Issuu on Google+

Canadian Forest Innovation Council

Conseil canadien de l’innovation forestière

Forest Science Policy Forum on Transformative Technologies Summary Report

Prepared by: The Conference Board of Canada

May 31, 2006


Executive Summary The Canadian Forest Innovation Council launched a Forest Science Policy Forum on Transformative Technologies early in 2006. The goal of the Forum was to identify and prioritize products and technologies that have the potential to transform the forest sector by maximizing the value extracted from Canadian forest fibre. Forum activities included the drafting of four white papers; vetting and building on white paper contents through consultation with domestic and international experts via two regional workshops; and a final event to table preliminary results and conduct final consultations. Domestic experts were commissioned to consult widely and draft white papers to identify technologies and products that have the technical potential to transform the Canadian forest sector. Aggressive and imaginative alternative uses of fibre and its derivatives were emphasized. Collectively the white paper topics - pulp and paper, wood products, biochemicals, and bioenergy - covered the traditional forest sector and key emerging areas. Workshops were attended by 61 participants representing forest sector researchers, policy makers, forest sector and allied industry stakeholders, and academics. Using an “effort-impact matrix methodology”, participants collectively evaluated the potential impact and effort required to attain technical viability of eighty-two potentially transformative technologies identified in the white papers. The effort-impact methodology is an expert opinion-based approach that uses quantitative measures of effort (levels of financial investment and time needed to develop a technology) and potential impact (the impact on sector revenue and the degree to which a technology would preferentially benefit the Canadian sector compared to international competitors) to evaluate the future potential of technologies and products. The main workshop products were four two-dimensional matrices (effort vs. impact) on which experts physically positioned the technologies for comparison. Experts identified barriers to adoption for 3-4 technologies that were deemed to have a potential major impact. Forum participants positioned the majority of the transformative technologies (67 per cent) in the upper two quadrants of the effort-impact grid (see below). The identification of these “high potential” impact technologies bodes well for the Canadian forest industry.

Major

(>10% of revenue/unique)

2

Q-II

20 6 9

9

Minor

Q-I

1

(0-2% of revenue/familiar)

POTENTIAL IMPACT

Placement of Transformative Technologies

8

7

21

Q-III

Q-IV

Difficult

Easy

(>10 years implementation / >$100 millions)

(0-2 years implementation /$0-$50million)

EFFORT

9

Edmonton Quebec City

CFIC Forest Science Policy Forum on Transformative Technologies Regional Workshops Summary Report, May 2006.

2


Source: The Canadian Forest Innovation Council, 2006.

Of the four forest sub-sectors, wood had the greatest percentage of technologies placed in the upper two quadrants (71 per cent), followed by the biochemicals sub-sector (69 per cent), the pulp and paper subsector (69 per cent), and the bioenergy sub-sector (59 per cent). A number of key findings emerged. Of prime importance, there are indeed many technologies that offer the technical potential to transform the Canadian forest sector, however, they differ widely in the effort required to bring them to technical viability and in their potential impact. To realize these possibilities, technical, policy, and institutional barriers must be properly understood and addressed. Much of the future sector potential lies at the intersections of sub-sectors within the forest sector, and between the forest sector and other sectors like agriculture, chemicals and energy. Tapping into potentially new markets such as biochemicals and bioenergy, where the technology and market risks are unfamiliar to the traditional forest sector, may require formal partnerships with governments and industry in the chemicals, energy and agriculture sectors. A more complete understanding of the nature and magnitude of the competitive advantage Canada may have based on the intrinsic properties of Canadian wood fibre resources is a research field with potentially large returns on investment. To accelerate sector transformation and to continue momentum started by the Forest Science Policy Forum on Transformative Technologies, the Canadian forest sector may wish to consider concentrating on a specific and limited number of key initiatives: •

Develop and execute a program designed to identify, quantify, and capitalize on Canada’s unique fibre characteristics.

Establish and task an appropriately skilled consortium to refine the biorefinery concept in a Canadian context, and develop key aspects to a demonstration project stage.

Ensure the optimization of the Canadian forest sector innovation system is continued so that technology and knowledge give Canada a sustainable, competitive advantage in an increasingly global market place.

CFIC Forest Science Policy Forum on Transformative Technologies Regional Workshops Summary Report, May 2006.

3


Table of Contents CHAPTER ONE ............................................................................................................................. 6 Introduction..................................................................................................................................... 6 The Transformative Technologies Forest Science Policy Forum Process.................................. 6 1. White Papers ................................................................................................................... 6 2. Regional Workshops....................................................................................................... 7 Workshop Methodology ................................................................................................................. 8 1. White Paper Presentations and International Perspectives ............................................. 8 2. Prioritization of Transformative Technologies in the Canadian Forest Industry ........... 8 3. Applying the Transformative Technology Effort-Impact Grid ...................................... 8 4. Identification and Prioritization of Barriers to Implementation ................................... 10 CHAPTER TWO .......................................................................................................................... 11 Transformative Technologies in the Canadian Forest Sector ....................................................... 11 CHAPTER THREE ...................................................................................................................... 15 Effort vs. Impact Prioritization of Transformative Technologies by Forest Sub-Sector.............. 15 Building and Living With Wood Transformative Technologies .............................................. 15 Barriers to Implementation of the Wood Technologies........................................................ 18 Regional Workshop Discussions and Insights—Wood Sub-sector ...................................... 18 Pulp and Paper Transformative Technologies .......................................................................... 21 Barriers to Implementation of Pulp and Paper Technologies ............................................... 24 Regional Workshop Discussions and Insights—Pulp and Paper Sub-sector........................ 24 Biochemicals Transformative Technologies............................................................................. 26 Barriers to Implementation of Biochemicals Technologies.................................................. 29 Regional Workshop Discussions and Insights—Biochemicals Sub-sector .......................... 29 Bioenergy Transformative Technologies.................................................................................. 31 Barriers to Implementation of Bioenergy Technologies....................................................... 33 Regional Workshop Discussions and Insights—Bioenergy Sub-sector ............................... 34 CHAPTER FOUR......................................................................................................................... 36 Collective Insights ........................................................................................................................ 36 Key Findings................................................................................................................................. 36 Potential Next Steps...................................................................................................................... 39 CHAPTER FIVE .......................................................................................................................... 40 Appendices.................................................................................................................................... 40 A-1 Regional Workshop Agenda.............................................................................................. 41 A-2 Regional Workshop Participants List ................................................................................ 43 A-3 Regional Workshop Breakout Working Groups................................................................ 46 A-4 Effort-Impact Grid Summary Chart: Quebec City and Edmonton Placements................. 49 A-5 Barriers to Implementation of Selected Potential “High-Impact” Technologies .............. 50 A-6 Workshop Evaluation Scores and Comments.................................................................... 61 B-1 White Paper: Transformative Technologies — Solid and Reconstituted Wood ............... 65 B-1 Livre Blanc : Technologies Transformantes —Solides ou Reconstitués du Bois ............ 77 B-2 White Paper: Transformative Technologies — Pulp and Paper ........................................ 89 B-2 Livre Blanc : Technologies Transformantes — Pâtes et Papiers.................................... 100 B-3 White Paper: Transformative Technologies — Biochemicals......................................... 113 B-3 Livre Blanc : Technologies Transformantes — Biochimiques....................................... 124

CFIC Forest Science Policy Forum on Transformative Technologies Regional Workshops Summary Report, May 2006.

4


B-4 White Paper: Transformative Technologies — Bioenergy.............................................. 136 B-4 Livre Blanc : Technologies Transformantes — Bioénergie ........................................... 155 B-5 International Perspectives: European Vision and Strategies ........................................... 174

CFIC Forest Science Policy Forum on Transformative Technologies Regional Workshops Summary Report, May 2006.

5


CHAPTER ONE Introduction

T

he Canadian forest sector is currently experiencing a period of difficult markets and intense global competition that has resulted in serious questions concerning its long-term sustainability and competitiveness. To help address these sector-wide challenges, the Canadian Forest Innovation Council ∗ initiated a process of identifying and prioritizing technologies that are potentially transformative for the Canadian forest sector. Through the Forest Science Policy Forum on Transformative Technologies a number of key sector objectives were identified and addressed: 1. Provide a venue where private and public forest sector representatives (including researchers, policy makers, forest and allied industry, academics and suppliers) can openly explore major research and development (R&D) and technology issues. 2. Identify a number of bona fide products and technologies with the technical potential to transform the forest sector through fibre value maximization. 3. Inform strategic sector R&D and technology investments and influence private and public R&D policies to ensure maximum value creation. 4. Raise the profile of Canadian forest research. By tapping into the expertise of a diverse group of forest sector and allied industry stakeholders the Transformative Technologies Forest Science Policy Forum has identified products and technologies that have the potential to make significant contributions to future value creation in the Canadian forest sector. The Transformative Technologies Forest Science Policy Forum Process

T

he Transformative Technologies Forest Science Policy Forum consisted of two primary activities: the commissioning of four white papers that collectively covered both the traditional forest sector and key emerging areas, and the delivery of two regional workshops to prioritize “high-impact” transformative technologies identified in the papers and flag barriers to their implementation. 1. White Papers Paper contents were intentionally limited to transformative technologies rather than technologies and processes designed to cut costs or ensure a fibre supply. Cost cutting, and fibre supply technologies and R&D are important but were not the subject of this exercise. Authors were asked to place emphasis on aggressive and imaginative alternative uses of fibre and its

The Canadian Forest Innovation Council, CFIC, is a group of 11 senior decision makers in the Canadian forest sector that formally represent the three major constituencies that fund forest sector innovation: the Government of Canada, the provinces, and industry. Representation is at the CEO, Deputy Minister, and Assistant Deputy Minister level.

CFIC Forest Science Policy Forum on Transformative Technologies Regional Workshops Summary Report, May 2006.

6


derivatives. Authors were asked to focus on the technical aspects of transformative technologies and barriers to their implementation. They were not asked to make recommendations. Early white paper drafts were reviewed by eight international experts and their comments were incorporated prior to pre-workshop distribution of the papers. The four white papers are found in Appendix B of this report. The four forest sub-sectors that were the topics of the white papers were: •

Building and Living with Wood: any product that is made from a wood fibre or a derivative, solely or in combination with another substance, to fill a market need. This category included, but was not limited to, the historic dominant structural and building products. °

Dr. Alan Potter, Executive Director, Forest Opportunity B.C.

Pulp and Paper: looking at ways to extend the range of final products within the sub-sector encompassing market pulp, newsprint, and wood-free products. ° Dr. Richard Kerekes, Director, University of British Columbia, Pulp and Paper Centre; and Dr. Andrew Garner, Director of Strategic Planning, Paprican (submitted by: The Canadian Pulp and Paper Network for Innovation in Education and Research (PAPIER)).

Biochemicals: exploring ways in which forest-based biomass can serve as the renewable feedstock derived from hemicelluloses, cellulose, or lignin components of trees to produce biochemicals in a “biorefinery”. ° Dr. Andrew Garner, Director of Strategic Planning, Paprican; and Dr. Richard Kerekes, Director, University of British Columbia, Pulp and Paper Centre (submitted by: PAPIER).

Bioenergy: examining how transformative technologies (including advanced thermochemical and bioconversion systems) could be used to expand bioenergy production in Canada, and maximize the economic and environmental benefits to the industry. ° Dr. Warren Mabee and Dr. Jack Saddler, Faculty of Forestry, University of British Columbia

2. Regional Workshops Two transformative technology workshops were held in mid-April: 1. Quebec City, Laval University (April 18-19, 2006). 2. Edmonton, Alberta Research Council (April 20-21, 2006). The regional workshops were designed to: •

Clarify, confirm and supplement the transformative technologies identified in the four white papers and presented at the workshops by the lead authors and designates.

Learn from the experience of other nations in developing transformative technologies for the forest sector.

Perform a preliminary technical prioritization of products and technologies in each of the four forest sub-sectors (wood, pulp and paper, biochemicals and bioenergy) to identify those with the most potential to deliver sector transformation through fibre value maximization.

CFIC Forest Science Policy Forum on Transformative Technologies Regional Workshops Summary Report, May 2006.

7


Identify and rank the key barriers (e.g., funding, institutional, policy and technical) to realizing the benefits of the priority transformative technologies.

The same agenda was followed in both workshops. The agenda is found in Appendix A–1.

Workshop Methodology

T

he workshops were 1½ days long. Participants included a cross-section of executives in Canadian forest products companies, research scientists and mangers from universities and other institutions, and senior officials in forest-oriented provincial and federal departments and agencies. A list of workshop participants and presenters is found in Appendix A–2.

1. White Paper Presentations and International Perspectives The morning of Day 1 consisted of presentations of the four white papers as well as an international perspective on transformative technologies. The white papers and the international perspective presentation are found in Appendix B of this report (B 1–5). Participants engaged in question and answer sessions following each presentation—raising points for clarification and bringing in new insights and knowledge. 2.

Prioritization of Transformative Technologies in the Canadian Forest Industry During the afternoon of Day 1, participants broke out into four working groups (self-selection) based on the white paper themes—living and building with wood, pulp and paper, biochemicals and bioenergy. The working group participants’ lists are found in Appendix A–3. Participants identified10 to 25 key technologies from each white paper for further discussion and analysis. In particular they were instructed to determine, based on their collective knowledge and expertise, whether or not any transformative technologies identified in the white papers should be aggregated or split, added or removed, to allow for a more meaningful analyses and outcome. The working groups then prioritized the identified technologies by positioning them on an effortimpact grid. 3. Applying the Transformative Technology Effort-Impact Grid The effort-impact grids were two-dimensional matrices defined in terms of potential impact on Canada’s forest sector, and the effort required to bring the technologies to a level of technical viability. 1. Effort: on the “x” axis workshop participants were asked to estimate the effort required to bring technologies to technical viability on a scale from “easy” to “difficult”.

CFIC Forest Science Policy Forum on Transformative Technologies Regional Workshops Summary Report, May 2006.

8


2. Potential Impact: on the “y” axis workshop participants were asked to simultaneously estimate the potential impact of a technology on the forest sector on a scale from “major” to “minor”. Chart 1 illustrates the meaning and values of the four quadrants of the effort-impact grid. The effort-impact grid is a first-stage cost-benefit analysis designed to quickly tap into the collective expertise of workshop participants, where cost typically correlates with effort and benefit correlates with impact. Chart 1: Transformative Technologies Effort-Impact Grid

Major

Minor

(0-2% of revenue/familiar)

POTENTIAL IMPACT

(>10% of revenue/unique)

Effort–Impact Grid Q-II

Q-I

• high cost • high potential impact/benefit

• low cost • high potential impact/benefit

(possible action: conduct further analysis on select opportunities)

(possible action: pursue opportunities)

Q-III

Q-IV

• high cost • low potential impact/benefit

• low cost • low potential impact/benefit

(possible action: do not pursue at this time)

(possible action: explore niche opportunities)

Difficult

Easy

(>10 years implementation / >$100 millions)

(0-2 years implementation /$0-$50million)

EFFORT

Effort Axis The horizontal “effort” axis of the grid runs the spectrum from “easy to develop” to “difficult to develop”. When positioning each technology, participants were guided by the following questions: •

What is the time frame for technical feasibility? “Easier” technologies, for example, have the potential to be implemented in the shorter term (0-2 yrs); the “more difficult” technologies require a much longer time frame (e.g., >10 yrs) before application or use because of the need for significant technical advances. What is the relative cost for technical feasibility? The technology has the potential to be ready for implementation with relatively little investment (0 – $50 million) versus a larger investment (>$ 100’s of millions).

Impact Axis The vertical “impact” axis of the matrix runs the spectrum from “major” potential impact to “minor” potential impact. In making placement decisions, participants were guided by the following questions:

CFIC Forest Science Policy Forum on Transformative Technologies Regional Workshops Summary Report, May 2006.

9


How large is the potential impact of the technology on the forest sector? Use of the technology has transformative potential in contributing to the sustainable development of the total forest sector in Canada which was approximately $84 billion in 2005 1. A “small” or “minor” impact was defined to be in the range of 0 to 2 per cent of revenues, whereas a “large” or “major” impact was >10 per cent of revenues. How unique is the potential impact relative to global competitors? A technology, for example, that can obtain full value from the available Canadian forest fibre resource in ways not available to international competitors has the potential to be of “major” impact.

The result of the effort-impact grid exercise was the placement of each technology or product identified in the white papers into one of the four quadrants. A grid was constructed for each of the white paper topics. This report focuses much of its attention on the findings of the effortimpact grids constructed on Day 1 of the workshops. 4. Identification and Prioritization of Barriers to Implementation The second day of the workshops began with a review and validation of Day 1 results. Participants then went back into their respective breakout groups to select 3 or 4 “high impact” technologies and identify and prioritize what they perceived to be the key barriers to realizing the benefits from these technologies. Participants were encouraged to place the barriers under one of four groupings: • • • •

Institutional barriers (e.g., relationships to/with partners in the forest sector, relationships to/with partners in other sectors). Policy barriers (e.g., policies hindering or limiting development and implementation). Funding barriers (e.g., magnitude; mechanism). Technical barriers (e.g., science, innovation).

Finally, participants were asked to prioritize the barriers to implementation using a process known as “multi-voting” or “dotmocracy”. 2 The outcome of this stage of the workshops was a compelling list of some of the most significant barriers to implementation of the transformative technologies identified in each of four Canadian forest sub-sectors. Appendix A–5 lists the primary barriers to implementation (as identified by workshop participants) for a select number of potential high-impact transformative technologies. Ideas for action and next steps were also tabled and discussed during the workshops’ final plenary question and answer sessions. Workshop participants’ evaluation scores and comments are found in Appendix A–6. Ninety-two per cent of participants who completed their evaluation forms (51 individuals) said the workshops met the stated objectives, and ninety-percent (46 individuals) were either highly satisfied or satisfied with the workshop process and outcomes.

1

The $84 billion figure was derived at by adding four Statistics Canada North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) codes, including: 113–Forestry and Logging; 1153–Support Activities for Forestry; 321–Wood Product Manufacturing; and, 322–Paper Product Manufacturing. 2 “Dotmocracy” is a facilitated process in which participants are given three dots to place beside any number of barriers that they feel are of significant importance. Participants are free to place all of their “dots” beside one or more technologies. Once all of the dots are placed and tallied, a ranking of the top barriers is produced.

CFIC Forest Science Policy Forum on Transformative Technologies Regional Workshops Summary Report, May 2006.

10


CHAPTER TWO Transformative Technologies in the Canadian Forest Sector Workshop participants identified a significant number of potential transformative technologies within the forest sector. In total, 82 unique transformative technologies were identified and placed on the forest sub-sector effort-impact grids (see Table 1). The pulp and paper and biochemicals sub-sectors have the largest number of transformative technologies identified (24 each), followed by the wood sub-sector, with 20 technologies. The bioenergy sub-sector has the fewest number of technologies (14). Table 1 lists the number of unique transformative technologies identified within each of the four forest sub-sectors. Table 1 also breaks down the transformative technology selection and identification process by region (Quebec City and Edmonton). Given that the Edmonton workshop built on the initial list of technologies identified in Quebec City it is not surprising that the total number of technologies was higher in Edmonton—79 transformative technologies identified—compared to Quebec City, where 69 technologies were identified. 3 Additionally, it is not surprising that the Edmonton workshop participants identified substantially more bioenergy transformative technologies than their Quebec City counterparts given the regions vested interest in energy resources. Table 1: Transformative Technologies Identified in the Forest Sub-sectors Total # of Technologies Identified

Quebec City Workshop

Edmonton Workshop

Building and Living with Wood

20

19

19

Pulp and Paper

24

22

24

Biochemicals

24

20

22

Bioenergy

14

8

14

Total Technologies Identified:

82

69

79

Forest Sub-sector

The range of promising transformative technologies was extensive (see: effort-impact grids 2 through 6). The analysis in this report is restricted to a “high-level” overview of where the transformative technologies identified in Quebec City and Edmonton were placed on the effort-impact grid. Patterns and trends are identified and overarching conclusions drawn. Interested organizations 3

The differences in numbers between the total number of unique technologies identified with the regional numbers can be attributed to the technology recording and placement process used for this exercise. To ensure continuity between the two regions, the technologies in Quebec City were issued a number for each of the four sub-sectors (e.g., 1, 2, 3…). The same numbers were used in Edmonton, however not all of the technologies identified in Quebec City were placed on the Edmonton effort-impact grids. As well, additional technologies, not identified in Quebec City, were identified in Edmonton. Rather than issuing a new numbering system, the Quebec City numbers and technologies were simply carried-forward, and where new and different technologies were identified, a new number created.

CFIC Forest Science Policy Forum on Transformative Technologies Regional Workshops Summary Report, May 2006.

11


or individuals with appropriate technical competencies will be able to use this report as a starting point for further analyses or consultation. The majority of the transformative technologies identified in the white papers were perceived by workshop participants as having a real potential to significantly impact the Canadian forest sector (QI and Q-II quadrants). Interestingly, workshop participants distributed these “high impact” technologies equally between the “easy” to implement and “difficult” to implement quadrants—recognizing that each technology faces its own set of barriers to overcome before wide spread implementation could be realized. Chart 2: Transformative Technology Placements (Quebec City and Edmonton Workshops)

Quebec City and Edmonton Technology Placement

Major

(>10% of revenue/unique)

2

Q-II

20 6 9

9

Minor

Q-I

1

(0-2% of revenue/familiar)

POTENTIAL IMPACT

(All Sub-sectors)

8

7

21

Q-III

9

Q-IV

Difficult

Easy

(>10 years implementation / >$100 millions)

(0-2 years implementation /$0-$50million)

EFFORT

Edmonton Quebec City

Identification of High-Potential Impact Technologies (Q-I and Q-II) •

Forty-four of the transformative technologies placed on the effort-impact grid (30 per cent) were situated in the upper-right quadrant (Q-I) and were considered to be relatively easy to implement (e.g., low cost, short implementation timeframe) with a potentially high impact/benefit to the forest sector.

Thirty-seven per cent of all transformative technologies placed on the effort-impact grid (55) were located in the upper-left quadrant (Q-II), were considered to be of high potential impact/benefit to the forest sector, but were perceived to be much more difficult to implement (e.g., costly and timely). The identification of “high-potential” impact technologies bodes well for the Canadian forest sector. In total 67 per cent of the transformative technologies identified and placed on the effort-impact grid (Quebec City and Edmonton results combined) were seen as having a

CFIC Forest Science Policy Forum on Transformative Technologies Regional Workshops Summary Report, May 2006.

12


potentially high impact/benefit for the forest sector. Just 32 per cent of the technologies placed on the grid were considered to have a minor impact. Appendix A-4 offers a summative chart depicting the placement of technologies by regional workshop and quadrant. Identification of Low-Potential Impact Technologies (Q-III and Q-IV) •

Fifteen per cent (23) of the transformative technologies placed on the effort-impact grid were found in the lower-left quadrant (Q-III), were considered to have potentially little impact/benefit, and were potentially very difficult to implement (e.g., costly and timely). Workshop participants noted that the combination of the difficulty in getting the technologies to market, and the potentially small impact that they might have on the forest sector, meant it was not likely that they would be pursued anytime soon.

Eighteen per cent (26) of the transformative technologies found on the effort-impact grid were placed in the lower-right quadrant (Q-IV) and were considered to have potentially little impact/benefit to the forest , yet were relatively easy to implement. Workshop participants noted that this quadrant offered the forest sector a number of potential niche markets to pursue if carefully considered and approached.

Differences between Quebec City and Edmonton Workshops: The Placement of Technologies There were a number of similarities and differences between the Quebec City and Edmonton workshop results (Chart 3). Where Quebec City participants more evenly distributed the transformative technologies among all four quadrants of the effort-impact grid, Edmonton participants tended to place the transformative technologies in the upper two quadrants. Chart 3: Transformative Technology Placement Patterns—Quebec City and Edmonton Workshops

Q-III

Q-IV

Major

Q-II

Q-I

6

7

(0-2% of revenue/familiar)

POTENTIAL IMPACT

Q-I

(>10% of revenue/unique)

Edmonton Technology Placement (All Sub-sectors)

Minor

Major

(>10% of revenue/unique)

Q-II

(0-2% of revenue/familiar)

Minor

POTENTIAL IMPACT

Quebec City Technology Placement (All Sub-sectors)

Q-III

Q-IV

Difficult

Easy

Difficult

Easy

(>10 years implementation / >$100 millions)

(0-2 years implementation /$0-$50million)

(>10 years implementation / >$100 millions)

(0-2 years implementation /$0-$50million)

EFFORT

Quebec City

EFFORT

Edmonton

In the Quebec City workshop, for example, just 19 per cent of the transformative technologies (13 of 69) were placed in the high impact/low cost (Q-I) quadrant, whereas in Edmonton over 39 per cent (31 of 79) were found in this upper-right quadrant. As well, Quebec City workshop participants placed over 20 of the transformative technologies (29 per cent) in the lower-left quadrant (Q-III: high cost and low impact), compared to just three technologies (4 per cent) of the Edmonton workshop total.

CFIC Forest Science Policy Forum on Transformative Technologies Regional Workshops Summary Report, May 2006.

13


Table 2 identifies the placement of the transformative technologies in the Quebec City and Edmonton workshops by quadrant. Table 2: Transformative Technologies Placement Trends—Quebec City and Edmonton Transformative Technologies Placement—Quebec City and Edmonton Effort-Impact Quadrant

Quebec City # of technologies (%)

Edmonton # of technologies (%)

QI: High Impact/Low Cost

13 (19%)

31 (39%)

QII: High Impact/High Cost

21 (30%)

34 (43%)

QIII: Low Impact/High Cost

20 (29%)

3 (4%)

QIV: Low Impact/Low Cost

15 (22%)

11 (14%)

Overall, Edmonton workshop participants identified more of the transformative technologies as having a greater potential impact on the Canadian forest sector. However, both workshops did identify a number of key transformative technologies, in each of the forest sub-sectors, to consider further. Chapter 3 of this report examines the placement of the transformative technologies by forest subsector (wood, pulp and paper, biochemicals, and bioenergy). This analysis is important given the unique opportunities and challenges facing each of the four forest sub-sectors identified in the commissioned white papers. Differences in placement of the same technology on the effortimpact grid by participants of the two workshops may be explained, at least partially, as artifacts of the technical competences of the participants and differences in industry structure between East and West.

CFIC Forest Science Policy Forum on Transformative Technologies Regional Workshops Summary Report, May 2006.

14


CHAPTER THREE Effort vs. Impact Prioritization of Transformative Technologies by Forest Sub-Sector Building and Living With Wood Transformative Technologies

T

his section of the report looks at the results of the workshops’ wood working groups (Chart 4).

Chart 4: Living and Building with Wood Transformative Technologies Effort-Impact Matrix

Major

(>10% of revenue/unique)

2

4 1

16

17

12

6

10 20

1

16 10

3

18

13 9 2

11

5

Minor

6

11 19

17 8

7

9

5 8

(0-2% of revenue/familiar)

POTENTIAL IMPACT

Wood: Transformative Technologies

18 12

15 15

3

7

13

4

19

14

Difficult

Easy

(>10 years implementation / >$100 millions)

(0-2 years implementation /$0-$50million)

EFFORT

Edmonton Quebec City

Legend: Living and Building with Wood (Wood) Transformative Technologies (QC and EDM) 1

Low energy breakdown of wood with reconstitution at the nano-level to give ultra-light yet strong structures with minimum variability

11

Computer Numerical Control (CNC) processing coupled with Computer Aided Design (CAD)

2

100 per cent green building

12

Hybrid building systems optimizing the values of wood, steel and concrete (e.g., Ready to Assemble (RtA) House-in-a-Box)

3

“Welding” of wood without the use of metal connectors

13

“Welding” of wood to create furniture/interior applications without the use of adhesives

4

Reconstituted wood with built-in pest, fire and moisture resistance

14

Fibre based panels and non-woven materials for building system sound attenuation

5

In-line vacuum plasma modification

15

Improved mechanical properties through polymeric modification and compression

6

IT for supply chain optimization from seed to market

16

Oriented strand lumber on conventional thermal presses

7

Ink-jet printing on panels, faces and edges

17

High speed sawing headrig that curve saws and strands rather than chips the outside edges

8

Heat-treatment of wood to improve dimensional stability

18

Nanoparticle coatings/surface modification to maintain appearance of high grade wood finishes

9

Low pressure treatment of wood by “super solvents”

19

Incorporation of sensors into wood-based materials to detect changes in building structures (e.g., moisture ingression, temperature fluctuation)

10

Sensors (near IR, laser) to optimize the process of reconstituting wood

20

Building system solutions (durable and flexible design)

CFIC Forest Science Policy Forum on Transformative Technologies Regional Workshops Summary Report, May 2006.

15


Placement of the Wood Transformative Technologies Thirty-eight transformative technologies were placed on the Wood Effort–Impact Grid (19 by Quebec City workshop participants, 19 by Edmonton participants) (Chart 4). •

The majority of the wood technologies placed on the effort-impact grid by workshop participants (71 per cent) were perceived to have high potential impact: °

37 per cent of the technologies (14) were placed in the upper-right quadrant (Q-I): easy to implement/high potential impact;

°

34 per cent (13) were placed in the upper-left quadrant (Q-II): difficult to implement/high potential impact; Interestingly, of the four forest sub-sectors identified, wood had the greatest percentage of technologies placed in the upper two quadrants (high potential impact) at 71 per cent, compared with biochemicals (69 per cent), pulp and paper (65 per cent), and bioenergy (59 per cent).

16 per cent of the wood technologies (6) were placed in the lower-left quadrant (Q-III): difficult to implement/low potential impact; and

13 per cent (5) were placed in the lower-right quadrant (Q-IV): easy to implement/low potential impact.

Chart 4a illustrates the positioning of the wood technologies by Quebec City and Edmonton workshop participants. A number of similarities and differences are apparent. Chart 4a: Quebec City and Edmonton Working Group Details—Living and Building with Wood (Wood) Technologies Placement

17

9 2

5

(0-2% of revenue/familiar)

8

18 12

3

7

13

15

19

14

Major

16

17

2

12 10

1

20 6 3

11

18

13 5

19 8

(0-2% of revenue/familiar)

16 10

7

9

15

Difficult

Easy

Difficult

Easy

(>10 years implementation / >$100 millions)

(0-2 years implementation /$0-$50million)

(>10 years implementation / >$100 millions)

(0-2 years implementation /$0-$50million)

EFFORT

POTENTIAL IMPACT

1

Minor

Major

(>10% of revenue/unique)

6

11

Minor

POTENTIAL IMPACT

4

(>10% of revenue/unique)

Wood: Edmonton

Wood: Quebec City

Quebec City

EFFORT

4

Edmonton

Where Quebec City workshop participants placed 52.5 per cent of the wood technologies in the upper two quadrants (21 per cent in Q-I, 31.5 per cent in Q-II), Edmonton workshop participants placed 90 per cent of the wood transformative technologies in the upper two quadrants (53 per cent in Q-I, 37 per cent in Q-II).

CFIC Forest Science Policy Forum on Transformative Technologies Regional Workshops Summary Report, May 2006.

16


Edmonton workshop participants placed none of the wood transformative technologies in QIII (difficult to implement/minor potential impact), whereas the Quebec workshop participants placed 31.5 per cent of the wood technologies in this quadrant.

Wood “High Potential Impact” Technologies: Quebec City and Edmonton Seven technologies were identified and placed in one of the upper two quadrants of the effortimpact grid (Q-I or Q-II) by both Quebec City and Edmonton workshop participants (Charts 4 and 4a). The technologies, listed below, were perceived by both regional workshop participants to be high potential impact technologies in the wood sector. For example, transformative technology #10 (sensors to optimize the process of reconstituting wood) was identified as relatively easy to implement and with a high potential impact (Q-I). Transformative technology #17 (high speed sawing headrig that curve saws and strands) was identified by both workshops as having a high potential impact, although Quebec City participants feel it would be easier to implement (Q-I) than their Edmonton counterparts (Q-II). ID Placement Number/Grid

Wood Transformative Technologies Identified as “High Potential Impact” Technologies by both Quebec City and Edmonton Workshops

#1

Low energy breakdown of wood with reconstitution at the nano-level to give ultra-light yet strong structures with minimum variability.

#2

100 per cent green building.

#6

IT for supply chain optimization from seed to market.

#9

Low pressure treatment of wood by “super solvents”.

# 10

Sensors (near IR, laser) to optimize the process of reconstituting wood.

# 16

Oriented strand lumber on conventional thermal presses.

# 17

High speed sawing headrig that curve saws and strands rather than chips the outside edges.

It is important to note that all of the transformative technologies placed in either of the two upper quadrants are worthy of attention. Not being identified by one or the other workshop may not reflect the technology’s underlying value or importance. There are regional differences in the forest (sub)sectors that must be taken into consideration when analyzing the charts. A technology identified in Edmonton as being easy to implement with little potential impact (Q-IV), for example, could very well be a technology in Quebec that is seen as being difficult to implement but having a major potential impact on the wood industry (Q-II). Transformative technology # 4 (reconstituted wood with built-in pest, fire and moisture resistance) is such an example. Wood “Niche Market” Technologies (Q-IV): Quebec City and Edmonton Charts 4 and 4a identify wood transformative technologies placed in the lower right quadrant (QIV) of the effort-impact grid by workshop participants. Thirteen per cent of the wood technologies (5) were considered to be relatively easy to implement, yet having minor potential impact. It is possible that some of the technologies, listed below, could be turned into niche market opportunities for the wood sub-sector.

CFIC Forest Science Policy Forum on Transformative Technologies Regional Workshops Summary Report, May 2006.

17


The wood technologies identified by workshop participants in the fourth-quadrant were: •

# 4: reconstituted wood with built-in pest, fire and moisture resistance;

# 15: improved mechanical properties through polymeric modification and compression;

# 18: nanoparticle coatings/surface modification to maintain appearance of high-grade wood finishes; and

# 19: incorporation of sensors into wood-based materials to detect changes in building structures (e.g., moisture ingression, temperature fluctuation).

Just one of the technologies - # 15 (improved mechanical properties) - was identified in the quadrant by both Quebec City and Edmonton workshop participants. Barriers to Implementation of the Wood Technologies The wood working group participants were asked to identify some of the most pressing implementation barriers for 3 or 4 “high-impact” technologies identified in the wood sub-sector. Participants were asked to identify barriers under four common themes: technical barriers; policy barriers; institutional barriers and funding barriers. The technologies selected by Quebec City and Edmonton workshop participants and the corresponding barriers to implementation analysis, are found in Appendix A–5. A high level summary of the key barriers to implementation identified by regional workshop participants for the wood sub-sector included: 1. Matching Canadian fibre characteristics to wood applications. 2. Building and developing market acceptance of engineered wood products. 3. Harmonizing or improving the compatibility of non-residential and residential building codes and standards. 4. Building cohesion within the industry because a fragmented sector with many smaller players inhibits the ability to commercialize new technologies. Regional Workshop Discussions and Insights—Wood Sub-sector Lively and insightful discussions took place during the wood working group presentations and in the final plenary sessions. The following represent some of the key insights and takeaways offered by the workshop participants: The Canadian Fibre Advantage Science and knowledge can overcome the disadvantages of wood (variable strength, rot) and further enhance the advantages (light, strong, easily connected, aesthetics).

• •

Do slow growth Canadian trees have better fibre properties around strength, etc., than some other countries using faster growth plantation tree stocks?

For structural and aesthetic uses of fibre, Canada has an apparent advantage over plantation fibre. However, Canada cannot rely on this fibre advantage alone and must strive to advance its processing, design and engineering technologies. If it does, 10-15 years down the road Canada could have a real wood advantage through a number of unique proprietary technologies.

CFIC Forest Science Policy Forum on Transformative Technologies Regional Workshops Summary Report, May 2006.

18


The uniqueness in fibre lies in the commercialization, selling and marketing of the products rather than simply the value of the fibre itself.

Our industry cannot compete with southern countries based on cost. The reality is that other countries can grow fibre faster than Canada can and the quality is getting better and better. Canada has more land and potentially a better supply. With the right people better solutions can come out of it.

We must scope out the Canadian advantage. We must also have the mindset that we can be the best. We must have a global mind set.

Engineering and Process Developments •

The wood sub-sector is all about (1) moving the raw materials (fibre) to end-use components, systems, and solutions; and (2) moving from production and development processes to new design and engineering activities.

With little or no action now, opportunity costs combined with advancements in technologies in competitor countries could result in Canada losing any advantage that it might otherwise have had.

We must not forget that new building designs can overcome many of the inequalities in fibre.

Right now Canada is in a cost-minimizing stage within the forest sector. It has to get beyond this (resource based model) and work toward higher-end products and developments (a value add model). This requires a higher level and capacity of knowledge especially in engineering and design.

Canada is ahead of the U.S. in wood engineering and adhesive technologies and should be proud. As a result, Canada is able to maintain market share.

A lot of recyclable wood that is hitting landfills could be used for commercial purposes. Canada has some projects in this area but they are small scale—too small to be feasible on a grander scale (e.g., use of recyclable demolition wood that is refined and chipped for roofing purposes).

Wood products have a potential advantage over concrete building technologies in that they can be reconfigured and recycled. This is a real opportunity for the wood sub-sector.

Fibre Supply •

The wood sector must look at the transitional issues regarding net biomass challenges in Canada. What is the fibre supply in Canada and what fibre can be used for what solutions or transformative technologies (e.g., black spruce or white spruce)?

British Columbia is building an information platform that will quantify many of the attributes that affect the amount of fibre supply and its effective delivery (e.g. tenure, road networks, etc).

The right species of trees and proper sorting mechanisms for fibre are needed and are currently being examined in Canada. Supply-side management techniques and the introduction of more effective sorting practices are critical issues for the future sustainability of the forest sector.

CFIC Forest Science Policy Forum on Transformative Technologies Regional Workshops Summary Report, May 2006.

19


Production and Processing Costs • The costs of production are poor compared to other countries and are significantly higher in eastern Canada compared to western Canada. •

The United States is our major market for building materials. How can Canadian producers and manufacturers sell more products in the U.S. and overcome current institutional barriers?

CFIC Forest Science Policy Forum on Transformative Technologies Regional Workshops Summary Report, May 2006.

20


Pulp and Paper Transformative Technologies

T

his section of the report looks at the results of the workshops’ pulp and paper working groups (Chart 5).

Chart 5: Pulp and Paper Transformative Technologies Effort-Impact Matrix

Major

(>10% of revenue/unique)

18 11

11

2 11 3 10

6

5

2

8

17

13

8 9 24

Minor

4 7 (0-2% of revenue/familiar)

POTENTIAL IMPACT

Pulp and Paper: Transformative Technologies

5

20 19 22

13

20 9

3

12 19

7 4

14

12

14

21

18 21

15 16 17

10

15 16

23

6 22

Difficult

Easy

(>10 years implementation / >$100 millions)

(0-2 years implementation /$0-$50million)

Edmonton Quebec City

Legend: Pulp and Paper Transformative Technologies (QC and EDM) 1

Structurally engineered fibres, paper and board

13

Chemically modified fibres

2

New chemical pulping methods (if justified by biorefinery)

14

Improved fibre fractionation technology

3

Mechanical pulping: 80% yield with biorefinery extracted co-product

15

Non-paper products: building/furniture products

4

Rapid assessment tools and remote sensing technology to better identify and evaluate standing trees and logs

16

Non-paper products: textiles

5

Non-paper products: cellulose nanocrystal reinforcement fibre

17

Packaging: returnable, foldable containers to replace plastic boxes

6

Mechanical pulping: 90+ brightness mechanical pulps

18

Use of genomics to optimize fibre quality for end products

7

New wood tracking/sorting systems (matching fibre properties of species to performance attributes)

19

Non-paper products: fibres for composites

8

Chemical pulping: “super reinforcement” pulp for ultra low weight papers

20

Ultra-filled paper, starch and synthetic polymers

9

Chemical pulping” “super-coated” paper

21

Mechanical pulping: increased low-consistency refining for energy savings and control

10

Papermaking: bioactive papers

22

Working forests for industrial use

11

Papermaking: Ultra-filled papers bonded by natural polymers

23

Use of wood residues (densification and use)

12

Non-wood fibres (agriculture)

24

New pulping and paper making processes

Placement of the Pulp and Paper Transformative Technologies Forty-six transformative technologies were placed on the Pulp and Paper Effort–Impact Grid (22 by Quebec City workshop participants, 24 by Edmonton participants) (Chart 5).

CFIC Forest Science Policy Forum on Transformative Technologies Regional Workshops Summary Report, May 2006.

21


65 per cent of the pulp and paper technologies placed on the effort-impact grid by workshop participants were perceived to have high potential impact: °

24 per cent of the technologies (11) were placed in the upper-right quadrant (Q-I): easy to implement/high potential impact;

°

41 per cent (19) were placed in the upper-left quadrant (Q-II): difficult to implement/high potential impact; Of the four forest sub-sectors identified, the pulp and paper sub-sector had the second fewest technologies found in the upper two quadrants. Interestingly, the pulp and paper sector had the greatest number (and highest percentage) of transformative technologies placed in the upper-left quadrant (high potential impact but difficult to implement) compared to the other three forest sub-sectors.

13 per cent of the pulp and paper technologies (6) were placed in the lower-left quadrant (QIII): difficult to implement/low potential impact; and

22 per cent (10) were placed in the lower-right quadrant (Q-IV): easy to implement/low potential impact.

Chart 5a illustrates the placement of pulp and paper technologies by Quebec City and Edmonton workshop participants. A number of similarities and differences are apparent. Chart 5a: Quebec City and Edmonton Working Group Details—Pulp and Paper Technologies Placement

19

12

14

18 21

15 16 17

10

6

Major

(>10% of revenue/unique)

8 9

18 1

19

11 10 5

17

8

2

20 9

3

13 6 24

7 4

(0-2% of revenue/familiar)

22

13

5

POTENTIAL IMPACT

(0-2% of revenue/familiar)

20

11

2 3

Pulp and Paper: Edmonton

Minor

Major

(>10% of revenue/unique)

1

4 7

Minor

POTENTIAL IMPACT

Pulp and Paper: Quebec City

14

12 21

15 16

23

22

Difficult

Easy

Difficult

Easy

(>10 years implementation / >$100 millions)

(0-2 years implementation /$0-$50million)

(>10 years implementation / >$100 millions)

(0-2 years implementation /$0-$50million)

EFFORT

Quebec City

EFFORT

Edmonton

Where Quebec City workshop participants placed 46 per cent of the pulp and paper technologies in the upper two quadrants (19 per cent in Q-I, 27 per cent in Q-II), Edmonton workshop participants placed 83 per cent of the technologies in the upper two quadrants (29 per cent in Q-I, 54 per cent in Q-II).

Similar to the wood sub-sector, Edmonton workshop participants placed none of the pulp and paper transformative technologies in Q-III (difficult to implement/minor potential impact), whereas the Quebec workshop participants placed 27 per cent of them (6) in the quadrant.

CFIC Forest Science Policy Forum on Transformative Technologies Regional Workshops Summary Report, May 2006.

22


Quebec City participants also placed 27 per cent of the pulp and paper technologies in the lower-right quadrant (Q-IV) compared with just 17 per cent of technologies (4) placed in the quadrant by Edmonton participants. This suggests that Quebec City participants may possibly have seen a greater potential for niche markets within the pulp and paper sub-sector than their western counterparts.

Pulp and Paper “High Potential Impact” Technologies: Quebec City and Edmonton Charts 5 and 5a also reveal eight transformative technologies placed by Quebec City and Edmonton workshop participants in one of the upper two quadrants of the effort-impact grid (Q-I or Q-II). The technologies, listed below, were perceived by both regional workshops to be high potential impact technologies in the pulp and paper sub-sector. They included: ID Placement Number/Grid

Pulp and Paper Transformative Technologies Identified as “High Potential Impact” Technologies by both Quebec City and Edmonton Workshops

#1

Structurally engineered fibres, paper and board

#3

Mechanical pulping: 80% yield with biorefinery extracted co-product

#8

Chemical pulping: “super reinforcement” pulp for ultra low weight papers

#9

Chemical pulping” “super-coated” paper

# 11

Papermaking: Ultra-filled papers bonded by natural polymers

# 13

Chemically modified fibres

# 19

Non-paper products: fibres for composites

# 20

Ultra-filled paper, starch and synthetic polymers

Pulp and Paper “Niche Market” Technologies (Q-III): Charts 5 and 5a identify a number of pulp and paper transformative technologies placed in the lower-right quadrant (Q-IV) of the effort-impact grid by workshop participants. Twenty-two per cent of the pulp and paper technologies were considered to be relatively easy to implement, yet having minor potential impact. It is possible that some of the technologies, listed below, could be turned into niche market opportunities within the pulp and paper sub-sector. The pulp and paper technologies identified by workshop participants in quadrant IV were: •

# 14: improved fibre fractionation technology;

# 15: non-paper products: building/furniture products;

# 16: non-paper products: textiles;

# 17: packaging: returnable, foldable containers to replace plastic boxes;

# 18: use of genomics to optimize fibre quality for end products;

# 21: mechanical pulping: increased low-consistency refining for energy savings and control;

# 22: working forests for industrial use; and

CFIC Forest Science Policy Forum on Transformative Technologies Regional Workshops Summary Report, May 2006.

23


# 23: use of wood residues (densification and use).

Two of the pulp and paper technologies - # 15 (non-paper products: building and furniture products) and # 16 (non-paper products: textiles) - were placed in the quadrant by both Quebec City and Edmonton workshop participants. Barriers to Implementation of Pulp and Paper Technologies The pulp and paper working group participants identified barriers to implementation for 3 or 4 “high-impact” technologies. Participants were asked to identify the barriers under four common themes: technical barriers; policy barriers; institutional barriers and funding barriers. The pulp and paper “high impact” technologies selected by Quebec City and Edmonton workshop participants and their corresponding barriers to implementation, are found in Appendix A–5. The key barriers to implementing the transformative technologies in the pulp and paper sub-sector included: 1. Determining the Canadian fibre advantage through:

» 3D mapping; » genome mapping; and » linking fibre advantages to market applications. 2. Developing separation techniques for pulp and co-products. 3. The lack of a collaborative multi-disciplinary network to address:

» » » » » »

technology development; intellectual property issues; market development issues; technology transfers; skills identification and development; and commercialization.

