Admission $38/$15 students. Sneak peek of next season’s highlights. Audience is welcomed on stage after performance for reception. Midland Center for the Arts, Midland; 989-631-8250, www. mcfta.org Jungle Jack Hanna’s Into the Wild. April 9, 3 p.m. Admission $20 – $55. Respected ambassador between human and animal worlds, author, television personality, conservationist, and director emeritus of the Columbus Zoo and Aquarium brings his handson approach to the stage. Temple Theatre, Saginaw; 877-754-7469, www.templetheatre.com Cabaret Night April. April 13, 8 p.m. Admission $10. With differing monthly themes, veteran Center Stage Theatre performers

provide an evening of music and performance. Midland Center for the Arts, Midland; 989-631-8250, www. mcfta.org Youth Choirs Spring Concert. April 19, 7 p.m. Admission $8. Over 100 young musicians of Midland’s premier choral program for young singers. One-hour, family-friendly show. Midland Center for the Arts, Midland; 989-631-8250, www.mcfta.org The Lullabies of Broadway. April 22, 7:30 p.m. Admission $20/$15 students. Including Broadway’s most enduring, foot-stomping classics from the early days of the Great White Way and into Broadway of Stephen Sondheim and Stephen Schwartz. Midland Center for the Arts, Midland; 989-631-8250, www. mcfta.org Men of Music Spring Show. April 28, 8 p.m. Admission $15. Including costumed skits, wholesome family fun, and the 50-voice Men of Music. Midland Center for the Arts, Midland; 989631-8250, www.mcfta.org “The Jokes on You Comedy Tour” featuring Gallagher, Artie Fletcher, and Bob Nelson. April 29, 7 p.m. Admission $35 – $40. Enjoy the smashing of watermelons (Gallagher) and a night of hilarious insights and creative word play. State Theatre, Bay City; 989-892-2660, www. statetheatrebaycity.com Midland Symphony Orchestra: “Tchaikovsky and Grieg.” April 29, 7:30 p.m. Tickets start at $34. Venezuelan guest pianist Gabriela Martinez joins the MSO to perform this enduring favorite with panache and poetry. Midland Center for the Arts, Midland; 989-631-8250, www. mcfta.org Free Movie Sunday: Gone With the Wind (1939). April 30, 2 p.m. Free admission with donation to benefit Safe Harbor Kitchen. State Theatre, Bay City; 989-892-2660, www.statetheatrebaycity.com

Nature Spring Exploration Days. April 1 – 9, Monday – Saturday, 8 a.m. – 5

April 2017 | Great Lakes Bay 45


THINGS TO DO / A&E

p.m., and Sundays and holidays, 12 – 5 p.m. Free admission. All ages welcome; younger than 18 with adult. Enjoy spring break from school at this indoor program that includes a variety of self-guided, hands-on exploration stations. Experiments, fun facts, crafts, and scavenger hunts. Chippewa Nature Center, Midland; 989-631-0830, www. chippewanaturecenter.org Families in Nature: Vernal Pools. April 8, 1 – 2 p.m. Free. All ages welcome; younger than 18 with adult. Program series for families. Outdoor program exploring spring vernal pools and wetland species, using dippers, nets, and pans. Chippewa Nature Center, Midland; 989-631-0830, www. chippewanaturecenter.org Nature’s Eggs Extravaganza. April 15, 10 a.m., 10:30 a.m., 11 a.m., and 11:30 a.m. Cost $10/$8

CNC members, register by April 12. For children ages 3 to 12. Each child makes a personalized hunt bag and ventures into the woods to find eggs. Games, activities, and family fun. Chippewa Nature Center, Midland; 989-631-0830, www.chippewanaturecenter.org Experience Earth Day. April 22, 10 a.m. – 4 p.m. Free. All ages welcome; younger than 18 with adult. Celebrate the 47th Earth Day by planting a young tree or shrub, learning about invasive plants, building a bird house, and discovering ways to live a green lifestyle. Chippewa Nature Center, Midland; 989-631-0830, www. chippewanaturecenter.org

Networking Saginaw Area Chamber of Commerce: Percolator Breakfast. April 6, 7:30 – 9 a.m.