Regional Workshop Discussions and Insights—Pulp and Paper Sub-sector The following bullets represent some of the key insights and points of discussion raised by workshop participants: Fibre Advantage •

Canada potentially has the best long fibre in the world but the physical limits of these fibres (e.g., how long they can be stretched) is not known. More research is needed to determine how far Canadian fibre can go in terms of strength and durability. With the best reinforcement fibre in the world, Canada could charge a premium.

In the pulp sector there are two realities: be cheap (cost) or different (bring value from fibre). Some real questions need to be asked of the Canadian pulp and paper sub-sector: what are the

CFIC Forest Science Policy Forum on Transformative Technologies Regional Workshops Summary Report, May 2006.

24


different properties of Canadian fibre and how can this be used to the competitive advantage of Canadians? Fibre Access and Supply •

Different ways to harvest and manage the feedstock needs to be examined (e.g., roundwood versus slash). Different mills might evolve to be capable of producing different products from different parts of the tree (trunk, inside, tips, bark, etc.).

Inefficiencies result if the fibre resource is not used to its full potential (e.g., the straw industry separates top-half from bottom-half and sends it to the appropriate mills, but this may not be optimized in the forest sector perhaps due to current tenure and harvesting systems). Accordingly, streaming different species or portions of trees to particular processing facilities may enable extraction of more value from the resource. To effectively do so it may be necessary to consider tenure system and/or harvesting system adjustments or the insertion of a new sorting protocol between the harvest and the mills.

In essence it does not matter where the fibre comes from (wood or agriculture). What is important is that a separation is done so that it can be used by other sectors of the economy. A change of paradigm will have occurred when the forest sector is providing new types of fibre products to other sectors of the economy (e.g., the automotive industry, other manufacturing sectors).

Pulping Processes and the State of the Industry •

If nothing is done differently the Canadian pulp and paper industry will be marginalized as Canada cannot compete on cost alone. Something different must be done.

One of the top opportunities and probabilities for success is to act on and change the ways of mechanical pulping to produce valuable new products.

None of these opportunities, however, will succeed if the forest sector is not able to attract and retain a skilled and knowledgeable labour supply.

CFIC Forest Science Policy Forum on Transformative Technologies Regional Workshops Summary Report, May 2006.

25


Biochemicals Transformative Technologies

T

his section of the report looks at the results of the workshops’ biochemicals working groups (Chart 6).

Chart 6: Biochemicals Transformative Technologies Effort-Impact Matrix

Major

(>10% of revenue/unique)

21 3 1

1

12 4 19 5 5

2

8

22 10

Minor

4 (0-2% of revenue/familiar)

POTENTIAL IMPACT

Biochemicals: Transformative Technologies

9

20 13

10

2 14

17 15 8

23 13 14 16 15 9

24

11 18

3

11

6

16

7

19

17

6

20

18

Difficult

Easy

(>10 years implementation / >$100 millions)

(0-2 years implementation /$0-$50million)

EFFORT

Edmonton Quebec City

Legend: Biochemicals Transformative Technologies (QC and EDM) 1

Develop dedicated biochemical mills (no pulp) (more difficult technologies)

13

Using enzymes for industrial and biochemical processes

2

Solvent pulping and biochemicals

14

Membranes for concentration and purification

3

Developing bioplastics (HARD technologies)

15

Chromatographic resins for concentration and purification

4

Developing lignin chemicals from trees for proprietary products and niche markets (e.g., phenols, resins, polyols)

16

Developing bioplastics (polyactic acid: coatings, films; levulinic acid: polyestors, nylon substitutes; cellulose copolymers) from trees

5

Developing structured and tailored feedstock (including annuals) using seedling technologies: genetics, genomics, metagenomics, embryogenesis

17

Microorganisms for bioproducts

6

Developing extractives: pharmaceuticals and nutraceuticals from trees (wood, bark, foliage) including tall oil, terpenes, flavanoids, essential oils)

18

Functionalized cellulose fibres: cellulose nanocrystals (largely unexplored, gels, paints, cosmetics, extraction not yet commercial)

7

Hemicellulose pre-extraction to Et0H

19

Lignin separation, off-loading recovery boilers, and energy

8

Developing functionalized cellulose fibres from trees for other purposes than just paper (e.g., bioplastics, substitution for glass fibre, in place of polyesters and cotton)

20

Developing cellulose derived chemicals from trees and waste fibre (e.g., that are oxygen functionalized, resistant to enzymes)

9

Organic solvents for concentration and purification

21

Developing new biorefinery processes (e.g., separation and purification)

10

Supercritical liquids, gas expanded liquids, ionic liquids

22

Solvent extraction methods and processes (e.g., pulping with organic solvents, using supercritical and gas expanded liquids)

11

Developing hemicellulose chemicals from trees used in biomedical, pharmaceutical and paper-making applications

23

Developing co-products in pulp mills (e.g., pre-extraction of hemicellulose, lignin washing to avoid cellulose degradation)

12

Develop dedicated biochemical mills (no pulp) (easier technologies)

24

Hemicellulose pre-extraction to EtOH and polymers, chemicals

CFIC Forest Science Policy Forum on Transformative Technologies Regional Workshops Summary Report, May 2006.

26


Placement of the Biochemicals Transformative Technologies Forty-two transformative technologies were placed on the Biochemicals Effort–Impact Grid (20 by Quebec City workshop participants, 22 by Edmonton participants) (Chart 6). •

69 per cent of the biochemicals technologies placed on the effort-impact grid by workshop participants were perceived to have high potential impact: °

31 per cent of the technologies (13) were placed in the upper-right quadrant (Q-I): easy to implement/high potential impact;

°

38 per cent (16) were placed in the upper-left quadrant (Q-II): difficult to implement/high potential impact; Of the four forest sub-sectors, biochemicals had the second most number of transformative technologies found in either one of the upper two quadrants.

21 per cent of the biochemicals technologies (9) were placed in the lower-left quadrant (QIII): difficult to implement/low potential impact; and

10 per cent (14) were placed in the lower-right quadrant (Q-IV): easy to implement/low potential impact. There were relatively few niche market opportunities identified for the biochemicals sub-sector of the forest sector.

A number of similarities and differences between the opinions of Quebec City and Edmonton workshop participants are apparent (Chart 6a). Chart 6a: Quebec City and Edmonton Working Group Details—Biochemicals Technologies Placement

2 9

13

10

14

11 7 6

15

16 17

20

18

Major

(>10% of revenue/unique)

8

21 3 1

5 22

4

20 2

10

Minor

19 5

(0-2% of revenue/familiar)

4

POTENTIAL IMPACT

Major

(>10% of revenue/unique) (0-2% of revenue/familiar)

Biochemicals: Edmonton

12

3

Minor

POTENTIAL IMPACT

Biochemicals: Quebec City 1

17 8

23 13 14 16 15 9

24

11 18 19

6

Difficult

Easy

Difficult

Easy

(>10 years implementation / >$100 millions)

(0-2 years implementation /$0-$50million)

(>10 years implementation / >$100 millions)

(0-2 years implementation /$0-$50million)

EFFORT

Quebec City

EFFORT

Edmonton

Where Quebec City workshop participants placed 60 per cent of the biochemicals technologies in the upper two quadrants (20 per cent in Q-I, 40 per cent in Q-II), Edmonton workshop participants placed 77 per cent of the technologies in the upper two quadrants (41 per cent in Q-I, 36 per cent in Q-II).

This is the only sub-sector where Edmonton workshop participants placed one or more of the transformative technologies in Q-III (difficult to implement/minor potential impact).

CFIC Forest Science Policy Forum on Transformative Technologies Regional Workshops Summary Report, May 2006.

27


Edmonton participants placed 3 technologies (14 per cent) in Q-III, compared with 6 transformative technologies (30 per cent) placed by Quebec workshop participants. Biochemicals “High Potential Impact” Technologies: Quebec City and Edmonton There were a marked number of biochemical transformative technologies (9) that both Quebec City and Edmonton workshop participants identified and placed in one of the upper two quadrants of the effort-impact grid (Q-I or Q-II) (See: Charts 6 and 6a). Interestingly, this subsector had the most number of technologies identified by both regional workshops in one of the two upper quadrants (high impact technologies) (listed below). They included: ID Placement Number/Grid

Biochemicals Transformative Technologies Identified as “High Potential Impact” Technologies by both Quebec City and Edmonton Workshops

#1

Develop dedicated biochemical mills (no pulp) (more difficult technologies)

#2

Solvent pulping and biochemicals

#5

Developing structured and tailored feedstock (including annuals) using seedling technologies: genetics, genomics, metagenomics, embryogenesis

#8

Organic solvents for concentration and purification

#9

Developing functionalized cellulose fibres from trees for other purposes than just paper (e.g., bioplastics, substitution for glass fibre, in place of polyesters and cotton)

# 10

Supercritical liquids, gas expanded liquids, ionic liquids

# 13

Using enzymes for industrial and biochemical processes

# 14

Membranes for concentration and purification

# 15

Chromatographic resins for concentration and purification

Biochemicals “Niche Market” Technologies (Q-IV): Quebec City and Edmonton Charts 6 and 6a identify a number of biochemicals transformative technologies placed in the lower-right quadrant (Q-IV) of the effort-impact grid by workshop participants. Just 10 per cent (4) of the biochemicals technologies were considered to be relatively easy to implement, yet having minor potential impact. It was deemed possible that some of the technologies, listed below, could be turned into niche market opportunities within the biochemicals sub-sector. The biochemicals technologies identified by workshop participants in quadrant IV were: •

# 11: developing hemicellulose chemicals from trees used in biomedical, pharmaceutical and paper-making applications;

# 18: functionalized cellulose fibres: cellulose nanocrystals (largely unexplored, gels, paints, cosmetics, extraction not yet commercial);

# 19: lignin separation, off-loading recovery boilers, and energy; and

# 20: developing cellulose derived chemicals from trees and waste fibre (e.g., that are oxygen functionalized, resistant to enzymes).

CFIC Forest Science Policy Forum on Transformative Technologies Regional Workshops Summary Report, May 2006.

28


None of the biochemicals technologies were placed in this quadrant by both Quebec City and Edmonton workshop participants. Barriers to Implementation of Biochemicals Technologies The biochemicals working group participants identified barriers to implementation for 3 or 4 “high-impact” technologies. The biochemicals “high impact” technologies selected by Quebec City and Edmonton workshop participants and their corresponding barriers to implementation are found in Appendix A–5. The key barriers to implementing the transformative technologies within the biochemicals sub-sector included: 1. Characterizing and demonstrating the Canadian fibre advantage for biochemical

production. 2. Linking Canadian feedstock characteristics to quality end-products. 3. Engaging cross-sectoral stakeholders for co-product development. 4. Tailoring chemical/biochemical modifications for specific uses. 5. Identifying sustained multi-year “champions” from industry and government.

Regional Workshop Discussions and Insights—Biochemicals Sub-sector The following represent some of the key insights and points of discussion raised by workshop participants: Fibre Supply and End Products •

One opportunity requiring more study is the potential for Canada to grow trees for specific biochemical end-products. To be successful, a unique advantage for Canada is needed.

The Canadian forest sector must identify and rally under strategies that give Canada an advantage over competitor countries. Tailoring a tree to a final end-product might be more beneficial to the competitors (who typically have faster growth cycles).

Using genetics research to select trees from a feedstock that are most desirable (not GM or genetically modified) for an end-product is feasible; a better understanding of the suitability of a stock for a particular end-product is needed.

Once the forest biochemical sub-sector is in place the applications and potential new markets will be significant and they will also create further value (e.g., additional uses for cellulose).

CFIC Forest Science Policy Forum on Transformative Technologies Regional Workshops Summary Report, May 2006.

29


Fibre Research and Development •

A high percentage of the transformative technologies identified in the workshops are still many years away from commercialization and remain in the research stages of development. These initiatives need to be supported in order to achieve success.

Many fibres can be manufactured to be resistant to moisture or heat and many do not decompose quickly. It would be wise to watch and understand what is going on in the agricultural sector re: innovations in technology and agri-fibres. Are they doing the same sorts of things that the forest sector is looking at? What advantages does the forest sector have over the agricultural sector (e.g., existing infrastructure, supply of fibre)? These sorts of questions need to be addressed further.

In the past 50 years the Canadian pulp and paper sub-sector has been “super-optimized”, what is different now is the need to find new processes and products.

Research needs to be done on the relative value of wood fibres versus other fibres.

The technologies presented are forward looking but for some a knowledge gap needs to be bridged. Strategies to address the gap(s) may include a collaborative process involving government, the forest sector and other natural resource sectors of the economy (e.g., oil and gas industries).

Market Issues •

What is true today might not be true 2 years, 5 years or 20 years from now. The forest sector must always be cognizant of this and adapt and plan for change. Although some of the biochemical technologies identified in the white paper may seem out of reach, things change (e.g., the oilsands industry in Alberta was once seen as unsustainable).

The energy efficiencies and issues associated with biochemicals production must be understood regarding R&D, and investment in these products and processes.

For any of the biochemicals products, a realized return on investment is required. A company CEO must know that the venture is profitable (short or longer-term). The forest sector needs to show investors how biochemicals are a profitable venture.

CFIC Forest Science Policy Forum on Transformative Technologies Regional Workshops Summary Report, May 2006.

30


Bioenergy Transformative Technologies

T

his section of the report looks at the results of the workshops’ bioenergy working groups (Chart 7).

Chart 7: Bioenergy Transformative Technologies Effort–Impact Matrix

Major

(>10% of revenue/unique)

1

3 11

6

2 1 9

10

5

12

6

8

4

Minor

2 (0-2% of revenue/familiar)

POTENTIAL IMPACT

Bioenergy: Transformative Technologies

7a/b 14 7b 7a 3

4 8 5

13

Difficult

Easy

(>10 years implementation / >$100 millions)

(0-2 years implementation /$0-$50million)

EFFORT EFFORT

Edmonton Quebec City

Legend: Bioenergy Transformative Technologies (QC and EDM) 1

Gasification to recover pulping chemicals for gas/steam turbine

8

Wood pellets in residential furnaces and in district heating applications

2

Biofuels from thermo-chemical platforms (fischer-tropschs, methanol, higher alcohols)

9

Pyrolysis oils as a biofuels feedstock

3

Hemicellulose fractionation to C5 and C6 sugars, and fermentation EtOH

10

Gasification of biomass

4

Tall oil to biodiesels; bioesters (methanol) and bioparaffins (H2 from gasification)

11

Hemicellulose fractionation to C6 sugars

5

Biofuels from the bioconversion platforms (converting sugar, starch and lignocellulose into biofuels)

12

Pyrolysis oils as an energy feedstock

6

Biomass power and cogeneration

13

Co-firing coal power plants with biomass

7

Bundling and pre-treatment (feedstock conditioning) and power boilers to work with bark and logging residues (as an alternative to beehive burners)

14

Composting for methane

Placement of the Bioenergy Transformative Technologies Twenty-two transformative technologies were placed on the Bioenergy Effort–Impact Grid (8 by Quebec City workshop participants, 14 by Edmonton participants). •

59 per cent of the bioenergy technologies placed on the effort-impact grid by workshop participants were perceived to have high potential impact: °

27 per cent of the technologies (6) were placed in the upper-right quadrant (Q-I): easy to implement/high potential impact;

CFIC Forest Science Policy Forum on Transformative Technologies Regional Workshops Summary Report, May 2006.

31


°

32 per cent (7) were placed in the upper-left quadrant (Q-II): difficult to implement/high potential impact; Of the four forest sub-sectors identified, bioenergy had the fewest number of technologies (13) found in either one of the upper two quadrants.

9 per cent of the bioenergy technologies (2) were placed in the lower-left quadrant (Q-III): difficult to implement/low potential impact; and

32 per cent (7) were placed in the lower-right quadrant (Q-IV): easy to implement/low potential impact.

Chart 7a illustrates the placement of bioenergy technologies by Quebec City and Edmonton workshop participants. A number of similarities and differences are apparent. Chart 7a: Quebec City and Edmonton Working Group Details—Bioenergy Technologies Placement Bioenergy: Edmonton

7a/b 3

4 8 5

Major

(>10% of revenue/unique)

3 11

6

2

9

10

12

8

4

14 (0-2% of revenue/familiar)

POTENTIAL IMPACT

(0-2% of revenue/familiar)

2

1

5

Minor

Major

(>10% of revenue/unique)

1

6

Minor

POTENTIAL IMPACT

Bioenergy: Quebec City

7b

13

Difficult

Easy

Difficult

Easy

(>10 years implementation / >$100 millions)

(0-2 years implementation /$0-$50million)

(>10 years implementation / >$100 millions)

(0-2 years implementation /$0-$50million)

EFFORT

Quebec City

7a

EFFORT

Edmonton

Where Quebec City workshop participants placed 25 per cent of the bioenergy technologies in the upper two quadrants (12.5 per cent in Q-I, 12.5 per cent in Q-II), Edmonton workshop participants placed 79 per cent of the technologies in the upper two quadrants (36 per cent in Q-I, 43 per cent in Q-II).

Edmonton workshop participants placed none of the bioenergy transformative technologies in Q-III (difficult to implement/minor potential impact).

Quebec City workshop participants placed 4 of 8 transformative technologies in Q-IV, representing 50 per cent of all bioenergy technologies identified in the workshop.

Bioenergy “High Potential Impact” Technologies: Quebec City and Edmonton Charts 7 and 7a also identify those bioenergy transformative technologies that both Quebec City and Edmonton workshop participants identified and placed in one of the upper two quadrants of the effort-impact grid (Q-I or Q-II). There were just two such technologies, perceived to be high potential impact technologies in the bioenergy sub-sector of the Canadian forest sector, identified by both regional workshops. They included:

CFIC Forest Science Policy Forum on Transformative Technologies Regional Workshops Summary Report, May 2006.

32


ID Placement Number/Grid

Bioenergy Transformative Technologies Identified as “High Potential Impact” Technologies by both Quebec City and Edmonton Workshops

#1

Gasification to recover pulping chemicals for gas/steam turbine

#6

Biomass power and cogeneration

Bioenergy “Niche Market” Technologies (Q-III): Quebec City and Edmonton Charts 7 and 7a identify a number of bioenergy transformative technologies placed in the lower right quadrant (Q-IV) of the effort-impact grid by workshop participants. Thirty-two per cent (6) of the bioenergy technologies were considered to be relatively easy to implement, yet having minor potential impact. This sub-sector had the most number of technologies positioned in the lower right quadrant. Workshop participants felt that it was possible to turn some of the technologies, listed below, into niche market opportunities within the bioenergy sub-sector. The bioenergy technologies identified by workshop participants in quadrant IV were: •

# 4: tall oil to biodiesels; bioesters (methanol) and bioparaffins (H2 from gasification);

# 5: biofuels from the bioconversion platforms (converting sugar, starch and lignocellulose into biofuels);

# 7: bundling and pre-treatment (feedstock conditioning) and power boilers to work with bark and logging residues (as an alternative to beehive burners);

# 8: wood pellets in residential furnaces and in district heating applications

# 13: co-firing coal power plants with biomass

# 14: composting for methane.

One of the bioenergy technologies placed in this quadrant was identified by both Quebec City and Edmonton workshop participants—transformative technology # 7 (bundling and pretreatment feedstock conditioning and power boilers to work with bark and logging residues). Barriers to Implementation of Bioenergy Technologies The bioenergy working group participants identified barriers to implementation for 3 or 4 “highimpact” technologies. The bioenergy “high impact” technologies selected by Quebec City and Edmonton workshop participants and their corresponding barriers to implementation are found in Appendix A–5. The key barriers to implementing a number of the transformative technologies within the bioenergy sub-sector included: 1. Scaling up the technology applications to achieve commercial viability. 2. Engaging cross-sectoral stakeholders for co-product development. 3. Developing biofuel standards and specifications to ensure product homogeneity and

quality.

CFIC Forest Science Policy Forum on Transformative Technologies Regional Workshops Summary Report, May 2006.

33


4. Understanding of the relative economic value of Canada’s forest biomass as a feedstock

for biofuels. 5. Need for a better understanding of the availability of feedstock. 6. Developing a green procurement policy to generate market-pull.

Regional Workshop Discussions and Insights—Bioenergy Sub-sector The following represent some of the key insights and points of discussion raised by workshop participants: Use of Biomass •

Biodiesel is used from crops so it could be used from trees as well. What about hydrogen? Hydrogen is made from natural gas, so in theory hydrogen can be made from the tree feedstock.

There are predictions that show that in 2020 the pulp and paper sub-sector will run into a fibre shortage. This will only feed into the challenge of supplying the bioenergy sub-sector with the required biomass (i.e., where will all of the wood needed for the bioenergy subsector come from?).

The Canadian advantage: we have a lot of fibre and maybe, based on demand, Canada will need to break these biomass molecules into fuels. Canada needs to show leadership in this venture and capture any advantage.

Research and Development •

Why do we always tend to focus on transportation fuels and not on heating fuels? The logic is that in the pulp mills the first thing to do is to separate the fossil fuels (transportation fuels). Also there are logistical issues around transportation (unless you put the pulp mill at the site of an oil refinery). The best return on investment and best utilization of the forest biomass at this time is in the production of ethanol.

Canada needs to understand what is going on in the United States and elsewhere. What are other governments doing in terms of policy and regulations? How can Canada compete or play on the global scale in this market? To succeed Canada must find its role in the bioenergy sector and move forward.

How much energy you take out from ethanol conversion as to how much energy you put in must be better understood.

Market Influence •

There are some big chemical/energy companies that have targeted upwards of 30 per cent of sales coming form bio-sources in the next 5 years. One company also has plans to become the world leader in cellulose conversion. This bodes very well for the forest sector and this sub-sector.

CFIC Forest Science Policy Forum on Transformative Technologies Regional Workshops Summary Report, May 2006.

34


It is not certain which industry will be the big player in the bioenergy field—whether it is the forest sector or some other sector of the economy with a vested interest in this alternative energy source. A better understanding as to who the key stakeholders are needs to take place. The energy sector and not the forest sector might be the key investors

A market price of $1/litre for bioenergy versus other fuel sources would certainly influence the appeal of the energy resource. There is real potential for the bioenergy market but the effort to market and commercialize it in the near term will be challenging.

There is a need for bioenergy demonstration projects.

CFIC Forest Science Policy Forum on Transformative Technologies Regional Workshops Summary Report, May 2006.

35


CHAPTER FOUR Collective Insights A summary of the collective insights captured from the feedback forms of workshop participants include: The sector should: • • • • •

better understand the issues that will be the competitive drivers of the forest sector of the future; explore, understand and quantify the Canadian fibre advantage; better understand the fibre supply in Canada (e.g., where it is, what it is and who controls it); increase formal, collective efforts to collaborate and partner with other industries and sectors; and increase interaction and collaboration among the four forest sub-sectors (wood, pulp and paper, biochemicals, and bioenergy).

Workshop participants also felt strongly that the process of better understanding the transformative technologies identified in the Quebec City and Edmonton workshops needs to continue through: •

further technical, economic and market analysis of these technologies and their barriers to implementation; and

a more holistic engagement of key technology implementers—both within the forest sector as well as with potential partners from other industries and sectors.

Key Findings The participants’ insights corroborate with the key findings of the regional workshop, listed below: 1. TRANSFORMATIVE TECHNOLOGIES HOLD SIGNIFICANT POTENTIAL FOR THE CANADIAN FOREST SECTOR There are many promising technologies for the Canadian forest sector to consider. » There are big differences in effort needed for technical viability among proposed products and technologies. » There is a risk of looking for the silver bullet. There is almost certainly no technology that provides a single answer to sector sustainability. The Canadian forest sector should consider concentrating on a number of platforms and concepts rather than specific technologies or products. For example: • •

a significant biorefinery pilot project or projects; and/or tasking a specific group to explore the best use of Canadian fibre.

CFIC Forest Science Policy Forum on Transformative Technologies Regional Workshops Summary Report, May 2006.

36


2. THE BARRIERS TO IMPLEMENTATION MUST BE BETTER UNDERSTOOD AND ULTIMATELY OVERCOME IF A TRANSFORMATIVE TECHNOLOGY IS TO SUCCEED » The Forum concentrated on a technical triage of options. » Non-technical barriers can hinder the realization of technologies with high technical potential. » Next steps for prioritization need to expand beyond the technical concerns and focus on: • market and economic considerations; • social impacts; and • environmental impacts. 3. LINKS WITHIN AND OUTSIDE OF THE FOREST SECTOR ARE BECOMING INCREASINGLY IMPORTANT » Much future potential lies at the intersection of: • forest sub-sectors: – wood, pulp and paper, biochemicals, and bioenergy. •

the forest sector and other existing sectors: – forest–energy; – forest–chemicals; – forest–agriculture; and – forest–mining.

» To better tap into markets and to finance technology risks unfamiliar to the forest sector, partnerships with firms/governments in chemical, energy and agricultural sectors may be required. » Future technology developments are best pursued through multidisciplinary, crosssectoral teams. • Are the mining, chemicals, or agricultural sectors doing things that could be used, replicated or adopted for the forest sector? » Formal governance practices need to be in place to maximize the effectiveness of R&D collaboration. • Jurisdictional challenges of the E.U. are large yet through proper, formal governance the E.U. forest sector has twenty-five countries working together on R&D projects designed to deliver targeted outcomes. »

Systemic and coordinated efforts are needed to ensure the most effective and efficient development and implementation of transformative technologies.

It is difficult for the Canadian forest sector to compete with others on the cost of fibre alone. To create value from its supply of quality fibre the industry needs to collaborate with other industries and sectors in order to develop new and unique products.

CFIC Forest Science Policy Forum on Transformative Technologies Regional Workshops Summary Report, May 2006.

37


4. THE CANADIAN FIBRE ADVANTAGE NEEDS TO BE FULLY UNDERSTOOD AND DEVELOPED » There continue to be many unanswered questions that hinder the development of future research programs in, and for, the forest sector, including: •

What is the best use of our fibre resources?

Does Canada have a “fiber advantage” — unique fibre properties that can be capitalized on economically? • If so, what are the advantages? • How large are they? Where are they? • How can they best be exploited?

» The Canadian forest sector could benefit from a more detailed knowledge about what market strategies or competitive niches competing regions and countries are pursuing. This knowledge would enable informed decision-making on how to capitalize on any potential Canadian fibre advantage. » More global intelligence may also help avoid duplication of R&D effort where appropriate and potentially lead to synergistic R&D programs. » Decisions on best future uses of Canadian forest fibre resources may be affected by levels of fibre supply. Increased knowledge of not only quality, but quantity of future fibre supply is needed.

CFIC Forest Science Policy Forum on Transformative Technologies Regional Workshops Summary Report, May 2006.

38


Potential Next Steps To capitalize on the Forum and Workshop momentum, the Canadian forest sector may wish to consider concentrating on the following three initiatives: 1. Research Fibre to understand Canada’s Advantage » Task the Fibre Centre with the immediate development and execution of a work plan asking and answering questions around the themes: » What is the best use of Canada’s fibre? » Does Canada have a fibre advantage? »

Answers to these questions are required before longer–term research agendas can be responsibly developed.

2. Establish a Biorefinery Demonstration Project » A Biorefinery Pilot is a concept that addresses many of the Forum and Workshops key messages. » Task an appropriately skilled consortium to develop a suite of research options with details on required partners, timeframes, funding requirements and potential outcomes that would advance a pre-competitive biorefinery initiative to the demonstration phase. 3. Ensure the Optimization of the Canadian Forest Sector Innovation System »

Task the Board and CEO of the emerging amalgamated single Institute with ensuring the momentum in the pursuit of transformative technology development is maintained, and ensuring the forest sector innovation system is linked to appropriate sectors, sub-sectors and constituent institutions to optimize the pursuit of transformative technology development and implementation.

CFIC Forest Science Policy Forum on Transformative Technologies Regional Workshops Summary Report, May 2006.

39


CHAPTER FIVE Appendices A-1

Regional Workshop Agenda

A-2

Regional Workshop Participants List

A-3

Regional Workshop Breakout Working Groups

A-4

Effort-Impact Grid: Quebec City and Edmonton Workshop Placement of Technologies

A-5

Barriers to Implementation of Selected Transformative Technologies

A-6

Regional Workshop Evaluation Scores and Comments

B-1

White Paper: Transformative Technologies in Solid and Reconstituted Wood Products “Building and Living with Wood�

B-2

White Paper: Transformative Technologies for Pulp and Paper Products and Processes

B-3

White Paper: Transformative Technologies for Biochemicals

B-4

White Paper: Transformative Technologies for the Forest Sector: Bioenergy Production in Canada

B-5

International Perspectives: European Vision and Strategies

CFIC Forest Science Policy Forum on Transformative Technologies Regional Workshops Summary Report, May 2006.

40


A-1 Regional Workshop Agenda April 18-19, Laval University Pavillon Gene-H.-Kruger (right beside the Abitibi-Price Pavilion) Room 2330, Université Laval, Quebec, QC G1K 7P4 April 20-21, Alberta Research Council 250 Karl Clark Road, Edmonton, AB T6N 1E4 Workshop Objectives • • • • •

To clarify, and supplement or confirm the transformative technologies by building on the four “white papers”. To learn from the experience of other nations in developing transformative technologies for the forest sector. To prioritize products and technologies with the most potential to deliver sector transformation through fibre value maximization. To identify and rank the barriers to realizing the benefits of priority transformative technologies. To scope strategies to address the barriers.

DAY ONE 8:30 a.m.

Continental breakfast (hosted by Laval University – Quebec; CFIC - Alberta)

9:00

Introductions and review of agenda • Quebec City – Denis Brière, Dean, Faculty of Forestry and Geomatics, Laval University • Edmonton – Yaman Boluk, Senior Scientist, Bioproducts and Bioprocessing, Alberta Research Council • Dan Wicklum, Executive Director, CFIC • Al Howatson, The Conference Board of Canada White Paper Presentations

The key messages of the four white papers will be presented by the authors. A period of about 20 minutes following each presentation will provide an opportunity for questions and answers. 9:15

Pulp and Paper • Dr. Richard Kerekes, Director, UBC Pulp and Paper Centre

10:00

Biochemicals • Dr. Andrew Garner, Andrew Garner & Associates

10:45

Networking break

11:00

Bioenergy • Dr. Andrew Garner on behalf of Drs. Warren Mabee and Jack Saddler, Faculty of Forestry, UBC

11:45

Lunch (Hosted by CFIC)

CFIC Forest Science Policy Forum on Transformative Technologies Regional Workshops Summary Report, May 2006.

41


12:30 p.m.

Building and Living with Wood • Dr. Alan Potter, Executive Director, Forest Opportunity B.C.

1:15

Technology Prioritization • In groups of 6 to 10, participants will be asked to prioritizes the identified technologies using an effort vs. impact methodology (attached)

2:30

Overview of Results

3:05

Break

3:15

International Perspectives on Transformative Technologies Dr. Patrice Mangin, Past CEO of CTP, the French Pulp & Paper Research Centre, Past Chairman of the Confederation of European Paper Industries (CEPI) Research Group. ƒ ƒ

What are some emerging technologies in other key jurisdictions? Questions and Answers

4:15

Question and answer period on the two international presentations

4:45

Summary and directions for Day Two

4:50

Facility Tour (Optional)

DAY TWO 8:30 a.m.

Continental breakfast (Hosted by CFIC)

9:00

Introduction to Day Two • Dan Wicklum

9:10

Review of Day One results • Al Howatson

9:20

Identification of barriers • Small groups will identify the key barriers to realizing the benefits of high potential impact technologies from Day One • Moderated by Al Howatson

10:20

Networking Break

10:40

Report back • Rapporteurs for each small group will present a summary of the key barriers as selected by that group • Moderated by Al Howatson

11:00

Workshop Conclusion • This plenary session will provide participants an opportunity to reflect on the workshop results, and to offer their views on the way forward.

Noon

Wrap-up and adjournment • Dan Wicklum

CFIC Forest Science Policy Forum on Transformative Technologies Regional Workshops Summary Report, May 2006.

42


A-2 Regional Workshop Participants List Quebec City Quebec City Workshop Participants Quebec City INDUSTRY Participants 1

Martin Fairbank

Manager of Continuous Improvement

Abitibi-Consolidated

2

Richard Gratton

Technical Director

Domtar Inc

3

Heather Lynch

Assistant Editor

Pulp & Paper Canada

4

Anya Orzechowska

Managing Editor

Pulp & Paper Canada

5

Harshad Pande

Senior Process Specialist

Domtar Inc

6

Jacques Rocray

VP Environment & Technology

Tembec Inc.

Quebec City UNIVERSITIES & RESEARCH participants 1

Denis Brière

Dean, Faculty of Forestry and Geomatics

Laval University

2

Virginie Chambost

Student

École Polytechnique de Montreal

3

Richard Desjardins

Manager, Building Systems Department

Forintek Canada Corp.

4

Ernie Heidersdorf

Research Director

FERIC

5

Michael Paleologou

Principal Scientist, Chemical Pulping Program

Paprican

6

Jean Paris

Professor, Department of Chemical Engineering

École Polytechnique de Montreal

7

Ivan Pikulik

Manager, Papermaking Program

Paprican

8

Paul Stuart

Professor, Department of Chemical Engineering

École Polytechnique de Montreal

9

Chris Thompson

Manager, Strategic Planning

Paprican

Quebec City GOVERNMENT participants 1

René-Pierre Allard

Bioenergy Research and Development

CANMET Energy Technology Centre

2

George Bruemmer

Executive Director, Fibre Centre

Natural Resources Canada

3

Fraser Dunn

Director, Applied Research and Development Branch

Ministry of Natural Resources/Ontario

4

Jean-Paul Gilbert

5

Yvon Giroux

6

Marie Anick Liboiron

7

Sebnem Madrali

Engineering Projects Leader

Natural Resources Canada

8

Danny Murphy

Director, Forest Management / Natural Resources

Government of New Brunswick

9

Denis Ouellet

Research Director, Forest Ecosystems

Canadian Forest Service

10

René Pigeon

Research Advisor, Bioenergy Systems

Natural Resources Canada

11

Vincent Roy

Research Scientist

Ministry of Natural Resources/Quebec

Ministry of Natural Resources/Quebec Senior Industry Officer

Industry Canada Fibre Centre-Canadian Forest Service

CFIC Forest Science Policy Forum on Transformative Technologies Regional Workshops Summary Report, May 2006.

43


Quebec City Presenters, Facilitators, Experts, Administrators 1

Dick Kerekes

Director

University of British Columbia, Pulp & Paper Centre

2

Andy Garner

Director Of Strategic Planning

Paprican

3

Doug Watt

Senior Research Associate

The Conference Board of Canada

4

Al Howatson

Principal Research Associate, Energy Policy Centre

The Conference Board of Canada

5

Patrice Mangin

Professor, Chemical Engineering Department

Université du Québec à Trois-Rivières

6

Tina Mattila

Administrative Assistant

Canadian Forest Innovation Council

7

Alan Potter

Executive Director

Forest Research Opportunity BC

8

Dan Wicklum

Executive Director

Canadian Forest Innovation Council

34 — TOTAL Quebec City

Edmonton Edmonton Workshop Participants Edmonton INDUSTRY Participants 1

Thomas Browne

Program Manager Mechanical Pulping, Sustainability and Environment

Paprican

2

Len Bykowski

President and CEO

BioProducts Alberta

3

David Holehouse

Publisher

The Edge forest business magazine

4

Kenneth Koo

Director - Technical Development, Temlam / JBS

Jager Building Systems

5

Ken Kozak

General Manager

Millar Western

6

Ken Lau

7

Fernando Preto

Biomass & Renewables Group Leader

CANMET Energy Technology Centre

8

Shawn Wasel

Director, Environmental Sciences

Alberta-Pacific Forest Industries Inc.

Ainsworth

Edmonton UNIVERSITIES & RESEARCH participants 1

Wade Chute

Engineer

Alberta Research Council

2

Marv Clark

Research Director, Western Division

FERIC

3

Walter Cool

Industrial Technology Advisor

National Research Council Canada

4

Jim Dangerfield

Vice President, Western Division

Forintek Canada Corp.

5

Paul Layte

Vice President, Engineered Products and Services

Alberta Research Council

6

Steve Moran

7

Gail Sherson

Principal Scientist

Paprican

8

Honghi Tran

Professor, Department of Chemical Engineering & Applied Chemistry

University of Toronto

9

Bob Weldwood

Manager, Forest Products

Alberta Research Council

Alberta Research Council

CFIC Forest Science Policy Forum on Transformative Technologies Regional Workshops Summary Report, May 2006.

44


Edmonton GOVERNMENT participants 1

Yaman Boluk

Senior Scientist, Bioproducts and Bioprocessing

Alberta Research Council

2

Daphne Cheel

Executive Director, Life Sciences

Government of Alberta

3

Bill Cruickshank

Manager, Biochemical Conversion

NRCan, CANMET

4

Joe Cunningham

Senior Industry Development Officer

Industry Canada

5

Marie Cusack

Public Affairs Officer

Alberta Innovation and Science

6

Brad Guthrie

Branch Head

Alberta Innovation and Science

7

Don Harrison

Managing Director

Alberta Forest Research Institute

8

Terry Hatton

Chief, Industry and Trade Economics

Canadian Forest Service

9

John Hector

Science Policy Advisor

Canadian Forest Service

10

Ed Hogan

Manager, Thermochemical Conversion

Natural Resources Canada

11

Bill Hunter

Co-Chair

Alberta Forestry Research Institute

12

George Pan

Senior Scientist, Bio-Industrial Technologies Division

Alberta Research Council

13

Barrie Phillips

A/Director Research Branch

BC Ministry of Forests and Range

14

Kraig Short

Sector Officer

Industry Canada

15

Paul Short

Senior Director, Value Added Strategic Forest Initiatives

Department of Sustainable Resource Development

16

Vallier Simard

Program Engineer

Environment Canada

17

Ted Szabo

Director

Alberta Forest Research Institute

18

Song Wang

Manager

Alberta Innovation and Science

Edmonton Workshop Presenters, Facilitators, Experts, Administrators 1

Richard Kerekes

Director

University of British Columbia, Pulp & Paper Centre

2

Andy Garner

Director Of Strategic Planning

Paprican

3

Doug Watt

Senior Research Associate

The Conference Board of Canada

4

Al Howatson

Principal Research Associate, Energy Policy Centre

The Conference Board of Canada

5

Patrice Mangin

Professor, Chemical Engineering Department

Université du Québec à Trois-Rivières

6

Tina Mattila

Administrative Assistant

Canadian Forest Innovation Council

7

Alan Potter

Executive Director

Forest Research Opportunity BC

8

Dan Wicklum

Executive Director

Canadian Forest Innovation Council

43 — TOTAL Edmonton

CFIC Forest Science Policy Forum on Transformative Technologies Regional Workshops Summary Report, May 2006.

45


A-3 Regional Workshop Breakout Working Groups 1.

Wood

Wood – Edmonton Name

Organization

1. Ken Lau

Ainsworth

2. Kraig Short

Industry Canada

3. John Hector

Canadian Forest Service

4. Ted Szabo

Alberta Forest Institute

5. Ken Koo

Jager Building Systems

6. Jim Dangerfield

Forintek Canada Corp

7. Walter Cool

National Research Council Canada

8. Rob Wellwood

Albert Research Council

Wood – Quebec City Name

Organization

1. Richard Desjardins

Forintek Canada Corp

2. Jean-Paul Gilbert

Ministry of Natural Resources/Quebec

3. Denis Ouellet

Canadian Forest Service

4. Ernie Heidersdorf

FERIC

5. Vincent Roy

Ministry of Natural Resources/Quebec

6. George Bruemmer

Natural Resources Canada

7. Marie Anick Liboiron

Fibre Center- Canadian Forest Service

2.

Pulp and Paper

Pulp and Paper – Edmonton Name 1. Gail Sherson

Organization Paprican

2. Wade Chute

Alberta Research Council

3. Patrice Mangin

Université du Québec a Trois-Rivières

4. Joe Cunningham

Industry Canada

5. Honghi Tran

University of Toronto

CFIC Forest Science Policy Forum on Transformative Technologies Regional Workshops Summary Report, May 2006.

46


Pulp and Paper – Quebec City Name

Organization

1. Ivan Pikulik

Paprican

2. Patrice Mangin

Université du Québec a Trois-Rivières

3. Jean Paris

École Polytechnique de Montreal

4. Richard Gratton

Domtar Inc.

5. Harshad Pande

Domtar Inc.

6. Chris Thompson

Paprican

7. Virginie Chambost

École Polytechnique de Montreal

8. George Bruemmer

Natural Resources Canada

9. Martin Fairbank

Abitibi-Consolidated

10. Danny Murphy

Government of New Brunswick

11. Yvon Giroux

Industry Canada

3.

Biochemicals

Biochemicals – Edmonton Name 1. Ted Szabo

Organization Alberta Forest Research Institute

2. Len Bykowski

BioProducts Alberta

3. Andy Garner

Paprican

4. Yaman Boluk

Alberta Research Council

5. Don Harrison

Alberta Forest Research Institute

6. Joe Cunningham

Industry Canada

7. Ed Hogan

Natural Resources Canada

Biochemicals – Quebec City Name 1. Michael Paleologou

Organization Paprican

2. Andy Garner

Paprican

3. Paul Stuart

École Polytechnique de Montreal

4. Marie Anick Liboiron

Fibre Center - Canadian Forest Service

5. Grant Allen

CFIC Forest Science Policy Forum on Transformative Technologies Regional Workshops Summary Report, May 2006.

47


4.

Bioenergy

Bioenergy – Edmonton Name 1. Shawn Wasel

Organization Alberta-Pacific Forest Industries

2. Barrie Phillips

BC Ministry of Forests and Range

3. Thomas Browne

Paprican

4. Terry Hatton

Canadian Forest Service

5. Marv Clark

FERIC

6. Paul Short

Department of Sustainable Resource Development

7. Fernando Preto

CANMET Energy Technology Center

8. Bill Cruickshank

NRCan, CANMET

9. Honghi Tran

University of Toronto

10. Vallier Simard

Environment Canada

Bioenergy – Quebec City Name

Organization

1. Rene Pigeon

Natural Resources Canada

2. Jacques Rocray

Tembec Inc.

3. Sebnem Madrali

Natural Resources Canada

4. Rene-Pierre Allard

CANMET Energy Technology Center

5. Fraser Dunn

Ministry of Natural Resources/Ontario

CFIC Forest Science Policy Forum on Transformative Technologies Regional Workshops Summary Report, May 2006.

48


A-4 Effort-Impact Grid Summary Chart: Quebec City and Edmonton Placements

Major

(>10% of revenue/unique)

Minor

(0-2% of revenue/familiar)

POTENTIAL IMPACT

Effort窶的mpact Grid Q-II

Q-I

QC: 21 technologies (30%) EDM: 34 technologies (43%)

QC: 13 technologies (19%) EDM: 31 technologies (39%)

Total: (37% of technologies)

Total: (30% of technologies)

(possible action: conduct further analysis)

(possible action: pursue opportunities)

Q-III

Q-IV

QC: 20 technologies (29%) EDM: 3 technologies (4%)

QC: 15 technologies (22%) EDM: 11 technologies (14%)

Total: (15% of technologies)

Total: (18% of technologies)

(possible action: do not pursue at this time)

(possible action: explore niche opportunities)

Difficult

Easy

(>10 years implementation / >$100 millions)

EFFORT

(0-2 years implementation /$0-$50million) Quebec City: n = 69 Edmonton: n = 79

CFIC Forest Science Policy Forum on Transformative Technologies Regional Workshops Summary Report, May 2006.

49


A-5 Barriers to Implementation of Selected Potential “High-Impact” Technologies The numbers in the (brackets) refer to the number of workshop participants who identified the barrier as being significant.

Wood Edmonton – Barriers to Implementation of Selected “High Impact” Wood Transformative Technologies (EDM Technology # 12, 20) Wood High Priority Technology: Total Wood Building System Solutions Technical Barriers:

Policy Barriers:

• More advanced system performance (2)

• Codes/standards differences between residential and non-residential buildings (6) o USA o Canada

• Software integration (1) • More advanced materials (1) Institutional Barriers:

Funding Barriers:

• Fragmentation of the sector (7)

• Low research and development dollars (3)

• Developing the non-residential market further (4) • Resistance change • Small builders • “Perception” of market

(EDM Technology # 1) Wood High Priority Technology: “True” Engineered Lumber (S.C.L.) Technical Barriers:

Policy Barriers:

• Achieving a cost-performance breakthrough. Getting the product to market at a price consumers are willing to pay (10)

• Costly wood supply and fibre access (4)

• “Emerging” technology

• Lack of public dollars for commercialization/ innovation

• Foreign technology Institutional Barriers:

Funding Barriers:

• Fragmented sector (6)

• Lack of commercialization funding (2)

• There is a dominant market player in the US. Getting players together into an entity large enough to compete with the dominant US player will be a challenge because of the fragmented nature of the Canadian industry

• Proprietary systems

“Fibre access is an issue across all of these technologies (engineered lumber).”

CFIC Forest Science Policy Forum on Transformative Technologies Regional Workshops Summary Report, May 2006.

50


(EDM Technology # 17) Wood High Priority Technology: High Speed Head Rig Technical Barriers:

Policy Barriers:

• Difficulty of combining technologies (10)

• Fibre access issues (1)

• Blue sky: Technical barriers are unknown at this point

• Barriers to new entrants (chip vs PPM contracts)

Institutional Barriers:

Funding Barriers:

• Paradigm shift required (logs, wood and engineered, and pulp and paper) (9)

• No umbrella funding (4)

• Silos/fragmented between mechanical producers and Regional institutions

• Need to pull all the players together to get the bluesky technology working

Quebec City – Barriers to Implementation of Selected “High Impact” Wood Transformative Technologies (QC Technology # 4) Wood High Priority Technology: Reconstituted Wood with Built-in Properties Technical Barriers:

Policy Barriers:

• Cost-effectiveness versus steel (5)

• Tenured fibre supply (7)

• Maintain environmentally friendly product and production systems (3)

• Incentives to innovate at manufacturing level (2)

• Match species characteristics to desired properties of product

• Permissions to use required chemicals (1)

• Development on commercial scale Institutional Barriers:

Funding Barriers: • Pre-competitive funding needed (1)

(QC Technology # 16) Wood High Priority Technology: Oriented Strand Lumber Technical Barriers:

Policy Barriers:

• Use of low-quality hardwood for OSL? (6)

• Allocation (tenure) of Aspen fibre supply (5)

• Development of technology to commercial scale (1) Institutional Barriers:

Funding Barriers:

“It’s not a matter of high technical difficulty; it’s a matter of doing it and getting the funding.”

CFIC Forest Science Policy Forum on Transformative Technologies Regional Workshops Summary Report, May 2006.

51


(QC Technology # 6) Wood High Priority Technology: Information Technology from Seed to Market Technical Barriers:

Policy Barriers:

• Data acquisition systems (availability and compatibility) (5) • Knowledge of resource (4) • Customized modeling (integrated) (1) • Integration of sectoral knowledge Institutional Barriers:

Funding Barriers:

• Coordination of sectors and priorities (8)

• Lots of capital required (1)

• Common forest inventory (1) • Lack of national communications infrastructure • Will of various sectors and stakeholders • Jurisdictional issues (federal / provincial)

Pulp and Paper Edmonton – Barriers to Implementation of Selected “High Impact” Pulp and Paper Transformative Technologies (EDM Technology # 18) Pulp and Paper High Priority Technology: Genomics to Optimize Fibre Quality Technical Barriers:

Policy Barriers:

• Fibre genome mapping and linking fibre to end use (3)

• Access to fibre (e.g., management of crown assets) (3)

• Time frame to develop and implement (3)

• Genetically modified organisms GMO (1)

• Genetic engineering (1)

• Land use

• Wide variety of species

• Biodiversity

Institutional Barriers:

Funding Barriers:

• Intellectual Property (2)

• Long-term funding and commitment. (7)

• Lack of coordination “There is long-term opportunity for Canada in this area.”

CFIC Forest Science Policy Forum on Transformative Technologies Regional Workshops Summary Report, May 2006.

52


(EDM Technology # 1) Pulp and Paper High Priority Technology: Structurally Engineered Fibres Technical Barriers:

Policy Barriers:

• Funding for 3D mapping of fibres (7)

• Tax credits (long-term funded research) (1)

• Material performance (1) • Lack of machinery to develop fibres (1) • Fibre chemistry • Need for a fibre network (natural and synthetic) Institutional Barriers:

Funding Barriers:

• Long-term commitment is needed (1)

• Difficult to get funding from industry on longer-term research projects (> 5years) (8)

• Need for proper skills (with adequately trained personnel) (1)

• Government funding

• Network is required • Intellectual Property “The main barriers are linked—technical and funding—because you need a lot of research on the fibre structure to answer the questions and really engineer the product."

(EDM Technology # 8) Pulp and Paper High Priority Technology: Chemical and Mechanical Reinforcement for Ultra Low Weight Papers Technical Barriers:

Policy Barriers:

• Improvement of best Canadian fibre (6)

• Paper standards

• Engineering of paper structures and surfaces (6)

• Marketing (1)

• Machinery needs to be in place • Chemistry needs to be in place Institutional Barriers:

Funding Barriers:

• Intellectual Property (1)

• Mixed industry and government funding (6)

• Technology transfers (1)

• Paper sold on area

• Marketing of products (1) • Overcoming existing mindsets in the industry “We potentially have the best fibre in the world but we are not making any money out of it (this fibre advantage). Let’s do even better than the natural fibre.”

CFIC Forest Science Policy Forum on Transformative Technologies Regional Workshops Summary Report, May 2006.

53


(EDM Technology # 3) Pulp and Paper High Priority Technology: 80% Mechanical Pulping Yield with 20% Biorefinery Co-products Technical Barriers:

Policy Barriers:

• Selectivity of the separation techniques (5)

• Tax credits and incentives (3)

• Separation techniques (3)

• Depreciation (capital) and risk (related to energy economics, market drivers, co-products value)

• Pulp quality maintenance + biotechnology aspects (2) • Purification Institutional Barriers:

Funding Barriers:

• Need for a champion within the industry and/or government (3)

• Capital for process modification (2)

• Lack of a multidisciplinary network

• R&D and network funding (2)

• Intellectual Property “This is a Canadian-oriented technology.”

Quebec City – Barriers to Implementation of Selected “High Impact” Pulp and Paper Transformative Technologies (QC Technology # 20) Pulp and Paper High Priority Technology: Ultra filled paper, starch and synthetic polymers Technical Barriers:

Policy Barriers:

• (5)

• Not a policy barrier, but there is great uncertainty about “market acceptance” (6)

Institutional Barriers:

Funding Barriers:

• (3)

• Process modification dollars (14) “More about money than anything else.”

(QC Technology # 2) Pulp and Paper High Priority Technology: Pulping Biorefinery Technical Barriers:

Policy Barriers:

• Fibre quality (13)

• Environmental impact (1)

• Hemicellulose conversion • Risk assessment Institutional Barriers:

Funding Barriers:

• Competencies (4)

• Research dollars (9)

• Partnerships • Other industry management practices

CFIC Forest Science Policy Forum on Transformative Technologies Regional Workshops Summary Report, May 2006.

54


(QC Generic Technology) Pulp and Paper High Priority Technology: Engineered products and fibre Technical Barriers:

Policy Barriers:

• Research and development and commercialization (10) Institutional Barriers:

Funding Barriers:

• Partnerships, networking, and modelization (5)

• Long-term funding (10)

“There is little government support in Canada, especially compared to other OECD countries, for this type of transformation of the industry.”

Biochemicals Edmonton – Barriers to Implementation of Selected “High Impact” Biochemicals Transformative Technologies (EDM Technology # 5) Biochemical High Priority Technology: Tailored Feedstock Technical Barriers:

Policy Barriers:

• Linking feedstock characteristics to end-product quality (6)

• GMO on public lands

• Sequencing and linking traits to genetic sequences (pheno-typing) (1)

• Land and feedstock tenure

Institutional Barriers:

Funding Barriers:

• Need to demonstrate the value of investment so institutions actually do invest. (4)

• Long-term commitment to funding. Results will not come in the short-run (8)

• Making this effort cross-sectoral (1)

(EDM Technology # 23) Biochemical High Priority Technology: Co-products in Existing Pulp Mills Technical Barriers:

Policy Barriers:

• Applications development (6)

• Green procurement policies including targets and objectives (for government, industry and corporations) (9)

• Separation and purification conversion (3) • Market acceptance of alternate products

• Product standards (CSA/LEED) (1)

Institutional Barriers:

Funding Barriers:

• Looking outside our own backyard (e.g., corporate policy happens outside of Canada)

• Market development (4)

• Need outward-focused “champions” for building coproducts

• Price of alternate products (comparability) (1)

CFIC Forest Science Policy Forum on Transformative Technologies Regional Workshops Summary Report, May 2006.

55


(EDM Technology # 1) Biochemical High Priority Technology: Greenfield Biorefinery (Industrial Chemicals) Technical Barriers:

Policy Barriers:

• Process technologies need development (4): o Separation and purification [2] o Conversion [2] o Pretreatment

• Need for government and corporate vision, objectives and goals for the biorefinery industry (5)

• Product application/markets

• Access to stable supplies of biomass (4) • Alignment of regulatory systems and approvals (e.g., transportation and communications systems)

• Feedstock Institutional Barriers:

Funding Barriers:

• Connecting with multinational expertise/experts to understand their needs (4)

• Need for a demonstration facility (7)

• Cross-sectoral interaction and integration (1)

• Market pull

• Coordination/network research/development and deployment “champions”

(EDM Technology # 4, 19) Biochemical High Priority Technology: Lignin Recovery and Utilization Technical Barriers:

Policy Barriers:

• Characterization of Canadian lignin and its advantages vis-à-vis other nation’s lignin (3)

• Green credits

• New routes to value added products (2) • Demonstration of recovery and burning Institutional Barriers:

Funding Barriers:

• Careful market development (6) o What are we going to use the lignin for and how are we going to market it?

• Lack of funding for demonstration (4) o A sense that this could be done, if we could find the appropriate markets for it

Edmonton – Barriers to Implementation of Selected “High Impact” Biochemicals Transformative Technologies (QC Technology # 18) Biochemical High Priority Technology: Developing Functionalized Cellulose Fibres Technical Barriers:

Policy Barriers:

• What are the chemical/biochemical modifications we should be looking at to tailor cellulose fibres for specific uses? (6)

• Health issues with nanocrystals (2)

• Defining the Canadian advantage with our softwood fibre? (4) • Separation of the cellulose nanocrystals (3) Institutional Barriers:

Funding Barriers:

• Working with new small, medium-sized enterprises

• Non-explored area (nano)

CFIC Forest Science Policy Forum on Transformative Technologies Regional Workshops Summary Report, May 2006.

56


(QC Technology # 7, 11, 24) Biochemical High Priority Technology: Hemicellulose Recovery and Utilization Technical Barriers:

Policy Barriers:

• Need for the development of utilizations (5): o Bioplastics o Direct uses on papers o Fuels and chemicals

• Lack of capital tax credits

• Need for green credits

Pilot and lab development of extraction technologies for softwood (4)

Institutional Barriers:

Funding Barriers:

• Decision to convert in a new field (2)

• Lack of funding for demonstration lab and pilot (3)

• Working with other industrials (1)

(QC Technology # 13, 22) Biochemical High Priority Technology: Advanced Separation and Biochemical Conversion Technologies Technical Barriers:

Policy Barriers:

• Identifying promising technologies (4)

• Safety issues (1)

• Running sterile processes (1) • Unknown technologies (1) • Low energy separation • Reducing cost of biochemicals Institutional Barriers:

Funding Barriers:

• Sustained multi-years effort and lack of receptors (need champions that will carry something through for the long-term) (4)

• Need government and industry funding

• New fields for existing pulp mills (2) • Multidisciplinary skills required (2) “Need research to determine exactly where the Canadian advantage is.” “Obtaining sustained, multi-year funding commitment is a huge barrier.”

CFIC Forest Science Policy Forum on Transformative Technologies Regional Workshops Summary Report, May 2006.

57


Bioenergy Edmonton – Barriers to Implementation of Selected “High Impact” Bioenergy Transformative Technologies (EDM Technology # 9, 12) Bio-Energy High Priority Technology: Pyrolysis Oils for Biofuels Technical Barriers:

Policy Barriers:

• Scale-up from 100 tonnes/day (5)

• Biomass availability and ownership (slash) (4)

• Portability of small units

• Lack of tax/carbon dioxide/other incentives. Something to encourage the use of biofuels as a substitute for petroleum (4)

• Product quality versus feedstock • Separation (fractionation) • Forest sustainability

• Stumpage fees….per barrel? (1) • “Residue” versus “waste” regulations • Environmental assessment • Lack of incentives (e.g., mandate Ethanol-15 fuels) • Federal-Provincial jurisdictional issues

Institutional Barriers:

Funding Barriers:

• Fossil fuel and forest industry collaboration is needed for this technology development to advance (4)

• Absence of research and development dollars

• There is an absence of biofuel specifications. When you produce it, how do you know that it is suitable for use? (example: SAE, ASTM) (3)

(EDM Technology # 3) Bio-Energy High Priority Technology: Hemicellulose C5 to EtOH Technical Barriers:

Policy Barriers:

• Process equipment for the extraction of hemicellulose (3)

• Competition with lower cost corn and sugar cane as feedstock (4)

• Yeast development (fermentation) (2)

• Incentives for EtOH

• Impact of sugar extraction on pulp quality (TMP versus Kraft) (2)

• Mandated EtOH levels

• Yield loss in TMP (1)

• Yeast development begins to be a GMO issue

• Sugar stream clean-up Institutional Barriers:

Funding Barriers:

• Scientific background needs development to identify the yeasts and so on needed in Canada (e.g., IOGEN got their yeasts from the US (4)

• Need for long-term research and development support (5)

• Lack of fossil fuel and forest industry collaboration

• Tax / carbon dioxide incentives

“No matter how much effort we put into making ethanol from C5, Brazil will likely always be able to produce it much cheaper. As a nation, what effort do we put into making ethanol because of corns from the US and sugar canes from Brazil?”

CFIC Forest Science Policy Forum on Transformative Technologies Regional Workshops Summary Report, May 2006.

58


(EDM Technology # 2) Bio-Energy High Priority Technology: Biofuels from Thermo-Chemical Platforms (Fisher-Tropsh, methanol, alcohols) Technical Barriers:

Policy Barriers:

• Gas clean-up. The manufactured Syngas needs to be cleaned up so one can burn it in something other than a furnace (6)

• Biomass availability (4)

• Gas composition and consistency (1) • Development of the catalysts required for the FisherTropsh process (1) • Build-up of NPEs in the kiln Institutional Barriers:

Funding Barriers:

• Lack of fossil fuel and forest industry collaboration (4)

• Tax / carbon dioxide incentives (3)

• Biofuel specifications (example: SAE, ASTM) (1) • Unknown fuel to the forest sector (1) • Relation with communities

Quebec City – Barriers to Implementation of Selected “High Impact” Bioenergy Transformative Technologies (QC Generic Technology) Bio-Energy High Priority Technology: Feedstock Availability Technical Barriers:

Policy Barriers:

• What should we leave on ground after harvest?

• Ownership (2)

• Other sources of fibre…landfills, demolition wood, etc. Institutional Barriers:

Funding Barriers:

• Collaboration of research parties knowledgeable about “What should we leave after the harvest? • Collaboration between Fibre Centre and universities and provincial governments

CFIC Forest Science Policy Forum on Transformative Technologies Regional Workshops Summary Report, May 2006.

59


(QC Technology # 1, 10) Bio-Energy High Priority Technology: Gasification and Steam Turbines fueled by black liquor, log residues, and other biomass Technical Barriers:

Policy Barriers:

• Corrosion (3)

• Reimbursable tax credit (1)

• Gas purification • Feed quality -homogeneity Institutional Barriers:

Funding Barriers:

• US and Canadian synergy in research and development (4)

• Pilot project co-funded by government, co-owned by technology provider and other investors. Government involvement allows higher risk (5)

• TAPPA • Networking brokerage by government of industry and innovators to assemble expertise

“For the purpose of funding a pilot project the criteria for accepting risk needs to be relaxed (in government.)”.

CFIC Forest Science Policy Forum on Transformative Technologies Regional Workshops Summary Report, May 2006.

60


A-6 Workshop Evaluation Scores and Comments Quebec City and Edmonton: Scores and Comments The workshops met the stated objectives: Yes

No

Yes/No

47 (92%)

1 (2%)

3 (6%)

Overall satisfaction with the workshops: Highly Satisfied

Satisfied

Neither Satisfied nor Dissatisfied

Dissatisfied

Highly Dissatisfied

8 (16%)

38 (74%)

5 (10%)

0

0

Comments: 1. A Collective Desire to Act and Move things Forward is Apparent •

• • • • •

There’s a strong desire at the technical level to move the agenda forward, but: - the industry must keep moving; - the industry must involve other sectors; and - the industry must engage industry senior management. Many issues were identified, but it gives an indication of where things are coming from in terms of representation at the workshop. We now need to have a discussion on “next steps”. There is lots of interest among stakeholders to find ways to make things work. Large degree of consensus from largely diverse groups of people; we are all (mostly) agreed on a path forward. So now we must act. The recognition that the sector has to move from center–a major paradigm shift is required. Anything is possible; it is a move from center–very little is possible if we do not do something. How large and relatively easy the opportunity really is.

2. A Better Understanding of the Issues Facing the Forest Industry is Needed • •

We are trying to be too specific on topics that are very broad; there are technologies that industry can apply right away, provided there is funding available and a bit of risk tolerance. Three of the four white papers were good. The wood products white paper stayed at the margin of commodity products. It is a first step but we need to go further.

3. Momentum and Focus (A Strategy is Needed) • • • • •

Keep this momentum going – need a game plan to keep moving. Need more integration and focus to come in 1-3 major priorities row Somewhat satisfied; white papers on primary group a bit weak. Need to integrate work of White Paper 4. Need to engage energy, chemical, and agriculture sectors; industry participation weak. Need to identify next steps. It is important to follow-up on the outcome/recommendations of these workshops. This should be an evergreen process of meeting and reporting on progress.

CFIC Forest Science Policy Forum on Transformative Technologies Regional Workshops Summary Report, May 2006.

61


• • • • •

Need a step by step process to get to the defined goal. This was a good first step. I hope that the sense of urgency to change will be reflected by some prompt action. Need for a more narrow final focus, need to “communicate and communicate” the outcome and should follow-up with an impact review in 6 months, 12 months, 18 months. Next steps are not clear; need recommendations in place- even to highlight priority needs (to improve linkages). Workshop focused on (rightly) more long-term objectives and strategies. However, industry is (at least at the moment) more short-term focused. The issue is how to put the road starting from short-term objectives towards long-term targets. The most significant insight: hearing different perspectives and concerns. Some surprises at how many opportunities were placed initially in the top right quadrant. Why are we missing these opportunities as an industry? Before moving the other high potential projects into the top/right, why are we not focusing our attention on the high impact and easy to implement technologies?

4. Understanding of the Canadian Fibre Advantage Needs to be Explored Further • •

• • • • •

Great workshop. Still looking for the Canadian advantage. Would be good to have more international perspectives. Not clear at all that Canadian fibre has competitive advantage or advantages that can make a difference for the future of the Canadian forest industry; need to put emphasis on the knowledge of the resource. Saying that: It was very good; probably we went as far as we could! Need to identify the real Canadian advantage – suggest a workshop to review/revisit this. This forum was well organized, moderated, and used a very scientific approach for assessing the various technologies. I am looking forward to the overall results and how this moves forward operationally (i.e. what new technologies will be used). Canadian advantage; 4 themes are interrelated and should be analyzed together; maybe the next step is to see the best marketable/sellable products to be integrated. The common wisdom of the superiority of Canadian fibre was neither confirmed nor denied, and should have been. The strong linkage with feedstock and the technologies. Would like to see explicit identification of technologies that could advantage Canada versus the global industry. Unifying statement of outcome: the best thing that came out of this exercise is the realization that we need to change the way we look at the resources we have if we are to be successful (or even around!) in the future.

5. Need For Other Interests/Industries and Sectors to Be Part of the Process •

• • •

Despite best efforts to include other sectors they were underrepresented. Need to include in the discussions other interested-parties (e.g. energy companies, chemical companies, equipment companies). The output is only as good as the input! So long as the conclusions drawn are balanced with other sources and other strategic direction setting processes, the output will be useful. Even if we had a good “cross-representation”, I believe the next step will have to include broader expertise to prevent too much self-evaluation. We can learn a lot from other sectors of industry. Multiple partners needed at the table (e.g., agricultural, petrochemical, pharmaceutical interests).

CFIC Forest Science Policy Forum on Transformative Technologies Regional Workshops Summary Report, May 2006.

62


New technology innovations will not come exclusively from the forest sector. We also need to forge partnership with builders, energy companies, and chemical companies.

6. Need for More Discussions and Collaboration among the Four Forest Sub-Sectors • • • •

• •

Canadian advantage; 4 themes are interrelated and should be analyzed together; maybe the next step is to see the best marketable/sellable products to be integrated. Industry willingness/championship to take risks to transform themselves, not as a pulp and paper industry, but as more bioenergy-bio product-biomaterials industry to complement other industries/products. Strategic integration of the four sectors could have significant impacts on the forest industry. A lot work needs to be done to focus the best opportunities in terms of: - the top advantages for Canada; - an integrated plan across the forest sector; - the integration of the institute at the working level; and - bringing in market experts early-on to make sure we invest our resources (time and capital) on the right things. We have a long way to go to set an integrated Forest Products Strategy. - Currently foresters/wood products/pulp and paper all act as three solitudes. Need to integrate the four sub-sectors: a cluster approach; a multi-disciplinary initiative will be the key to success.

7. Need to Better Engage the Forest Industry in the Process • • •

The understanding of how advances in wood, biochemicals, and bioenergy can advance the trust within the forest industry and among forest industry stakeholders. Industry is not engaged and they must be from here on in. The Canadian pulp and paper industry may not have the ability to change their perception in time to save them. The people (foreign, most likely) who buy them as they go bankrupt will undoubtedly capitalize on the lost opportunities of Canadians.

8. Need to Make the Business Case • • • • •

We need to attach the economic-value to this process. Need to develop “real business cases” for each of the transformative technologies chosen. Need to invest directly in the various industries not only in universities and agencies. We have to develop products that can be run on our machines using our actual fibers. As useful as the White Papers and brainstorming exercises are, we need to move; take action.

9. Other Insights/Takeaways • • •

High degree of agreement (80 per cent paper yield), bioenergy, and use hemicellulose as a polymer bonding agent. As a member of government, I have a better idea of where to focus (R&D, funding, tax credits). Significant insight gained in the bioenergy and biochemicals areas.

CFIC Forest Science Policy Forum on Transformative Technologies Regional Workshops Summary Report, May 2006.

63


10. Workshop Format, Logistics and Facilitation • • • • • • • • • •

Well organized, well chaired. Interesting discussions: the workshop format helped me understand the issues much better than by just reading the white papers. A good mechanism for building consensus. I found this workshop to be useful, insightful, and well-organized. Well done! Excellent job overall. Location, facilities, coordination, animation, food: great! Well-organized meeting-leading extracting the results. Overall, I found the workshop useful in improving my understanding of the P&P industry issues as they relate to the objectives of the R&D program I manage. Light bulbs came on all over the audience. Good venue, good facilitator. Really useful. The process was very efficient and the initial papers and presentation were great stimulants.

CFIC Forest Science Policy Forum on Transformative Technologies Regional Workshops Summary Report, May 2006.

64


B-1 White Paper: Transformative Technologies — Solid and Reconstituted Wood

TRANSFORMATIVE TECHNOLOGIES IN SOLID AND RECONSTITUTED WOOD PRODUCTS……OR THE OF FUTURE ‘BUILDING AND LIVING WITH WOOD’ Alan Potter 4 Executive Director Forest Research Opportunity BC

Introduction The object of this paper is to explore, and indeed speculate, on some of the transformative technology opportunities that are possible in the wood products sector. It is one of four papers being developed which will be discussed in forums being held in the Spring of 2006 by the Canadian Forest Innovation Council, the Conference Board of Canada, and the Forest Products Association of Canada. The other three papers will deal with other transformative technology opportunities in the forest product sector i.e. in pulp and paper, biorefining and bioenergy/biofuels. As an aside, perhaps one transformation of the mind, or paradigm shift, would be to look at wood products as biomaterials with defined properties occupying an important niche within the diverse spectrum of materials rather than pieces of lumber or boards. Background Considerations The Canadian wood products sector faces a number of challenges. In recent years, North America has enjoyed a strong housing market which has allowed Canadian lumber and panelboard producers to make a fair return on investment. However these returns have been offset by some factors e.g. export tariffs on lumber products, the appreciation of the value of the Canadian dollar compared to the US dollar, and increases in energy costs especially natural gas. The primary products are commodity in nature. Future returns may be further reduced by an anticipated decline in demand from lower housing starts. The challenge for the sector is to ultimately reduce the exposure to commodity markets and develop products and services which generate greater profit margins. In effect, to generate a greater return to the economy for every cubic meter of wood harvested in Canada. This is not only a desire for the industry but presumably also a desire of the owners of the forest resource, i.e. the public as represented through Canada’s provincial governments. Transformative technologies in products and processing are one piece to take on this challenge. Effort will also be required in other parts of the wood products industry. For example the creation of NAFTA encouraged rapid growth of the Canadian secondary wood products industry in the 1990’s. Now growth is slowing due, in part, to strong competition from Asia— particularly China and Vietnam.

4

The author is Executive Director of Forest Research Opportunity B.C., an initiative to form a forest products industry/institute/university cluster in BC. He was formerly Vice President Technology and Environment for Nexfor Inc., a Toronto based wood and paper products company. Other applied research assignments include positions with Forintek Canada Corp, MacMillan Bloedel Research, and Crown Forest Industries, all in Vancouver, B.C. He holds a Ph.D. & B.Sc. from St. Andrews University, Scotland, and an M.B.A. from the University of British Columbia.

CFIC Forest Science Policy Forum on Transformative Technologies Regional Workshops Summary Report, May 2006.

65


For this paper, a vision of where the world may be in 20 years is proposed. The current market structure for wood products is summarized. Then a view of technology transformations needed, and barriers to be overcome, to grow the use of wood based products is presented and discussed. The vision is: In 20 years time there will be a world where: Three of the basic needs for human development. i.e.; shelter, heating, and cooling will be met by renewable and sustainable materials. Many of the homes, and workplaces, in all countries will be built and furnished from fibre-based materials which utilize knowledge-based building systems. The energy and fuels for heating, cooling and the transportation of goods will be generated from renewable sources including residual biomass. Key assumptions behind this vision are: • We are living in a world where there are increasing expectations of a higher standard of living. This is especially strong in the developing world. The recent radical increase in living standards in China, and its resulting pull on the world’s commodities to drive the economic growth, is a portent to future demand. • It is in everybody’s political interest to use human ingenuity to satisfy this demand. • The economic growth requires energy and material to make the required products. • There is an increasing concentration of population into urban areas putting increased pressure on the environment. • Growth that is not balanced with minimizing the environmental footprint will be politically and socially unacceptable. • Wood based materials can play a key role in providing three of mankind’s base physiological needs, i.e. shelter, and energy for heating and cooling. They have a low environmental footprint because they take low energy to manufacture and for subsequent disposal are pulpable, burnable, or compostable. • There is abundant wood fibre in the world. • The forests of Canada will continue to be certified and sustainable and thus have a social license to operate, • Mechanical technology will continue to evolve to keep delivered wood costs competitive. The Canadian wood products sector is in a comfort zone of being a very efficient producer of wood construction materials. One challenge is to transform it, in part with technology, to an active participant, and preferably a leader, in providing building solutions to the world. Further, the world has no shortage of wood fibre. Building solutions can also be provided with other materials from anywhere in the world. To prosper Canada must make the best use of its diverse wood basket and combine it with knowledge and ingenuity to transform the wood into marketable business solutions. Maintaining the overall demand for wood based products will be essential so the Canadian industry can find the appropriate niches. It will need to adapt transformative technologies to do this, and spend resources to develop new businesses. A recent study on innovation in the forest products sector revealed that adopted innovative technologies share a number of features: • A market pull approach that uses technology to respond to customer demand rather than a resource or technology push not in tune with market demand. • Mainly developed by private sector companies with technological capacity.

CFIC Forest Science Policy Forum on Transformative Technologies Regional Workshops Summary Report, May 2006.

66


Either incorporated features demanded by the markets not naturally found in wood or lowered the costs of production.

The Canadian wood products sector has shown significant innovation in the past. It’s sawmills have adapted to new technologies and are among the most efficient and cost effective in the world. In fact most of the current research and development effort directly supported by the industry is targeted to process and cost reductions. It is anticipated that such application of technology will continue in order to maintain cost competitiveness. However, Canada has shown its ability to develop transformative wood products that provide consumers with features that are not naturally found in wood. For example, the developments of Oriented Strand Board, Laminated Strand Lumber, and Parallel Strand Lumber all had origins in Canada. It is critical that Canada takes the best advantage of attributes of its fibre base and combine them with proprietary knowledge to make product more highly valued by consumers. Thus, barriers to entry can be formed and some sustainable competitive advantage achieved. The primary purpose of this discussion paper is to anticipate transformative technologies that could make major changes. Market Considerations Canada’s wood products are essentially used in two very distinct markets: The largest volume of wood goes to ‘Building with Wood’, i.e., lumber, structural panels, engineered wood, assemblies and building systems. A lesser volume, but perhaps superior ultimate value, is used in ‘Living with Wood’ , i.e. appearance quality lumber and veneer, often combined with non structural wood panels, are used for exterior cladding, windows, doors, interior flooring, decoration and furnishings etc. Building with Wood Wood products are used primarily for residential construction. There is relatively low use in nonresidential construction. While much of the market is likely unsuitable for wood based products, with imagination and innovation significant inroads to increase market share of wood in the industrial building sector could be achieved. Even in residential construction wood use is limited to a few geographic areas, i.e. North America, Japan and Northern Europe. The demand for wood products in these markets is essentially saturated. To maintain market share innovation will be required to offset the use of alternative materials. The use of wood has traditionally been by practice. The building codes for residential construction are largely prescriptive. New codes being developed are performance based. With resources applied, this can open the door for the use of wood in broader applications. Indeed wood products themselves are evolving to be more engineered as summarized in the table below. Where houses are traditionally constructed with a frame built on site with lumber and plywood, and increasing portion of houses are now being built with factory engineered components, assemblies and systems: Term Wood Products Wood Composites Components

Examples Lumber, Plywood, Glulam. OSB, Structural Composite Lumber, Fibreboard, Wood-Cement boards, Wood-Plastic lumber. I-joists, Rim boards, Precut house frames.

CFIC Forest Science Policy Forum on Transformative Technologies Regional Workshops Summary Report, May 2006.

67


Assemblies

Structural insulated panels, Roof trusses,

Systems

Floor systems, Wall systems, Building systems.

Living with Wood The aesthetics of wood are capitalized upon in many applications of ‘Living with Wood’. Although appearance grade lumber manufactured by primary producers is sold into the sector, the subsequent value creation is generally made by small and medium sized enterprises in secondary and tertiary manufacturing. Many primary producers produce panelboards, mainly particleboard and medium density fibreboard (MDF) from wood residues; again the real value is created from the downstream conversion of the materials to finished product e.g., furniture and interior decorative products. Technology plays a key role in extracting the most appearance grade from the wood resource, but also in enhancing the visual appeal and durability of the appearance wood products. Technology Barriers Wood as a building and furnishing material has some inherent advantages. It is lightweight with a high stiffness to weight ratio. It is easily machined. It can be easily connected into many diverse structures and forms. It is natural, and is obtained from a renewable resource. Its manufacture into building products consumes much less energy and water and produces less carbon dioxide in its manufacture than alternative products such as steel, concrete or plastic. Wood has an inherent visual quality that many consumers attach to nature and tradition. Traditionally an inherent advantage of Canadian wood is the ability to extract a variety of long dimension from the ‘big’ tree in its forests. The aesthetics of the clear grades from the same trees offers grades which command a premium in the market. While this is still an important Canadian advantage it is diminishing as composite products have evolved to fill the same niches. Therefore it will be a challenge is to continue to develop value from solid timber particularly as the fibre base is changing to second growth forests. Wood has some disadvantages. Its strength is variable. It changes dimension in the presence of water which can lead to warping and splitting. It is susceptible insect attack and to decay at certain moisture contents. It can burn and degrade with UV exposure. Thus the technology challenge is to cost effectively improve strength consistency without compromising weight; impart fire resistance and durability to pests and surface breakdown. Knowledgeable material application and building design is also important. Technology Possibilities Suggested transformative technologies are summarized in Tables 1, 2 and 3. They are segregated into near, mid and long-term. The near-term possibilities are those that are in process, or near to introduction. In broad terms they cover areas such as advanced materials and composites based on wood constituents, wood building solutions and knowledge based building with wood, and upgrading product attributes with novel treatments. Three process technologies have also been put forward for the near-term, largely because they command significant portion of the technology efforts in current enterprises. Near Term (1-2 years) Near-term developments are more predictable since they largely depend on the diffusion of technologies from more technologically advanced industries or societies. Hence there are many more examples in this section than the following section foreshadowing development in the mid-to-long term.

CFIC Forest Science Policy Forum on Transformative Technologies Regional Workshops Summary Report, May 2006.

68


Process: Non-contact sensors development coupled with advanced statistical analyses and advanced process control More evolutionary than transformative. Further development of such sensors will be important to ensure not only further converting cost reductions in sawmilling, but also the future manufacture of truly engineered composite wood materials with minimal variability in properties. Examples include X-ray, near-IR & laser technology to gain rapid measurement of process and product properties which, combined with advanced process control practices, will drastically reduce variability in the processes to make wood composites. Such application of technology is widespread in advanced manufacturing in other sectors. Information Technology and Operations Research for supply chain optimization Similarly not transformative in a general sense as many sectors are already well advanced in such techniques. The ability for the wood products sector to optimize supply chains, minimize working capital, will be critical in transforming the financial returns in the sector. Computer Numerical Control (CNC) processing coupled with Computer Aided Design (CAD) Again more evolutionary but we can expect to see more widespread use of CNC machines in all areas of wood processing, including cutting and shaping of large dimension lumber and logs. These machines, when couple to CAD software, will enhance the choice of structures available to consumers and thus add value in both solid wood and composites. Products: Oriented Strand Lumber on conventional thermal presses This is the next step in the evolution of engineered wood materials from laminated veneer lumber to parallel strand lumber. With the advances of polymer technology applied to gluing wood it will soon be possible to use current stranding and pressing technology to press a reconstituted wood billet to a nominal 2 inch thickness. With advances in forming technology it will open the door to the cost effective manufacture of a dimension lumber substitute. It minimizes the variability in wood strength. This is a particular opportunity for lower grade wood in Canada’s diverse wood basket e.g. western and eastern hardwoods. Reconstituted wood with built in pest, fire & moisture resistance for specific high risk building environments Improved technologies in additives will allow either in-process or post-process treatments to mitigate the potential downsides of reconstituted wood products i.e. pest damage, dimensional stability under moisture, fire and UV resistance. Material can be tailored to application for specific high risk areas in building applications. Also has the advantage of propriety protection through patent rights with a relatively easy ability to enforce. Treatment of wood by ‘super solvents’ and penetrating chemicals The current treatment processes for wood require high pressure equipment, has limits on throughput, and increases inventory holding costs. Developments in treating chemistry are being made where non heavy metal biocides can be applied to solid wood products and penetration gained more effectively. This makes the production of pest resistant or possible fire resistant, material more competitive with steel & concrete. Heat treatment of wood Research has shown that greater dimensional stability to moisture, and some decay resistance, can be imparted from the thermal heat treatment of wood either in oil or inert gases, or with steam. This has the advantage of imparting such properties without the use of more costly polymers

CFIC Forest Science Policy Forum on Transformative Technologies Regional Workshops Summary Report, May 2006.

69


resins or additives. Such products can command a premium in niches where dimensional stability under moisture is essential e.g. flooring systems. Fibre based panels, and non woven materials, to be applied to building system, for sound and radiation attenuation. There are opportunities for materials and systems which attenuate sound in buildings, particularly as multifamily units in urban areas become more prevalent. There is also opportunity in workplaces to shield information technology centres from radio frequency. Modified and hybrid wood materials have application in such areas. Mid term (3-10 years) Mid term developments are less predictable than those mentioned above since the technologies are still in the development stage. Nevertheless processes and products under development in the R&D labs of universities, institutes and industry can give a possible picture of future developments. Process: High speed sawing headrig that curve saws and flakes, rather than chips, the outside edges. Most of the Canadian sawmilling sector is locked into chip and saw headrig technology to make the first cuts on a log. These rigs are designed for rapid throughput and to generate chips in one step. This works well if the requirements for lumber and pulp chips are in balance. Going forward, the flexibility to have a headrig which can process high volumes of lumber, but also prepare flakes for engineered wood products rather than chips would be transformative. In-line vacuum plasma modification to improve gluing and coating Plasma modification of surfaces to improve the adhesion of coatings is employed in the auto industry. This technology shows promise as a means of improving the adhesion of glues and finishes to wood. Prototype in-line systems are under development although much basic research still needs to be done. This technology could be used to manufacture glulam products from difficult to glue, dense eastern hardwood species. Ink-jet printing on panels faces and edges Ink-jet printing is cheap and ubiquitous. However it has the potential to create photo-realistic images on the edges and faces of smooth panel products. A prototype machine that uses UV curing inks and coating has been developed to create images on the edges of panels thus replacing edge banding and enhancing surface design possibilities for panels used in value added wood industries. Anticipated reduction in the cost of this technology could see it become more widely used in the wood industry. Product: Hybrid building systems which optimize the values of wood, steel & concrete Rather than exclusive building with steel/concrete or exclusively with wood, future designs will use the qualities of the best materials for the building application. Designs that mitigate the challenges of wood as a material but maximize its positive attributes will be successful. Two examples are: Design to ‘fill’ concrete cubicles This idea stems from the reality that high-rise inner city housing will always be built with steel and concrete. However people will essentially buy concrete cubicles. However it is envisage that there will be a demand for higher end living space. This could be furnished by two, or three, story, concrete ‘cubicles’ in a high-rise as the base living space. Wood products and building systems are then be used to fill the space with interesting rooms,

CFIC Forest Science Policy Forum on Transformative Technologies Regional Workshops Summary Report, May 2006.

70


stairwells, silent floors and ceilings etc. The aesthetics of wood can maximize the quality of the living space. This is transformative in the sense that it’s a different paradigm of the use of wood, it’s a hybrid application. Ready to Assemble, ‘House in a Box’, for fast assembly in developing economies The concept of a ‘house in a box’ has been developed in Europe. Conceptually it is a structural application of the ready to assemble concept which is know a standard in the household furniture business (the IKEA model). It thus saves significant costs in assembly and meets factory quality standards. A real challenge is to develop the concept and assemble structures compatible and acceptable to the developing world. Nanoparticle coatings/surface modification to maintain appearance of high grade wood finishes. As nanomaterials evolve it is envisaged that such materials, and other that diffuse into the wood industry from high tech fields may provide improved solutions to what has long been a ‘holy grail’ in wood technology i.e. the ability to retard for significant times the discoloration and surface degradation of wood in sunlight. This enhances one of wood’s inherent advantages, the warm natural look prized in ‘living with wood applications’. Such materials will be compounded in an appropriate formulation to make surface pre-treatments cost effective. When such a pretreatment is combined with a durable coating or polymer film it may be possible to provide customers with a long-lasting clear finish for wood. This is a product that has been long desired but which is still out of reach. Incorporation of sensors into wood-based materials to sense changes in building structure e.g., moisture ingression, temperature fluctuation As building practices evolved to incorporate new generation engineered wood products, and residences have in-house wireless information systems, it is envisage market opportunities will evolved to incorporate sensors e.g. Radio Frequency Identification (RFID) into wood products. The could potentially be designed to sense changes within the microclimate of the building and trigger responsive actions, e.g. the ingression of moisture into a wall cavity to repaired before rot (or corrosion) can set in. ‘Welding’ of wood to create structures without the use of metal connectors to give glue free furnishings This is an intriguing new technology which potentially bonds wood without the use of conventional glue. Given increased concerns for interior air quality, furnishings made with 100% wood without the use of glues could command a premium price. Less novel solutions to the same problem include wood to wood connections formed through mechanical interlocking of joints optimized through CNC-CAD technology mentioned above. Improved mechanical properties through polymeric modification and compression Potentially chemistries, combined with compression, can produce grades of aesthetically pleasing woods which have the hardness and durability to perform in interior flooring and paneling applications where a wear resistant and impact resistant surface is important. Could also be used for outdoor decking products. This could provide an opportunity to increase the use of underutilized species in Canada’s wood basket e.g. hemlock, alder, aspen, and birch. Long term ‘Wish list’ technologies (10-20 years) These are technologies that at this stage are out of the box dreams. However, with a little imagination, one can see that they have potential

CFIC Forest Science Policy Forum on Transformative Technologies Regional Workshops Summary Report, May 2006.

71


Low energy breakdown of wood with reconstitution to give ultra-light yet stiff structures (combination of bio & nanotechnology) Visionary more than substantive. A time will come when bioenzyme will be available which will ‘pulp’ wood as very low energy input. Not only could this be a breakthrough in papermaking, but also in the formation of a whole new family of reconstitutes wood products. 100% Green Building i.e. Building structures which are completely made from lignocellulose or naturally derived materials, i.e. structure, connections, insulation, décor. An ultimate goal is to have a building which is made from materials which are completely renewable and the building has a very minimal environmental footprints. This requires technological advances where wood is readily reconstituted into engineered wood products, connection can be made without metal, and the building systems are durable. When the building is eventually deconstructed all the components are recyclable, pulpable or compostable. Welding’ of wood to create structures without the use of metal connectors to develop recyclable buildings A key barrier to implementing the vision above. Technology, and design, that can make connections without the use of metal. It has been done….wood shipbuilding technology joined wood with minimal use of metal. It requires transformative ingenuity to do this on an industrial scale to manufacture modern building systems. Commercial & Policy barriers While one can be eternally optimistic about opportunities, in reality there are several barriers to pursuing a transformative technology agenda in Canada. The issues have been well studied over the years. Successful innovation requires calculated risk taking, venture capital to finance the risk, and leadership to be persistent in the development from an idea to a commercial reality. Canada does invest in basic research and development in its universities, although it can be argued not to any great extent in the wood products area. However, despite some stellar examples to the contrary, on aggregate the application of university generated knowledge to create wealth is not good. In most economies the wealth generated from technology comes from the developments of well trained entrepreneurs, or entrepreneurial organizations, which can raise the capital and quickly adapt to find business solutions. The R&D engine is in need of overhaul and refurbishment. The emphasis on short term research and operational problem solving swamps any long term research efforts. In the wood products sector there is a very low investment in fundamental R&D in Canada. Further, there are better opportunities for trained talent in other sectors. We need to attract and hire versatile talent who can combine technology skills with business acumen. In the vision to increase the use of wood for building and living, a huge barrier to moving ahead is the low marketing effort compared to rival materials such as steel and concrete. This marketing is probably less the need to promote but rather the need to supply the construction and architectural sector the product information and know-how to use wood effectively. This is vital to make inroads into the non-residential markets. Without a firm foundation to channel the products, new materials based on wood, however technically advanced will not fare well. Part of this marketing is the level of efforts required in building codes and standards committees. Even more importantly a larger effort is needed to train the next generation of architects and engineers so that they understand wood and have confidence in using it for structural applications.

CFIC Forest Science Policy Forum on Transformative Technologies Regional Workshops Summary Report, May 2006.

72


Conclusion There are opportunities for transformative technologies to be applied to wood products which will both create solutions for customers and make money. Looking back from the future, I hope we will revisit the vision articulated earlier in the paper and see how the Canadian forest products industry reinvented itself. • To complement its world scale lumber industry, Canada developed advanced fibre-based building systems which now are standard construction practices in residential and non-residential buildings in the developed and developing world. • It rationalized and then transformed its pulp and paper sector into a manufacturer of advanced, fibrebased communications media, packaging and bio-products. • The forest industry became a net contributor of energy. • The global demand for sustainable forest products grew 5-fold in 20 years. • This was achieved by a concentrated effort by government and industry to create the funding and fiscal environment to stimulate the education, research, the partnerships, and business development to implement these transformative technologies Acknowledgements: The author would like to acknowledge the following people for their input and valuable insights into this paper: Forintek Canada: Feric: Universite Laval: UNB: UBC: Ainsworth Engineered Wood

Erol Karacabeyli, Conroy Lum, Paul Morris, Jennifer O’Connor, Chris Gaston Alex Sinclair Alain Cloutier, Tatjana Stevanovich Y.H. Chui, Ian Smith Phil Evans Ken Lau

CFIC Forest Science Policy Forum on Transformative Technologies Regional Workshops Summary Report, May 2006.

73


Table 1: Summary of Near-Term Transformative Technology Opportunities Time Frame

Technology

‘Building’ with Wood

‘Living’ with Wood

REQUIRES DEVELOPMENT INVESTMENT MATCHED WITH BUSINESS MODEL FOR IMPLEMENTATION Product •

• •

Now/Near Term (1-2 years)

Oriented Strand Lumber on conventional thermal presses (i.e., the next generation of Engineered Wood Products) Reconstituted wood with built in pest, fire & moisture resistance for specific high risk building environments Low pressure treatment of solid wood by ‘super solvents’ to improve resistance to pests and fire Heat treatment of wood to improve dimensional stability Fibre based panels and non woven materials, to be applied to building system, for sound attenuation

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

Process •

• •

Sensors (near IR, laser, to optimize the process to reconstitute wood and drastically reduce variability IT for supply chain optimization Computer Numerical Control (CNC) processing coupled with Computer Aided Design (CAD

*

*

*

*

*

*

CFIC Forest Science Policy Forum on Transformative Technologies Regional Workshops Summary Report, May 2006.

74


Table 2: Summary of Mid-Term Transformative Technology Opportunities Time Frame

Technology

‘Building’ with Wood

‘Living’ with Wood

REQUIRES BUSINESS VISION AND INVESTMENT IN APPLIED TECHNOLOGY Product •

Mid Term (3-10 years)

• •

Hybrid building systems which optimize the values of wood, steel & concrete o Design & systems to ‘fill’ concrete cubicles. o Ready to Assemble (RTA), ‘House in a Box’, for fast assembly (potential in developing economies?) Nanoparticle coatings/surface modification to maintain appearance of high grade wood finishes Incorporation of sensors into wood-based materials to detect changes in building structure e.g., moisture ingression, temperature fluctuation, decay growth, subsidence Improved mechanical properties through polymeric modification and compression ‘Welding’ of wood to create furniture, interior application without the use of adhesives

* *

*

*

*

*

*

* *

Process • • •

High speed sawing headrig that curve saws and flakes, rather than chips, the outside edges In-line vacuum plasma modification to improve gluing and coating Ink-jet printing on panels faces and edges

CFIC Forest Science Policy Forum on Transformative Technologies Regional Workshops Summary Report, May 2006.