Horizons Conference Center, Saginaw Township; 989-752-7161, www.saginawchamber.org Midland Area Chamber of Commerce: Wake Up! Midland. April 7, 7:30 – 9 a.m. Great Hall Banquet and Convention Center, Midland; 989-839-9522, www. macc.org Great Lakes Bay Regional Hispanic Business Association. April 10. Saginaw; 989-753-1999, www.mmhba.org Saginaw County Chamber of Commerce: Business after Hours. April 13, 5 p.m. Wildfire Credit Union, 6640 Bay Rd, Saginaw Township; 989-757-2112, www.saginawchamber.org Bay Area Chamber of Commerce: Business after Hours. April 20, 5 – 7 p.m. Members only. Location TBD,

Bay City; 989-893-4567, www. baycityarea.com Bay Area Chamber of Commerce: Eye Opener Breakfast. April 21, 7:30 – 9 a.m. Held at DoubleTree by Hilton Hotel Bay City–Riverfront, Bay City; 989-893-4567, www. baycityarea.com Midland Area Chamber Connection. April TBD, 5 – 7 p.m. Midland Country Club, Midland; 989-839-9522, www.macc.org Mount Pleasant Area Chamber of Commerce: Business over Breakfast. April TBD. Location TBD, Mt Pleasant; 989-772-2396, www.mt-pleasant.net Mount Pleasant Area Chamber of Commerce: Business after Hours. April TBD, 5 – 7 p.m. Mt Pleasant; 989-772-2396, www.mtpleasant.net

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THE BACK STORY

Back to School BY NANCY SAJDAK MANNING

T

his undated photo depicts the second Salzburg area Riegel Elementary School (est. 1907), located at 406 W. Ivy Avenue, Bay City. In 1923, Bay County Normal School also was established at Riegel. This school provided oneyear courses for teacher training and three-year teaching certificates in order to help fill instructional posts in one- or two-room rural schools while trainees attained required additional schooling. The growth of Bay City’s school system and Riegel School are discussed in Bay City Times’ historic clippings, in Bay County Past and Present (George E. Butterfield, 1957), and at Bay-Journal.com. Riegel School is described as one of four brick schools (also Woodside, Wenona, and McKinley) built by the Union School District to replace old frame buildings in the four years following the merger of Bay City’s east and west sides (1905). Each of the Riegel schools was named for Michael Riegel (b. 1852, Germany), who was a merchant, postmaster of Salzburg, leader in west Bay City activities, and president of the board of education for 26 years (until 1908). The Salzburg community has been served by three Riegel-named schools. The first four-room school (est. about 1880) was sold to nearby St. Hedwig’s Catholic Parish; the second (pictured) school on West Ivy Avenue was demolished/ replaced; and the third/current (1970) Riegel School is an expansive single-story building, located at adjacent 1805 S. Raymond Street. The 1970 school was closed in 2005 due to declining student populations, then used for storage, and finally sold to Double J Properties LLC in 2015. The renovated/repurposed Riegel School building now continues to adapt to the community’s changing needs as the Close to Home Assisted Living–Riegel (www.closetohomemi.com). Photo courtesy of Sue Pike, Bay City.

48 Great Lakes Bay | April 2017


A HigHEr

CAlling Conserving the Wetlands in Our Communities

More than 9,500 acres of wetlands have been conserved around the Great Lakes Bay Region in large part because of people like Dow Automotive production leader, Steve Persyn. At Michigan Operations, providing innovative solutions to society extends far beyond our manufacturing facilities. Dow employees like Steve, also lend their time and expertise to strengthening our communities.

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The Great Lakes Bay Region Does Better with Garber. “I buy my cars at Garber because of the people. When you walk into a dealership, you know you are going to deal with good people that you can trust. The Garber family has built this reputation for over a century, and it still holds true today. Also, I believe in working with local businesses that give back to their community. The Garber name is synonymous with philanthropy, and the Great Lakes Bay Region is a better place because of their generous contributions. It matters where I buy my car. That’s why I buy from Garber!” Matt Blasy, General Manager, The Dow Event Center

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Great Lakes Bay Magazine April 2017  
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