* * *

75


Table 3: Summary of Long-Term Transformative Technology Opportunities Time Frame

Technology

‘Building’ with Wood

‘Living’ with Wood

REQUIRES INVESTMENT IN FUNDAMENTAL AND APPLIED RESEARCH •

Long Term (10-20 years) •

Low energy breakdown of wood with reconstitution and the nano level to give ultralight, yet strong structures with minimum variability (combination of bio & nanotechnology) 100% Green Building i.e. Building structures which are completely made from lignocellulose or naturally derived materials, i.e. structure, connections, insulation, décor ‘Welding’ of wood to create structures without the use of metal connectors to develop recyclable buildings

*

*

*

*

*

CFIC Forest Science Policy Forum on Transformative Technologies Regional Workshops Summary Report, May 2006.

76


B-1 Livre Blanc : Technologies Transformantes —Solides ou Reconstitués du Bois

LES TECHNOLOGIES TRANSFORMATIVES APPLIQUÉES AUX PRODUITS SOLIDES OU RECONSTITUÉS DU BOIS… OU « CONSTRUIRE ET VIVRE AVEC LE BOIS » DANS LE FUTUR Alan Potter 5 Directeur exécutif Forest Research Opportunity BC

Introduction L’objectif de cet article est d’explorer, voire de spéculer, sur certaines des possibilités de technologie transformative qui s’offrent dans le secteur des produits du bois. Il s’agit d’un de quatre articles en développement qui feront l’objet de discussions lors d’un forum présenté au printemps 2006 par le Conseil canadien de l’innovation forestière, le Conference Board du Canada, et l’Association des produits forestiers du Canada. Les trois autres articles traiteront d’autres possibilités de technologie transformative dans le secteur des produits forestiers, c.-à-d. les pâtes et papiers, le bioraffinage, et la bioénergie/biocombustible. Disons d’emblée qu’une transformation de l’esprit, ou un changement de paradigme, serait peut-être de considérer les produits du bois comme des biomatériaux au lieu de les voir comme des morceaux de bois ou des planches. Considérations de fond Le secteur canadien des produits du bois est confronté à un certain nombre de défis. Au cours des récentes années, l’Amérique du Nord a profité d’un marché du logement fort qui a permis aux producteurs canadiens de petit bois d’œuvre et de carton-fibre d’obtenir un bon taux de rendement du capital investi. Ces rendements ont toutefois été affectés à la baisse par certains facteurs, notamment les tarifs d’exportation des produits de bois d’œuvre, l’appréciation de la valeur du dollar canadien versus le dollar américain, et la hausse des coûts énergétiques — du gaz naturel, en particulier. Les produits primaires sont des essentiellement des marchandises. Les rendements futurs risquent d’être encore réduits par un déclin anticipé de la demande provenant des mises en chantier d’habitations. Le défi pour ce secteur est d’arriver à réduire sa dépendance vis-à-vis des bourses des marchandises et développer des produits et des services susceptibles de générer des marges supérieures de profits. C’est vraisemblablement le souhait des propriétaires des ressources forestières, c.-à-d. la population représentée par les gouvernements provinciaux du Canada. En fait, il faudrait générer un meilleur taux de rendement à l’économie pour chaque mètre cube de bois récolté au Canada. Les technologies transformatives des produits et des procédés représentent une façon de relever ce défi. 5

L’auteur est le directeur exécutif de Forest Research Opportunity B.C., une initiative visant à former un regroupement industrie/institutions/universités dans le domaine des produits forestiers en C.-B. M. Potter était jusqu'à récemment viceprésident, Technologie et environnement, chez Nexfor Inc., une firme torontoise spécialisée dans les produits de bois et de papier. Ses recherches appliquées comprennent des projets chez Forintek Canada Corp, MacMillan Bloedel Research, et Crown Forest Industries, des firmes établies à Vancouver, C.-B. Il détient un doctorat et un baccalauréat ès sciences de l’Université Saint-Andrews, en Écosse, ainsi qu’une maîtrise de l’Université de la Colombie-Britannique.

CFIC Forest Science Policy Forum on Transformative Technologies Regional Workshops Summary Report, May 2006.

77


Dans cet article, nous proposerons une vision de ce que sera le monde dans 20 ans. Nous ferons ensuite un résumé de la structure actuelle du marché des produits du bois. Enfin, nous traiterons d’une perspective des barrières technologiques et des transformations technologiques nécessaires à l’accroissement de l’utilisation des produits dérivés du bois. La vision Dans 20 ans, nous vivrons dans un monde où : — trois des besoins essentiels au développement humain — c.-à-d. l’habitation, le chauffage et le refroidissement — seront comblés par des matériaux renouvelables et durables; — beaucoup de maisons, et de lieux de travail, dans tous les pays seront construits et meublés à partir de matériaux à base de fibres utilisant des systèmes de construction fondés sur la connaissance; — l’énergie et les combustibles nécessaires au chauffage, au refroidissement et au transport des marchandises proviendront de sources renouvelables, dont la biomasse résiduelle. Les présupposés clés qui sous-tendent cette vision sont les suivants : •

• • • • •

• • •

Nous vivons dans un monde où grandissent sans cesse les attentes d’un niveau de vie élevé. Et cela est encore plus vrai dans les pays en développement. La récente et radicale augmentation du niveau de vie en Chine, et son influence sur les marchandises mondiales nécessaires à alimenter cette croissance économique, constitue un mauvais présage quant à la demande future; Il en va de l’intérêt politique de chacun de faire usage de l’ingéniosité humaine pour satisfaire à cette demande; La croissance économique requiert de l’énergie et de la matière pour faire les produits voulus; Les populations sont de plus en plus nombreuses à vivre dans les zones urbaines, ce qui augmentent la pression sur les environnements urbains; Une croissance opérée sans minimisation de son impact environnemental sera politiquement et socialement inacceptable; Les matériaux dérivés du bois peuvent jouer un rôle clé en remplissant deux des besoins humains fondamentaux, soit le logement et l’énergie servant au chauffage et au refroidissement. Leur impact environnemental est faible parce qu’ils nécessitent peu d’énergie à fabriquer et parce qu’on en dispose subséquemment en les transformant en pulpe, en les brûlant ou en les compostant; On trouve de la fibre de bois en abondance dans le monde; L’exploitation des forêts du Canada, qui continuera d’être certifiée et durable, sera justifiée par ses avantages pour la société; La technologie mécanique continuera d’évoluer de manière à assurer la compétitivité des coûts du bois livré.

Le secteur canadien des produits du bois, producteur très efficace de matériaux de bois de construction, se trouve en bonne position. Le défi est de le transformer, en partie à l’aide de la technologie, en un participant actif, de préférence un leader, en fournissant au monde des solutions pour la construction. De plus, le monde ne manque pas de fibre de bois. Des solutions pour la construction peuvent aussi provenir d’autres matériaux de partout au monde. Afin de prospérer, le Canada se doit de faire le meilleur usage possible de son panier diversifié d’essences de bois et le combiner au savoir et à l’ingéniosité pour transformer le bois en une solution d’affaires commercialisable. Le maintien de la demande pour les produits dérivés du bois sera essentiel pour que l’industrie canadienne puisse trouver les créneaux appropriés. Pour ce faire, elle devra s’adapter aux technologies de transformation et investir des ressources dans le développement de nouvelles entreprises.

CFIC Forest Science Policy Forum on Transformative Technologies Regional Workshops Summary Report, May 2006.

78


Le secteur canadien des produits du bois a fait preuve d’une grande innovation par le passé. Ses scieries se sont adaptées aux nouvelles technologies et sont aujourd’hui parmi les plus efficaces au monde. En fait, la majeure partie des efforts actuels de recherche et de développement ciblent les procédés et la réduction des coûts de production. On prévoit que de telles applications de la technologie se poursuivront dans le but de maintenir la compétitivité des coûts. Cependant, le Canada a démontré son habileté à développer des produits de bois transformés. C’est au Canada qu’ont été développés les panneaux de copeaux orientés (OSB) et les bois à lamelles parallèles (PSL). Il est primordial que le Canada tire le meilleur parti possible des caractéristiques uniques de ses approvisionnements en fibres et qu’il les transforme en produits de valeur à l’aide de techniques brevetées. Ainsi, il bénéficiera d’un avantage compétitif durable par rapport à la concurrence. Le but premier de ce document de travail est de prévoir quelles sont les technologies transformatives susceptibles d’amener des changements majeurs.

Considérations du marché Les produits du bois du Canada sont essentiellement utilisés dans deux marchés distincts : Le plus grand volume de bois est affecté à la « construction avec le bois », c.-à-d. le bois d’œuvre, les panneaux structuraux, le bois d’ingénierie, les assemblages et les systèmes de construction. Un volume moindre de bois mais dont la valeur ultime est peut-être supérieure est employé pour la « vie avec le bois », c.-à-d. les bois d’œuvre et placages de catégorie de finition, souvent combinés à des panneaux de bois non structuraux, sont utilisés pour le revêtement extérieur, les fenêtres, les portes, les planchers intérieurs, la décoration, les meubles, etc. La construction avec le bois Les produits du bois sont principalement utilisés dans la construction résidentielle. Alors que la plus grande partie du marché semble convenir peu aux produits dérivés du bois, avec un peu d’imagination et d’innovation, des avancées considérables pourraient être réalisées en termes d’augmentation de la part de marché du bois. Même dans la construction résidentielle, l’utilisation du bois se limite à quelques régions géographiques, soit l’Amérique du Nord, le Japon, et l’Europe septentrionale. La demande en produits du bois dans ces régions est essentiellement saturée. Le maintien de la part de marché requerra de l’innovation pour contrebalancer l’utilisation de matériaux alternatifs. L’utilisation du bois est une pratique traditionnelle. Les codes de construction résidentielle sont largement prescriptifs. Les nouveaux codes en développement sont fondés sur la performance. En appliquant les ressources appropriées, on peut ouvrir la voie à l’utilisation du bois dans davantage d’applications. En effet, les produits du bois évoluent eux-mêmes sur le plan de la conception comme le montre le tableau ci-après. Alors que les maisons sont traditionnellement construites à partir d’une structure assemblée sur place avec du bois de charpente et des panneaux de contreplaqué, de plus en plus de maisons sont construites à partir de composantes, d’assemblages et de systèmes fabriqués en usine :

CFIC Forest Science Policy Forum on Transformative Technologies Regional Workshops Summary Report, May 2006.

79


Terme Produits du bois

Exemples Bois d’oeuvre, Contreplaqué, Panneaux OSB

Bois aggloméré

Panneaux de fibres, Panneaux fibragglo, Composites bois-plastique

Composantes

Solives en I, Solives de rives, Charpentes précoupées

Assemblages

Panneaux structuraux isolés, Fermes de toits

Systèmes

Systèmes de planchers, Systèmes de murs

La vie avec le bois On tire profit de l’esthétique du bois de plusieurs façons dans la « vie avec le bois ». Bien que le bois de finition fabriqué par les producteurs primaires soit vendu dans le secteur, la création de valeur subséquente est en générale faite par les petites et moyennes entreprises dans les industries du secondaire et du tertiaire. Plusieurs producteurs primaires produisent du carton-fibre, principalement des panneaux de particules et des panneaux de fibres de bois de densité moyenne (MDF), à partir de chutes de bois; ici encore, la valeur réelle est créée lors de la conversion subséquente de ces matériaux en meubles et autres produits décoratifs d’intérieur. La technologie joue un rôle clé dans l’extraction d’un maximum de bois de qualité de finition des ressources de bois, en plus d’améliorer l’aspect visuel et la durabilité des produits du bois de catégorie de finition. Barrières technologiques Le bois en tant que matériau de fabrication d’ameublement et de construction comporte des avantages inhérents. Il est léger et possède un rapport rigidité-poids élevé. Il se travaille aisément. On peut facilement le combiner à diverses structures et formes. Il est naturel et provient d’une ressource renouvelable. Sa transformation en produits de construction consomme beaucoup moins d’énergie et d’eau et produit moins de gaz carbonique durant l’usinage que des produits tels que l’acier, le béton ou le plastique. Le bois possède une qualité visuelle inhérente que beaucoup de consommateurs associent à la nature et aux traditions. Un autre avantage inhérent au bois canadien est la capacité d’extraire une variété de pièces de longues dimensions des « gros » arbres des forêts canadiennes. L’esthétique des catégories claires des mêmes arbres est une qualité recherchée sur le marché. Si c’est encore un avantage important pour le Canada, l’un des défis consiste à continuer de développer des produits de valeur à partir d’approvisionnements en fibres changeants, pendant la croissance des forêts secondaires. Le bois comporte aussi quelques désavantages. Sa résistance est variable. La présence d’eau occasionne des changements de dimensions pouvant faire gauchir et fendre le bois. Il est susceptible de pourrir et de se dégrader dans certaines conditions d’humidité. Le bois peut prendre feu. Le défi technologique consiste donc à améliorer de manière rentable sa force sans compromettre son poids, et lui donner une meilleure résistance au feu et contre les insectes et la décomposition des surfaces. Il importe aussi d’avoir les connaissances expertes requises pour les applications des matières premières et la conception des bâtiments.

CFIC Forest Science Policy Forum on Transformative Technologies Regional Workshops Summary Report, May 2006.

80


Possibilités technologiques Les technologies transformatives suggérées sont résumées aux Tableaux 1, 2 et 3. Elles sont divisées en court, moyen et long termes. Les possibilités à court terme sont les pratiques actuelles, ou sur le point d’être introduites. En termes larges, elles couvrent des domaines tels que les matériaux et composites de pointe dérivés des éléments constitutifs du bois, les techniques innovatrices de fabrication du bois, les technologies de construction en bois fondées sur des connaissances expertes et l’amélioration des caractéristiques des produits par de nouveaux traitements. Deux technologies de processus ont aussi été proposées pour le court terme, principalement parce qu’elles dominent une portion importante de l’effort technologique dans les entreprises actuelles. Une technologie de processus est suggérée pour le moyen terme. Court terme (1 à 2 ans) Processus : Développement de capteurs associé à des analyses statistiques poussées et à des pratiques évoluées de contrôle de traitement Plus évolutive que transformative. Les développements à venir de tels capteurs seront importants pour assurer non seulement davantage de réduction des coûts de conversion dans l’industrie du bois de sciage, mais aussi la fabrication future de vrais matériaux composites d’ingénierie avec variations minimales des propriétés. Par exemple, la technologie laser et proche IR, qui permet d’obtenir rapidement les mesures du processus et des propriétés du produit et qui, alliée à des pratiques évoluées de contrôle de traitement, réduira drastiquement la variabilité dans les processus de fabrication des composites de bois. Ce type d’application technologique est répandu dans les systèmes avancés de production dans d’autres secteurs. Technologie de l’information et recherche opérationnelle pour l’optimisation de la chaîne logistique Dans ce cas aussi, il ne s’agit pas non plus d’une technologie transformative au sens large, étant donné que plusieurs secteurs sont déjà très avancés dans l’application de ces techniques. La capacité pour le secteur des produits du bois d’optimiser la chaîne logistique et minimiser les fonds de roulement sera cruciale dans la transformation du rendement financier dans le secteur. Produits : Bois à copeaux orientés sur presses thermiques conventionnelles Il s’agit du prochain pas dans l’évolution des matériaux de bois d’ingénierie, du bois de placage lamellé au bois à lamelles parallèles. Grâce à l’évolution de la technologie des colles à bois à base de polymères, il sera bientôt possible d’utiliser la technologie actuelle de découpage en baguettes et de pressage pour presser un rondin reconstitué pour en faire une pièce de bois d’une épaisseur nominale de deux pouces. Avec les avancées réalisées dans la technologie de feutrage, cela permettra la fabrication rentable d’un substitut de bois d’échantillon. Les variations dans la force du bois seront ainsi minimisées. Occasions intéressantes pour le bois de catégorie inférieure dans la gamme variée des essences canadiennes, notamment les feuillus de l’Est et de l’Ouest. Bois reconstitué résistant aux insectes, au feu et à l’humidité pour environnement de construction à risque élevé Les avancées technologiques du côté des additifs permettront des traitements en cours de fabrication ou post fabrication afin d’atténuer les inconvénients potentiels des produits de bois reconstitués, soit les dommages causés par les insectes, la stabilité dimensionnelle en condition d’humidité et la résistance au feu. Les matériaux peuvent être fabriqués en fonction de leur emploi dans des endroits où les risques sont particulièrement élevés dans la construction. Il a

CFIC Forest Science Policy Forum on Transformative Technologies Regional Workshops Summary Report, May 2006.

81


aussi l’avantage de d’offrir une protection exclusive grâce à des brevets qui sont relativement faciles à faire respecter. Traitement du bois à basse pression avec « super solvants » Les procédés actuels de traitement pour le bois nécessitent de l’équipement haute pression, ont des limites de débit, et augmentent les coûts de tenue d’inventaire. Grâce à des avancées dans la chimie des traitements, on peut appliquer des traitements à des produits de bois massif et obtenir une pénétration plus efficace. Ainsi, les matériaux obtenus, qui résistent mieux aux insectes ou peut-être même à la propagation du feu, seront plus compétitifs par rapport à l’acier et au béton. Traitement du bois par la chaleur Les recherches ont démontré que la stabilité dimensionnelle à l’humidité peut être obtenue par un traitement du bois par la chaleur, soit thermiquement ou avec vapeur. Ce procédé présente l’avantage de conférer ces propriétés sans l’utilisation plus coûteuse de résines de polymères ou d’additifs. De tels produits peuvent valoir cher dans les créneaux où la stabilité dimensionnelle en condition humide est essentielle, notamment dans les systèmes de planchers. Panneaux à base de fibres, et matériaux non-tissés, à appliquer à des systèmes de construction afin de réduire son et radiation Il y a des possibilités pour les matériaux et les systèmes qui atténuent le son dans les bâtiments, surtout au moment où les unités multifamiliales en milieu urbain gagnent en popularité. Il y a également des possibilités en milieu de travail, où l’on peut isoler les centres de technologie de l'information des fréquences radio. Les matériaux de bois modifiés ont des applications dans de tels domaines. « Maison en boîte », prête à être assemblée, pour un assemblage rapide dans les pays en développement Le concept de « maison en boîte » a été développé en Europe. Conceptuellement, il s’agit d’une application matérielle du concept « prête à être assemblée », qui est maintenant devenu un standard dans l’industrie de l’ameublement domestique (le modèle IKEA). Il permet de réduire considérablement les coûts d’assemblage et satisfait aux normes de qualité en usine. Un grand défi consiste à développer le concept et à assembler des structures compatibles au monde en développement. Moyen terme (3 à 10 ans) Processus : Scie de premier débit à haute vitesse, qui scie en courbe et transforme la partie extérieure du rondin en flocons, plutôt qu’en copeaux. La plus grande partie du secteur canadien du bois de sciage utilise l’équarrisseuse-déchiqueteuse pour faire les premières coupes sur un rondin. Ces machines sont conçues pour un débit rapide et pour produire des copeaux en une étape. Cela fonctionne bien si les exigences de bois de sciage et de copeaux à pâte sont équilibrées. Éventuellement, la flexibilité d’avoir une machine de premier débit qui peut traiter de grands volumes de bois en plus de préparer des flocons pour le bois d’ingénierie plutôt que des copeaux serait transformative. Produit : Systèmes de construction hybrides qui optimisent la valeur du bois, de l’acier et du béton Au lieu de construire exclusivement avec l’acier et le béton, ou exclusivement avec le bois, les designs futurs feront appel aux qualités des meilleurs matériaux selon la construction envisagée.

CFIC Forest Science Policy Forum on Transformative Technologies Regional Workshops Summary Report, May 2006.

82


Les designs qui atténuent les inconvénients du bois tout en maximisant ses qualités positives réussiront. Voici un exemple : Design pour « remplir » des compartiments de béton Cette idée provient du fait que les immeubles de grande hauteur des centres urbains seront toujours bâtis avec l’acier et le béton. Les gens achèteront essentiellement des compartiments de béton. Cependant, on prévoit qu’il y aura une demande pour des espaces habitables de haute gamme. Ceux-ci pourraient être faits d’une structure de deux ou trois étages de « compartiments » de béton. Des produits et systèmes de construction de bois seraient ensuite utilisés pour remplir l’espace de pièces intéressantes, de cages d’escaliers, de planchers et de plafonds insonorisés, etc. L’esthétique du bois peut maximiser la qualité d’une habitation. C’est transformatif dans le sens où il s’agit d’un modèle différent d’utilisation du bois, une application hybride. Enduits à base de nanoparticules/modification des surfaces pour préserver l’apparence des bois de finition de catégorie supérieure Considérant l’évolution des nanomatériaux, on prévoit que l’on pourrait trouver là la réponse à ce qui est depuis longtemps la « quête du Graal » en technologie du bois, c.-à-d. la capacité de retarder la décoloration et la dégradation des surfaces de bois par la lumière du soleil. Cela élimine l’un des avantages inhérents du bois, son apparence naturelle et chaleureuse, dans les applications de la « vie avec le bois ». Ces matériaux seront combinés en une formule adéquate pour rentabiliser le prétraitement des surfaces. Incorporation de détecteurs dans les matériaux dérivés du bois pour déceler les changements dans les structures de construction, c.-à-d. la pénétration de l’humidité, les variations de température Alors que les pratiques de construction commencent à intégrer des produits de bois d’ingénierie de nouvelle génération, et que les résidences sont équipées de systèmes d’information sans fil, on prévoit que les marchés évolueront de manière à intégrer des détecteurs, c.-à-d. des identificateurs par radiofréquence, dans les produits du bois. On pourrait les concevoir pour qu’ils puissent percevoir les changements dans le microclimat du bâtiment et déclencher une contre-réaction. Par exemple, l’infiltration d’humidité dans une cavité murale pourrait être réparée avant que la pourriture (ou la corrosion) ne s’y installe. « Collage » de bois pour créer des structures sans recourir à des connecteurs métalliques, et obtenir des meubles sans colle Une nouvelle et curieuse technologie permettrait d’unir des pièces de bois sans utiliser de colle conventionnelle. Considérant le souci grandissant pour une meilleure qualité d’air intérieur, les meubles fabriqués entièrement en bois et sans aucune colle pourrait valoir cher. Propriétés mécaniques améliorées par modification et compression polymériques Les réactions chimiques possibles, combinées à la compression, peuvent produire des qualités de bois esthétiquement agréables et suffisamment durs pour être appliqués aux planchers et autres applications d’intérieur où des surfaces résistant à l’usure et aux impacts sont nécessaires. Une occasion d’augmenter l’utilisation d’essences sous-utilisées dans le panier de la diversité du Canada, notamment l’aulne, le tremble et le bouleau. Long terme — « desideratas technologiques » (10 à 20 ans) Fragmentation du bois à faible énergie, avec reconstitution pour obtenir des structures à la fois ultra légères et rigides (combinaison de bio et nanotechnologie)

CFIC Forest Science Policy Forum on Transformative Technologies Regional Workshops Summary Report, May 2006.

83


Plus visionnaire que substantiel. Le temps viendra où les bioenzymes seront disponibles et permettront de réduire le bois en pâte en utilisant peu d’énergie. Cela constituerait non seulement une percée majeure dans l’industrie du papier, mais également dans la formation d’une toute nouvelle famille de produits du bois reconstitués. Bâtiment 100 % vert, c.-à-d. des structures entièrement faites de lignocellulose ou de matériaux naturellement dérivés, c.-à-d. structure, connections, isolation, décoration. Le but ultime serait d’avoir un bâtiment fabriqué de matériaux entièrement renouvelables, avec un impact environnemental minime. Cela requiert des avancées technologiques où le bois est facilement reconstitué en produits de bois d’ingénierie, où les connections sont faites sans métal, et où les systèmes de construction sont durables. Au moment de déconstruire le bâtiment, on peut recycler ses différentes composantes, en faire de la pâte à papier, ou les composter. « Collage » de bois pour créer des structures sans recourir à des connecteurs métalliques, pour le développement de bâtiments recyclables Un obstacle important à la mise en œuvre de la vision précédente. La technologie et le design qui permettent d’unir des pièces de bois sans recourir au métal. Cela a déjà été fait : la technologie de construction de bateaux de bois avec utilisation réduite de métal. Pour fabriquer des systèmes modernes de construction à l’échelle industrielle, on devra faire preuve d’ingéniosité transformative. Barrières commerciales et politiques Bien que l’on puisse être éternellement optimiste vis-à-vis des possibilités, il existe en réalité plusieurs obstacles à la poursuite d’un programme de technologie transformative au Canada. Les questions ont été étudiées en profondeur au fil des années. Pour avoir du succès, les innovations exigent certains risques calculés, un capital-risque pour financer le risque, et le leadership et la persévérance qu’il faut pour transformer une idée en une réalité commerciale. Le Canada investit en recherche et développement fondamentaux à travers ses universités. Cependant, malgré des exemples éblouissants qui tendent à démontrer le contraire, dans l’ensemble, l’application de ce savoir à la création de richesse est déficiente. Dans la plupart des économies, la richesse générée par la technologie provient du travail d’entrepreneurs bien formés ou d’organisations d’entrepreneurs capables de réunir les sommes nécessaires et de s’adapter rapidement pour trouver des solutions d’affaires. La machine de R&D a besoin d’être remaniée et remise à neuf. L’accent porté sur la recherche à court terme et la résolution de problèmes opérationnels nuit à la recherche à long terme. Dans le secteur des produits du bois, on investit très peu en R&D fondamentaux. De plus, il y a de meilleures possibilités dans d’autres secteurs pour les gens capables et bien formés. Nous devons attirer et embaucher des personnes versatiles et talentueuses qui sachent allier les habiletés technologiques au sens des affaires. Comparé à des matériaux rivaux comme l’acier ou le béton, le développement de la perspective d’augmentation de l’utilisation du bois dans la construction et la vie est considérablement freiné par la faiblesse des efforts de mise en marché. Celle-ci concerne probablement moins le besoin de promotion que celui de fournir aux secteurs de la construction et de l’architecture les informations sur les produits et les savoir-faire préalables à l’utilisation efficace du bois. Cela est nécessaire pour réaliser des percées dans les marchés non résidentiels. Sans mécanismes solides d’acheminement des produits, les nouveaux matériaux dérivés du bois, aussi avancés soient-ils sur le plan technologique, n’ont pas de chance de réussir. Une partie de cette mise en marché doit tenir compte du niveau d’effort requis pour l’établissement de comités des codes et des normes.

CFIC Forest Science Policy Forum on Transformative Technologies Regional Workshops Summary Report, May 2006.

84


Épilogue ou prière ? Il existe des possibilités d’application des technologies transformatives aux produits du bois qui sont susceptibles de créer des solutions et de générer des profits. J’espère que dans un avenir assez rapproché, nous pourrons constater comment l’industrie canadienne des produits forestiers s’y est prise pour se réinventer. • Elle a rationalisé et ensuite transformé son secteur des pâtes et papiers pour la production de supports de communication à base de fibres, d’emballages et de bioproduits évolués. • L’industrie forestière est devenue un producteur net d’énergie. • Afin de complémenter son industrie du bois de sciage d’échelle mondiale, le Canada a mis au point des systèmes de construction évolués à base de fibres qui sont maintenant devenus des pratiques standards de construction dans les marchés résidentiel et non résidentiel, aussi bien dans le monde industrialisé que dans le monde en développement. • La demande globale de produits forestiers durables est cinq fois supérieure à ce qu’elle était il y a vingt ans. • Cette réussite est le fruit d’un effort concerté de l’industrie et des gouvernements, qui ont créé l’environnement financier et fiscal essentiel à la stimulation de la recherche, à l’établissement de partenariats et au développement d’entreprises, qui ont entraîné l’application de ces technologies transformatives. Remerciements : L’auteur aimerait remercier les personnes suivantes pour leur contribution à cet article : Forintek Canada:

Feric Université Laval UNB UBC

Erol Karacabeyli, Conroy Lum, Paul Morris, Jennifer O’Connor, Chris Gaston Alex Sinclair Alain Cloutier, Tatjana Stevanovich Y.H. Chui, Ian Smith Phil Evans

CFIC Forest Science Policy Forum on Transformative Technologies Regional Workshops Summary Report, May 2006.

85


Tableau 1 : Résumé des possibilités de technologies transformatives à court terme Espace de temps

Technologie

« Construire avec le bois »

« Vivre avec le bois »

REQUIERT DES INVESTISSEMENTS POUR LE DÉVELOPPEMENT, ALLIÉS À UN MODÈLE D’AFFAIRES POUR LA MISE EN APPLICATION Produit •

• •

Maintenant / Court terme (1-2 ans)

Bois à copeaux orientés sur presses thermiques conventionnelles (c.-à-d., la prochaine génération de bois d’ingénierie) Bois reconstitué résistant aux insectes, au feu et à l’humidité pour environnement de construction à risque élevé Traitement du bois à basse pression avec « super solvants » Traitement du bois par la chaleur pour améliorer la stabilité dimensionnelle Panneaux à base de fibres, et matériaux nontissés, à appliquer à des systèmes de construction afin de réduire son et radiation « Maison en boîte », prête à être assemblée, pour un assemblage rapide dans les pays en développement

* *

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

Processus •

Détecteurs (proche IR, laser, pour optimiser le procédé de reconstitution du bois et réduire drastiquement la variabilité. Technologie de l’information pour l’optimisation de la chaîne logistique

*

*

*

*


Tableau 2 : Résumé des possibilités de technologie transformative à moyen terme Espace de temps

Technologie

« Construire avec le bois »

« Vivre avec le bois »

REQUIERT UNE VISION D’AFFAIRES ET DES INVESTISSEMENTS EN TECHNOLOGIE APPLIQUÉE Produit • Systèmes de construction hybrides optimisant la valeur du bois, de l’acier et du béton o Design pour « remplir » des compartiments de béton •

Moyen terme (3-10 ans) •

*

Enduits à base de nanoparticules/modification des surfaces pour préserver l’apparence des bois de finition de catégorie supérieure Incorporation de détecteurs dans les matériaux dérivés du bois pour déceler les changements dans les structures de construction, c.-à-d. la pénétration de l’humidité, les variations de température, le pourrissement, l’affaissement Propriétés mécaniques améliorées par modification et compression polymériques

*

*

*

« Collage » de bois pour créer des structures sans recourir à des connecteurs métalliques, et obtenir des meubles sans colle

Processus • Scie de premier débit à haute vitesse, qui scie en courbe et transforme la partie extérieure du rondin en flocons, plutôt qu’en copeaux.

*

*

*

CFIC Forest Science Policy Forum on Transformative Technologies Regional Workshops Summary Report, May 2006.

87


Tableau 3 : Résumé des possibilités de technologie transformative à long terme Espace de temps

Technologie

« Construire avec le bois »

« Vivre avec le bois »

REQUIERT DES INVESTISSEMENTS EN RECHERCHE FONDAMENTALE ET APPLIQUÉE •

Long terme (10-20 ans)

Fragmentation du bois à faible énergie, avec reconstitution pour obtenir des structures à la fois ultra légères et rigides (combinaison de bio et nanotechnologie) Bâtiment 100 % vert, c.-à-d. des structures entièrement faites de lignocellulose ou de matériaux naturellement dérivés, c.-à-d. structure, connections, isolation, décoration. « Collage » de bois pour créer des structures sans recourir à des connecteurs métalliques, pour le développement de bâtiments recyclables

*

*

*

*

*

CFIC Forest Science Policy Forum on Transformative Technologies Regional Workshops Summary Report, May 2006.

88


B-2 White Paper: Transformative Technologies — Pulp and Paper

Transformative Technologies for Pulp and Paper Products and Processes

Submitted to the Canadian Forest Innovation Council by PAPIER The Canadian Pulp and Paper Network for Innovation in Education and Research

Prepared by: R.J. Kerekes and A. Garner

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY This paper examines potential transformative technologies for the pulp and paper sector of Canada’s forest industry. Where possible, it focuses on technologies of preferential benefit to Canada relative to competitors, recognizing that such possibilities are limited given the structure of the world-wide Industry. The paper covers the full range from forest to product and considers transformative technologies to achieve the following: Forest practices: New sensing and tracking tools to transform wood flow management using detailed knowledge of wood and fibre quality to maximize end-product margins; tracking and recording methods for certifiable chain of custody from forest to recycle; seedling selection and use of genomics for desired fibre attributes Chemical pulping: a super reinforcement pulp for light-weight paper grades that will require northern softwood fibres. Mechanical pulping: a paradigm shift to 80% yield mechanical pulp preceded by extraction of valuable chemical co-products. Papermaking: ultra-filled mineral papers bonded by polymers from a bio-refinery Packaging and Novel products: molded containers, composites, textiles, decorative furniture, building panels, bioactive paper products Technical and organizational barriers have been identified in creating and implementing these transformative technologies.

CFIC Forest Science Policy Forum on Transformative Technologies Regional Workshops Summary Report, May 2006.

89


1.

MARKET INFLUENCES

The pulp and paper sector of the forest industry supplies a broad range of renewable, sustainable materials for the benefit of humanity. It is a major industry in most industrialized countries and a rapidly growing one in some key parts of the developing world. In Canada, however, the pulp and paper sector today faces daunting challenges. It has not earned an adequate return on capital for many years and in some cases reinvestment has dropped below the depreciation rate. The challenges come from new competitors having low cost fibre and labour coupled with modern pulping and papermaking technology. In addition, during the last three years the exchange rate of the Canadian dollar has increased substantially, further eroding Canada’s competitive position. The cost of energy has increased significantly for the Industry world-wide and is not expected to revert back to former levels... All three sectors of the Industry- communications papers, packaging, and hygiene products -are under threat in one form or another. In communications papers, new competitors with low-cost plantation fibre, low-cost labour, and modern pulping and papermaking technology have changed the world’s pulp and paper industry. As a consequence, Canada’s historical advantages of superior fibre, plentiful energy and abundant water supply have been eroded. There is also declining demand for some paper grades due to growing use of electronic media. In the packaging sector, much large-box production manufacturing is following the shift of product manufacturing overseas. There is also competition from plastic bags and returnable plastic containers. In the hygiene sector, new super-absorbent synthetic fibres have replaced or reduced wood pulp in products such as diapers and incontinence pads. There are also structural issues related to the Canadian pulp and paper industry. The largest companies headquartered in Canada are relatively small by world standards. Generally speaking, these companies have a small in-house R&D, although they are substantial contributors to Paprican. In addition, a significant portion of the Industry is owned by large multinationals, which have R&D capability outside Canada. These factors call for a new vision for the Canadian pulp and paper industry. It is a vision in which the Industry will move forward from its over-reliance on commodity grades to become a leader in the development of new grades and markets based on the unique attributes of Canadian fibre. As well, markets and products which have been lost to plastics over preceding decades will be reclaimed. The convergence of these needed changes with the rise of energy and petroleum concerns presents a further challenge, but at the same time offers an opportunity. It suggests that co-products with pulp and paper will play a strong role in the transformation of the pulp and paper sector. As in the age before petroleum, the forest can again become a major source of energy, chemicals, and polymer feed-stocks along with pulp and paper products. This suggests the concept of a “biorefinery” in which biomass is converted into several product streams of fibre, energy, and chemicals in various combinations. Two companion white papers discuss this biorefinery concept. Many factors will ultimately determine the form of any transformation of the pulp and paper sector. Organizational, political, financial, and market-place issues are critical, indeed dominant in many cases, however, technology is also a key factor: it has transformed the Industry in the

CFIC Forest Science Policy Forum on Transformative Technologies Regional Workshops Summary Report, May 2006.

90


past, and can do so again in the future. The objective of this white paper is to identify some potential transformative technologies for consideration in the next steps this white paper process. 2.

TECHNOLOGY POSSIBILITIES FOR THE CANADIAN FOREST SECTOR:

Introduction Historically, most of the basic technology for pulp and paper manufacture has been open and accessible. Thus, new players have been able to enter the industry without resort to partnering with established players, as would occur, for example, in the petroleum industry. Consequently, in considering transformative technologies, we must distinguish between those which will be of general benefit to world’s paper industry, and those which may be of unique, or at least preferential, benefit to Canada. If this distinction is not made, transformative technologies may well help the world industry but not change the relative competitive position of the Canadian forest sector. Indeed, in some cases they may make competitors stronger. Proprietary technology is one means of gaining preferential benefit. If this is not possible, as is often the case in the paper industry, technology which in some way benefits Canadian firms more than competitors is an alternative. Such regional advantage has been attained in the past by technology aimed at exploiting a natural advantage not easily duplicated by others. For example technology to handle pitch in the pines of the US South, develop suitable Eucalyptus species for plantation forests in Brazil, and segregate wood in New Zealand have all enhanced the competitiveness of the pulp and paper sectors in these regions. The manner in which transformational technologies produce benefit may vary. One is a quantum lowering of cost of production of commodity grades. Unless this can be done with proprietary technology, and perhaps even in this case, it is an unpromising route for Canada. Another is incremental improvements in traditional grades. While desirable and even necessary for the short term, this is not transformative in nature. Yet another option is to make new fibre products coupled with energy and chemical co-products. 3.

SPECIFIC TECHNOLOGY POSSIBILITIES

3.1 Forestry and Harvesting Practices The production of pulp and paper is commonly considered to start at the pulp mill gate. However, the forest is the starting point of the fibre supply chain and therefore deserving of mention here. All components of the fibre supply chain are important to quality and cost of paper products. Harvesting and delivery account for half the cost of delivered wood. In Canada, fibre is harvested from natural forests, in contrast to plantation forests dedicated to pulpwood as in the case of some overseas competitors. Moreover, about half the feedstock to Canadian pulp mills comes as residue from the wood products sector. These factors introduce a variability which, although mitigated somewhat by smaller differences in early wood/latewood ratio than southern woods, is often detrimental to product quality. This variability may lessen the value of pulp. For example, the presence of less than 5% of fibres with very thick walls can cause local defects in the surfaces of otherwise high quality papers. The wide diversity of wood species in Canadian forests might well be turned to advantage in place of being a disadvantage. Matching the fibre properties of species to performance CFIC Forest Science Policy Forum on Transformative Technologies Regional Workshops Summary Report, May 2006.

91


attributes could be the basis of new product platforms, either as single species or blends of species. New technologies are required to overcome variability or to select species within a forest. Rapid assessment tools are needed for evaluating standing trees and logs, along with remote sensing technology for better identification of stand quality. From the woods to the mill, there is a need for tracking systems beyond bar codes or radio frequency identification (RFID). These systems will need to have advanced image analysis tools and be linked by real-time, value-chain modeling to ensure full value capture. Taken as a whole, these systems amount to a radical transformation of wood flow management, creating a spectrum of new opportunities for capturing greater value in the manufacture of wood and paper products. A second benefit of such a transformational change is that it would allow tracking of wood and fibres beyond the mill, through to end use product and recycling thereafter. This anticipates a growing consumer demand, not only for certifiable forest practices, but also for certifiable chain of custody of fibre. Lastly, although forest planting practices are beyond the scope of this white paper, the question of forestry practices to achieve desired properties of end products must be addressed. These products may include biochemicals as well as pulp and paper. This raises the question of “working forests� set aside for industrial use, leaving the natural forest for recreation, wildlife habitat, and other purposes. A central issue is the potential role of genomics technology, for example, to decrease the age for trees to mature in Northern regions and, equally important, to attain specific fibre attributes linked to end use. In short, genomics efforts must be targeted to end product quality as well as forest health and knowledge of how genes function. Provincial progeny selection and replanting efforts exploit the natural variability existing in Canadian forests. The inclusion of wood quality parameters as selection criteria would be truly transformative. Genomics-based rapid assessment tools now make this possible.

3.2 Chemical Pulping and Pulps There are approximately 50 chemical pulp mills in Canada. About half are market pulp mills and half are integrated with paper mills. They average, in size, about 900 tonnes/day, which is about one third the size of a modern new mill. About 25% of the mills were built in the 1960’s, with only 4 built in the last 25 years. Clearly, these mills are small and old by modern standards. One option is to close mills and replace them with a few modern large mills. The economics do not justify this at the present time and perhaps in the foreseeable future for many areas in Canada. We consider the question of technological innovations in this framework.

3.2.1 Process Innovations for Current Products Kraft pulping is a very effective, though capital intensive, process for producing strong fibres from wood chips. However, two thirds of the capital is required to regenerate the pulping chemicals and create energy to operate the process. Improvements in operations and technological innovation to decrease the production costs of current products are needed for near-term survival, but this is not a viable strategy for the long term. These changes are also not transformative technologies. Radically new, non-sulphur, pulping processes may be possible, for example supercritical pulping. These would be particularly attractive in the context of coproducing biochemicals. Accordingly, such pulping options will be discussed in the Biochemicals White Paper. CFIC Forest Science Policy Forum on Transformative Technologies Regional Workshops Summary Report, May 2006.

92


3.2.2

Chemical Pulp Product Innovations: “Moving the Goalposts”

Northern Bleached Softwood Kraft (NBSK) from Canada is acknowledged to be the best reinforcement pulp in the world. Papermakers mix it with weaker pulps and mineral fillers to impart strength to paper, in particular to light-weight papers. Their reinforcing attribute comes from the fact that the fibres are long, strong, and fine. Unfortunately, this pulp commands little or no premium in the market place because adequate but inferior substitutions are available. To some degree, this substitution is possible because paper grades have remained relatively stable. It is time to move the goalposts. If papers were made significantly lighter, or were loaded with mineral fillers significantly beyond today’s levels, Canada’s fine boreal fibre would gain added value, perhaps unique value. We contemplate paper having two-thirds or less of the current basis weights. This would be accomplished by a monolayer “backbone” of softwood fibre, loaded with very short fibres or mineral filler. For good printability, the backbone must leave a small footprint on the scale of a fibre diameter. The reinforcement pulp should enhance not only wet and dry strength, but also paper stiffness. The above calls for a super reinforcing pulp. This might be produced by building on the fibre quality of Canada’s boreal forest using wood segregation, fibre fractionation by coarseness, chemical and mechanical treatments to straighten and de-kink fibres. An additional concept would be to build mineral fillers into pulp fibres in pulp mills. This concept has been explored for papermaking, but , the objective here is to develop it a value-added pulp for papermakers not only by displacing some need for filler in papermaking, but also by controlling fibre collapse to add stiffness to very light papers. Although this concept considers chemical pulp as the reinforcement fibre, it is quite conceivable that mechanical pulps of some species could fill this role as well in the future. The general concept suggested here is one of aggressively developing the northern fibre as a super reinforcement pulp for very light papers to an extent that it is not just an option, but a necessity. In essence, this aims at “moving the goalposts”. While there is no guarantee that this can be accomplished technically, or that a market exists for it, if successful this technology can be transformative.

3.2.3 Chemical Pulping and Co-Products (Biorefinery) The biorefinery concept- the production of energy, fuels and biochemicals along with pulp- is discussed in detail in the White Papers on Bio-energy and Bio-chemicals. The prevailing opinion seems to be that the cellulose fibre will remain an important, perhaps the most important, coproduct of a biorefinery, at least in the near future. This means that pulp quality must be maintained, or if it is degraded, the diminished revenue from its sale must be compensated for in energy or chemical production. Relatively little known is known about how much fibre material can be removed and how specific processes for doing so influence the final product quality. From the perspective of producing high quality pulp as a co-product in a biorefinery, these questions will have to be addressed. If barriers exist, these must be overcome. If successful, co-production of pulp, chemicals, and/or energy is a most attractive option and would be truly a transformative technology.

CFIC Forest Science Policy Forum on Transformative Technologies Regional Workshops Summary Report, May 2006.

93


3.3 Mechanical Pulping and Pulps Canada is a major producer of mechanical pulp, most of which is made into paper in Canada. Its northern fibre is well-suited to mechanical pulping and with hydroelectric power available in many parts of their country; the process is an attractive one for Canada. With the increasing cost of electrical energy, in the future it is likely that only mills with access to hydro or nuclear power will be competitive in mechanical grades, meaning many parts of Canada will be in a preferential position. Nevertheless, there is need for all producers to reduce power consumption in mechanical pulping. Given the importance to Canada, this question is of major interest.

3.3.1 Mechanical Pulping Process Technology Much research has shown that a very strong link exists between energy and pulp quality in conventional mechanical pulping. This suggests that major energy reductions will only come from major process changes. How this might be accomplished is not obvious, but in the interests of being specific, an example worthy of research will be cited here, recognizing that other possibilities exist as well. Recent evidence suggests that energy reductions are possible when part of the mechanical pulping process is carried out at low consistency (LC). Thus far, LC refining has only been employed as modest tertiary refining for fibre development after the first two stages of highconsistency (HC) refining. It is likely that more of the process can n be carried out at low consistency. In an extreme case, chips would be comminuted at high consistency only to the level of enabling transport as slurry though a sequence of LC refiners, each tuned for specific functions in comminution and fibre development. A more likely option is a single high consistency refiner followed by a series of small refiners, each tuned to a specific function in fibre comminution or development. Although this concept does not change the physics of the mechanical pulping process, it could lead to a new level of homogeneity of the process because it has potential for applying modern process control methods not now possible in very large high-consistency refiners. Thus, there could be quality improvements as well as energy savings. Another option, even more attractive and likely more feasible, is the use of LC refining in combination with “semi-mechanical pulp� described in Section 3.3.3. Clearly, these suggestions are speculative, but if successful, they could give a new, wellcontrolled mechanical pulping process using less energy. This would be transformative.

3.3.2 Mechanical Pulp Products: At the present time most mechanical pulp is used for relatively low value-added papers, such as newsprint, or when combined with reinforcing kraft pulp, light-weight coated papers. There has long been a desire to increase the quality of papers made from mechanical pulps. High, stable brightness and greater strength are key requirements for attaining this objective. Even for traditional mechanical grades, high brightness is desirable, and is likely to be more so in the future as paper competes with improving electronic graphics. Past research has made great strides in increasing brightness and decreasing brightness reversion in mechanical pulp. However, this has not led to large-scale advantages in the marketplace. Significant further improvements are needed to create a new generation of valueadded mechanical grades. For example, a stable brightness of 90 ISO or more would be

CFIC Forest Science Policy Forum on Transformative Technologies Regional Workshops Summary Report, May 2006.

94


desirable. This was set as an objective 16 years ago in the Mechanical Wood Pulps Network of Centre of Excellence, but has not yet been attained. It remains a worthy objective. Attainment of this high brightness in mechanical pulps without yield loss would be transformative.

3.3.3 Mechanical Pulping and Biorefinery The yield of current mechanical pulping is in the range 90-95%. This high yield is necessary because the lost material is considered waste. However, as energy costs increase, the use of copious amounts of electrical energy to produce high yield will in all likelihood no longer be justifiable. A paradigm shift is needed. We suggest here a new paradigm of 80% yield mechanical pulps with valuable co-products. This would be a “semi-mechanical� pulp produced by pre-extraction of much of the hemicellulose for production of bio-chemicals or bio-energy. A possible process, suggested in recent work in France and the US, is by dilute oxalic acid pre-treatment. This has given energy reductions of 30% or more in mechanical pulping. More research is needed, for example to address the question of formation of scale formation, but the concept is attractive. This semimechanical pulp could be produced in conventional high consistency refiners, or alternatively in the low consistency refining described in section 3.3.1. Semi-mechanical pulps as described above have other attractions as well. By removing the wood resins, toxic effluents from the mechanical pulping process are reduced or eliminated altogether. Furthermore, in contrast to a biorefinery linked to kraft pulping, in mechanical pulping the energy content of the removed hemicelluloses does not have to be made up from other sources. Clearly, although these suggestions are speculative, the concept of a paradigm shift to lower yield mechanical pulping with valuable co-products is very attractive and would be a transformative technology.

3.4

Papermaking and Papers

Canada’s paper machines tend to be smaller and older than new modern machines. There are numerous innovations which can improve their performance in producing conventional grades, and this is very desirable for short term survival. However, transformative technologies are likely to come from product innovations that exploit natural resource advantages. We consider some examples below.

3.4.1 Ultra-Filled Papers High brightness may be obtained from fibre bleaching, fluorescent dyes, and mineral fillers. Canada has abundant mineral resources that may be used in paper, for example limestone deposits in Ontario and Quebec which are suitable for precipitated calcium carbonate. However, there may be other minerals suitable for paper, which have not yet been discovered. Research on indigenous minerals for paper products may open new opportunities. Papers with high mineral filler content have low strength. For light-weight papers, this strength becomes critical and therefore a chemical dry bonding agent, for example starch, is often added.

CFIC Forest Science Policy Forum on Transformative Technologies Regional Workshops Summary Report, May 2006.

95


It should be possible to produce dry bonding agents in a pulp mill bio-refinery, thereby enabling their use in very large quantities, so as to produce essentially ‘mineral papers’ with only a backbone of pulp fibre. The copious amounts of dry bonding agents required for this could well come from the extracted hemicelluloses of a biorefinery. To achieve this, some scientific questions need to be addressed. For example, hemicellulose is not soluble at all pH values and it may not spontaneously adsorb onto pulp. However, it should be possible to overcome these issues by chemically optimizing hemicellulose extracted in pulp mills for use in papermaking. This use of hemicellulose, or polymers made from them, as dry bonding agents would address another issue related to production of bio-chemicals in pulp mills – developing markets of adequate size. In this application, specifically in an integrated pulp and paper mill, there would be a direct link between production and consumption of bio-chemicals. One may envisage a new generation of printing papers using the superior reinforcing properties of Canadian softwood fibres with abundant calcium carbonate or calcium sulphate, bonded by polymer binders produced in a pulp mill bio-refinery. This illustrates how technologies may be combined in synergistic ways into transformative ones.

3.4.2 Bioactive Papers Biotechnology is a rapidly advancing field with seemingly unlimited potential. It will therefore have a place in the paper industry as a new means of adding functionality and value to paper products. Canada has established a leading role in bioactive papers. The world’s largest university-based research network in the field, called SENTINEL, was inaugurated in 2005 with 24 professors at 10 universities, supported by NSERC, Paprican, and 8 companies. Its purpose is to create technology platforms for paper products to capture, detect, and/or deactivate pathogens. In the coming years, SENTINEL will provide unique opportunities for the paper industry. However, to exploit the scientific advances for economic gain, the research will need to be strengthened in some key areas, in particular at the interface with applications to paper products. It is likely that applications will have to be made though collaborations between companies, Paprican, and the universities. An illustration of a potential product is a disposable virus filter for face masks and buildings. One can imagine a pandemic in which large-scale air filtering is necessary and where filters must be disposed by incineration after short use. Paper filters would seem to be ideal for this. Research on high-specific surface pulp fibres, capturing nano-sized particles, and pathogen detection in paper substrates is currently underway in SENTINEL.

3.5 Packaging One of the greatest transformative technologies in the paper industry during the last century took place in the packaging sector: the development of corrugated boxes to virtually displace wooden crates. This was a paradigm shift of the type now needed to transform the Industry. One can only speculate on how this might come about in the packaging sector. A desirable target would be to replace plastic boxes and plastic inserts. Wood fibre in bulked-up form has excellent insulating and impact resistance. Bulking can be produced by highconsistency (30%) processing of high-yield fibres which can be made to flow well by addition of sodium CMC. Pulps discharge from mechanical pulp refiners at 30% consistency. One can CFIC Forest Science Policy Forum on Transformative Technologies Regional Workshops Summary Report, May 2006.

96


envisage a process using this pulp in an injection molding process to produce small boxes. Although some current biodegradable packing is now made by molding slurries of wood fibre and starch, there is likely further opportunity for small-box manufacture. Means to make wood fibre more resistant to moisture absorption, but at the same time remain recyclable, will have to be found. If not entire boxes, paper-based inserts to replace plastic inserts for insulation and impact resistance in corrugated boxes is another potential product, making the package fully recyclable and biodegradable. Functionality may be added to the inserts, for example by incorporating bioactive sensors for detection of contaminants. Other targets for plastic replacement are liquid packaging containers and returnable plastic containers. In the case of liquid packaging, current practice is to combine paper with other non cellulose impermeable materials to produce barrier properties. An all-cellulose container would be desirable, suggesting a “paper plastic�. This is discussed in the Biochemicals White Paper. To compete with returnable plastic containers, it may be possible to impart additional, attractive features and durability to corrugated boxes to produce returnable containers as opposed to recyclable containers. Paper-based containers may be folded rather than stacked for return. Issues such as season-dependent folding cracking might be addressed by designing or discovering new compounds that are compatible with cellulose and release moisture in summer and absorb moisture in winter. Again, these are specific examples of a general concept—targeting the replacement of plastics in the packaging field. 4. NON-PAPER PRODUCTS The discussion thus far has focused on extensions of conventional pulp and paper processes and products. However, some truly transformative technologies may lie in novel products. Any discussion of these is clearly very speculative, but necessary for the purposes of this white paper. We offer some suggestions below gleaned from various discussions.

4.1 Fibre Composites Wood pulp fibres are currently used as reinforcing fibre for many composites, for example cement reinforcement. An apparent shortcoming to their greater use as a reinforcing fibre is their hydrophilicity. Thus, means to render pulp fibres hydrophobic would expand their possible uses as reinforcing fibre in composites. The potential market for wood-derived reinforcement fibres in plastic-composites has become much larger now that a commodity plastic like polypropylene costs three times as much as wood pulp. Reinforcement can be achieved at various scales, macro, micro or nanoscale, taking advantage of fibre structure already present in trees. The lower cost and higher strength conferred by reinforcement could make this the major new product application so badly needed by the pulp industry.

4.2 Cellulose Nanocrystals Wood fibres themselves are composed cellulose microfibres called fibrils which in turn consist of sub-structure crystals having diameters in the nanometre range. Extreme pulping can liberate CFIC Forest Science Policy Forum on Transformative Technologies Regional Workshops Summary Report, May 2006.

97


these. Being crystalline and defect-free, they are very strong and even in minute amounts can add substantial strength to composite materials. They may have other uses as well, for example in liquids as gelling agents. The potential uses of cellulose nanocrystals depend upon their properties, which differ among wood species. There is a need to fully define the properties of the nanostructures of major Canadian wood species to establish the full potential of their possible uses.

4.3 Fibres for Textiles and Non-Wovens The market for cloth-like materials is huge, raising the question of paper apparel. Indeed, paper has been used for this purpose in the past. Shirts made of paper were common around 1900 and there was a brief resurgence paper clothes in the 1960’s. Today wood fibre is used in some cloth-like materials such as wipes, table cloths, and hospital gowns. One of their key attributes is ease of disposal. The above materials are non-wovens produced by wet or dry forming processes. An alternative is to use wood pulp for woven textiles. Generally wood fibres are too short for roving (making a continuous bundle of fibres by carding for subsequent spinning into yarn), but the long fine strong Canadian fibre such as cedar may have advantages here. Moreover, some recent research in Canada suggests that spinning can be accomplished with wood fibre mixed with some long fibre (flax) at high consistency (20%). An alternative process to produce textiles, used in the past, may be of renewed interest as a basis for further development. The process consists of bonding fibres into paper, and then cutting paper into narrow strips, which are then spun into yarns by modified textile machinery. In essence, this is a combination of pulp, paper, and textile technology. It was used for making inexpensive, disposable yarns and ropes. Further development of this concept might lead to new generation of forest-fibre based textiles.

4.4 Paper-Based Building Products Canada’s large solid wood sector for the most part produces building materials. There may be possible synergies with the paper sector in the creation of “Green Buildings”. Paper can be used as the basis for light-weight, portable, and in some cases disposable building and furniture products. An example is SOFTWALL ™, an innovative, decorative, selfstanding paper partition developed by a company in Vancouver, but regrettably fabricated in the US. This company also makes decorative chairs and tables from softwood kraft pulp. These are examples of innovative products with a high design component. Another potential product from wood fibre is insulation. Dry, fluffed cellulose fibre has one of the highest insulation ratings of any material. Indeed, shredded paper was used for many years in the prairies as ad hoc insulation. During the energy crisis of the 1970’s, efforts were underway develop wood fibre for insulation by treating it with fire retardant and anti-fungal agents. With looming energy shortages, it may be timely to this revisit this potential for value-added products, perhaps in the form of lightly-bonded, high-bulk, pads which are easily cut and fit into building panels and temporary shelters.

CFIC Forest Science Policy Forum on Transformative Technologies Regional Workshops Summary Report, May 2006.

98


5. BARRIERS TO IMPLEMENTATION i.

The technologies discussed in this white paper have significant impediments to implementation, both technical and commercial. Technical feasibility is a matter to be addressed by scientific research and development. Commercial risk will be significant and should be managed by shrewd assessment at each stage of development in the normal way.

ii.

An important barrier is the reduced R&D resources within pulp and paper companies in Canada. Enhanced capabilities for new product development are needed in the Industry. New process technology is also needed to produce the new products. Enhanced capabilities for this must be developed as well. The required capabilities in both cases encompass a wide range of non-technical skills as well as technical skills which have not been emphasized in recent years, e.g. wood and cellulose chemistry.

iii.

Organizational barriers of various types must be overcome. There will be a need for interactions with other industrial sectors, such as energy, chemicals, food production and textiles. There will also be a need for interactions among industries with differing cultures (open or secret) and scales of operation (global to start-up).

iv.

Regulatory issues form some barriers, for example in optimizing forestry practices for industrial needs along with societal needs.

v.

A poor public image of the Industry is also a barrier in some respects. It often hinders the recruitment of highly qualified personnel. It also makes government recognition of the Industry’s needs more difficult, although mill closures and resulting economic dislocation in small communities may change this.

ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS The authors gratefully acknowledge the support of PAPIER’s Council of Directors, consisting of the directors of Canada’s seven pulp and paper centres and the VP Research and Education of Paprican, and wish to specifically acknowledge the contributions of the following individuals to one or both white papers on pulp and paper and biochemicals: Edgar Acosta, Grant Allen, Chad Bennington, Richard Berry, Clark Binkley, Yaman Boluk, Tom Browne, Malcolm Campbell, Felisa Chan, Guy Dumont, Esteban Chornet, Peter Englezos, Ramin Farnood, Roger Gaudreault, Richard Gratton, Derek Gray, Jean Hamel, George Ionides, François Jette, John Kadla, Masahiro Kawaji, Tibor Kovacs, George Kubes, Peter Lancaster, Todd MacAllen, Leon Magdzinski, Vankatram Mahendraker, Patrice Mangin, Emma Master, David McDonald, Yonghao Ni, James Olson, Mike Paice, Michael Paleologou, Harshad Pande, Robert Pelton, Ivan Pikulik, Ken Pinder, Doug Reeve, Marc Sabourin, Mohini Sain, Brad Saville, John Schmidt, Malcolm Smith, Paul Stuart, Ted Szabo, Mike Towers, Honghi Tran, Vic Uloth, Adrian van Heiningen, Paul Watson, Ning Yan, Xiao Zhang.

CFIC Forest Science Policy Forum on Transformative Technologies Regional Workshops Summary Report, May 2006.

99


B-2 Livre Blanc : Technologies Transformantes — Pâtes et Papiers

LIVRE BLANC SUR LES TECHNOLOGIES TRANSFORMANTES POUR LES PRODUITS DE PÂTES ET PAPIERS ET LEURS PROCEDES DE FABRICATION présenté au Conseil canadien de l’innovation forestière par PAPIER le Réseau canadien de pâtes et papiers pour l’innovation en éducation et en recherche

Préparé par R. J. Kerekes et A. Garner

SOMMAIRE ANALYTIQUE Le présent Livre blanc examine les technologies transformantes possibles pour le secteur des pâtes et papiers de l’industrie forestière du Canada. Dans la mesure du possible, il met l’accent sur les technologies pour lesquelles le Canada jouit d’un avantage par rapport à ses concurrents. Cette étude porte sur une toute gamme des produits de la forêt, des matières brutes aux produits finis, et elle examine la possibilité d’utiliser diverses technologies transformantes en fonction des objectifs suivants : Pratiques forestières : Nouveaux outils de détection et de surveillance permettant de transformer les techniques de gestion du flux des produits de la forêt, grâce à des connaissances détaillées sur la qualité du bois et des fibres, afin d’augmenter le plus possible les marges de production des produits finis; méthodes de surveillance et d’enregistrement nécessaires pour l’établissement d’une chaîne de possession certifiée pour les produits, de leur production en forêt à leur recyclage, et techniques de sélection des semis et de génomique destinées à obtenir des fibres aux caractéristiques souhaitées. Réduction en pâte chimique : Pâte très renforcée pour la production de qualités de papier léger à base de fibres de résineux boréaux. Réduction en pâte mécanique : Changement de paradigme afin d’obtenir un rendement de pâte mécanique de 80 % avec un procédé de raffinage à faible consistance, combiné à un prétraitement des copeaux pour en extraire des coproduits chimiques de valeur. Fabrication du papier : Papiers à forte charge minérale, liés par des polymères obtenus par bioraffinage. Emballage et nouveaux produits : Contenants moulés, produits composites, textiles, meubles décoratifs, panneautage de construction, papiers bioactifs.

CFIC Forest Science Policy Forum on Transformative Technologies Regional Workshops Summary Report, May 2006.

100


On a identifié des obstacles d’ordre technique et organisationnel qui s’opposent au développement et à la mise en oeuvre de ces technologies transformantes. 1. INFLUENCES DU MARCHÉ Le secteur des pâtes et papiers de l’industrie forestière fournit une vaste gamme de matières renouvelables et durables qui contribuent au bien-être de l’humanité. Dans la plupart des pays industrialisés, il s’agit d’une industrie importante, qui connaît une croissance rapide dans certaines régions clés du monde développé. Toutefois, au Canada, il est confronté aujourd’hui à des défis de taille, à cause d’un rendement du capital trop faible depuis de nombreuses années; dans certains cas, le taux de réinvestissement a chuté sous le taux de dépréciation. Chacun des trois secteurs de cette industrie, les papiers pour équipements de communication, les emballages et les produits d’hygiène à base de papier sont menacés, d’une façon ou d’une autre. Dans le cas des papiers pour équipements de communication, des nouveaux concurrents utilisant des fibres peu coûteuses produites en plantation, de la main-d'œuvre bon marché et des technologies modernes de fabrication des pâtes et papiers ont changé cette industrie partout dans le monde. Ainsi, on note une érosion des avantages historiques du Canada (fibres de qualité supérieure, abondance de l’énergie et abondance des approvisionnements en eau). On note aussi un déclin de la demande pour certaines qualités de papier à cause de l’utilisation croissante des médias électroniques. Dans le secteur de l’emballage et du conditionnement, on constate que, de plus en plus, les grandes boîtes sont fabriquées à l’étranger; à cette perte de marché s’ajoute une plus grande compétition des industries des sacs de plastique et des contenants de plastique consignés. Dans le secteur des produits l’hygiène, les nouvelles fibres synthétiques superabsorbantes ont remplacé la pâte de bois, en tout ou en partie, dans des produits comme les couches et les serviettes pour incontinents. En plus de ces défis, les coûts de l’énergie se sont accrus notablement, et on ne s’attend pas à ce qu’ils reviennent aux niveaux antérieurs. De plus, il faut tenir compte des pénuries de pétrole attendues. Il y a aussi des problèmes liés à la structure de l’industrie canadienne des pâtes et papiers. Les grandes entreprises qui ont leur siège social au Canada sont relativement petites, par rapport aux grandes entreprises d’envergure mondiale. Habituellement, elles ne font que peu d’activités de R et D à l’interne, malgré leur contribution importante à Paprican. De plus, une portion significative de cette industrie appartient à des grandes multinationales, dont les installations de R et D sont situées à l’extérieur du Canada. Dans cette conjecture, il faut une nouvelle vision pour l’industrie canadienne des pâtes et papiers. Elle doit passer de sa position trop marquée de fournisseur de diverses qualités de produits à celle de chef de file mondial pour le développement de nouveaux produits et marchés basés sur les caractéristiques uniques des fibres canadiennes. De plus, elle doit reconquérir les marchés perdus et relancer les produits délogés par l’arrivée sur le marché des produits de plastique au cours des dernières décennies. La convergence de ces changements nécessaires et de la recrudescence de nouveaux problèmes d’approvisionnement en énergie et en pétrole représente un autre défi, mais elle constitue en même temps une occasion d’affaires unique.

CFIC Forest Science Policy Forum on Transformative Technologies Regional Workshops Summary Report, May 2006.

101


Dans ce contexte, il semble que les coproduits des pâtes et papiers devraient jouer un rôle important dans la transformation du secteur des pâtes et papiers. La forêt peut redevenir ce qu’elle était avant le développement de l’industrie du pétrole, c’est-à-dire une importante source d’énergie, de produits chimiques et de matières de base pour la fabrication de polymères, en plus de continuer à nous approvisionner en pâtes et papiers. C’est ce qu’on appelle le « bioraffinage », un procédé selon lequel la biomasse est convertie en plusieurs flux de produits comme des fibres, des produits chimiques et de l’énergie, en diverses combinaisons. Ces changements se réaliseront par le développement et la mise en oeuvre de technologies transformantes innovatrices, du milieu forestier aux produits finals et à leur distribution. L’objectif de ce Livre blanc est d’examiner toute une gamme de technologies transformantes pour la réalisation de cet objectif. 2.

POSSIBILITES TECHNOLOGIQUES POUR LE SECTEUR FORESTIER DU CANADA

Introduction Historiquement, la plupart des technologies de base utilisées pour la fabrication des pâtes et papiers étaient ouvertes et accessibles. Ainsi, les nouveaux venus dans cette industrie pouvaient commencer leurs opérations sans devoir recourir à des partenariats avec d’autres entreprises déjà établies, contrairement à ce qui se passe, par exemple, dans l’industrie du pétrole. Donc, en examinant les technologies transformantes, nous devons faire la distinction entre celles qui devraient procurer des avantages généraux à l’industrie papetière du monde entier, et celles qui peuvent donner au Canada des avantages uniques, sinon préférentiels. Sans cette distinction, les technologies transformantes, même si elles sont utiles à l’industrie mondiale, pourraient bien avoir un effet nul sur la position concurrentielle du secteur forestier canadien, voire même, dans certains cas, renforcer nos compétiteurs. Les technologies brevetées sont un moyen qui permet d’obtenir un avantage concurrentiel. Si cela n’est pas possible, comme c’est souvent le cas dans l’industrie papetière, on peut se tourner vers des technologies qui, pour une raison ou une autre, avantagent les entreprises canadiennes par rapport à leurs concurrents. On a noté des cas d’avantages régionaux dus à des technologies qui permettent d’exploiter un avantage naturel peu commun dans les autres pays. Il peut s’agir, par exemple, de technologies de la manipulation de la poix des pins dans le sud des États-Unis, de techniques de développement d’essences d’eucalyptus mieux adaptées aux plantations forestières du Brésil ou de techniques de ségrégation du bois en NouvelleZélande, qui ont permis d’améliorer la compétitivité du secteur des pâtes et papiers de ces pays. Le Livre blanc s’est donné pour but, chaque fois que cela est possible, d’identifier les technologies qui représentent un avantage naturel pour le Canada. Le type d’avantages produit par les technologies transformantes peut varier. Il peut s’agir, par exemple, d’abaisser quelque peu le coût de production de certains produits. À moins que cela puisse se faire par l’application d’une technologie brevetée, et peut-être même dans ce cas, il ne s’agit pas d’une voie prometteuse pour le Canada. Un autre type d’avantage possible est une série d’améliorations par étapes de qualités habituelles de papier. Bien que ce processus soit souhaitable et même nécessaire à court terme, il ne s’agit pas d’une technologie transformante comme telle. Une autre possibilité consiste à fabriquer de nouveaux produits de fibres en utilisant de l’énergie et des agents chimiques coproduits. Il s’agit là d’une des technologies transformantes qui sera examinée dans le présent document, qui doit aussi examiner tous les aspects des technologies des pâtes et papiers.

CFIC Forest Science Policy Forum on Transformative Technologies Regional Workshops Summary Report, May 2006.

102


3.

POSSIBILITES D’APPLICATION DE TECHNOLOGIES SPÉCIFIQUES 3.1 La foresterie et les pratiques d’exploitation forestière

Il est d’usage de considérer que la production de pâtes et papiers commence à la porte de l’usine. Toutefois, il faut bien reconnaître que c’est la forêt qui est le véritable point de départ de la chaîne d’approvisionnement en fibres. Tous les éléments de la chaîne d’approvisionnement en fibres sont des intrants importants qui déterminent la qualité et le coût des produits de papier. Pourtant, les étapes de l’exploitation forestière et du transport de ces produits comptent pour plus de la moitié des coûts du bois livré à l’usine. Au Canada, on obtient les fibres à partir des forêts naturelles, plutôt qu’à partir de plantations de bois de trituration, comme c’est le cas pour certains concurrents étrangers. De plus, environ la moitié des matières premières traitées par les usines de pâte canadiennes provient de résidus du secteur des produits du bois. Ces divers facteurs sont à l’origine d’une certaine variabilité qui, bien qu’elle soit un peu atténuée par des différences du rapport bois initial/bois final plus petites que celles observées pour les bois du Sud, est souvent nuisible à la qualité du produit. De plus, cette variabilité peut diminuer la valeur de la pâte. Par exemple, la présence de moins de 5 % de fibres à parois très épaisses peut être à l’origine de défauts locaux de surface dans des papiers qui devraient être de qualité supérieure. La grande diversité des essences d’arbres dans les forêts canadiennes pourrait très bien devenir un avantage, plutôt qu’un inconvénient. La sélection des propriétés des fibres des diverses essences (une seule essence ou un mélange d’essences) en fonction des caractéristiques requises pour une meilleure performance pourrait servir de base pour le développement de nouvelles plates-formes de production. Des nouvelles technologies sont nécessaires pour faire face à cette variabilité et pour sélectionner des essences particulières dans une forêt. Il faut aussi des outils rapides pour évaluer les volumes d’arbres sur pied et en grumes, ainsi que des technologies de télédétection pour une meilleure identification de la qualité des peuplements. De la forêt à l’usine, il faut des systèmes de surveillance plus perfectionnés que les codes de barre ou que les systèmes d’identification par radiofréquences (RFID). Ces systèmes devraient utiliser des outils perfectionnés d’analyse d’imagerie et être reliés par modélisation en temps réel de la chaîne de valorisation, afin de maximiser la valeur de la récolte. Dans leur ensemble, ces systèmes constituent une transformation radicale de la gestion du flux des produits du bois, qui devrait créer toute une gamme de nouvelles occasions d’affaires fondées sur une plus grande valeur des produits du bois et du papier qui sont fabriqués. Un deuxième avantage de cette transformation est qu’elle doit permettre la surveillance du bois et des fibres au-delà de l’usine, jusqu’au produit final et à son recyclage. On pourrait ainsi répondre à une demande croissante des consommateurs, qui réclament non seulement des pratiques forestières pouvant être certifiées, mais aussi une chaîne de possession des fibres certifiée. Enfin, bien que la question des pratiques de plantation forestière se situe en dehors du cadre de ce Livre blanc, il faut aborder la question des pratiques forestières requises pour obtenir certaines propriétés souhaitées pour les produits finis, tant pour les composés biochimiques que pour les pâtes et papiers. Cela soulève la question des « forêts fonctionnelles » affectées aux utilisations industrielles, et celle des forêts naturelles réservées aux loisirs, aux habitats fauniques et à d’autres usages. L’un des points chauds est le rôle possible de technologies

CFIC Forest Science Policy Forum on Transformative Technologies Regional Workshops Summary Report, May 2006.

103


fondées sur la génomique, par exemple, destinées à réduire le nombre d’années requis pour la maturation des arbres dans les régions nordiques ou, ce qui est tout aussi important, à obtenir des fibres à caractéristiques spécifiques, en fonction de leur utilisation finale. En bref, il faut axer les programmes de génomique sur la qualité des produits finis, grâce à une bonne connaissance de l’état des forêts et du fonctionnement des gènes. Les efforts provinciaux de sélection et de replantation en fonction de la descendance exploitent déjà la variabilité naturelle qui existe dans les forêts canadiennes. L’inclusion de paramètres de la qualité du bois comme critères de sélection ferait de ce processus une technologie transformante, grâce aux outils d’évaluation rapides fondés sur la génomique maintenant disponibles. 3.2 La réduction en pâte chimique et les pâtes Il y a environ 50 usines de pâte chimique au Canada, dont environ la moitié sont des usines de pâte commerciale et l’autre moitié, des usines de pâtes et papiers intégrées. Leur production moyenne est d’environ 900 tonnes/jour, ce qui correspond à environ le tiers de celle des nouvelles usines modernes. Environ 25 % de ces usines ont été construites au cours des années 1960, et seulement quatre d’entre elles au cours des 25 dernières années. Il est clair que ces usines sont petites et vétustes par rapport aux grandes usines modernes. L’une des options possibles est de fermer les vieilles usines et de les remplacer par un petit nombre de grandes usines modernes. Dans beaucoup de régions du Canada, les conditions économiques actuelles ne justifient pas cette option ni pour le moment, ni pour l’avenir prévisible. C’est dans ce cadre de travail que nous examinons la question des innovations technologiques. 3.2.1

Innovations des procédés pour les produits actuels

Le procédé kraft est un processus très efficace qui nécessite un important apport en capitaux pour la production de fibres très résistantes à partir de copeaux de bois. Toutefois, les deux tiers des coûts sont dus à la régénération des produits chimiques utilisés pour réduire le bois en pâte et à la production de l’énergie requise par le procédé. Il faut améliorer ce procédé et utiliser des innovations technologiques afin de diminuer les coûts de production des produits actuels pour la survie à court terme de ces usines, mais cette stratégie n’est pas viable à long terme. De plus, ces changements ne font pas appel à des technologies transformantes. On pourrait envisager des procédés de réduction en pâte radicalement nouveaux, sans soufre, par exemple la réduction en pâte dans des conditions supercritiques. Ces procédés pourraient être intéressants, notamment dans le contexte de la coproduction de composés biochimiques. Aussi, ces options seront examinées dans le Livre blanc sur les produits biochimiques. 3.2.2

Innovations pour les produits de pâte chimique : Changer les règles du jeu

La pâte kraft blanchie de résineux de l’hémisphère nord du Canada est reconnue comme étant la meilleure pâte renforcée du monde. Les papetiers la mélangent à des pâtes moins résistantes et à des matières de charge minérales pour renforcer les papiers, notamment les papiers légers. Ses caractéristiques de renforcement viennent du fait que ses fibres sont longues, fines et fortes. Malheureusement, les prix du marché n’offrent que peu ou pas d’incitants pour cette pâte, parce qu’il existe des substituts adéquats, mais inférieurs. Jusqu’à un certain degré, leur emploi a été rendu possible parce que les qualités de papier sont restées relativement stables. Il est donc temps de changer les règles du jeu.

CFIC Forest Science Policy Forum on Transformative Technologies Regional Workshops Summary Report, May 2006.

104


Si on fabriquait des papiers notablement plus légers, ou qui comportaient beaucoup plus de matières de charge minérales que les papiers actuels, les fibres boréales fines auraient une valeur ajoutée, et peut-être unique. Nous envisageons la possibilité de fabriquer un papier allégé des deux tiers, au maximum. À cette fin, il combinerait une monocouche de fibres de résineux, utilisée comme support, à une charge à fibres très courtes et de type minéral. Pour de bonnes caractéristiques d’impression, le support ne doit avoir que peu d’effets à l’échelle du diamètre des fibres. De plus, il faut maintenir la rigidité du papier. À cette fin, il faut une pâte ultrarenforcée, qu’on pourrait obtenir en tablant sur la qualité supérieure des fibres de la forêt boréale canadienne et en utilisant des techniques de ségrégation du bois ou de fractionnement des fibres selon leur grosseur, ainsi que des traitements chimiques et mécaniques pour redresser et dégauchir les fibres. Selon un autre concept, on pourrait rajouter en usine des matières de charge minérales dans les fibres de pâte, par exemple en introduisant des matières de charge dans le lumen des fibres ou en y précipitant du carbonate de calcium. Bien entendu, ces technologies ont déjà été explorées, mais on vise leur développement et leur optimisation pour la production des pâtes commerciales, plutôt que dans le cadre plus général des procédés de fabrication du papier. Ainsi, on pourrait produire une pâte à valeur ajoutée pour les papetiers non seulement en éliminant un certain besoin de matières de charge pour la fabrication du papier, mais également par l’utilisation de fibres moins effondrées, qui pourraient augmenter la rigidité des papiers très légers. Bien que ce selon ce concept, on utilise la pâte chimique comme source de fibres de renforcement, il est tout à fait concevable que des pâtes mécaniques obtenues avec certaines essences puissent jouer ce même rôle. Le concept général présenté ici consiste à développer résolument une superpâte renforcée à partir des fibres boréales, afin d’obtenir un papier très léger qui ne soit pas seulement une option, mais qui arrive à s’imposer. Bref, il s’agit de changer les règles du jeu, ni plus ni moins. Même si rien ne garantit la réussite de cette entreprise, en cas de succès, il s’agirait bel et bien d’une technologie transformante. 3.2.3 Réduction en pâte chimique et coproduits (bioraffinage) Le concept du bioraffinage – qui fait appel à la production simultanée d’énergie, de combustibles et de composés biochimiques avec la pâte - est examiné en détail dans les livres blancs sur la bioénergie et sur les produits biochimiques. De l’avis général, les fibres de cellulose devraient continuer à être un important coproduit de bioraffinage, et peut-être même le plus important, au moins pour l’avenir rapproché. Donc, il faut maintenir la qualité de la pâte ou, si celle-ci est dégradée, il faut compenser les pertes de revenus de vente par la production d’énergie ou de produits chimiques. On sait relativement peu de choses sur la quantité de fibres qui peut être retirée du processus et sur l’influence réelle des modifications proposées sur la qualité finale du produit. Il faut tâcher de répondre à ces questions en considérant la pâte de grande qualité comme un coproduit de bioraffinage. Pour ce faire, il y aura sans doute des obstacles à surmonter. Si elle est réalisée, la coproduction de pâte, de composés chimiques et/ou de l’énergie, qui une véritable technologie transformante, est une option très intéressante.

CFIC Forest Science Policy Forum on Transformative Technologies Regional Workshops Summary Report, May 2006.

105


3.3 La réduction en pâte mécanique et les pâtes Le Canada est un important producteur de pâte mécanique, dont la plus grande partie sert à la fabrication de papier ici même. Ce procédé est intéressant pour le Canada parce que ses fibres boréales se prêtent bien à la réduction en pâte mécanique et qu’il y a de l’énergie hydroélectrique bon marché dans de nombreuses régions du pays. Toutefois, il est probable qu’au cours des années à venir, seulement les usines qui ont accès à l’énergie hydroélectrique ou nucléaire seront compétitives pour la production des diverses qualités de pâte mécanique. Il importe donc de réduire la consommation d’énergie du procédé; étant donné son importance au Canada, cette question est primordiale. 3.3.1 Technologie du procédé mécanique de réduction en pâte Bon nombre d’études ont indiqué l’existence d’un lien très fort entre l’énergie et la qualité de la pâte obtenues par les procédés habituels de réduction du bois en pâte mécanique. Pour cette raison, il semble que des changements substantiels seront nécessaires au niveau du procédé afin d’obtenir d’importantes réductions de la consommation d’énergie. La réalisation de cet objectif n’est pas évidente, mais, puisqu’il faut apporter des exemples concrets, nous présentons ci-dessous une réalisation digne de mention, tout en étant bien conscients qu’il existe d’autres possibilités. Des études récentes semblent indiquer que des réductions de la consommation d’énergie sont possibles si une partie du procédé mécanique de réduction du bois en pâte est effectué à une faible consistance (FC). Jusqu’à ce jour, on n’a utilisé le raffinage FC que comme traitement tertiaire pour le développement des fibres, après les deux premières étapes de raffinage à haute consistance (HC). Il se peut que presque tout le procédé puisse être effectué à faible consistance. Dans ce cas, les copeaux seraient déchiquetés à haute consistance seulement quand il faut les acheminer sous forme de bouillie à travers une série d’appareils de raffinage FC, dont chacun est réglé pour des fonctions spécifiques de déchiquetage et de développement des fibres. Ainsi, au lieu de deux ou trois très grandes usines de raffinage à haute consistance, il est possible d’envisager un nouveau procédé mécanique de réduction en pâte constitué par une série de petites installations de raffinage, dont chacune serait optimisée pour une étape spécifique des processus de déchiquetage et de développement des fibres. Bien que ce concept ne change pas les caractéristiques physiques du procédé mécanique de réduction en pâte, il est probable qu’il rendra possible des améliorations de la qualité et de l’utilisation de l’énergie grâce à des facteurs comme une plus grande homogénéité du procédé et un contrôle beaucoup plus grand, comme celui qui est possible dans les très grandes installations de raffinage à haute consistance, à l’aide de méthodes modernes de régulation des procédés. Une autre option, qui semble même attrayante et probablement plus facile à réaliser, est l’utilisation du raffinage FC avec la pâte « semi-mécanique » décrite dans la section 3.5. Il est clair que les concepts présentés ci-dessus sont encore au stade théorique, mais leur réalisation permettrait d’obtenir un nouveau procédé mécanique de réduction en pâte bien contrôlé, moins énergivore. Il s’agirait d’une véritable technologie transformante.

CFIC Forest Science Policy Forum on Transformative Technologies Regional Workshops Summary Report, May 2006.

106


3.3.2 Produits de pâte mécanique Actuellement, la plus grande partie de la pâte mécanique est utilisée pour fabriquer de produits de papier à valeur ajoutée relativement faible, par exemple le papier journal, ou, si elle est combinée à de la pâte kraft renforcée, pour fabriquer du papier couché mince. Depuis longtemps, on souhaite améliorer la qualité du papier fabriqué à partir des pâtes mécaniques. Pour atteindre cet objectif, il faut un produit qui répond à des exigences clés comme une blancheur élevée et stable, et une plus grande résistance. Même dans le cas des qualités ordinaires de pâte mécanique, une grande blancheur est souhaitable, et il est probable que cette exigence deviendra encore plus importante au cours des années à venir parce que le papier est en compétition avec des moyens d’affichage électronique qui s’améliorent constamment. Grâce à la recherche, on note d’immenses progrès pour ce qui est de l’accroissement de la blancheur et de la diminution de la perte de blancheur des pâtes mécaniques. Toutefois, ces succès n’ont pas permis d’obtenir des avantages importants sur le marché. D’autres améliorations significatives sont nécessaires pour créer une nouvelle génération de qualités de pâtes mécaniques à valeur ajoutée. Par exemple, une blancheur stable de 90 ISO ou plus serait souhaitable. C’était l’objectif établi il y a seize ans pour le réseau des pâtes de bois mécaniques du Centre d’excellence, et il n’a pas encore été atteint. Cet objectif reste valable, et pour le réaliser sans perte de rendement, il faudrait une véritable technologie transformante. 3.3.3 Réduction en pâte mécanique et bioraffinage Le rendement du procédé actuel de réduction en pâte mécanique de l’ordre de 90 à 95 %. Ce rendement élevé est l’une des principales caractéristiques de ce procédé parce que les matières perdues sont considérées comme des déchets. Toutefois, à mesure que les coûts de l’énergie augmentent, il semble qu’on ne pourra plus justifier l’utilisation de grandes quantités d’énergie électrique requises pour obtenir ce rendement élevé. Un changement de paradigme s’impose. Nous proposons donc un nouveau paradigme : limiter à 80 % le rendement des pâtes mécaniques, avec lesquelles on obtiendrait des coproduits de valeur. À cette fin, on pourrait fabriquer une pâte semi-mécanique obtenue par la préextraction de la plus grande partie de l’hémicellulose, qui servirait à la production de composés biochimiques ou de biocombustibles. Un procédé possible, sur lequel ont porté des travaux récents effectués en France et aux ÉtatsUnis, utilise un prétraitement à l’acide oxalique dilué qui réduit de 30 % ou plus la consommation d’énergie pour la réduction en pâte mécanique. Même si d’autres travaux de recherche sont nécessaires, par exemple à cause de formation de problèmes d’entartrage, ce concept semble intéressant. Cette pâte semi-mécanique pourrait être produite dans des usines de raffinage à haute consistance ordinaires, mais, étant donné leur plus faible besoin en énergie, cette solution serait encore plus attrayante pour le raffinage à faible consistance décrit dans la section 3.4. Les pâtes semi-mécaniques décrites ci-dessus pourraient présenter d’autres avantages. L’élimination des résines du bois permet de diminuer ou d’éliminer en même temps les effluents toxiques du procédé mécanique de réduction en pâte. En outre, contrairement au bioraffinage utilisé pour la réduction en pâte kraft, pour la réduction en pâte mécanique, il n’est pas nécessaire de compenser par d’autres sources la réduction de la teneur en énergie due à l’enlèvement des hémicelluloses.

CFIC Forest Science Policy Forum on Transformative Technologies Regional Workshops Summary Report, May 2006.

107


Même si ces suggestions sont encore d’ordre théorique, il est clair qu’un changement de paradigme, qui vise à diminuer le rendement du procédé de réduction en pâte mécanique et à obtenir simultanément des coproduits de valeur, est un concept digne d’intérêt, qui constituerait une authentique technologie transformante. 3.4 La fabrication du papier et les papiers Les machines à papier du Canada ont tendance à être plus petites et plus anciennes que les nouvelles machines modernes. De nombreuses innovations peuvent améliorer leur performance pour la production des qualités classiques de papier, ce qui est très souhaitable pour la survie à court terme de nos entreprises. Toutefois, des technologies transformantes devraient vraisemblablement être développées pour tirer parti des innovations qui exploitent des avantages propres à nos ressources naturelles. Nous examinons quelques exemples de ces innovations ci-dessous. 3.4.1 Papiers à très forte charge On peut obtenir une grande blancheur par le blanchissement des fibres et par l’emploi d’azurants fluorescents et de matières de charge minérales. Le Canada dispose d’abondantes ressources minérales qui peuvent être utilisées pour la fabrication du papier, par exemple des gisements de calcaire en Ontario et au Québec, qu’on peut utiliser pour la précipitation du carbonate de calcium. Toutefois, il peut y avoir d’autres minéraux convenables pour la fabrication du papier, mais qui n’ont pas encore été découverts. Les recherches de minéraux canadiens pouvant servir à la fabrication des produits de papier pourraient créer de nouvelles occasions d’affaires. Les papiers à teneur élevée en matières de charge minérales ont une faible résistance. Dans le cas des papiers légers, cette résistance est critique et rend souvent nécessaire l’ajout d’un agent adhésif sec, par exemple de l’amidon. Il devrait être possible de produire des agents adhésifs secs dans une bioraffinerie de pâte, ce qui ouvrirait à voie à leur utilisation en très grandes quantités pour la fabrication d’un « papier essentiellement minéral », composé d’un simple support de fibres de pâte. Les grandes quantités d’agents adhésifs secs requises à cette fin pourraient bien provenir des hémicelluloses extraites par le procédé de bioraffinage. À cette fin, il faut résoudre les difficultés mises en évidence par certains chercheurs. Par exemple, l’hémicellulose n’est pas soluble à toutes les valeurs de pH et pourrait ne pas s’adsorber spontanément dans la pâte. Toutefois, il devrait être possible de surmonter ces difficultés par une optimisation chimique de l’hémicellulose extraite dans les usines de pâte afin de faciliter leur incorporation dans le papier. Cette utilisation de l’hémicellulose ou de polymères fabriqués à partir de celle-ci, sous forme d’agents adhésifs secs, résoudrait un autre problème lié à la production des composés biochimiques dans les usines de pâte, qui est de développer des marchés de taille adéquate. Dans cette application, et plus particulièrement dans le cas d’une usine de pâtes et papiers intégrée, il existerait un lien direct entre la production et la consommation des composés biochimiques. On peut envisager l’arrivée d’une nouvelle génération de papiers d’impression utilisant les propriétés supérieures de renforcement des fibres de résineux canadiens, ainsi que de grandes quantités de carbonate ou de sulfate de calcium, liées par des liants polymériques produits dans une bioraffinerie de pâtes. Cet exemple illustre comment on peut combiner diverses technologies de façon synergique afin de créer des technologies transformantes.

CFIC Forest Science Policy Forum on Transformative Technologies Regional Workshops Summary Report, May 2006.

108


3.4.2 Papiers bioactifs Le domaine des biotechnologies progresse rapidement et ses possibilités sont apparemment illimitées. II devrait donc avoir sa place dans l’industrie papetière pour la mise en œuvre de nouvelles technologies à fonctionnalités inédites, pour la fabrication de produits de papier à valeur ajoutée. Le Canada d’est taillé un rôle de chef de file dans le domaine des papiers bioactifs. SENTINEL, le plus grand réseau de recherche universitaire du monde, a été inauguré en 2005. Il regroupe 24 professeurs dans 10 universités et bénéficie de l’aide du CRSNG, de Paprican et de huit entreprises. Son but est de créer des plates-formes technologiques pour la fabrication de produits de papier destinés à capturer, à détecter et/ou à désactiver des agents pathogènes. Au cours des prochaines années, SENTINEL doit créer des occasions d’affaires uniques pour l’industrie papetière. Toutefois, afin d’exploiter les avancées de la recherche de manière à réaliser des gains économiques, il faut accroître les recherches dans certains secteurs clés, notamment au niveau de l’interface avec les applications, dans le cas des produits de papier. Il est vraisemblable que ces applications devront être réalisées dans le cadre de projets en collaboration regroupant les entreprises, Paprican et les universités. Un exemple de produit possible est un filtre antivirus jetable pour les masques faciaux et les bâtiments. On peut concevoir une pandémie au cours de laquelle on aura vraisemblablement besoin de filtres à l’air à grand volume utilisant des filtres qu’on peut éliminer par incinération après une courte période d’utilisation. Il semble que des filtres en papier seraient tout indiqués pour cette application. Actuellement, SENTINEL effectue des recherches sur des fibres de pâtes à grande surface spécifique, qui peuvent capter des nanoparticules, ainsi que sur des substrats de papier pouvant servir à la détection d’agents pathogènes. 3.5 Les matériaux d’emballage Au cours du siècle dernier, on a observé l’une des plus grandes transformations technologiques de l’industrie papetière dans le secteur de l’emballage et du conditionnement : le développement des boîtes de carton ondulé a permis de remplacer pratiquement toute la production des caisses de bois. C’est un autre changement de paradigme de cette envergure qui est maintenant requis pour transformer l’industrie de l’emballage et du conditionnement. On se perd en conjectures sur les formes que pourrait prendre ce changement dans ce secteur. L’un des objectifs souhaitables pourrait être le remplacement des boîtes et des garnitures de plastique. Les fibres de bois en vrac ont d’excellentes propriétés d’isolation et de protection contre les impacts. On peut les obtenir par le traitement à haute consistance (30 %) de fibres à haut rendement dont on peut améliorer les caractéristiques d’écoulement par l’addition de CMC sodium. Les pâtes produites par les raffineries de pâte mécanique ont une consistance de 30%. On peut envisager un procédé utilisant cette pâte dans un procédé de moulage par injection pour la production de petites boîtes. Bien que certains emballages biodégradables existants soient fabriqués à partir de bouillies de moulage composées de fibres de bois et d’amidon, il y a vraisemblablement d’autres possibilités pour la fabrication des petites boîtes. Il faut trouver des techniques pour la production de fibres de bois résistant mieux à l’absorption d’humidité, tout en restant recyclables.

CFIC Forest Science Policy Forum on Transformative Technologies Regional Workshops Summary Report, May 2006.

109


Même s’il ne s’agit pas de boîtes complètes, les garnitures pour boîtes à base de papier, destinées à remplacer les garnitures de plastique pour isoler et améliorer la résistance à l’impact des boîtes de carton ondulé, sont un autre produit possible, qui rend l’emballage entièrement recyclable et biodégradable. On peut leur rajouter des fonctionnalités, par exemple en y incorporant des capteurs bioactifs pour la détection de contaminants. Il y a d’autres cibles pour les produits de remplacement du plastique, par exemple les emballages pour liquides et les contenants en plastique consignés. Dans le cas des emballages pour liquides, les pratiques actuelles consistent à combiner le papier à d’autres matières imperméables non cellulosiques, de manière à leur conférer des propriétés de barrière. Un contenant tout en cellulose serait souhaitable; il faudrait inventer une espèce de « papier plastique ». Cette possibilité est examinée dans le Livre blanc sur les produits biochimiques. Pour faire compétition aux contenants en plastique consignés, on pourrait peut-être développer des boîtes de carton ondulé à caractéristiques innovatrices supplémentaires et à grande durabilité, afin de produire des contenants consignés, plutôt que recyclables. Quand ils sont retournés, ces contenants à base de papier pourraient être pliés, plutôt qu’empilés. Il faudra régler certains problèmes comme l’apparition de craquelures dues au pliage au cours de certaines saisons en concevant ou en découvrant de nouveaux composés compatibles avec la cellulose, qui libèrent l’humidité en été et l’absorbent en hiver. Les exemples ci-dessus sont de simples cas d’application d’un concept plus général, le remplacement des plastiques dans le domaine de l’emballage. 4. PRODUITS SANS PAPIER Jusqu’ici, la discussion a porté sur des développements des procédés et de produits classiques de l’industrie des pâtes et papiers. Toutefois, certains nouveaux produits pourraient faire appel à des technologies transformantes beaucoup plus innovatrices. Il est clair que toute discussion à ce sujet reste très hypothétique, mais elle est néanmoins nécessaire aux fins du présent Livre blanc. Voici un certain nombre de suggestions que nous avons notées au cours de discussions. 4.1 Matériaux composites à base de fibres On utilise actuellement les fibres de pâte à papier comme fibres de renforcement dans beaucoup de matériaux composites, par exemple pour renforcer le ciment. Un obstacle apparent limitant leur utilisation comme fibres de renforcement est leur caractère hydrophile. Donc, un procédé qui les rendrait hydrophobes augmenterait leurs utilisations possibles comme fibres de renforcement des matériaux composites. 4.2 Nanocristaux de cellulose Les fibres de bois sont composées de microfibres de cellulose appelées fibrilles, qui sont ellesmêmes constituées d’une sous-structure de cristaux dont les diamètres sont de l’ordre du nanomètre, et qui peuvent être libérés par trituration extrême. Or, ces nanocristaux de cellulose ont des caractéristiques uniques. Étant cristallins et exempts de défauts, ils sont très robustes, et même en quantités minuscules, ils peuvent augmenter de façon substantielle la résistance des matériaux composites. Ils peuvent également avoir d’autres utilisations, par exemple comme agents de gélification dans les liquides.

CFIC Forest Science Policy Forum on Transformative Technologies Regional Workshops Summary Report, May 2006.

110


Les utilisations possibles des nanocristaux de cellulose dépendent de leur composition et de leurs propriétés, qui varient selon les essences. Il faut mieux définir les propriétés des nanostructures des principales essences canadiennes afin de couvrir toute la gamme des utilisations possibles. 4.3 Fibres pour textiles tissés et non tissés Le marché des matières textiles est énorme, ce qui permet d’envisager la possibilité de vêtements de papier. En effet, on a déjà utilisé le papier à cette fin; on a fabriqué beaucoup de chemises de papier au cours des années 1900, et il y a eu une brève résurgence de la mode des vêtements de papier au cours des années 1960. Aujourd’hui, on utilise les fibres de bois dans certaines matières textiles comme les chiffons, les nappes de table et les chemises d’hôpital. L’une de leurs caractéristiques les plus intéressantes est une grande facilité d’élimination. Les matières ci-dessus sont des textiles non tissés produits par des procédés de fabrication secs ou humides. Une autre solution consiste à utiliser de la pâte de bois pour les textiles tissés. Habituellement, les fibres de bois sont trop courtes pour former des mèches (faisceau continu de fibres obtenu par cardage, utilisé pour le filage), mais certaines fibres canadiennes longues et fines, comme celles du thuya, pourraient présenter des avantages pour notre industrie. De plus, selon certains travaux de recherche récents au Canada, on pourrait filer les fibres de bois mélangées avec une certaine quantité de fibres longues (p. ex. les fibres de lin) à haute consistance (20 %). Un autre procédé possible déjà utilisé pour produire des textiles pourrait connaître un regain d’intérêt et faire l’objet de nouveaux développements. Il consiste à lier des fibres dans du papier, qui est ensuite découpé en minces bandes, et celles-ci sont filées à l’aide de machines textiles modifiées. En fait, ce procédé fait appel à une combinaison des technologies de production des pâtes, des papiers et des textiles. Il était utilisé pour la fabrication de fils et de cordes jetables peu coûteux. De nouveaux développements de cette technologie pourraient donner naissance à une nouvelle génération de textiles à base de fibres de bois. 4.4 Matériaux de construction à base de papier L’important secteur canadien du bois massif produit surtout des matériaux de construction. La mise au point des « bâtiments verts » pourrait créer des synergies entre ce secteur et celui des papiers. On peut utiliser le papier pour la production de matériaux de construction et de meubles légers, portables et voire même jetables. C’est le cas, par exemple, des cloisons autoportantes SOFTWALLMC, un produit décoratif innovateur à base de papier développé par une entreprise de Vancouver, mais fabriqué aux États-Unis – on peut le déplorer. Cette société fabrique aussi des chaises et des tables de style design à partir de fibres de pâte kraft. Il y a d’autres exemples de réussites de produits qui misent sur une conception très innovatrice. Un autre débouché possible pour les fibres bois est l’isolation. Les fibres de cellulose sèche en flocons sont caractérisées par l’une des plus fortes capacités d’isolation, par rapport aux autres matières isolantes. En effet, pendant bien des années, on a utilisé le papier déchiqueté comme isolant ad hoc dans les Prairies. Pendant la crise de l’énergie des années 1970, on a tenté de développer des produits isolants à base de fibres de bois en les traitant avec un composé

CFIC Forest Science Policy Forum on Transformative Technologies Regional Workshops Summary Report, May 2006.

111


ignifuge et des agents antifongiques. Avec les menaces de pénurie d’énergie qui s’annoncent, il serait opportun de réévaluer l’intérêt de ces usages. 5. OBSTACLES A LA MISE EN OEUVRE i)

Toutes les technologies décrites dans ce document sont confrontées à des obstacles d’ordre technologiques, qui peuvent être surmontés par des travaux de recherche et de développement. L’un des principaux obstacles est le peu d’envergure des ressources de R et D dans les entreprises de pâtes et papiers du Canada.

ii)

Des capacités améliorées sont nécessaires pour le développement de nouveaux produits dans cette industrie. Il faut aussi de nouvelles technologies des procédés pour créer ces nouveaux produits, ainsi que des capacités améliorées pour leur production. Dans les deux cas, cet accroissement des capacités doit toucher une vaste gamme de domaines techniques et non techniques qui suscitaient peu d’intérêt au cours des dernières années, p. ex. la chimie du bois et de la cellulose.

iii)

On doit également surmonter des obstacles d’ordre organisationnel de divers types. Il doit y avoir des échanges entre différents secteurs industriels, par exemple entre les secteurs de l’énergie, des produits chimiques, de la production des aliments et des textiles, et il doit y avoir des interactions entre des industries de cultures différentes (ouverte ou secrète) et de toutes catégories (des petites entreprises naissantes à celles qui offrent des services au niveau mondial)

iv)

Certains obstacles sont dus à des questions réglementaires, par exemple l’optimisation des pratiques forestières visant à tenir compte à la fois des besoins des industries et de ceux de la société.

v)

Une mauvaise image publique de l’industrie des pâtes et papiers constitue également un obstacle à certains égards, parce que souvent, elle nuit au recrutement des personnes les plus qualifiées. De plus, cette mauvaise image peut rendre plus difficile la reconnaissance par le gouvernement des besoins de l’industrie, même si, dans le contexte des fermetures d’usines et des effets économiques négatifs qui s’ensuivent pour les petites communautés, une meilleure compréhension mutuelle est tout à fait indiquée.

REMERCIEMENTS Les auteurs tiennent à remercier pour leur soutien le conseil des directeurs de PAPIER, constitué des directeurs des sept centres des pâtes et papiers du Canada et du vice-président à la recherche et à l’éducation de Paprican, et ils remercient également les personnes ci-dessous, pour leur contribution à l’un des livres blancs (Livre blanc sur les pâtes et papiers et Livre blanc sur les produits biochimiques), ou aux deux : Edgar Acosta, Grant Allen, Chad Bennington, Richard Berry, Clark Binkley, Yaman Boluk, Tom Browne, Malcolm Campbell, Felisa Chan, Guy Dumont, Esteban Chornet, Peter Englezos, Ramin Farnood, Roger Gaudreault, Richard Gratton, Derek Gray, Jean Hamel, George Ionides, François Jetté, John Kadla, Masahiro Kawaji, Tibor Kovacs, George Kubes, Peter Lancaster, Todd MacAllen, Leon Magdzinski, Vankatram Mahendraker, Patrice Mangin, Emma Master, David McDonald, Yonghao Ni, James Olson, Mike Paice, Michael Paleologou, Harshad Pande, Robert Pelton, Ivan Pikulik, Ken Pinder, Doug Reeve, Marc Sabourin, Mohini Sain, Brad Saville, John Schmidt, Malcolm Smith, Paul Stuart, Ted Szabo, Mike Towers, Honghi Tran, Vic Uloth, Adrian van Heiningen, Paul Watson, Ning Yan et Xiao Zhang.

CFIC Forest Science Policy Forum on Transformative Technologies Regional Workshops Summary Report, May 2006.

112


B-3 White Paper: Transformative Technologies — Biochemicals

TRANSFORMATIVE TECHNOLOGIES FOR BIOCHEMICALS Submitted to the Canadian Forest Innovation Council by PAPIER The Canadian Pulp and Paper Network for Innovation in Education and Research Prepared by: A Garner and R.J. Kerekes EXECUTIVE SUMMARY Increasing oil prices coupled with growing concerns over energy security and climate change have created an opportunity for biomass to replace petroleum as a feed stock for producing industrial organic chemicals. In the US, a target of 25% replacement by 2030 has already been established. Forest-based biomass can serve as the renewable feedstock to produce biochemicals in a “biorefinery”, whether as a stand-alone plant or one integrated within an existing pulp mill. The resulting biochemicals, produced alongside pulp, fuels, and energy from the forest resource have the potential to transform the Canadian forest products sector. This paper considers transformative technologies to accomplish this. Hemicellulose and cellulose components of wood can be used to produce building block chemicals for a vast range of end products. Of particular interest are large market products such as resins, polymers, and food additives: for example, structural plastics made from polymers have a world market similar in size to that for paper products. Similarly lignin can be converted into phenols, resins and many polymers. Hemicelluloses can be removed from woodchips prior to pulping. Doing so while preserving pulp quality has significant potential, but how to do this has yet to be determined, particularly for the strong softwood pulps important to Canada. Compared to hardwoods, products from the softwood hemicelluloses have been much less studied, making this a natural focus for development in Canada. Tree extractives are a rich source of bioactive compounds which have received little attention to date in Canada; there appears to be a significant opportunity in new pharmaceuticals and nutraceuticals awaiting discovery in Canada’s boreal forest. Functionalized fibres can be made at three different scales, macro, micro and nanoscale for reinforcement of structural plastics. Cellulose nanocrystals also have remarkable properties as gelling agents, reinforcement of plastics at very low concentrations, in cosmetics and in paints. The technologies for isolating and handing these fibres have yet to be perfected.

CFIC Forest Science Policy Forum on Transformative Technologies Regional Workshops Summary Report, May 2006.

113


Plantation forestry in Canada could be used to feed a biorefinery from species tailored for the desired biochemicals of interest. Genomics technologies, now applied in other countries, could be transformative for forestry in Canada. New process technologies for are needed for separation and purification in a biorefinery fed by wood waste. Examples are: solvent extraction, enzyme technology, and membrane and resin separations. Thermochemical methods like pyrolysis and gasification will also be needed. Supercritical carbon dioxide (CO2), near-critical water and gas expanded liquid techniques need to be brought out of the lab and into the biochemical plant. In short, there are many smart new technologies that can enable the forest sector to transform and meet the challenge of biochemical production. 2. MARKET INFLUENCES There is a strong interest in using biomass as an alternative to petroleum for chemical feedstocks in North America and Europe. This has come about because of recent concerns over climate change, energy security, and oil pricing. The renewability of biomass means that CO2 from it is not counted as a Green House Gas: biomass is recognized by governments and in the Kyoto Accord as being carbon-neutral. Added concerns about energy security and increasing oil prices have prompted the US Departments of Energy and Agriculture (US DOE & USDA) to set a goal to derive 25% of all industrial organic chemicals from biomass by 2030. In Canada, forest-based biomass is widely available and represents a renewable, biodegradable alternative to petroleum for the production of biochemicals. Agricultural biomass, either purpose-grown or as a waste, is also available in some parts of Canada. Forest biomass is typically lower in cost and more readily available than agricultural biomass, but both sources can be used to manufacture biochemicals. In addition to these factors, the Canadian pulp and paper sector at present is facing intense competition from large new mills based on tropical plantation wood. The production costs of these competitors are significantly lower than those in Canada, and consequently there is a need to derive more value from Canada’s fibre base. The development of the biorefinery, either as a stand-alone plant or integrated with a pulp mill, so as to produce biochemicals and/or biofuels in addition to pulp, has been increasingly recognized as a promising idea whose time has come. In concept, the biorefinery/pulp mill could produce three major co-products from wood: fibre for paper products; energy in the form of electricity, heat, and liquid fuels; and biochemical coproducts such as commodity and specialty chemicals as well as pharmaceuticals. Details of the full biorefinery concept along with bioenergy products are given in a companion white paper on bioenergy: much of the transformational technology required for the biorefinery has yet to be fully detailed and developed. The general concept, however, is not new. Up until the middle of the 20th century, the forest provided the feedstock for a significant amount of chemical production from the prevailing pulping process at the time, sulphite pulping. Since then the kraft process has taken over as the dominant pulping method. The historical low cost of oil meant that petrochemicals were able to replace many of the wood-based biochemical co-products formerly made with sulphite pulping. Production of biochemicals in kraft mills was never really able to get established when oil was such an inexpensive feedstock.

CFIC Forest Science Policy Forum on Transformative Technologies Regional Workshops Summary Report, May 2006.

114


This paper describes some of the most promising potential biochemicals and process routes to produce them using wood as a feedstock, now that petroleum is more costly. 2.

POSSIBILITIES – GENERAL CONSIDERATIONS

Both the United States and Canada have recently produced roadmaps for the biorefinery concept to produce marketable fibre, energy, and biochemical products. Although stand-alone production of biochemicals may come to predominate in the future, in the near-term it is likely that in Canada, a biorefinery would be based on an existing pulp mill and the required new technology will initially be developed by making co-products with wood pulp. The biorefinery would transform underutilized biomass components such as hemicellulose, lignin, extractives, hog fuel, and currently non-utilized forestry residuals, as well as existing mill effluents, into marketable products. This white paper is focused on biochemicals; a separate white paper will cover bioenergy from a biorefinery. There is a vast range of possible chemical products, for example: commodity chemicals such as formaldehyde; chemical building blocks like phenol or lactic acid; sweeteners such as xylitol or flavourings like vanillin; and pharmaceuticals such as proanthocyanidin antioxidant or taxol, an anticancer drug. The value of a product is typically inversely proportional to the equilibrium market size for that product. Markets for high value product can easily be saturated, whereas commodity chemicals and building blocks (as well as transportation fuels) have a vast market demand. Any newly developed products would therefore have to find their place in this spectrum and be able to compete on price or through proprietary protection. Change to widespread use of biomass for chemicals (and fuel) is in essence a move away from a hydrocarbon economy towards a carbohydrate/lignin economy. Biomass carbohydrates, Cn(H2O)n , are “oxygen-functionalized ”, whereas the petroleum hydrocarbons, CnH2n+2 , are not. In many cases, hydrocarbons require expensive oxidative processing to generate chemical products; in contrast, carbohydrates do not. This creates some remarkable new opportunities because the inherent composition and structure of biomass raw materials can reduce the catalysis and synthesis costs compared with the current petroleum feedstocks. On the other hand, biomass can be very heterogeneous. Some biochemicals and their processes require a high level of homogeneity which will need new technology to attain. 3.

POSSIBILITIES – PRODUCTS

Some biochemicals are already made from wood. These include cellulose derivatives from sulphite dissolving pulps such as: viscose for rayon; cellophane packaging or tire cording; cellulose esters such as acetates, butyrates and nitrates for membrane, filtration and film; and cellulosic ethers like methyl and carboxymethyl cellulose used in detergents, latex paints and food products. From the kraft process, products include tall oils and terpenes. Wood rosins are extracted from tree stumps and a number of pharmaceuticals are extracted from bark or knots. The above are just a few examples of today’s products. In future years, a biorefinery could become the dominant source of many more industrial chemicals, specialty chemicals, pharmaceuticals, and nutraceuticals.

CFIC Forest Science Policy Forum on Transformative Technologies Regional Workshops Summary Report, May 2006.

115


3.1 Industrial Chemicals from Trees The major components of lignocellulosic biomass comprise cellulose (38 to 48%), hemicellulose (15 to 44%), lignin (15 to 25%), and extractives (5 to 14%). Their general characteristics and potential uses for biochemicals from trees are briefly summarized in the following sections. 3.1.1 Cellulose Chemicals This highly crystalline polymer of glucose is the major structural component of a tree. Its crystalline form is quite resistant to biochemical conversion using enzymes, and by the same token, accounts for its value in the form of chemical pulp fibres and their smaller scale component, microfibrils, and nanocrystals. Cellulose can be converted to ethanol fuels, but at the present time, market prices for wood pulp in comparison to ethanol do not justify conversion of high quality wood cellulose to fuel, particularly when competing with corn-derived ethanol. On the other hand, it may well be feasible to utilize cellulose fibre wood residues and from fast grown plantation wood for new biomaterial development. A number of the sugar platform chemicals listed in the next section have been proposed based on cellulose glucose. It is also quite possible that there will be also be a resurgence of interest in the traditional chemical conversion of cellulose dissolving pulps to viscose and a great range of related cellulose products. 3.1.2 Hemicellulose Chemicals By contrast, hemicelluloses are non-crystalline polymers of C5 and C6 sugars and as such they attract the most interest as feed stock for biochemical manufacturing. These sugars, particularly the C6 hexosans, are convertible to chemicals which are building blocks for polymer manufacture, as well as to fuel such as ethanol. Fuel-grade ethanol has the great advantage of an essentially unlimited market. On the other hand, building- block chemicals need not only technology but also market development to establish large, value-added markets to compete successfully with petrochemicals. The US Department of Energy has identified twelve key building block chemicals that can be derived from biomass sugar platforms. They are: 1,4-diacids (succinic, fumaric malic), 2,5-furan dicarboxylic acid, 3-hydroxypropionic acid, aspartic acid, glucaric acid, glutamic acid, itaconic acid, levulinic acid, 3-hydroxybutyrolactone, glycerol, sorbitol and xylitol/arabinitol. These molecules have been chosen principally because of their potential as intermediates for making large-market products such a resins, polymers and food additives. Furfural alcohol is another hemicellulose chemical: it can be made into adhesives for wood products. Canada has softwoods as well as some hardwoods, often in mixed forests. Hardwoods, like other plant biomass, have higher levels of hemicellulose (25-35%) than softwoods (15-25%). Hardwoods are also richer in the more readily extractable C5 pentosan sugars called xylans than are softwoods in which C6 hexosan sugars called mannans dominate. Xylans can be used, for example, as raw materials together with petrochemicals for polymer production. Xylans can also be used to produce an anticariogenic sweetener called xylitol. Hemicellulose itself, suitably modified, holds promise as a bonding agent in paper which should be cost competitive with starches or the petrochemical wet-end additives used today. This application of hemicellulose is discussed further in a white paper on Transformative

CFIC Forest Science Policy Forum on Transformative Technologies Regional Workshops Summary Report, May 2006.

116


Technologies for Pulp and Paper. There are many biomedical and pharmaceutical applications for hemicellulosics such as in hydro gels and for drug delivery. Hardwood xylans, rather than the softwood glucomannans, have been the main the focus of much of the hemicellulose product development work to date. This suggests that in a country best known for its softwoods, there is a clear opportunity to develop processes and products in Canada based on the C6 mannan hemicelluloses. There are many promising new product lines that could be developed using the hemicelluloses which could be extracted before the pulping process (as discussed in section 4.4.2), particularly in the smaller more versatile softwood pulp mills in Canada. 3.1.3 Lignin Chemicals Lignin has a high heating value on which chemical pulp mills depend for energy. One of the first steps for an existing pulp mill converting into a biorefinery will likely be to displace fossil fuel, used in boilers and kilns, with low grade forest waste or with precipitated lignin. Any further excess lignin could be gasified, converted into transportation fuels such as gasoline, or used for biochemical production. Dried lignin might find a market as a fuel in Europe where it would attract carbon credits. As biochemical feedstock, lignin in general is underutilized. One current lignin product is lignosulphonate derived from the sulphite process, and through sulphonation of kraft lignin. This can be converted into phenols, thermosetting resins, polyurethane foam, polyols and other biodegradable polymeric products. Lignin from kraft mills is manufactured into activated carbon and carbon fibre products. Lower molecular weight fractions of some lignins are rich in phenols and have good radical scavenging, antioxidant properties. Generally the inhomogeneity, impurities, and complex chemical structure make lignin a challenge for chemical conversion – just the kind of challenge that could stimulate production of proprietary rather than commodity products. 3.1.4 Chemicals from Extractives Tall oil and other extractives-derived products are already collected after kraft cooking. However a much wider range of chemicals could be isolated from wood and wood residue. Barks contain a considerable range of flavonoids many of which are known to have health benefits. For example, quercetin can reduce the risk of diabetes. Procyanidines also have antioxidation properties and are approved for human consumption. Anthocyanidins have shown potential to protect the lens of eyes from cataracts. Naringenin has anti-cancer properties. Wood knots are a very rich source for lignans which are phytoestrogens that also have anticancer properties. Tree-derived lignans are approved as dietary supplements in the USA. Because of their abundance, it will likely be cheaper to produce these phytochemicals from trees rather than from agricultural sources Foliage is also a source of exotic chemicals such as chlorophylls, carotenoids, leaf protein and essential oils. To date, collection costs, technology limitations and small markets have tended to limit the product opportunities from extractives to things that are high value and proprietary. There has not been a comprehensive study of the full range of chemicals that might be produced from wood species of particular interest to Canada.

CFIC Forest Science Policy Forum on Transformative Technologies Regional Workshops Summary Report, May 2006.

117


3.2

Bioplastics

There is a great interest worldwide in the development of biodegradable polymers to replace traditional petrochemical plastics. One bioplastic that has attracted a lot of attention is polylactic acid, already manufactured on a million kilogram scale in the US. It is produced by fermentation of corn dextrose and used to make packaging, solvents, coatings, films, antifreeze, and detergents. It is expected that these kinds of bioplastics platform chemicals will also be made in competitive volumes from tree-derived sugars in the near future. Polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHAs) have the required thermoplastic and elastic properties for bioplastics. One common form of PHA, called 3-hydroxybutyric acid (PHB), is accumulated by bacteria in activated sludge effluent treatment systems in pulp mills. This effluent happens to have ideal chemistry for PHB formation. The bacteria convert sludge biomass into a biodegradable plastic. The required extraction steps have made bacterial PHB too costly in the past but one PHB fermentation process has recently been commercialized, showing that lower costs may well be possible. Pulp mill sludge biomass may prove to be a very good low cost source of this bioplastic. End products include food containers, plastic bottles, packaging, medical products and even coated paper i.e. many areas where petroleum-based polymers are currently used. Some examples of polymers made from hemicellulose-derived building blocks described in section 3.1.2 include a proprietary polyester made from 1,3-propanediol, hyper-branched polyesters made by reacting diacids with sugars, new biogenic polyester sheet molding compound, and a nontoxic antifreeze, 1,2 propylene diol. Production of the building block levulinic acid is in the process of commercialization, from which a dazzling array of products can be made: epoxy resins, polyesters, solvents, gasoline extenders, plasticizers, medicinals, cosmetics and flavourings. In addition to the hemicellulosic-based bioplastics mentioned above, cellulosics and cellulose copolymers can be produced which are biodegradable and increasingly cost effective. New cellulosic derivatives and functionalized cellulosic copolymers could be used to develop smart performance-bioplastics for unique new applications in stimuli-responsive/biosensing coatings, membranes and films. 3.3 Pharmaceuticals and Nutraceuticals Historically, many pharmaceuticals and nutraceuticals have been sourced from tropical forests. Quinine, an antimalarial alkaloid, is one of the best known early examples. In contrast, the boreal forest has been scarcely explored as a source of these products, yet it is known to have its own full range of bioactive compounds, some of which are starting to be discovered. Taxol, an anticarcinogen, and sterols for lowering cholesterol are two well known examples from the recent past. There appears to be a significant opportunity in new pharmaceuticals and nutraceuticals awaiting discovery in the Canadian boreal forest. A combination of botanists, biochemists and engineers is required to systematically investigate these opportunities, guided by an industry advisory group. 3.4 Functionalized Cellulose Fibres and Nanocrystals Fibres used in traditional paper products are 1-3mm long with a diameter of about 30 micrometers. These natural macro fibres have substructure microfibril fibres with one micrometer diameter, which in turn are made up from cellulose nanocrystals with diameters

CFIC Forest Science Policy Forum on Transformative Technologies Regional Workshops Summary Report, May 2006.

118


below 0.01 micrometers (10 nanometres). While the macro fibres are widely used in paper, the extraordinary properties of microfibrils and cellulose nanocrystals remain largely unexploited in today’s products. Macro, micro and nano scale cellulose fibres can be functionalized for reinforcement of plastic biocomposites for use throughout the full range of today’s plastics applications. The lower price of cellulose fibres (as little as one quarter the cost of commodity plastics) and enhanced functionality would drive their adoption in the $150 billion/year world market for structural plastics. Macro and micro wood fibres are also cheaper and healthier alternatives to glass fibre, today’s common plastics reinforcement fibre. At a smaller scale, cellulose nanocrystals have extraordinary strength enhancement capabilities and represent nature’s alternative to carbon nanotubes. This nanoscale architecture of trees has remained largely unexplored to date. Commercial extraction of these cellulose nanocrystals would enable their use in a wide range of products as well as in those mentioned above. For example, they can be gelling agents in food and in wound dressings, strengthening agents in plastic bottles, colouring agents in cosmetics and in paints. These representative products take advantage of the liquid phase ordering and flawless microstructures of these remarkable constructs of nature. Along with market development activities, environmental, health and safety issues surrounding cellulose nanocrystals need to be clarified: as with all nanoscale materials, there is a need to show that they are safe. 4.

POSSIBILITIES: PROCESS OPTIONS 4.1 Forest Feedstock

Forests in Canada have several advantages for biomass feedstocks. The extensive natural forests are harvested sustainably and unused residues are available. Compared to agricultural sources, the logistics of planting, harvesting, transport and storage are simpler and can be much cheaper; and the great variety of species and growth conditions in Canada produce a very broad range of fibre quality and wood chemistries. As is becoming better recognized in the traditional wood and paper products sector, the more successful mills are those which are ideally matched to the quality of the local wood supply. Afforestation of marginal farm land is starting to gain momentum in Canada using hybrid poplars and larch for example. As in the case of agricultural crops, genomics technology can be used in plantations to select or create the best trees with fibres functionalized for the desired end product properties. This approach is already being applied in forestry around the world. It is likely to become the preferred way of producing tailored feedstock for a biorefinery in the long run. With our challenges of cold climate and slow growth rates, it can be argued that nowhere could forest genomics be more transformative than in Canada. 4.2 Processing Options In an oil refinery, distillation is the predominant separation and purification technology; in a biomass refinery, a number of other processes will be needed for the more heterogeneous feedstock, including solvent extraction, biochemical enzyme methods, membranes and resin separations. Thermochemical (high temperature) processes like gasification and fast pyrolysis

CFIC Forest Science Policy Forum on Transformative Technologies Regional Workshops Summary Report, May 2006.

119


will also have a place, mostly for fuels, but they also present opportunities for chemical coproducts. Remarkable advances in the biotechnology fields of genomics and proteomics have opened the way for biochemical routes to isolating, extracting and processing chemicals from wood using enzymes. Cellular organisms such as bacteria or yeasts can be modified to yield very specific enzymes which can be used for biocatalysis within or outside the cells. This approach was pioneered by the pharmaceutical industry, and is now used more widely in the agri-food sector. Enzyme technology is ripe for exploitation on a much broader industrial scale. Enzymes are currently used in pulp and paper mills for bleaching and whitewater clean-up. Many other nonfuel applications for biochemical extraction or synthesis with enzymes await discovery. Rapid screening techniques and ingenious gene discovery will gradually uncover the highly specific enzyme biocatalysts that can perform the required biochemical miracles. Among the more innovative chemical extraction technologies are ones using supercritical CO2, near-critical water, gas-expanded liquids and ionic liquids. They are largely confined to lab and pilot scale today but they offer great promise at industrial scale with highly tunable selectivity, fast reaction rates and minimal chemical requirements. Supercritical CO2 pulping might even be possible. Engineering challenges abound in such areas as materials of construction and operational control, but success could bring a truly transformational opportunity for the biomass refinery. Turning to process options in the Canadian context, most of Canada’s kraft mills are small by world standards, and though this is a handicap in competing for low cost fibre production, it may be an asset in producing chemical co-products. Smaller mills may enable flexibility, for example in switching production from fibre to chemicals as market conditions dictate, which may not be possible, or justifiable in very large pulp mills. 4.3 Co-products in Pulp Mills In the short term, the most likely route to increasing production of biochemicals will be by making them as co-products in pulp mills. One advantage for a pulp mill biorefinery is that it can evolve by adding new product lines to existing facilities which have the infrastructure to process woodchips and other wood residues already in place. New process technologies arising from bioenergy applications will also be important, and may be established on or near a pulp mill site. Of course, for a pulp mill biorefinery, maintaining acceptable pulp quality will be a foundation requirement. There may be synergies between biochemical and pulp production. As described in the Pulp and Paper White Paper, biochemical production may make ‘semi-mechanical pulping’ an attractive, energy-conserving method of producing mechanical pulp, and polymers for new dry bonding agents may enable a new class of high mineral-filled papers. As markets get established, and production techniques are perfected then dedicated biochemical mills will likely become more common. 4.3.1 Co-products and Chemical Pulping Kraft pulping is a high temperature alkaline treatment, and is preeminent among all pulping methods for its selectivity. However, it leaves the hemicellulosic material somewhat degraded, and in a complex black liquor rich in sulphur compounds, making it difficult to remove and less

CFIC Forest Science Policy Forum on Transformative Technologies Regional Workshops Summary Report, May 2006.

120


usable. Other pulping methods such as soda-AQ or ethanol pulping are generally restricted to high yield or hardwood operations where selectivity or pulp strength is less critical. Sulphur-free pulping with the selectivity of kraft remains an elusive goal that would be truly transformative in that the technology needed for many co-product options would be greatly simplified. It would open the way to lower-cost black liquor gasification for example, and greatly simplify the recovery of the inorganic pulping chemicals. Several routes are possible to overcome the sulphur issue, but an attractive one is preextraction of hemicellulose from wood chips prior to kraft pulping, as described in the next section. It has been claimed that this can be accomplished without compromising pulp quality. This has yet to be fully demonstrated at lab and pilot scale, for a range of removal technologies, and particularly with Canadian softwoods, for which pulp strength properties are most critical. 4.3.2 Methods for Hemicellulose Removal in a Pulp Mill Optimized pretreatment methods prior to chemical pulping are the most likely route to begin the transformation of a kraft pulp mill into a biorefinery. The key technical challenge here is selective removal of hemicellulose from wood chips without degrading the cellulose component of the papermaking fibre. Hemicellulose can be removed from lignocellulosic materials by hot water, alkaline, acidic or solvent extractive methods. Some of these methods have been employed to provide fermentable feed stock for ethanol production, but these may not be selective enough if papergrade pulp is a co-product, due to cellulose degradation. Others may extract too little hemicellulose in too low a concentration. New research is needed to find the best pretreatment process to use prior to kraft pulping. Note that two product streams will be of interest: one for polymeric hemicellulose and a second stream for simple sugars not concerned with use as a polymer. Integrated mechanical pulp and paper mills comprise a large segment of the Canadian pulp and paper industry. Thus, the biorefinery concept for mechanical pulping is of particular interest in Canada. This has scarcely been addressed to date, but the potential for valuable co-products and the promise of lower electric power needs would make such technology transformative. Here too, pretreatment, perhaps with an acid hydrolysis removal of hemicelluloses, may be a likely process. 4.3.3 Lignin Removal Lignin can be removed from kraft cooking liquor by ultrafiltration or precipitation, and washed prior to chemical conversion or combustion. Of course the energy content of any lignin that is offloaded from the recovery boiler will have to be compensated for with increased efficiency or by burning additional biomass waste. 4.4 Dedicated Biochemical Mills Dedicated biochemical mills will be the best option for some feedstocks and products, and may predominate in the future. They would be most appropriate for agriculture and tree-plantation feedstock which can be tailored to the product. Genomics (and metagenomics) can be used to select or create (groups of) improved seedlings. Typically these will be ones best adapted to produce the desired growth characteristics (disease and drought resistance, cold-hardiness,

CFIC Forest Science Policy Forum on Transformative Technologies Regional Workshops Summary Report, May 2006.

121


growth rate), fibre structure (longer, stronger, finer) and chemistry for the end product of interest. These transformative technologies can greatly accelerate conventional breeding programs for the crops of the future. In Canada, these techniques would be applied on marginal farmland to produce high quality feedstock for a biorefinery. A very homogeneous feed would greatly simplify processability and expand processing options, particularly with bio- and thermochemical routes where lack of uniformity can be a barrier. 5. BARRIERS TO IMPLEMENTATION 5.1 Almost all the technologies outlined in this paper are transformational, but there are many technical barriers to be overcome with scientific and engineering process and product development work at laboratory, pilot and commercial scale. Technologies of particular interest to Canada are those relating to the nature and properties of Canadian tree species. There is a need to learn how to create a vast new range of biochemical products from sawmill and forest residuals while continuing to supply the world’s best softwood pulps: learning how to integrate bioproducts manufacturing into the current pulp and papermaking is the biggest initial challenge. Unknowns of fibre chemical composition and variability of feed stock are two important technical issues. How best to maximize value creation from Canadian forest is the underlying driver. 5.2 Organizational challenges include interactions between industrial sectors such as energy, agri-food, textiles and pharmaceutical and the forest products sector, and between companies with very different cultures and scales of operation. Forest products companies will need to widen their focus to include a more proprietary product mix. Harnessing the power of smaller scale entrepreneurship in product development is also an important issue. Fostering innovative joint ventures within biomass processing complexes is another way to encourage the growth of private/proprietary development with some public support. 5.3 Competition from agricultural feedstocks and their ability to target specific end product biochemical building blocks will be an ever present reality for the forest sector. Competition in making chemical products from coal should not be underestimated as the technologies for carbon-capture and environmental clean-up become perfected for this abundant raw material. Similarly, any biomass technology that produces methane as an intermediate will have to compete with natural gas as a feedstock, particularly the low cost ‘stranded’ natural gas from inland gas fields remote from a pipeline. 5.4 Some specialty skills may be lacking in such areas as wood and fibre chemistry as well as chemical process and product development on a vast range of scales e.g. from kilograms to thousands of tonnes per day. 5.5 Government policy and incentives could provide a crucial stimulus for the production of green products. By the same token, challenges associated with private access to a public resource could be minimized through informed dialog and timely decision making. Experience in other sectors has shown that extraordinarily positive transformations can be triggered by sensitive adjustment of regulatory constraints.

CFIC Forest Science Policy Forum on Transformative Technologies Regional Workshops Summary Report, May 2006.

122


7 Recommendation Although it is beyond the mandate of this white paper to recommend specific actions to overcome the barriers cited above, we offer a general comment on the course of action. The scope and nature of the effort needed to achieve the transformations inherent in these technologies, and the risks involved, are large. Accordingly, the full range of intellectual capital of Canada’s universities, government laboratories, industry institutes, and company research and technical teams should be mobilized in a coordinated effort to achieve them. ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS The authors gratefully acknowledge the support of PAPIER’s Council of Directors, consisting of the directors of Canada’s seven pulp and paper centres and the VP Research and Education of Paprican, and wish to specifically acknowledge the contributions of the following individuals to one or both white papers on pulp and paper and biochemicals: Edgar Acosta, Grant Allen, Chad Bennington, Richard Berry, Clark Binkley, Yaman Boluk, Tom Browne, Malcolm Campbell, Felisa Chan, Guy Dumont, Esteban Chornet, Peter Englezos, Ramin Farnood, Roger Gaudreault, Richard Gratton, Derek Gray, Jean Hamel, George Ionides, François Jette, John Kadla, Masahiro Kawaji, Tibor Kovacs, George Kubes, Peter Lancaster, Todd MacAllen, Leon Magdzinski, Vankatram Mahendraker, Patrice Mangin, Emma Master, David McDonald, Yonghao Ni, James Olson, Mike Paice, Michael Paleologou, Harshad Pande, Robert Pelton, Ivan Pikulik, Ken Pinder, Doug Reeves, Marc Sabourin, Mohini Sain, Brad Saville, John Schmidt, Malcolm Smith, Paul Stuart, Ted Szabo, Mike Towers, Honghi Tran, Vic Uloth, Adrian van Heiningen, Paul Watson, Ning Yan, Xiao Zhang.

CFIC Forest Science Policy Forum on Transformative Technologies Regional Workshops Summary Report, May 2006.

123


B-3 Livre Blanc : Technologies Transformantes — Biochimiques

LES TECHNOLOGIES TRANSFORMATIVES DÉDIÉES AUX PRODUITS BIOCHIMIQUES Présenté au Conseil canadien de l’innovation forestière par PAPIER Réseau canadien de pâtes et papiers pour l’innovation en éducation et en recherche Préparé par : A Garner et R.J. Kerekes

RÉSUMÉ L’augmentation des prix du pétrole, conjuguée aux préoccupations croissantes concernant la sécurité de l’énergie et les changements climatiques, devrait permettre à la biomasse de se substituer au pétrole, en tant que matière première, pour la production des produits chimiques organiques industriels. Aux États-Unis, on prévoit déjà une substitution du pétrole par la biomasse de l’ordre de 25 % d’ici 2030. La biomasse axée sur les ressources forestières peut servir d’énergie renouvelable pour produire des produits biochimiques dans une « bioraffinerie », qui serait soit une installation autonome, soit une unité intégrée au sein d’une usine de pâtes et papiers existante. Les produits biochimiques obtenus, produits en plus de la pâte et des combustibles, et l’énergie générée par les ressources forestières pourraient potentiellement transformer le secteur canadien des produits de la forêt. Le présent document indique que les technologies transformatrices permettraient d’atteindre cet objectif. Il est possible d’utiliser l’hémicellulose et les composés cellulosiques du bois pour fabriquer les produits chimiques de base d’une grande variété de produits finis; sont notamment visés les produits à fort potentiel commercial, tels que les résines, les polymères et les additifs alimentaires. À titre d’exemple, le plastique pour la construction, produit à partir des polymères, représente un marché mondial similaire, en termes d’ampleur, à celui des produits du papier. De même, il est possible de valoriser la lignine en la transformant en phénols, résines et en de nombreux polymères. Il est possible d’extraire les hémicelluloses des copeaux de bois avant la réduction en pâte. Procéder ainsi tout en préservant la qualité de la pâte à papier est potentiellement intéressant, mais il reste à savoir comment procéder, notamment pour ce qui a trait aux pâtes de bois résineux solides qui sont importantes au Canada. Comparé aux bois de feuillus, les produits dérivés des hémicelluloses de bois résineux n’ont pas fait l’objet d’études très poussées, ce qui en fait une cible toute choisie que le Canada pourrait exploiter. Les produits d’extraction du bois constituent une source prolifique de composés bioactifs qui ont suscité, à ce jour, peu d’intérêt au Canada; ils représentent néanmoins un enjeu important pour

CFIC Forest Science Policy Forum on Transformative Technologies Regional Workshops Summary Report, May 2006.

124


les nouveaux produits pharmaceutiques et nutraceutiques, et la forêt boréale canadienne en recèle une source toujours inexplorée. Il est possible de produire des fibres fonctionnalisées à trois échelles différentes – macro-, micro- et nanométrique – afin de renforcer le plastique armé. Les nanocristaux de cellulose possèdent aussi des propriétés manifestes en tant qu’agents gélifiants, mais aussi pour le renforcement des plastiques à des concentrations très faibles, ainsi que dans la cosmétique et les peintures. Il reste cependant à perfectionner les technologies utilisées pour isoler et manipuler ces fibres. La ligniculture au Canada permettrait d’alimenter une bioraffinerie avec des espèces spécifiquement élevées pour répondre aux besoins exprimés en matière de produits biochimiques. La technologie génomique, désormais appliquée dans d’autres pays, pourrait être une technologie transformatrice pour la foresterie du Canada. De nouvelles technologies de procédé s’avèrent cependant nécessaires pour ce qui a trait à la séparation et à la purification réalisées dans les bioraffineries alimentées par des déchets ligneux. Ces technologies sont notamment : l’extraction par solvant, la technologie enzymatique et les technologies de séparation des membranes et de la résine. Les voies thermochimiques, telles que la pyrolyse et la gazéification, seront également nécessaires. Les techniques mettant en œuvre du liquide expansé par du gaz et de l’eau sous-critique ou du CO2 supercritique doivent aussi sortir de la sphère du laboratoire pour être appliquées dans les usines biochimiques. Pour résumer, il existe donc bon nombre de nouvelles technologies intelligentes susceptibles d’aider le secteur forestier à se transformer et à faire face aux défis inhérents à la production biochimique. 1. INCIDENCE DU MARCHÉ En Amérique du Nord et en Europe, le recours à la biomasse en lieu et place du pétrole pour assurer la charge d’alimentation suscite un vif intérêt. Cela s’explique par les nouvelles préoccupations liées aux changements climatiques, à la sécurité de l’énergie et aux prix du pétrole. La biomasse est une énergie renouvelable en ce sens que le CO2 qu’elle contient n’est pas comptabilisé comme un gaz à effet de serre : les gouvernements et le Protocole de Kyoto considèrent d’ailleurs que la biomasse ne contribue pas à l’émission de dioxyde de carbone. Les autres inquiétudes concernant la sécurité de l’énergie et le coût croissant du pétrole ont incité les départements américains de l’énergie et de l’agriculture (US DOE & USDA) à se fixer pour objectif de dériver 25% de tous les produits chimiques organiques industriels de la biomasse d’ici 2030. Au Canada, la biomasse générée par les ressources forestières est disponible en grande quantité et constitue une alternative renouvelable biodégradable au pétrole pour ce qui a trait à la production des produits biochimiques. La biomasse agricole, qu’il s’agisse de composants générés à des fins spécifiques ou de déchets, est également présente dans certaines régions du Canada. Même s’il est vrai que la biomasse forestière implique généralement des coûts inférieurs et qu’elle s’avère plus rapidement disponible que la biomasse agricole, il n’en demeure pas moins que les deux sources peuvent être utilisées pour fabriquer des produits biochimiques. Outre ces facteurs, le secteur canadien des pâtes et papiers doit actuellement faire face à la concurrence acharnée des nouvelles grandes fabriques qui transforment le bois des plantations tropicales. Les coûts de production de ces compétiteurs sont bien inférieurs à ceux en vigueur

CFIC Forest Science Policy Forum on Transformative Technologies Regional Workshops Summary Report, May 2006.

125


au Canada. Il est par conséquent nécessaire de dériver davantage de valeur des usines de fibre classiques du Canada. Le développement de la bioraffinerie - qu’il s’agisse d’une usine autonome ou d’une installation intégrée à une usine de pâtes et papiers - en vue de fabriquer, outre des pâtes, des produits biochimiques et/ou des biocombustibles, est de plus en plus considérée comme une idée prometteuse qu’il est temps de concrétiser. S’agissant du concept, la bioraffinerie ou l’usine de pâtes pourrait produire trois coproduits majeurs à partir du bois : de la fibre pour les produits à base de papier; de l’énergie, sous la forme d’électricité, de chaleur et de combustibles liquides; et des coproduits biochimiques, tels que les produits chimiques utilitaires et spéciaux ainsi que les produits pharmaceutiques. Les informations détaillées concernant le concept global de bioraffinerie et les produits bioénergétiques sont présentées dans un livre blanc connexe traitant de la bioénergie. Il reste encore à étoffer et à développer en profondeur la plupart des technologies de transformation qui devront être mises en œuvre au sein de la bioraffinerie. Le concept général n’est cependant pas nouveau. Jusqu’au milieu du 20e siècle, la forêt a fourni la matière première nécessaire à la fabrication d’une grande quantité de produits chimiques, ce par le biais du procédé de fabrication qui prévalait à l’époque : la cuisson au bisulfite. Depuis, le procédé kraft a pris le relais et s’est imposé en tant que principale technique de réduction en pâte. Le faible coût du pétrole de l’époque signifiait que les produits pétrochimiques étaient en mesure de remplacer bon nombre des coproduits biochimiques basés sur le bois et fabriqués auparavant avec un procédé au sulfite. La production des produits biochimiques dans les usines kraft n’a jamais vraiment pu commencer, car le pétrole était encore une matière première peu coûteuse. Le présent document décrit certains des produits biochimiques potentiels les plus prometteurs, ainsi que les procédés permettant de les fabriquer en utilisant le bois comme matière première, le pétrole étant désormais plus onéreux. 2. POSSIBILITÉS – CONSIDÉRATIONS D’ORDRE GÉNÉRAL Les États-Unis et le Canada ont récemment mis au point une feuille de route concernant le concept de bioraffinerie en vue de produire des fibres, de l’énergie et des produits biochimiques commercialisables. Bien que la production autonome des produits biochimiques soit appelée à prédominer à l’avenir, à moyen terme, il est probable qu’au Canada, les bioraffineries voient le jour au sein d’une usine de pâtes et papiers existante, et que, au stade préliminaire, les nouvelles technologies requises se développent par le biais de la fabrication de coproduits avec de la pâte de bois. La bioraffinerie transformerait en produits commercialisables les composés de la biomasse sous-utilisés, tels que l’hémicellulose, la lignine, les produits d’extraction du bois, les déchets de bois, ainsi que les résidus forestiers actuellement non utilisés et les effluents d’usine. Ce livre blanc est dédié aux produits biochimiques; un autre document abordera la bioénergie générée par les bioraffineries. Il existe une gamme étendue de produits chimiques potentiels, à savoir : les produits chimiques utilitaires, tels que le formaldéhyde; les composants chimiques de base, tels que le phénol ou l’acide lactique; les édulcorants, tels que le xylitol ou les arômes comme la vanille; et les produits pharmaceutiques, tels que l’antioxydant proanthocyanidine ou le taxol, substance anticancéreuse. En règle générale, la valeur d’un produit est inversement proportionnelle à la taille d’équilibre du marché de ce produit. Le marché des produits de grande valeur peut être facilement saturé,

CFIC Forest Science Policy Forum on Transformative Technologies Regional Workshops Summary Report, May 2006.

126


tandis que les produits chimiques utilitaires et les composés chimiques de base (ainsi que les carburants de transport) bénéficient d’une demande importante sur le marché. Tout produit nouvellement élaboré devra par conséquent trouver sa place dans ce schéma et être compétitif, qu’il s’agisse de prix ou de protection exclusive. Les changements affectant l’utilisation répandue des produits chimiques (et des combustibles) impliquent, par nature, un fléchissement de l’économie des hydrocarbures au profit de l’économie des hydrates de carbone et de la lignine. Les hydrates de carbone de la biomasse, comme le Cn(H2O)n, sont des composés « fonctionnalisés par oxygène », tandis que les hydrocarbures pétroliers, le CnH2n+2 par exemple, ne le sont pas. Dans bien des cas, il est nécessaire de soumettre les hydrocarbures à un traitement oxydant coûteux pour pouvoir produire des produits chimiques, ce qui n’est pas le cas avec les hydrates de carbone. Cela implique de nouvelles opportunités intéressantes, car la composition intrinsèque et la structure des matières premières de la biomasse permettent de réduire les coûts inhérents à la catalyse et à la synthèse, comparativement aux matières premières courantes du pétrole. Par ailleurs, la biomasse peut s’avérer très hétérogène. Certains produits biochimiques et leur procédé exigent un niveau élevé d’homogénéité que les nouvelles technologies se devront de satisfaire. 3. POSSIBILITÉS CONCERNANT LES PRODUITS Certains produits biochimiques sont déjà fabriqués à partir du bois. Ceux-ci incluent des dérivés cellulosiques issus des pâtes de transformation chimique obtenues par cuisson au bisulfite, tels que : la rayonne viscose; les emballages de cellophane ou la rayonne pour pneus; les esters cellulosiques, tels que les acétates, butyrates et nitrates des membranes, filtres et pellicules; et les esters de cellulose, comme la méthylcellulose et la carboxyméthylcellulose utilisées dans les détergents, les peintures au latex et les produits alimentaires. Le procédé kraft permet de fabriquer des produits comme le tallöl et le terpène. Les colophanes de bois sont extraites des souches d’arbre, et un certain nombre de produits pharmaceutiques est extrait de l’écorce ou des nœuds des arbres. Il ne s’agit que de quelques exemples de produits actuels. À l’avenir, la bioraffinerie pourra devenir la source principale de bien d’autres produits chimiques industriels, produits chimiques spéciaux, produits pharmaceutiques et nutraceutiques. 3.1 Produits chimiques industriels issus des arbres Les principaux composants de la biomasse lignocellulosique comprennent la cellulose (38 à 48%), l’hémicellulose (15 à 44%), la lignine (15 à 25%) et les produits d’extraction du bois (5 à 14%). Leurs caractéristiques générales et leur utilisation potentielle pour la fabrication des produits biochimiques à partir des arbres sont présentées succinctement dans les paragraphes ci-dessous. 3.1.1 Produits chimiques à base de cellulose Le polymère de glucose hautement cristallin est le principal constituant structural de l’arbre. Sa forme cristalline résiste assez bien à la conversion biochimique réalisée avec des enzymes, et contribue, en outre, à sa valeur en raison des fibres de pâte à papier chimiques et de ses composants, microfibrilles et nanocristaux plus petits. La cellulose peut être transformée en carburant à l’éthanol, mais à l’heure actuelle, les prix du marché de la pâte de bois par rapport à CFIC Forest Science Policy Forum on Transformative Technologies Regional Workshops Summary Report, May 2006.

127


ceux de l’éthanol ne justifient pas la transformation de la cellulose de bois de haute qualité en combustible, notamment en raison de la présence concurrentielle de l’éthanol dérivé de l’amidon de maïs. D’autre part, il serait possible d’utiliser des déchets de bois à fibre cellulosique et le bois des forêts de plantation à croissance rapide pour élaborer de nouveaux produits biochimiques. Un certain nombre de produits chimiques issus de la plate-forme de bioconversion du sucre, et énumérés dans le paragraphe ci-dessous, a été proposé à partir du glucose de cellulose. Il se peut également qu’il y ait un regain d’intérêt pour la transformation chimique conventionnelle des pâtes pour dissolution en viscose, ainsi que celle d’un large éventail de produits cellulosiques connexes. 3.1.2 Produits chimiques à base d’hémicelluloses À titre de comparaison, les hémicelluloses sont des polymères non cristallins des sucres C5 et C6, et en tant que tels, ils suscitent le plus d’intérêt lorsqu’il est question de matières premières dévolues à la fabrication des produits biochimiques. Ces sucres, notamment les hexosanes C6, peuvent être transformés en produits chimiques, qui sont des éléments constitutifs nécessaires à la fabrication des polymères, ainsi qu’en combustibles, tel que l’éthanol. L’éthanol avec indice d’octane a l’avantage d’être positionné sur un marché pratiquement illimité. D’autre part, les produits chimiques constitutifs requièrent non seulement des technologies, mais aussi un élargissement du marché afin d’y trouver une place à valeur ajoutée stratégique en vue de faire face, dans de bonnes conditions, à la concurrence des produits pétrochimiques. Douze éléments constitutifs chimiques pouvant être dérivés des plates-formes de sucres issus de la biomasse ont été identifiés par le département de l’énergie américain. Ces éléments constitutifs sont les suivants : Les diacides 1,4 (succinique, fumarique malique), l’acide furan2,5 dicarboxylique, l’acide 3-hydroxypropionique, l’acide aspartique, l’acide glucarique, l’acide glutamique, l’acide itaconique, l’acide lévulinique, l’hydroxybutyrolactone 3, le glycérol, le sorbitol et le xylitol/arabinitol. Ces molécules ont été choisies principalement en raison de leur rôle potentiel d’intermédiaires pour la fabrication de produits bénéficiant d’un marché étendu, tels que les résines, les polymères et les additifs alimentaires. L’alcool furfurylique est un autre produit chimique à base d’hémicellulose qu’il est possible de transformer en colle pour les produits ligneux. Les forêts du Canada renferment des résineux et certains feuillus, les deux étant souvent présents dans des forêts mixtes. Les bois de feuillus, à l’instar des autres phytomasses, ont des niveaux d’hémicellulose supérieurs (25-35%) à ceux des arbres résineux. Les feuillus sont également plus riches en sucres pentosane C5 (désignés sous le nom de xylanes), qui sont des sucres plus rapidement extractibles, que les bois résineux dans lesquels les sucres hexosanes C6 (désignés mannanes) prédominent. Les xylanes peuvent par exemple être utilisés comme matières premières conjointement avec les produits pétrochimiques pour fabriquer des polymères. On peut également les utiliser pour produire un édulcorant anticarieux appelé xylitol. L’hémicellulose elle-même, modifiée comme il se doit, est un liant prometteur pour l’industrie du papier qui devrait être compétitif en termes de coût face aux amidons ou aux adjuvants pétrochimiques en partie humides utilisés aujourd’hui. Cette application de l’hémicellulose est abordée plus en détails dans un livre blanc portant sur les technologies de transformation des pâtes et papiers. L’hémicellulose trouve sa place dans de nombreuses applications

CFIC Forest Science Policy Forum on Transformative Technologies Regional Workshops Summary Report, May 2006.

128


biomédicales et pharmaceutiques, telles que les hydrogels et la libération contrôlée des médicaments. Les xylanes tirés du bois de feuillus, plutôt que les glucomannanes tirés du bois résineux, ont été l’objet essentiel de nombreux travaux de développement portant sur des produits à base d’hémicellulose effectués à ce jour. Cela laisse penser qu’au Canada, pays réputé pour ses bois résineux, il est opportun de développer des procédés et des produits basés sur les hémicelluloses contenant des mannanes C6. Bon nombre de nouvelles gammes de produits prometteuses pourraient être développées en utilisant des hémicelluloses extraites avant le procédé de réduction en pâte (tel qu’abordé dans le paragraphe 4.4.2), notamment dans les usines de pâtes de bois résineux plus petites mais néanmoins polyvalentes du Canada. 3.1.3

Produits chimiques issus de la lignine

La lignine a un pouvoir calorifique élevé dont les usines de pâtes chimiques sont tributaires pour leur énergie. L’une des premières étapes à suivre pour convertir une usine de pâtes et papiers en bioraffinerie serait de mettre le combustible fossile, utilisé dans les chaudières et séchoirs, avec des résidus forestiers de qualité inférieure ou avec de la lignine précipitée. Toute autre lignine excédentaire pourrait être gazéifiée ou transformée en carburant de transport, comme indiqué dans le livre blanc traitant de la bioénergie. De manière générale, la lignine est sous-utilisée en tant que matière première biochimique. L’un des produits actuels basé sur la lignine est le ligninesulfonate dérivé du procédé au sulfite et obtenu par sulfonation de la thiolignine. Il est possible de le transformer en phénols, en résines thermodurcissables, en mousse de polyuréthane, en polyols et en d’autres produits polymériques biodégradables. La lignine issue des fabriques de pâte kraft est transformée en produits de fibre de carbone et de carbone activé. Les fractions de masse moléculaire plus faibles de certaines lignines sont riches en phénols et ont des propriétés antioxydantes qui permettent de lutter efficacement contre les radicaux libres. En règle générale, l’inhomogénéité, les impuretés et la structure chimique complexe font de la lignine un enjeu pour la transformation chimique; le type d’enjeu qui pourrait justement stimuler la production des produits exclusifs plutôt que celle des produits courants. 3.1.4

Produits chimiques issus des produits d’extraction du bois

Le tallöl et les autres produits d’extraction du bois sont déjà collectés après la cuisson du kraft. Cependant, une gamme de produits chimiques bien plus étendue pourrait être fabriquée à partir du bois et des résidus forestiers. Les écorces contiennent une grande variété de flavonoïdes dont beaucoup sont réputés pour leurs bienfaits sur la santé. La quercétine permet par exemple de réduire les risques de diabète. Les procyanidines possèdent également des propriétés antioxydantes et peuvent être consommées par l’homme. Les anthocyanidines ont démontré des propriétés qui permettraient de protéger les yeux contre les effets de la cataracte. Enfin, la naringénine est connue pour ses propriétés anticancéreuses. Les nœuds des arbres constituent une source très riche en lignanes qui sont des phytoestrogènes possédant également des propriétés anticancéreuses. Les lignanes dérivées des arbres ont reçu une approbation en tant que complément alimentaire aux États-Unis. En raison de leur abondance, il serait probablement meilleur marché de fabriquer ces produits phytochimiques à partir des arbres plutôt qu’à partir des sources agricoles.

CFIC Forest Science Policy Forum on Transformative Technologies Regional Workshops Summary Report, May 2006.

129


Les feuillages constituent aussi une source de produits chimiques exotiques, tels que la chlorophylle, les caroténoïdes, les huiles essentielles et les protéines de feuille. À ce jour, les coûts liés à la collecte, les limites technologiques et les marchés à faible densité ont contribué à limiter les opportunités commerciales des produits de l’extraction du bois à ceux dotés d’une valeur élevée et d’une exclusivité. Aucune étude approfondie n’a été menée sur la gamme complète de produits chimiques que l’on pourrait produire à partir des espèces de bois présentant un intérêt spécifique pour le Canada. 3.2

Les produits bioplastiques

Le développement des polymères biodégradables en vue de remplacer les plastiques pétrochimiques traditionnels suscite un vif intérêt à l’échelle mondiale. L’un des produits bioplastiques qui a le plus retenu l’attention est l’acide polylactique, déjà fabriqué à hauteur d’un million de kilogrammes aux États-Unis. Il est produit par fermentation du dextrose de maïs et est utilisé pour fabriquer des emballages, des solvants, des revêtements, des films, de l’antigel et des détergents. Ce type de produits chimiques issus de plate-forme bioplastique devrait aussi, dans un avenir proche, être fabriqué en volumes compétitifs à partir des sucres dérivés des arbres. Les polyhydroxyalcanoates (PHA) possèdent les propriétés thermoplastiques et élastiques requises pour fabriquer des produits bioplastiques. L’une des formes courantes du PHA, désignée acide 3-hydroxybutirate (PHB), est produite par des bactéries dans les installations de traitement d’effluents par boues activées des usines de pâtes et papiers. Ces effluents ont une composition chimique idéale pour la production de PHB. Les bactéries transforment la biomasse boueuse en plastique biodégradable. Les étapes d’extraction requises ont rendu le PHB bactérien trop coûteux dans le passé, mais un procédé de fermentation du PHB a été commercialisé récemment, ce qui indique qu’il est possible de le produire à des coûts inférieurs. La biomasse boueuse des usines de pâtes peut se révéler être une source de bioplastique bon marché et très intéressante. Les produits finis incluent les contenants alimentaires, les bouteilles en plastique, les emballages, les produits médicaux et même le papier couché, autrement dit de nombreuses ressources qui font actuellement appel aux polymères à base de pétrole. Certains exemples de polymères fabriqués à partir des éléments constitutifs dérivés de l’hémicellulose, tels que décrits dans le paragraphe 3.1.2, incluent un polyester exclusif fabriqué à partir du 1,3-propanediol, des polyesters hyper-ramifiés fabriqués par des diacides réactifs avec des sucres, un nouveau mélange à mouler en feuilles polyester biogénique et un antigel non toxique, le 1,2 propylène diol. La production de l’acide lévulinique constitutif est en cours de commercialisation; grâce à cet acide, une large gamme de produits peut être fabriquée : résines époxydes, polyesters, solvants, allonges d’essence, plastifiants, produits médicinaux, cosmétiques et arômes. Outre les bioplastiques à base d’hémicellulose énoncés ci-dessus, il est possible de fabriquer des articles cellulosiques et des copolymères cellulosiques qui sont des produits biodégradables et de plus en plus économiques. Les nouveaux dérivés cellulosiques et les copolymères cellulosiques fonctionnalisés pourraient servir à élaborer des bioplastiques à rendement intelligent pour de nouvelles applications exclusives dans les revêtements, membranes et films réceptifs aux stimuli et doués d’une capacité de biodétection.

CFIC Forest Science Policy Forum on Transformative Technologies Regional Workshops Summary Report, May 2006.

130


3.3

Produits pharmaceutiques et nutraceutiques

Voilà longtemps que l’on extrait de nombreux produits pharmaceutiques et nutraceutiques du bois des forêts tropicales. La quinine, un alcaloïde antipaludique, est l’un des produits précurseurs le mieux connu. En revanche, la forêt boréale est restée peu explorée en tant que source potentielle de ces produits. Elle est pourtant réputée pour avoir son propre réservoir de composés bioactifs, réservoir que l’on commence à sonder. Le taxol, un produit anticancéreux, et le stérol, qui est utilisé pour faire baisser le taux de cholestérol, sont deux exemples bien connus assez récents. Il semble que les nouveaux produits pharmaceutiques et nutraceutiques encore inexplorés que recèle la forêt boréale canadienne présentent une réelle opportunité. Une démarche plurielle réunissant des botanistes, des biochimistes et des ingénieurs est cependant nécessaire pour exploiter méthodiquement cette opportunité. 3.4

Fibres de cellulose fonctionnalisées et nanocristaux

Les fibres utilisées dans les produits de papier classiques mesurent entre 1 et 3 mm de long et ont un diamètre d’environ 30 micromètres. Ces macro-fibres naturelles comportent des fibres de microfibrilles de sous-structure ayant un diamètre d’un micromètre, lesquelles à leur tour sont composées de nanocristaux de cellulose ayant des diamètres inférieurs à 0,01 micromètre (10 nanomètres). Alors que les macro-fibres sont largement utilisées dans le papier, les propriétés extraordinaires des microfibrilles et des nanocristaux cellulosiques restent peu exploitées dans les produits actuels. Les fibres de cellulose de l’ordre du macro-, micro- ou nanomètre peuvent être fonctionnalisées afin de renforcer les biocomposites de plastique utilisés dans tout l’éventail d’applications actuelles dédiées aux produits en plastique. Le coût plus faible des fibres cellulosiques (un quart du coût des produits en plastique courant) et leurs fonctionnalités améliorées permettraient de les intégrer au marché mondial annuel du plastique armé qui s’élève à 150 millions de $. Les micro- et macro-fibres ligneuses sont également meilleur marché et constituent une alternative plus saine à la fibre de verre, fibre de renfort des produits plastiques couramment utilisés aujourd’hui. À une échelle plus petite, les nanocristaux de cellulose permettent d’améliorer la résistance de certains matériaux de manière extraordinaire, et représentent une alternative aux nanotubes de carbone. L’extraction commerciale de ces nanocristaux de cellulose permettrait de les utiliser dans une plage étendue de produits ainsi que dans ceux mentionnés plus haut. À titre d’exemple, ils pourraient servir de gélifiants dans l’industrie alimentaire et dans le mastic à greffer, d’agents de renforcement pour les bouteilles en plastique, et de colorants dans la cosmétique et les peintures. Ces produits représentatifs tirent profit de l’agencement par phase liquide et des microstructures impeccables de ces remarquables produits de la nature. 4.

POSSIBILITÉS : OPTIONS DE PROCÉDÉ 4.1 Matières premières forestières

Les forêts canadiennes possèdent de réels atouts en ce qui a trait aux matières premières issues de la biomasse. Les forêts naturelles immenses sont exploitées selon des méthodes viables et les résidus non exploités foisonnent. Par rapport aux sources agricoles, la logistique associée à la plantation, à la récolte, au transport et au stockage est plus simple et peut s’avérer meilleur marché; et la grande variété d’espèces et les conditions de végétation au Canada permettent de fabriquer un très large éventail de produits fibreux issus du bois. Comme

CFIC Forest Science Policy Forum on Transformative Technologies Regional Workshops Summary Report, May 2006.

131


on l’admet plus justement dans le secteur des produits de papier et de bois traditionnel, les usines les plus viables sont celles qui sont idéalement adaptées à la qualité du bois local. Le boisement des terres agricoles peu productives à l’aide de peupliers hybrides et de mélèzes par exemple, commence à prendre de l’ampleur au Canada. Comme dans le cas des terres agricoles, il est possible d’appliquer la technologie génomique aux plantations afin de sélectionner ou de concevoir des arbres parfaits qui permettront d’obtenir les propriétés voulues quant au produit fini. Cette approche est déjà mise en œuvre dans les activités forestières à travers le monde. Mais c’est au Canada que les capacités de transformation de cette technologie seraient les plus spectaculaires. 4.2 Options de procédé Dans les raffineries de pétrole, la distillation est la technologie de séparation et de purification prédominante; dans une raffinerie de biomasse, d’autres procédés seront nécessaires pour traiter la matière première qui est plus hétérogène. Ceux-ci incluent l’extraction par solvant, les méthodes enzymatiques biochimiques et les techniques de séparation des membranes et de la résine. Les procédés thermochimiques (haute température), tels que la gazéification et la pyrolyse rapide, occuperont également une place de choix, principalement pour les combustibles, mais ils présentent aussi des opportunités pour les coproduits chimiques. Les progrès considérables réalisés dans les domaines biotechnologiques de la génomique et de la protéomique ont pavé le chemin des voies biochimiques pour ce qui a trait à l’isolation, à l’extraction et au traitement des produits chimiques tirés du bois à l’aide des enzymes. Cette approche a été éprouvée par l’industrie pharmaceutique, et est désormais plus largement utilisée dans le secteur agro-alimentaire. La technologie enzymatique est prête à être exploitée à une échelle industrielle plus grande. Les usines de pâtes et papiers utilisent actuellement les enzymes pour le blanchiment et le nettoyage à l’eau blanche. Il reste à découvrir de nombreuses autres applications non énergétiques pour l’extraction ou la synthèse biochimique à l’aide d’enzymes. Les techniques de criblage rapide et la découverte ingénieuse de gènes permettront, petit à petit, de mettre au jour les biocatalyseurs enzymatiques hautement spécifiques en mesure de réaliser les miracles biochimiques attendus. Les technologies d’extraction chimique les plus innovantes incluent notamment celles qui mettent en œuvre des liquides expansés par du gaz ou de l’eau sous-critique et du CO2 supercritique. Elles sont en grande partie confinées dans des laboratoires et limitées à l’échelle préindustrielle, mais elles augurent de bonnes choses à l’échelle industrielle en raison de leur sélectivité élevée, des vitesses de réaction élevées et des exigences chimiques minimales. La réduction en pâte avec du CO2 supercritique serait même envisageable. Les défis techniques abondent dans les domaines tels que les matériaux de construction et le contrôle opérationnel, mais la réussite pourrait se traduire par une véritable opportunité transformationnelle pour les raffineries dédiées à la biomasse. S’agissant des options de procédés dans le contexte canadien, il faut noter que la plupart des fabriques de pâte kraft du Canada sont petites par rapport aux normes internationales, et bien que cela soit un handicap pour résister à la concurrence qui sévit dans le domaine de la production de fibres à bas coût, cela se révèle être un atout lorsqu’il est question de fabriquer des coproduits chimiques. Les usines de moindre ampleur peuvent faire preuve de flexibilité, notamment lorsqu’il s’agit d’alterner entre production de fibres et fabrication de produits chimiques en fonction des conditions du marché, ce qui n’est pas forcément possible ou justifiable avec les grandes usines de pâtes et papiers.

CFIC Forest Science Policy Forum on Transformative Technologies Regional Workshops Summary Report, May 2006.

132


4.3 Coproduits fabriqués dans les usines de pâtes et papiers Il se peut que les possibilités les plus prometteuses du développement biochimique se concrétisent avec le concours des nouvelles technologies de traitement résultant des applications bioénergétiques. Les usines de pâtes et papiers offrent aussi de bonnes opportunités. L’un des avantages de la bioraffinerie de pâtes et papiers est qu’elle peut évoluer en ajoutant de nouvelles gammes de produits aux installations existantes qui disposent déjà de l’infrastructure nécessaire pour traiter des copeaux de bois et d’autres déchets de bois. Bien évidemment, pour une bioraffinerie, l’exigence fondamentale consistera à conserver une qualité de pâte acceptable. 4.3.1

Coproduits et réduction en pâte chimique

Le procédé kraft est un traitement alcalin à haute température qui prévaut sur toutes les autres méthodes de réduction en pâte en raison de sa sélectivité. Cependant, il dégrade quelque peu le matériau hémicellulosique, et, dans une liqueur résiduaire complexe riche en composés sulfurés, complique son retrait et le rend moins exploitable. Les autres méthodes, telles que le procédé à la soude (AQ) ou à l’éthanol, se limitent généralement aux opérations impliquant les bois feuillus ou à haut rendement lorsque la sélectivité ou la résistance de la pâte est moins critique. La réduction sans soufre associée à la sélectivité du kraft demeure un objectif difficile à atteindre qui serait véritablement transformateur, en ce sens que la technologie requise par de nombreuses options de coproduits serait grandement simplifiée. Cela ouvrirait par exemple la voie à la gazéification économique de la liqueur noire, et simplifierait énormément la récupération des produits chimiques inorganiques issus de la réduction. Plusieurs options sont envisageables pour surmonter le problème lié au soufre, mais une option séduisante consiste en la préextraction de l’hémicellulose des copeaux de bois avant la mise en œuvre du procédé kraft, tel que décrit dans le paragraphe suivant. On a allégué que cela pouvait se faire sans compromettre la qualité de la pâte. Reste cependant à le démontrer intégralement en laboratoire et à l’échelle préindustrielle, ce pour un éventail de technologies d’extraction, et notamment avec les bois résineux canadiens pour lesquels les propriétés de résistance de la pâte sont les plus critiques. 4.3.2 Méthodes d’extraction des hémicelluloses appliquées dans les usines de pâtes et papiers Les méthodes de prétraitement optimisé appliquées avant la réduction en pâte chimique constituent la solution la plus probable pour amorcer la transformation d’une usine de pâte kraft en bioraffinerie. Les enjeux techniques clés résident ici dans l’extraction sélective de l’hémicellulose des copeaux de bois sans dégrader le composant cellulosique de la fibre utilisée pour la fabrication du papier. Il est possible d’extraire l’hémicellulose des matières lignocellulosiques en appliquant une technique d’extraction à l’eau chaude, alcaline, à l’acide ou au solvant. Certaines de ces méthodes ont été utilisées pour fournir les matières premières fermentescibles nécessaires à la production d’éthanol, mais il arrive qu’elles ne soient pas suffisamment sélectives si la pâte de catégorie papier est un coproduit, ce en raison de la dégradation de la cellulose. D’autres permettent d’extraire trop peu d’hémicellulose dans une concentration trop faible. De nouvelles

CFIC Forest Science Policy Forum on Transformative Technologies Regional Workshops Summary Report, May 2006.

133


recherches qui permettraient de trouver la technique de prétraitement idéale utilisable avant le procédé kraft s’imposent donc. Notons que deux types de produits présentent un intérêt : Le premier concerne l’hémicellulose polymérique, tandis que le second vise les sucres simples qui ne sont pas concernés par un usage en tant que polymère. Les usines de réduction en pâte mécanique intégrées occupent un grand segment de l’industrie des pâtes et papiers canadienne. Ainsi, le concept de bioraffinerie appliqué à la réduction en pâte mécanique suscite un intérêt particulier au Canada. Il n’a pas été beaucoup pris en compte à ce jour, mais le potentiel des coproduits de valeur et la promesse d’une consommation électrique plus faible feraient de cette technologie une technologie de transformation. Dans ce cas aussi, le prétraitement, éventuellement avec extraction des hémicelluloses par hydrolyse acide, peut s’avérer être un procédé utilisable. 4.3.3 Extraction de la lignine Il est possible d’extraire la lignine de la lessive de cuisson du kraft par ultrafiltration ou précipitation, puis de la laver avant la combustion ou la conversion chimique. Naturellement, le contenu énergétique d’une lignine qui est déchargée de la chaudière de récupération devra être compensé par un rendement accru ou en brûlant des déchets supplémentaires issus de la biomasse. 4.4 Usines biochimiques spécialisées Les usines biochimiques spécialisées incarneront la meilleure solution pour certaines matières premières et certains produits, et pourraient bien prédominer à l’avenir. Elles seront plus adaptées aux matières premières agricoles et à celles issues de la plantation, car celles-ci peuvent s’ajuster au produit. Une matière très homogène simplifierait grandement la transformabilité et élargirait les options de traitement, notamment avec des voies bio- et thermochimiques où le manque d’uniformité peut constituer un obstacle. 5. OBSTACLES À LA MISE EN ŒUVRE 5. 1 Pratiquement toutes les technologies énoncées dans ce document sont des technologies de transformation, mais il reste à surmonter de nombreux obstacles techniques par le biais de travaux de développement de produits et de procédés techniques et scientifiques au niveau du laboratoire et de l’échelle préindustrielle et commerciale. Les technologies suscitant un intérêt particulier pour le Canada sont celles liées à la nature et aux propriétés des espèces d’arbre canadiennes. Il est nécessaire de savoir comment créer une nouvelle gamme de produits biochimiques étendue à partir des résidus des scieries et des forêts tout en continuant de fournir les meilleures pâtes de bois résineux au monde : apprendre comment intégrer la fabrication des bioproduits à la fabrication actuelle des pâtes et papiers est le défi le plus ardu. La méconnaissance de la composition chimique des fibres et la variabilité des matières premières sont deux préoccupations techniques importantes. Comment optimiser au mieux la création de valeur avec la forêt canadienne est le facteur sous-jacent. 5.2 Les défis relatifs à l’organisation incluent les interactions entre, d’une part, les secteurs industriels - tels que l’énergie, l’agro-alimentaire, les textiles et les produits pharmaceutiques - et le secteur des produits forestiers, et, d’autre part, entre les entreprises ayant des cultures et des échelles de production très différentes. Les

CFIC Forest Science Policy Forum on Transformative Technologies Regional Workshops Summary Report, May 2006.

134


entreprises de produits forestiers devront élargir leur rayon d’action afin d’inclure un éventail de produits qui soit plus exclusif. Impliquer la force de l’entreprenariat de moindre ampleur dans le développement de produits est également un point important. Stimuler la coentreprise innovante au sein des complexes de traitement de la biomasse est une autre façon d’encourager la croissance du développement privé/exclusif avec un certain soutien public. 5.3 La concurrence des matières premières agricoles et leur capacité à adapter les éléments constitutifs biochimiques des produits finis à cible spécifique sera toujours une réalité omniprésente pour le secteur forestier. Il ne faudra pas non plus sousestimer la compétition associée à la fabrication de produits chimiques à partir du charbon, car les technologies dédiées à la capture du carbone et à la dépollution environnementale ont été mises au point pour cette matière première abondante. 5. 4 Certaines connaissances spécialisées pourraient faire défaut dans certains secteurs comme la chimie du bois et de la fibre, ainsi que les procédés chimiques et le développement de produits dans une large gamme d’échelles de production, allant des kilogrammes aux milliers de tonnes par jour. 5.5 La politique et les mesures incitatives du gouvernement pourraient stimuler la production des écoproduits de manière significative. En outre, les défis inhérents à l’accès privé à des ressources publiques pourraient être allégés par l’entremise d’un dialogue éclairé et d’une prise de décision opportune. L’expérience des autres secteurs a montré que des transformations extraordinairement positives peuvent voir le jour si l’on ajuste sensiblement les contraintes réglementaires. REMERCIEMENTS Les auteurs remercient chaleureusement l’Assemblée des directeurs de PAPIER, qui réunit les directeurs de sept centres de pâtes et papiers du Canada et le vice-président Recherche et éducation de Paprican, et souhaitent remercier plus particulièrement les personnes citées cidessous pour leur contribution à l’un des deux livres blancs, voire aux deux, consacrés aux pâtes et papiers et aux produits biochimiques : Edgar Acosta, Grant Allen, Chad Bennington, Richard Berry, Clark Binkley, Yaman Boluk, Tom Browne, Malcolm Campbell, Felisa Chan, Guy Dumont, Esteban Chornet, Peter Englezos, Ramin Farnood, Roger Gaudreault, Richard Gratton, Derek Gray, Jean Hamel, George Ionides, François Jette, John Kadla, Masahiro Kawaji, Tibor Kovacs, George Kubes, Peter Lancaster, Todd MacAllen, Leon Magdzinski, Vankatram Mahendraker, Patrice Mangin, Emma Master, David McDonald, Yonghao Ni, James Olson, Mike Paice, Michael Paleologou, Harshad Pande, Robert Pelton, Ivan Pikulik, Ken Pinder, Doug Reeves, Marc Sabourin, Mohini Sain, Brad Saville, John Schmidt, Malcolm Smith, Paul Stuart, Ted Szabo, Mike Towers, Honghi Tran, Vic Uloth, Adrian van Heiningen, Paul Watson, Ning Yan, Xiao Zhang.

CFIC Forest Science Policy Forum on Transformative Technologies Regional Workshops Summary Report, May 2006.

135


B-4 White Paper: Transformative Technologies — Bioenergy TRANSFORMATIVE TECHNOLOGIES FOR THE FOREST SECTOR: BIOENERGY PRODUCTION IN CANADA Submitted by: Faculty of Forestry, University of British Columbia Prepared by: Dr. Warren Mabee and Dr. Jack Saddler EXECUTIVE SUMMARY Canada’s forest industry will change the way that it does business in the 21st century. Increasing competition from tropical regions of the world and the impacts of global environmental change will create challenges that can only be overcome through innovation. One pathway that the industry might follow leads to bioenergy production. This white paper presents two transformative technologies that could be used to expand bioenergy production in Canada, and deliver additional energy products that can maximize economic and environmental benefits to the industry. These technologies include advanced thermochemical systems that reduce wood to its most basic gaseous components through pyrolysis or gasification, and bioconversion systems that can isolate the building-block chemicals of wood. Using components of these platforms, forest biomass can provide a sustainable, renewable source of bioenergy for Canada. This paper illustrates how evolutions in technology may be combined to create truly revolutionary processes that can transform the forest sector. Some of the most exciting options for bioenergy application are in the area of transportation fuels. The platforms described in this paper are chosen for their ability to deliver bioenergy in the form of heat, electrical power, as well as liquid fuel. These platforms also have the ability to generate other valueadded industrial chemicals that may significantly improve process economics. A key recommendation is that the development of the biorefinery should take precedence over specific bioenergy projects. This white paper makes a number of key recommendations, summarized in the last section. In brief, they are as follows: •

• • • • •

Develop a comprehensive strategy for bioenergy development that includes minimizing risk for infrastructure development, as well as economic incentives for bioenergy production and consumption Funding for RD&D should be linked to development of biorefinery facilities; Bioenergy funding should be harmonized with renewable energy programs and other synergistic programs, such as rural employment and agricultural assistance programs Continue funding to address technical challenges and hurdles in the development of transformative technologies; and Establish a Centre for Innovation that brings together Canadian capacity in biorefinery research, involving government, industry, and university players. Identify champions within the Canadian forest products sector to promote bioenergy and bioenergy products.

CFIC Forest Science Policy Forum on Transformative Technologies Regional Workshops Summary Report, May 2006.

136


MARKET INFLUENCES FOR BIOENERGY The forces of globalization and global environmental change will revolutionize the way that Canada’s forest industry does business in the 21st century. An integrated global market for forest products means that Canada faces increasing competition from tropical regions of the world, which must be met with an ageing infrastructure, an expensive workforce, and a relatively slow-growing forest resource. The impact of new players has changed the economics of the industry; while lumber and solid wood products have tended to hold their value, traditional residue-based commodities like Kraft pulp have trended downwards over the long term. At the same time, a warming global climate is playing havoc with Canadian forests, extending the habitat for pests, and increasing the likelihood of catastrophic wildfires. The response to global environmental change have included a call for ‘green’ energy, which does not contribute to the net balance of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere and which exists in a renewable, sustainable form. The long-term declining trend in the value of paper and pulp commodities will have a large impact on the Canadian forest sector. As the integrated forest products industry requires economic uptake of residues, an alternate use needs to be created for residues that can no longer be made into pulp or paper at a reasonable profit. Without these alternative uses, the returns on solid wood and panel products will be reduced. In order to adapt to these forces, the industry must embrace new technologies, products, and markets. Bioenergy, in the form of heat, electricity, and fuels, represents a ‘new’ forest product – one that can take advantage of external economic and environmental drivers. Technology to provide bioenergy is almost as old as civilization, and campfires and charcoal are still widely used as an energy source in parts of the world. But today, new and transformative technologies for generating bioenergy are being piloted or demonstrated in Canada and around the world. The Canadian industry can take advantage of these technologies to create new business opportunities, expand the range of forest products, and transform the forest sector. The technologies that will be discussed in this white paper are capable of taking wood apart into intermediate or basic components, maximizing energy return - or creating a platform for value-added chemical and material production. Wood is almost completely comprised of lignocellulosic structures, a complex matrix combining cellulose, hemicellulose, and lignin, along with a variable level of extractives. Cellulose and hemicellulose, in turn, are made up of a number of sugars, including glucose, while lignin is made up of aromatic hydrocarbons. These intermediate components may be further deconstructed into basic molecules of carbon dioxide, carbon monoxide, water, and methane. The two technologies that are discussed in this paper - the thermochemical and bioconversion platforms - take different approaches to processing the wood, each of which offer certain benefits and drawbacks. This paper includes a brief discussion of some of the drivers that are important to the emerging bioenergy sector, providing a rationale for adopting new technologies. A very brief discussion of some existing bioenergy options is provided, followed by a discussion of the potential associated with two transformative technologies: thermochemical processing and bioconversion. Technical, social, and organizational barriers to these technologies are discussed. The concept of the biorefinery is introduced as a way of overcoming some of these challenges. A series of recommendations summarize this white paper and provide guidance for future endeavours.

CFIC Forest Science Policy Forum on Transformative Technologies Regional Workshops Summary Report, May 2006.

137


CANADIAN ENERGY USE As shown in Figure 1, Canadian energy use is dominated by the consumption of refined petroleum products (RPP’s). 6 Refined petroleum products include transportation fuels (gasoline and diesel fuel) as well as fuel for industrial, residential, and commercial processes. The second largest demand for energy was in the form of natural gas, followed by electricity. A variety of other energy sources make up the rest of Canadian energy demand, including liquefied petroleum gas (LPG), coke and coke oven gas, residential wood, coal, and steam. 4500

Refined Petroleum Products (RPPs)

Energy Demand by Fuel (PJ)

4000 3500 3000

Natural Gas 2500

Electricity 2000 1500 1000

Other LPG Coke, Wood, Coal & Steam 2020

500 0 1990

1995

2000

2005

2010

2015

Figure 1 Canadian energy demand by major fuel Source: NRCan (1997) Canada’s Energy Outlook Update 1997-2020

As evident in Figure 1, it is anticipated that the greatest increase in Canadian energy demand to 2020 will be for RPP’s. Refined petroleum products consumption has risen by almost 10% over the past fifteen years; by 2020 it is anticipated that demand will be about 25% over current consumption levels. 7

3500 Transportation

3000 2500

Oil demand by sector (PJ)

2000 1500 1000

Industrial

500

Res'l/Commercial Electricity

0 1990

1995

2000

2005

2010

2015

2020

Figure 2 Canadian oil demand by end-use sector

6 The total end-use demand for energy in Canada in 2005 was estimated to be about 8940 petajoules (PJ); of this, about 3490 PJ, or 39%, was in the form of RPP’s. 7 NRCan (1997) Canada’s Energy Outlook Update 1997-2020.

CFIC Forest Science Policy Forum on Transformative Technologies Regional Workshops Summary Report, May 2006.

138


Source: NRCan (1997) Canada’s Energy Outlook Update 1997-2020

In Figure 2, demand for refined petroleum by end-use sector is shown. It is clear from this figure that the dominant growth in RPP use is related to transportation; industrial growth is essentially flat, while the use of petroleum in residential or commercial applications, or in the production of electricity, has actually declined. (Note that the dotted lines indicate a projection based on historical data). The market for RPP’s therefore represents an important driver that has the potential to shape the demand for forest bioenergy. In order to capture part of a growing energy market, the forest industry should embrace technologies that have the capacity to deliver a liquid fuel energy product, as well as traditional energy in the form of heat and power. OIL & GAS PRICES The increasing Canadian demand for transportation fuels dominates the domestic energy market. It is also an indicator of global competition for fossil fuel resources. New discoveries of oil no long can keep up with demand around the world, and the public is now aware that a shortfall in supply must eventually arise. Uncertainty and conflict in the Middle East have reduced imports from this region. Finally, a series of hurricanes has decimated the oil producing capacity in the Gulf of Mexico. Figure 3 illustrates the trend in petroleum prices since 1997.

$ 80

West Texas cruide oil (US$/bbl)

$ 70 $ 60 $ 50 $ 40 $ 30 $ 20 $ 10 $0 Jan-97

Jan-98

Jan-99

Jan-00

Jan-01

Jan-02

Jan-03

Jan-04

Jan-05

Jan-06

Figure 3 Monthly cost per barrel of West Texas Intermediate crude oil (US$/bbl) Source: www.economagic.com

As Figure 3 shows, the increasing overall price of oil has been matched by heightened volatility. Swings of over $10 per barrel are now quite common, creating uncertainty in the fuel market. The global nature of the petroleum industry means that these swings have impacted consumers in Canada, even though this country is a net exporter of petroleum, and has benefited from higher prices in terms of balance of trade and GDP. The impact that unstable fuel prices may have on the overall economy has encouraged governments in Canada and the US to look seriously at alternative fuels, which might help stabilize prices (albeit at a higher cost per litre). In the latest State of the Union speech, President Bush publicly vowed to make ethanol from forest and agricultural biomass viable within six years. 8

8

State of the Union Address, January 31, 2006. Available at www.whitehouse.org.

CFIC Forest Science Policy Forum on Transformative Technologies Regional Workshops Summary Report, May 2006.

139


The increase in the value of a barrel of oil, or a litre of refined fuel, creates a situation where technologies once considered uneconomical can become mainstream, and where untraditional players - such as the Canadian forest industry - may suddenly become important participants. Strong government support in the US and Canada can bring these technologies to commercial success. BIOMASS SUPPLY AND IMPACTS OF CLIMATE CHANGE Rising oil prices reflect globalization or social change. At the same time, a number of environmental changes have been observed around the globe. A warming trend is changing the ecology of many regions on the planet, including Canadian forests. As these areas grow warmer, the range and impact of forest pests can grow significantly.

Figure 4 Mountain pine beetle outbreak in British Columbia - 2005 Source: BC Ministry of Forests (2005) Mountain pine beetle initiative: Canadian Forest Service and BC Forest Service

In Figure 4, the impact of the ongoing Mountain Pine Beetle (MPB) outbreak is shown. MPB is controlled in by very cold winters, but a series of warm years has allowed this pest to spread to historic proportions. The current outbreak is estimated to have killed about 164 million m3 of lodgepole pine between 1999 and 2003, with far more volume affected since. It is anticipated that the annual volume of pine killed will peak during 2007 or 2008, impacting about 70 million m3 of pine annually on the timber harvesting landbase. A recent report projects that the annual volume killed will not decrease to preoutbreak levels until after 2020. 9 A biomass availability study should be carried out for Canada in order to confirm the amounts of forest biomass available for bioenergy, taking into account the opportunities like MPB that have arisen due to a warming climate. In this report, we suggest that a number of logistical issues, including transport costs and wood quality variations, need to be addressed in terms of accessing biomass for bioenergy production. 9

Source: Eng et al. (2005). Provincial-level projection of the current MPB outbreak.

CFIC Forest Science Policy Forum on Transformative Technologies Regional Workshops Summary Report, May 2006.

140


POSSIBILITIES FOR EXISTING BIOENERGY APPLICATIONS A number of existing technologies are currently in use for bioenergy production. While these technologies are not necessarily ‘transformative’, in that they do not fundamentally change the manner in which the industry operates, they represent an established - and growing - sector of the Canadian forest products industry. These technologies will continue to play an important role in bioenergy generation throughout the country. Brief summaries are provided for three present-day bioenergy applications. Energy production in the forest sector Recovery boilers are used in pulp and paper mills to recycle black liquor and recover pulping chemicals, as well as to produce steam which drives the pulping process. The steam can also be used to power turbines in order to generate electricity, although long-term low energy costs in Canada has not provided much incentive for this type of capacity. The design of recovery boilers has improved significantly over the latter half of the 20th century and particularly since the 1980’s; breakthroughs include the ability to concentrate black liquors to higher solids contents and better systems control that help reduce char buildup and plugging in the system. In Figure 5, figures from NRCan show a steady increase in the demand for spent liquor and wood residues for energy production by the pulp and paper industry. (Dotted lines indicate a projection based on historical trends). This increase in demand reflects the rise in energy costs, described in the previous section, which has provided a renewed impetus to the forest industry for self-generation of heat and power. A decline in the number of Kraft pulp mills in Canada since this data was last updated (in 2000) means that the projected demand is probably higher than the actual requirement by the industry.

800 700 600 500 400 300 200 100 0 1990

1995

2000

2005

2010

2015

2020

Figure 5 Demand for spent liquor and wood residues for energy Source: NRCan (2000) Canada’s Emissions Outlook Updated 1997-2020

Power boilers, designed to work primarily with bark, can be added to sawmills and serve as an alternative to beehive burners and other forms of waste disposal. As with recovery boilers, from power boilers can be used to generate steam, which in turn can be used to meet process requirements or directed to electricity generation. Power boilers have improved significantly with the introduction of fluidized bed technology.

CFIC Forest Science Policy Forum on Transformative Technologies Regional Workshops Summary Report, May 2006.

141


Biomass power and cogeneration The same technology used in pulp and paper mills to generate a combination of heat and power can be used in a stand-alone power plant, given appropriate economic conditions. The largest example of a biomass power facility in Canada is the plant in Williams Lake, BC, a 60 MW electricity generating plant that has been operational since 1993. This facility consumes about 600,000 tonnes of wood residues including bark, chips and sawdust annually. The wood waste fuel is provided by five surrounding sawmill operations; the electricity generated at the facility is sold under a 25-year electricity purchase agreement to BC Hydro. This facility uses standard boilers and a high pressure steam turbine for electricity production. The Williams Lake facility is used for electricity generation only. Similar facilities, given appropriate siting and sufficient local need, can make use of the process steam to supply other industrial processes, or to support district heating grids for residential heating. The recovery of both heat and power from the process is referred to as cogeneration, and can significantly raise the efficiency of these operations. At the time of construction, the Williams Lake facility was primarily designed to deal with a wood waste problem; the sawmilling operations near the town were burning residues in beehive burners, which were negatively affecting air quality. Construction of the facility was justified by payment of a governmentmandated environmental premium for the power cost which recognized benefits that this facility had on local air quality. McCloy reports that the levelized cost of power from this plant has been estimated at 6 cents per kWh 10, which is high compared to traditional technologies such as coal. The rising cost of natural gas and petroleum, however, means that electricity derived from wood waste could be quite competitive at these prices. 11 Wood pellets Wood pellets are made from wood fibres, often in the form of ground wood. Once dried, the wood can be run through a pellet mill, which extrudes wood under pressure to create high-density pellets. Wood pellets can be used in residential furnaces that resemble wood stoves, which offer improved combustion and minimal air emissions. Wood pellets are also used in district heating applications in Europe, and plans have been discussed to use them in small-scale electricity generation facilities. The Canadian wood pellet industry has grown significantly over the past ten years. Rising prices for energy around the world have driven consumers, particularly in rural areas of North America, to consider wood pellets as an alternative in home heating. Growth in North American use of wood pellets is relatively flat, however, when compared to the tremendous increases in demand that have been observed in Europe. European demand is largely being driven by ‘green energy’ credits and subsidies that are available to homeowners and small power generators. An illustration of the growth in the wood pellet industry can be seen in Figure 6. (Note that dotted lines indicate projections in production and consumption, based on historical trends). There are currently 19 active pellet plants in Canada, with a number of new facilities under construction. A large number of planned facilities in Western Canada are part of the response to the Mountain Pine Beetle outbreak ongoing in Alberta and British Columbia.

10

BW McCloy and Associates. (1999). Opportunities for increased woodwaste cogeneration in the Canadian pulp and paper industry 11 Based on price figures from www.energyshop.com

CFIC Forest Science Policy Forum on Transformative Technologies Regional Workshops Summary Report, May 2006.

142


No rth A merican P ro ductio n 7000 No rth A merican Co nsumptio n

6000

Pellet Production (000 tonnes)

Euro pean Co nsumptio n 5000

Other Co nsumptio n

4000

To tal Co nsumptio n

3000 2000 1000 0 2000

2001

2002

2003

2004

2005

2006

2007

2008

2009

2010

Figure 6 Wood pellet consumption by region versus North American production Source: Wood Pellet Association of Canada (2005)

Transformative technology - Thermochemical conversion The thermochemical conversion platform is the first ‘transformative technology’ that this white paper will consider. Using this platform, it is possible to liquefy or gasify wood, collect the chemical components which are generated, and ultimately reassemble these components into fuels and possibly industrial chemicals. This platform combines process elements of pyrolysis, gasification, and catalytic conversion. Pyrolysis and gasification may be used for bioenergy generation independently of catalysis; however, the potential product range is greatly increased when the entire platform is implemented. The first stage of thermochemical conversion, pyrolysis, is carried out on biomass that have been reduced to a relatively small size through milling or grinding. Pyrolysis (or heating in the absence of oxygen) takes place at temperatures ranging from 450° - 600° C. Depending on how fast the pyrolysis stage is carried out, a variety of products can be achieved. If pyrolysis is carried out quickly (fast pyrolysis), a combination of vapours, condensable vapours, and char is produced. The condensation of these products creates a bio-oil, which can under ideal conditions make up 60-75% of the original fuel mass. Bio-oil might be used as feedstock for value-added chemicals, or as a biofuel. 12 If the pyrolysis is carried out at a slower rate (slow pyrolysis), the vapours that are formed are less likely to condense into bio-oil. The vapours themselves consist of carbon monoxide, hydrogen, methane, carbon dioxide and water, as well as volatile tars. Slow pyrolysis, like fast pyrolysis, leaves behind a solid residue of char (or charcoal), which can make up about 10-25% of the original fuel mass. By gasifying the char at temperatures of 700°-1200° C, the char may be used as a fuel source to drive the pyrolysis process. At these temperatures, the char reacts with oxygen in order to produce carbon monoxide. 13 The gaseous products from pyrolysis and gasification are generally referred to as synthesis gases (or syngas). Pyrolysis/gasification systems have been reported to be much more efficient for energy recovery, in terms of electricity generation, than traditional combustion. Electrical generation from typical biomass power 12 13

Garcia, L. et al. (2000). Applied Catalysis A: General 201(2): 225-239. Cetin, E. et al. (2005). Combustion Sci. Technol. 177(4): 765-791.

CFIC Forest Science Policy Forum on Transformative Technologies Regional Workshops Summary Report, May 2006.

143


generation plants have efficiencies up to the 30% range. An integrated gasification combined cycle may be used to increase efficiencies, by using the waste heat from the turbine to make steam that then can be used to generate additional electricity. This type of system can give theoretical efficiencies that reach 60%. 14 Efficiencies have been noted for both co-firing systems (where biomass is gasified, and then the gaseous products are combusted with a fossil fuel such as coal or natural gas) and in dedicated biomass gasification processes. 15 Because the potential for energy recovery is so much higher, gasification systems without any downstream catalysis stage might be applied in some situations to increase bioenergy production, without impacting on existing product streams in sawmilling or pulping operations. This type of ‘evolutionary’ technology application is a logical step on the path towards greater process efficiencies and increased energy self-generation. Significant technical hurdles remain, however, particularly regarding biomassderived syngas clean-up requirements and associated char buildup problems. Biofuels from thermochemical platforms It is possible to create one potential biofuel from the thermochemical platform without a catalysis stage. Bio-oil has been advocated as a substitute for bunker-grade heating oil, and is approved for use in district heating utility boilers in Sweden. It has been mixed with coal in a co-firing facility in the United States successfully. The CANMET Energy Technology Centre is exploring a number of applications for biooil. 16 Other biofuels may be generated by applying a catalysis stage. The truly ‘revolutionary’ aspect of the thermochemical platform is its ability to use this approach to convert syngas into chemical building blocks and eventually end products. 17 Proven catalytic processes for syngas conversion to fuels and chemicals exist using syngas produced commercially from natural gas and coal. These proven conversion technologies can be applied to biomass-derived syngas. Before catalysis, raw syngas must be cleaned up in order to remove inhibitory substances that would inactivate the catalyst. These include volatile tars, sulfur, nitrogen, and chlorine compounds. The ratio of hydrogen to carbon monoxide may need to be adjusted and the carbon dioxide byproduct may also need to be removed. Methanol is one potential biofuel that can be generated through catalysis. The majority of methanol produced today is being derived from natural gas, however. Methanol has a high octane number (129) but relatively low energy (about 14.6 MJ/l) compared to gasoline (91-98 octane, 35 MJ/l). 18 Methanol is mostly used to produce MTBE, which is used as an octane booster today, but could conceivably be used in higher blends or as a stand alone fuel. Because methanol has a favourable hydrogen:carbon ratio (4:1), it is often touted as a potential hydrogen source for future transportation systems. Another potential biofuel that can be produced through the thermochemical platform is Fischer-Tropsch diesel (or biosyn diesel). This fuel was first discovered in 1923 and was commercially based on syngas made from coal, although the process could be applied to natural gas- or biomass-derived syngas. The process of converting CO and H2 mixtures to liquid hydrocarbons over a transition metal catalyst has 14

DOE. (2006). http://eereweb.ee.doe.gov/biomass/electrical_power.html Gielen, D.J. et al. (2001). Energy Policy 29(4): 291-302. 16 CANMET Energy Technology Centre (2006). http://www.nrcan.gc.ca/se/etb/cetc/pdfs/bio_oil_diesel_mixture_fuels_e.pdf 17 OBP. (2003). Multiyear Plan – 2003 to 2008. Washington, D.C.: U.S. Department of Energy. 18 Davenport, B. (2002). Chemical economics handbook marketing research report, SRI International, Menlo Park, CA. 15

CFIC Forest Science Policy Forum on Transformative Technologies Regional Workshops Summary Report, May 2006.

144


become known as the Fischer-Tropsch (FT) synthesis. Most existing production of FT-diesel was carried out in South Africa, in part because that country was under UN trade sanctions for many years and had no available source of petroleum for fuel production. Eventually, five plants were built in South Africa in the 1980’s and 1990’s (three based on coal, and one based on natural gas); and a number of other natural gas-based plants have been commissioned or constructed around the world in the late 1990’s. Another potential catalytic conversion of biomass-based syngas is to higher alcohols, including ethanol. Ethanol and other higher alcohols form as byproducts of both Fischer-Tropsch and methanol synthesis, and modified catalysts have been shown to provide better yields. 19 Other products from thermochemical platforms The thermochemical platform provides the opportunity for a number of additional coproducts, as well as energy in the form of heat or electricity and biofuels. Each syngas component (i.e. CO, CO2, CH4, H2) may be recovered, separated, and utilized. The volatile tar component, which acts as a barrier to largescale production, has been exploited by as a feedstock for value-added chemicals by Canadian companies such as Ensyn and Enerkem.

Figure 7 Thermochemical platform Source: Mabee et al. (forthcoming)

19

Putsche, V. (1999). NREL Milestone Report

CFIC Forest Science Policy Forum on Transformative Technologies Regional Workshops Summary Report, May 2006.

145


Transformative technology – Bioconversion The bioconversion platform is the second ‘transformative technology’ that this white paper will consider. This technology applies biological agents, in the form of enzymes and microorganisms, to carry out a structured deconstruction of lignocellulose components. This platform combines process elements of pretreatment with enzymatic hydrolysis to release carbohydrates and lignin from the wood, followed by fermentation to create end products. Essentially, this platform represents a blend of pulp and paper technology with commercial biotechnology processes being used today by the agricultural products sector. The pretreatment stage is designed to optimize the biomass feedstock for further processing. In the bioconversion platform, this step uses techniques analogous to traditional pulping in that they are designed to expose cellulose and hemicellulose for subsequent enzymatic hydrolysis, increasing the surface area of the substrate for enzymatic action to take place. Like in traditional pulping, lignin is either softened or removed, and individual cellulosic fibres are released creating pulp. While bioconversion pretreatment is based on existing pulping processes, however, traditional pulping parameters are defined by resulting paper properties and desired yields, while optimum bioconversion pretreatment is defined by the accessibility of the resulting pulp to enzymatic hydrolysis. After pretreatment, it is possible to separate the base components of cellulose, hemicellulose and lignin in order to facilitate industrial processing of these components. This may include bioenergy generation with the lignin fraction, allowing cellulose and hemicellulose to be processed into traditional or non-traditional wood products. The most effective isolation may be carried out by combining correct pretreatments with enzymatic hydrolysis. 20 The value of lignin for bioenergy is quite significant. In June 1996, the cost of natural gas was about $1/GJ (CDN currency), but by 2005, the average price has risen to about $7/GJ. 21 Electricity costs have risen as well, increasing self-generation as a viable alternative. It has been estimated that one tonne of softwood lignin embodies between 22.2-23.5 GJ of energy (lower heating value/higher heating value). 22 This means that one dry tonne of lignin can be worth approximately $155/tonne in energy value to a mill that currently utilizes natural gas, up from $22/tonne in 1996. At this value, self-generation of heat and power for in-mill use may be economical, even given the predilection of the wood products industry to view energy projects as outside their mandate. There is some government support for investment in more efficient self-generation technology. For example, the Renewable Energy Deployment Initiative (REDI), introduced by Natural Resources Canada in 1998, can be used to offset 25% of purchase and installation costs of biomass energy systems, up to a total of $80,000 (CDN) per installation. 23 Applying ‘evolutionary’ technology to improve lignin recovery from the pretreatment stage and processing this material by gasification to increase energy self-generation is an example of ways in which the bioconversion platform and the thermochemical platform complement each other in practice. Biofuels from the bioconversion platform The ‘revolutionary’ component of the bioconversion platform is its ability to combine pulping technologies with advanced biotechnology. Using enzyme mixtures expressed from a variety of sources, the cellulose and hemicellulose components of wood can be hydrolyzed - in essence releasing their constituent sugars, including glucose, galactose, mannose, arabinose and xylose. These sugars are an intermediate chemical product that can be used as the basis for fermentation to ethanol, a renewable 20

Mabee, W.E. et al. (Forthcoming). Appl. Biochem. Biotechnol. NRCan. (2005). Canadian Natural Gas: Review of 2004 & Outlook to 2020. 22 ECN. (2005). Phyllis, database for biomass and waste. 23 NRCan. (2006). Renewable Energy Deployment Initiative. 21

CFIC Forest Science Policy Forum on Transformative Technologies Regional Workshops Summary Report, May 2006.

146


transportation fuel, or converted to a variety of other products. Fuel ethanol, the primary output from the bioconversion platform, may be readily blended with gasoline, or used on its own. Almost all commercial hydrolysis programs today use enzymes to facilitate fast, efficient, and economic bioconversion of the wood. Enzymatic hydrolysis of lignocellulosics uses cellulases most commonly produced by fungi such as Trichoderma, Penicillum, and Aspergillus. 24 A cocktail of cellulases is required in order to break down the cellulosic structure into its carbohydrate components in an efficient manner, unlike the bioconversion of starch, which has a simpler chemical structure. The enzymatic hydrolysis step may be completely separate from the other stages of the bioconversion process which is termed separate hydrolysis and fermentation (SHF). Alternatively, it may be combined with the fermentation of carbohydrate intermediates to end-products, referred to as simultaneous hydrolysis and fermentation (SSF). The former offers the platform more flexibility, and makes it easier in theory to alter the process for different end products; however a separate process requires additional engineering and will cost more to build and operate. 25 However, SSF has been found to be highly effective in the production of specific end products. 26 Once hydrolyzed, six-carbon sugars can be fermented to ethanol using age-old yeasts and processes. Five-carbon sugars, however, are more difficult to ferment; new yeast strains are being developed that can process these sugars, but issues remain with process efficiency and the length of fermentation. Based on a review of the literature, it is estimated that ethanol yields from lignocellulosics will range between 0.12 and 0.32 L/kg undried feedstock, depending upon the efficiency of five-carbon sugar conversion. 27 A forthcoming paper by Mabee et al. has estimated the potential levels of Canadian bioethanol production from lignocellulosic sources. The results indicated that sustainable bioethanol production in Canada could be highly significant. It was estimated that residue generation from the wood processing industry could support the annual production of between 480 and 1.6 billion litres of ethanol, while forest harvest residues could contribute between 2.3 and 10.4 billion litres of bioethanol every year. In addition, energy plantations on marginal farmland could generate between 1.9 and 11.0 billion litres of bioethanol annually. It is possible that all fuel consumption in Canada could be substituted with lignocellulosicbased ethanol without impacting agriculture or forestry operations significantly. There is great potential for fuel production from biomass using the bioconversion platform. 28 Other products from bioconversion platforms One of the tremendous advantages of the bioconversion platform is that sugars, which are a primary product of hydrolysis, may be processed into a variety of value-added products. The value of biochemicals, including bioethanol, to the Canadian economy has been estimated as in excess of $1.7 billion annually. 29 Moreover, many of these products are already being demonstrated or commercially produced by the agriculture sector, providing the forest sector with a roadmap for development. Some of these products, including applications for polylactide (PLA) 30 and other bulk polymers 31 are discussed in the Biochemical White Paper commissioned by CFIC. In Figure 8, a hypothetical process flow diagram

24

Galbe, M. and Zacchi, G. (2002). Appl. Microbiol. Biotechnol. 59(6): 618-628. Mabee, W.E. et al. (Forthcoming). Appl. Biochem. Biotechnol. 26 Gregg, D.J. et al. (1998). Bioresource Technol. 63(1): 7-12. 27 Ibid; Wingren, A. et al. (2003) Biotechnol. Prog. 19(4): 1109-1117; Lawford, H.G. et al. (2001). Appl. Biochem. Biotechnol. 91-93: 133-146; Lawford, H.G. et al. (1999). Appl. Biochem. Biotechnol. 77-79: 191-204. 28 Mabee, W.E. et al. (Forthcoming). Appl. Biochem. Biotechnol. 29 Crawford, C. 2001. Discussion framework: developing bio-based industries in Canada. 30 Natureworks LLC. (2006). Natureworks LLC Corporate Website: www.natureworksllc.com. 31 DOE. (2006). New platform intermediates. 25

CFIC Forest Science Policy Forum on Transformative Technologies Regional Workshops Summary Report, May 2006.

147


for the thermochemical platform is provided, showing one configuration that provides a range of potential products.

Figure 8 Bioconversion platform Source: Mabee et al. (2005)

Barriers to implementation Technical barriers - Thermochemical platform The major technical problem with thermochemical production of fuels and chemicals is the quality of biobased syngas, which is more heterogeneous than natural gas-based syngas. While technical approaches are well documented for the production of hydrogen, methanol and FT liquids from syngas, the input gases must be relatively clean in order for these processes to function in a commercially viable sense. The heterogeneous nature of biomass means that the number of inhibitory substances, as well as the overall composition of the syngas, is more variable and thus more problematic for processing. Another issue is that deployment on a large scale is required to gain necessary economies of scale for most of

CFIC Forest Science Policy Forum on Transformative Technologies Regional Workshops Summary Report, May 2006.

148


these processes, where the cost of syngas production can easily be more than 50% of the total process cost. 32 One major problem with methanol synthesis is that biomass-based syngas tends to be hydrogen-poor compared to natural gas syngas. Methanol synthesis requires a ratio of 2:1 hydrogen:carbon monoxide to be cost-effective. Research is ongoing to allow lower ratio hydrogen:carbon monoxide syngas to be used. 33 Similarly, problems associated particularly with Fisher-Tropsch synthesis reflect syngas composition; these include low product selectivity (the unavoidable production of perhaps unwanted coproducts, including olefins, paraffins, and oxygenated products), and the sensitivity of the catalyst to contaminants in the syngas that inhibit the catalytic reaction. Research to improve the ability of catalysts to resist inhibitors is required to lower the cost of production to economic ranges. 34 Elements of the thermochemical platform for the production of bioenergy are commercially viable today. However, assembling the complete technological platform for biofuel production will require significant time, and may not be commercially viable for a decade or more. Technical barriers - Bioconversion platform The most fundamental issues for the bioconversion platform include improving the effectiveness of the pretreatment stage, decreasing the cost of the enzymatic hydrolysis stage, and improving overall process efficiencies by capitalizing on synergies between various process stages. There is also a need to improve process economics by creating coproducts that can add revenue to the process. In order to improve the ability of the pretreatment stage to optimize biomass for enzymatic hydrolysis, a number of non-traditional pulping techniques are being examined by a consortium of Canadian and US researchers, including our group at UBC. The Biomass Refining Consortium for Applied Fundamentals and Innovation (CAFI) has set its objective as advancing the efficacy and knowledge base of pretreatment technologies. 35 The pretreatments being considered by the consortia include water-based systems, such as steam-explosion pulping; acidic treatments, using concentrated or dilute acids such as H2SO4; alkaline treatments that utilize recirculated ammonia or modified steam-explosion (AFEX); and organic solvent pulping systems, such as acetic acid or ethanol. Fundamental research into the dynamics of bioconversion has also focused on the cost of enzymatic hydrolysis, which must be tailored to the complexity of the lignocellulosic matrix. Over four years, coordinated projects between Novozymes, Genencor, and the National Renewable Energy Laboratory in the United States succeeded in reducing the cost of enzymatic hydrolysis on ideal substrates by about 30fold. 36 Finally, the fermentation of pentose sugars must be achieved in order to reach maximum biofuel production. While 5-carbon fermentation has been achieved on ideal substrates, significant work remains to apply this to realistic lignocellulosic feedstocks. Integration of various process steps and increasing overall process efficiency is being improved by integrated research programs, which combine process development units with pilot or demonstrationscale facilities around the world. Process development units are operating at the University of British Columbia, at Lund University in Sweden, and in the United States at the National Renewable Energy Lab (NREL). Other facilities include the Etek Etanolteknik pilot facility in Sweden, the Abengoa 32

Spath, P. And Dayton, D. (2003). Preliminary screening - technical and economic assessment of synthesis gas to fuels. 33 Bhatt, B.L. et al. (1999). Preprints - American Chemical Society, Division of Petroleum Chemistry 44(1): 25-27. 34 DOE. (2006). Catalytic conversion. 35 Wyman, C.E. et al. (2005). Bioresource Technol. 96(18): 1959-1966. 36 Novozymes. (2005). Novozymes and NREL reduce enzyme cost. Press Release, 14 April 2005.

CFIC Forest Science Policy Forum on Transformative Technologies Regional Workshops Summary Report, May 2006.

149


demonstration plants in Spain and the USA, and the Iogen demonstration plant in Canada. Other Canadian facilities, including the CANMET Energy Technology Centre and the Alberta Research Council, have capacity to support process development. Networks of researchers that work at different process scales have combined their efforts to address this issue. It should be pointed out that most of these facilities have been designed to produce bioethanol as their primary product, but can be configured to examine a variety of coproducts. Elements of the bioconversion platform still require significant research and development. However, the bioconversion platform is now being assembled for demonstration-scale production of bioethanol by two companies, Iogen and Abengoa. It is reasonable to assume that the time horizon for commercial installations is relatively short, perhaps less than five years. Organizational barriers In order to implement new technology platforms, significant amounts of training will be required for the forest industry. The executives and leaders of the industry might look to variety of sectors, including agriculture, energy, and biotechnology, for new expertise and skills that might be applied in bioenergy applications. Forest products companies must also form strategic partnerships in order to enter new markets that are outside of the traditional mix of products. Some of these partnerships will likely be with international corporations that conduct business around the world. Other partnerships will be with smallscale companies that are developing the technologies and processes that will drive the industry in the future. Government has a strong role to play in minimizing risk and encouraging investment as new technologies are adopted by the Canadian forest sector. It is imperative that programs for clean air and water, renewable energy, renewable transportation fuels, rural employment, and resource-sector economic diversification be coordinated in order to provide the industry with maximum potential return on their investments. Academia and the research institutes of Canada also have a role to play in re-imagining the forest sector. New ideas and technologies are largely being created in these institutes. It is up to this community to build successful research programs that can support the forest sector over the next twenty years. Collaboration between universities, research institutes, government, and industry is required to ensure that research is targeted and directed towards the most promising avenues. Overcoming barriers – biorefining This white paper has made a case for the development of bioenergy technology that follows two technical platforms, both of which are capable of generating liquid biofuels in addition to more traditional forms of bioenergy. These technologies are also capable of delivering a number of chemical or material products. In essence, it is proposed that the biorefinery become the model for the future Canadian forest industry. Using the biorefining model allows the forest industry to exploit the latest and best technology under development. A wood-based biorefinery can offer many environmental, economic, and security-related benefits to global society, and particularly to Canada. For instance, energy, fuels and chemicals made from renewable biomass are characterized by reduced carbon dioxide emissions when compared to petroleum use, and thus can play a role in meeting the challenges of climate change. 37 Canada can use biorefinery products to offset GHG emissions in order to fulfill national obligations under the Kyoto Protocol, or national ‘clean air’ targets that may be set by domestic policy. The processing facilities 37

Braune, I. (1998), Ber. Landwirtsch. 76(4), 580-597.

CFIC Forest Science Policy Forum on Transformative Technologies Regional Workshops Summary Report, May 2006.

150


required to convert biomass into value-added products create direct and indirect jobs, provide regional economic development, and can increase resource-dependent incomes in the rural areas of the country. 38 Perhaps most importantly, the biorefinery offers a new path forward for the forest industry, and gives the industry a chance to diversify well beyond the bounds of traditional forest products. Designing the biorefinery The wood-based biorefinery will take many of its design cues from existing starch-based biorefineries, found throughout the world today. It may be possible to retrofit existing pulp mills, adding new process stages to liberate wood chemicals or to more efficiently generate heat and power. It may be more expedient to focus on expanding modern sawmills - adding new processing facilities on these sites would allow us to utilize mill residues without a transportation cost. In some cases, economics may dictate the creation of new ‘green field’ facilities that will be purpose-built for thermochemical processing or bioconversion. Much will depend upon economies of scale. Some technologies, such as bioconversion, work well at relatively small scales, while others - such as thermochemical conversion - require significantly larger facilities. A biorefinery must be able to derive products directly or create intermediates that can be processed into new end-products in other facilities. Because of the complexity of the chemical structure, isolating the chemical constituents of lignocellulosics is difficult and relatively costly. Offsetting these costs, of course, is the option that biorefineries provide of co-producing high-value, low-volume products for niche markets together with lower-value commodity products, such as industrial platform chemicals, fuels, or energy. Horizontal and vertical biorefining Most literature on biorefining describes the process as ‘horizontal’; that is to say, a single facility that is capable of generating a selection of energy, fuels, chemicals, and material products from a single feedstock. However, it is also useful to begin thinking of biorefining as a ‘vertical’ concept, by enforcing recyclability into every stage of forest products processing. Wood is a fundamentally recyclable material. Paper fibres can be recycled and reused several times in paper sheets. Lumber can be salvaged and reused many times in the hands of a skilled craftsman. An integrated strategy that creates a recyclability standard throughout the forest products value chain would allow fibre to move from solid wood, to panel and beam products, to biomaterials, to cardboard and paper applications, and finally to chemical, fuel and energy recovery. By making every fibre a ‘vertical biorefinery’, it is possible to extend the utility of a single tree over several hundred years. This type of strategy would greatly enhance the ability of the Canadian forest resource to meet multiple demands for materials, chemicals, fuel and energy. It would continue to build on the industry’s solid reputation as an environmental steward, and would create new product opportunities across the entire spectrum of traditional and non-traditional uses. The vertical and horizontal biorefinery strategies combined provide the Canadian forest industry with an exciting roadmap towards a re-invented, rejuvenated, and responsible future.

38

Morris, D. (2000), Carbohydrate Economy Newsletter, Fall 2000 Issue, Institute for Local Self Reliance, Washington, DC.

CFIC Forest Science Policy Forum on Transformative Technologies Regional Workshops Summary Report, May 2006.

151


Champions for bioenergy and biorefining Canada has in excess of 400 million ha of forested land, about 93% of which is publicly-owned, and 77% of which is controlled by various provincial governments. The Canadian forest sector has long held the rights to harvest or manage these public resources through the forest tenure system, providing jobs and revenues to communities and governments. In this white paper, we have argued that we are moving towards a future that where bioenergy emerges as a cost-competitive, strategically important resource for Canada as well as a major forest product for the sector. What is not clear, however, is if Canada’s forest product sector is prepared to adapt in this direction. As energy concerns rise, we might anticipate changes to the tenure system designed to give other champions for bioenergy access to the Canadian forest resource. Champions for bioenergy may include a variety of players outside of the Canadian forest industry. These players may include petroleum companies, energy providers and utilities with access to markets and distribution networks, entrepreneurial providers of new technologies and processes, and agricultural or chemical sector partners who focus on process and are capable of handling forest feedstocks. As the ownership of Canadian forests resides with the Crown, it is entirely feasible that new policies could provide these other champions with equal or greater access to the forest resource. To meet the economic and environmental challenges of the 21st century, Canada’s forest sector must transform itself - or be left behind. The technologies illustrated in this white paper offer Canada’s forest sector with a pathway towards new products, new markets, and new profits. Potential competitors should be seen as partners, whose expertise and skills complement the forest sector. Transformative technologies mark a significant point in the evolution of our businesses and our ability to use the forest resource effectively. Recommendations We identify six key policy recommendations for developing a forest-based bioenergy sector in Canada. 1. All levels of government should consider a three-component approach to the development of bioenergy capacity in Canada: •

Utilize existing models of government programs that can minimize the economic risk to investors associated with establishing bioenergy infrastructure in Canada.

Introduce an economic incentive for the production of bioenergy, reflecting its origin and the costs associated with production, in the form of tax breaks or producer credits, and the potential for coproducts or biorefining activities.

Introduce an economic incentive for consumer utilization of bioenergy the form of tax breaks or subsidy which translates to lower energy prices.

2. Government funding for all aspects of RD&D related to transformative technologies should be separate from traditional technologies, and should be linked to development of biorefinery facilities. The specific technological platform should not be specified by policy, but should be guided by industry’s assessment of technical capabilities, potential coproducts, and total economic returns. Where possible, these strategies should consider linkages between biorefining and traditional platforms for cogeneration and wood pellet production. 3. Where possible, funding for bioenergy should be harmonized with renewable energy programs and other synergistic programs, such as rural employment and agricultural assistance programs, in order

CFIC Forest Science Policy Forum on Transformative Technologies Regional Workshops Summary Report, May 2006.

152


to maximize support for infrastructure development. This requires continuation of dialogue and collaboration between Ministries, and between the Federal and Provincial government equivalents. This activity may also help determine the optimum technological platform for specific applications. •

In specific cases where there is an emphasis on development of the rural economy through alternative value-added commodity products, the bioconversion platform provides the best immediate opportunities for biorefining activities.

In specific cases where there is a requirement for bioenergy to meet demand for electricity or energy, the thermochemical platform offers the best immediate opportunities for biorefining activities.

4. It is important that all levels of government continue to provide funding aimed at addressing technical challenges and hurdles in the development of these transformative technologies, at levels ranging from research, to development, to deployment. This funding should include research into the downstream creation of biofuels and value-added chemical products, as well as bioenergy generation. Continue to build strong linkages to the US, in order to build upon the advances that the agricultural and chemical sector in that country has made with the bioconversion platform. 5. Establish a Centre for Innovation that brings together Canadian capacity in Biorefinery research, including, and involving government, industry, and university players. We strongly suggest that this Centre be housed in a Canadian University, or group of universities, with expertise in commerce, engineering, biotechnology, and policy. The Centre could act in a ‘virtual’ manner to link a number of Canadian proponents. •

Support the Centre through funding that explores technical improvements to bioenergy production capabilities, including both ‘horizontal’ and ‘vertical’ biorefining activities.

Promote cross-sectoral research partnership opportunities between Canadian and US universities and companies, which allow the lessons learned in the agricultural and chemical sectors to be applied within the Canadian forestry and energy sectors.

Include process demonstration and scale-up capacity to provide the industry with some figures on commercial applications

Link this research with a biomass supply review that would be carried out at both the national and provincial levels.

Create a policy research branch within this Centre that works closely with government, informs the technical research network, and determines the ability of new advancements to meet Canadian policy goals.

Charter the Centre for five years to achieve specific goals, and renew the charter on a five-year basis with changes that reflect technological and business needs.

6. Identify Champions within the Canadian forest products sector to promote bioenergy and bioenergy products. We strongly feel that, without the active transformation of the Canadian forest products sector towards a more diverse portfolio of products and services, a number of new ‘champions’ including entrepreneurial technology developers, non-traditional agricultural and chemical companies, and energy providers and utilities - may provide a more compelling case for access to Canada’s publicly-owned forests. To combat this challenge, Canada’s forest companies must aggressively utilize transformative technologies to generate new products. It may be necessary to leverage partnerships with the other players, in order to exploit existing distribution systems and markets.

CFIC Forest Science Policy Forum on Transformative Technologies Regional Workshops Summary Report, May 2006.

153


Acknowledgements In the preparation of this paper, a number of leading Canadian experts in bioenergy research were consulted. This paper has been modified greatly based on the input of the following individuals: Don O’Connor ((S&T)2), Bill Cruickshank, John Burnett, and Sebnem Madrali (Natural Resources Canada), and Shahab Sokhansanj (University of British Columbia), and Andy Garner (Andy Garner and Associates, Vancouver, BC).

CFIC Forest Science Policy Forum on Transformative Technologies Regional Workshops Summary Report, May 2006.

154


B-4 Livre Blanc : Technologies Transformantes — Bioénergie LES TECHNOLOGIES TRANSFORMATIVES POUR LE SECTEUR FORESTIER : LA PRODUCION DE BIOÉNERGIE AU CANADA Présenté au Conseil canadien de l’innovation forestière Préparé par : Warren Mabee et Jack Saddler Sommaire analytique Ce Livre blanc présente deux technologies transformantes qui pourraient augmenter la production de bioénergie au Canada et fournir des produits d’énergie supplémentaires qui permettent à l’industrie d’obtenir un maximum d’avantages économiques et environnementaux. Ces technologies sont notamment des systèmes thermochimiques avancés qui réduisent le bois dans ses composants gazeux élémentaires par la pyrolyse ou par la gazéification, ainsi que des systèmes de bioconversion qui peuvent isoler les constituants chimiques du bois. Transformée par ces plates-formes, la biomasse des forêts peut devenir une source de bioénergie durable et renouvelable pour le Canada. Dans ce document, on montre comment on peut combiner de nouveaux développements technologiques pour mettre au point des procédés vraiment révolutionnaires qui peuvent transformer le secteur forestier. C’est dans le domaine des carburants de transport qu’on observe certaines des possibilités les plus intéressantes pour l’application des bioénergies. Ce document présente des plates-formes qui ont été choisies à cause de leurs caractéristiques de production des bioénergies sous forme de chaleur, d’énergie électrique et de combustibles liquides. Ces plates-formes peuvent également fabriquer d’autres produits chimiques industriels à valeur ajoutée susceptibles d’améliorer notablement la rentabilité des procédés. L’une des principales recommandations du Livre blanc est qu’on devrait accorder la priorité au développement des procédés de bioraffinage, plutôt qu’à des projets de bioénergie particuliers. Ce Livre blanc présente sous forme de sommaire un certain nombre de recommandations clés dans la dernière section. En voici un bref résumé : • •

• •

Le financement de la RD et D doit favoriser le développement des installations de bioraffinage. Le financement des bioénergies doit être harmonisé avec les programmes d’énergie renouvelable et d’autres programmes à caractère synergique, par exemple les programmes d’emploi rural et d’aide à l’agriculture. Il faut un financement continuel pour répondre aux défis techniques et pour aplanir les obstacles rencontrés au cours du développement des technologies transformantes. Il faut élaborer une stratégie globale pour le développement des bioénergies, qui tente de réduire au minimum les risques liés au développement des infrastructures, et qui prévoie des incitations économiques pour la production et la consommation des bioénergies. Il faut créer des programmes spécifiques qui favorisent l’augmentation de la consommation de biocombustibles sélectionnés.

CFIC Forest Science Policy Forum on Transformative Technologies Regional Workshops Summary Report, May 2006.

155


Il faut mettre sur pied un Centre d’innovation qui doit regrouper les meilleures compétences canadiennes pour la recherche en matière de bioraffinage, en faisant appel à la collaboration d’intervenants du gouvernement, de l’industrie et des universités.

Influences du marché sur le développement des bioénergies Au cours du 21e siècle, les forces de la mondialisation et les changements environnementaux planétaires devraient changer radicalement les pratiques d’affaires de l’industrie forestière canadienne. À cause de l’intégration du marché mondial des produits de la forêt, le Canada est confronté à une compétition croissante des régions tropicales, malgré le vieillissement de ses infrastructures, sa main-d'œuvre coûteuse et une croissante relativement lente de ses ressources forestières. L’impact des nouveaux intervenants a changé les caractéristiques économiques de cette industrie; alors que le bois d’oeuvre et les produits du bois massif tendent à garder leur valeur, on note une tendance à long terme vers la baisse pour les produits ordinaires à base de résidus forestiers comme la pâte kraft. Cela pose un problème dans toutes les parties de l’industrie des produits de la forêt, qui a besoin de ces débouchés pour les débris ligneux des divers procédés. Simultanément, le réchauffement mondial du climat bouleverse les conditions des forêts canadiennes, en augmentant l’aire des habitats des ravageurs forestiers et en rendant plus probables des feux de forêt catastrophiques. En réponse au changement environnemental planétaire, on préconise l’utilisation de l’énergie verte, qui n’a pas d’effets sur l’équilibre net des gaz à effet de serre dans l’atmosphère et qui est une forme d’énergie renouvelable et durable. Afin de s’adapter à ces forces, l’industrie doit se tourner vers de nouvelles technologies, de nouveaux produits et de nouveaux marchés. Les bioénergies, sous la forme de chaleur, d’électricité et de combustible, représentent un « nouveau produit de la forêt », qui peut tirer parti des déterminants économiques et environnementaux extérieurs. Les technologies sur lesquelles sont fondées les bioénergies sont presque aussi vieilles que la civilisation; par exemple, les feux de camp et le charbon sont encore largement utilisés comme source d’énergie dans certaines parties du monde. Toutefois, de nos jours, au Canada et dans le monde entier, on fait l’essai, à l’échelle pilote ou de la démonstration, de technologies nouvelles et transformantes pour la production de bioénergie. L’industrie canadienne peut profiter de ces technologies pour créer de nouvelles occasions d’affaires, accroître la gamme des produits de la forêt et transformer le secteur forestier. Les technologies examinées dans ce Livre blanc peuvent réduire le bois en ses composants intermédiaires ou primaires, ce qui permet d’en tirer un maximum d’énergie ou de créer une plate-forme pour fabriquer des produits chimiques à valeur ajoutée et des matières premières. Le bois est presque entièrement constitué de structures lignocellulosiques, une matrice complexe composée de cellulose, d’hémicellulose et de lignine, ainsi que d’une proportion variable de substances extractibles. La cellulose et l’hémicellulose sont elles-mêmes constituées d’un certain nombre de sucres, notamment le glucose, alors que la lignine est faite d’hydrocarbures aromatiques. Ces composants intermédiaires peuvent être euxmêmes décomposés en molécules de base comme le gaz carbonique, le monoxyde de carbone, l’eau et le méthane. Dans ce document, on examine deux types de technologies, les technologies thermochimiques et les technologies de bioconversion, qui adoptent des approches différentes pour le traitement du bois, chacune avec ses avantages et ses inconvénients. Ce document présente également un bref examen de certains des déterminants clés dans le nouveau secteur de la bioénergie, qui justifient l’adoption des nouvelles technologies. On y trouve aussi une très brève discussion sur certaines des options actuelles pour les bioénergies, suivie par une autre discussion sur les possibilités associées aux deux technologies transformantes examinées, le traitement thermochimique et la bioconversion. On y examine également les obstacles d’ordre technique, social et organisationnel qui s’opposent à leur développement. On présente le concept du bioraffinage, une technologie qui devrait permettre de relever certains des défis annoncés. Enfin, une série de

CFIC Forest Science Policy Forum on Transformative Technologies Regional Workshops Summary Report, May 2006.

156


recommandations résume les objectifs du Livre blanc, afin de guider les entreprises au cours des prochaines années. Utilisation de l’énergie au Canada Comme le montre la figure 1, au Canada, l’utilisation de l’énergie est dominée par la consommation de produits du pétrole raffinés (PPR). 39 Ce sont notamment les carburants de transport (essence et carburant diesel), ainsi que les combustibles pour les procédés industriels, résidentiels et commerciaux. La deuxième source d’énergie la plus en demande, c’est le gaz naturel, et la troisième, l’électricité. Diverses autres sources d’énergie constituent le reste de la demande en énergie du Canada, notamment le gaz de pétrole liquéfié (GPL), le coke et le gaz de four à coke, le bois de chauffage, le charbon et la vapeur. 4500

Refined Petroleum Products (RPPs)

4000

Energy Demand by Fuel (PJ)

3500 3000

Natural Gas

2500

Electricity

2000 1500 1000

Other LPGCoke,

500 0 1990

1995

2000

2005

2010

2015

2020

Wood, Coal & Steam

Figure 3 Demande en énergie du Canada pour les principales sources d’énergie Source : RNCan (1997) Perspectives énergétiques du Canada : 1997-2020, mise à jour

Comme le montre la figure 1, on prévoit que, d’ici 2020, la plus forte augmentation de la demande en énergie du Canada sera celle des PPR. En effet, la consommation de produits du pétrole raffinés a augmenté de presque 10 % au cours des quinze dernières années et vers 2020, elle devrait dépasser les niveaux de consommation actuels d’environ 25 %. 40 La figure 2 montre la demande de pétrole raffiné par secteur d’usage final. Elle indique clairement que la croissance de la dominance de l’utilisation des PPR est liée aux transports, car la croissance industrielle est essentiellement stationnaire et on note un déclin de l’utilisation du pétrole dans les secteurs résidentiel et commercial, ou pour la production d’électricité (les pointillés représentent des prévisions basées sur des données historiques). Le marché des PPR constitue donc un facteur déterminant clé qui peut influer sur la demande en bioénergie forestière. Afin de capturer une partie du marché énergie en pleine croissance, l’industrie forestière devrait adopter des technologies qui peuvent produire des combustibles liquides, ainsi que des types habituels d’énergie, sous forme de chaleur et d’énergie. 39 On évalue la demande totale en énergie des usages finals au Canada pour 2005 à environ 8 940 pétajoules (PJ), dont environ 3 490 PJ, ou 39 %, sous forme de PPR. 40 RNCan (1997) Mise à jour de Perspectives énergétiques du Canada : 1997-2020.

CFIC Forest Science Policy Forum on Transformative Technologies Regional Workshops Summary Report, May 2006.

157


3500

Transportation

3000

Oil demand by sector (PJ)

2500 2000 1500 1000

Industrial

500

Res'l/Comme Electricity

0 1990

1995

2000

2005

2010

2015

2020

Figure 4 Demande canadienne de pétrole, par secteur d’usage final Source : RNCan (1997), Perspectives énergétiques du Canada : 1997-2020, mise à jour

Prix du pétrole et du gaz La demande croissante du marché canadien pour les carburants de transport est le facteur dominant du marché intérieur de l’énergie. C’est aussi un indicateur de la compétition mondiale pour les ressources en combustibles fossiles. Les nouvelles découvertes de pétrole ne parviennent plus à répondre à la demande mondiale, et le public sait maintenant que des pénuries sont inévitables. L’incertitude politique et les conflits du Moyen-Orient ont réduit les importations de cette région. Enfin, une série d’ouragans a décimé les installations de production pétrolière dans le golfe du Mexique. La figure 3 montre les tendances des prix du pétrole depuis 1997.

$80

West Texas cruide oil (US$/bbl)

$70 $60 $50 $40 $30 $20 $10 $0 Jan-97

Jan-98

Jan-99

Jan-00

Jan-01

Jan-02

Jan-03

Jan-04

Jan-05

Jan-06

Figure 3 Coût mensuel du baril de brut intermédiaire de l’ouest du Texas ($US/baril) Source : www.economagic.com

CFIC Forest Science Policy Forum on Transformative Technologies Regional Workshops Summary Report, May 2006.

158


Comme le montre la figure 3, le prix d’ensemble croissant du pétrole est accompagné par une plus grande volatilité des cours. Des oscillations de plus de 10 $ par baril sont maintenant assez courantes, ce qui crée une certaine incertitude sur le marché des combustibles. À cause de la nature mondiale de l’industrie du pétrole, ces oscillations ont des effets sur les consommateurs canadiens, même si le Canada est un exportateur net de pétrole et que sa balance commerciale et son PIB profitent des prix plus élevés. L’impact que la volatilité des prix des combustibles peut avoir sur l’ensemble de l’économie a encouragé les gouvernements du Canada et des États-Unis à examiner sérieusement les possibilités offertes par d’autres combustibles, qui pourraient contribuer à stabiliser les prix (malgré un coût du litre plus élevé). Lors du dernier discours sur l’état de l’Union, le président Bush s’est engagé publiquement à rentabiliser d’ici six ans l’industrie de l’éthanol produit à partir des ressources forestières et de la biomasse agricole. 41 À cause de l’augmentation du prix du baril de pétrole ou du litre d’essence, des technologies qui étaient jadis jugées non rentables peuvent prendre leur place au milieu des technologies traditionnelles. Ainsi, de nouveaux intervenants, par exemple l’industrie forestière canadienne, peuvent devenir des joueurs importants du jour au lendemain. Aux États-Unis et au Canada, un appui non équivoque des gouvernements peut rendre possible le succès commercial de ces technologies. Approvisionnements en biomasse et impacts du changement climatique L’augmentation des prix du pétrole reflète la mondialisation ou le changement social. En même temps, on a observé un certain nombre de changements environnementaux à divers endroits sur la planète. La tendance au réchauffement est en train de changer l’écologie de beaucoup de régions du monde, notamment les forêts canadiennes. À mesure que ces régions se réchauffent, l’aire de distribution géographique et l’impact des ravageurs des forêts pourraient s’accroître considérablement.

Figure 4 Infestation de dendroctones du pin en Colombie-Britannique (2005) Source : Ministère des Forêts de la Colombie-Britannique (2005), Mountain pine beetle initiative, Service canadien des forêts et BC Forest Service

41

Discours sur l’état de l’Union, 31 janvier 2006. Disponible sur le site www.whitehouse.org.

CFIC Forest Science Policy Forum on Transformative Technologies Regional Workshops Summary Report, May 2006.

159


La figure 4 montre l’impact de l’infestation actuelle de dendroctones du pin. Les populations de cet insecte sont limitées par les hivers très froids, mais, à la faveur d’une série d’années chaudes, elles ont atteint des records historiques. On estime que l’infestation actuelle a détruit un volume d’environ 164 millions de m3 de pin tordu entre 1999 et 2003, et le volume des arbres touchés depuis est encore plus grand. On s’attend à ce que le volume annuel de pin détruit atteigne un maximum en 2007 ou 2008, passant à environ 70 millions de m3 par année dans la zone d’exploitation du bois d’oeuvre. Selon un rapport récent, des volumes significatifs de pin devraient être touchés jusqu’en 2015, et ce n’est qu’après 2020 que le volume des arbres détruits diminuera à des valeurs inférieures à celles l’infestation actuelle. 42 Débouchés pour les applications de bioénergie actuelles On utilise actuellement un certain nombre de technologies pour la production de bioénergie. Alors que ces technologies ne sont pas nécessairement « transformantes », du fait qu’elles ne changent pas fondamentalement le mode de fonctionnement de l’industrie, elles représentent un secteur établi et en croissance de l’industrie canadienne des produits de la forêt. Ces technologies devraient continuer à jouer un rôle important pour la production de bioénergie dans l’ensemble du pays. On présente ci-dessous de brefs sommaires pour les trois applications de bioénergie actuelles. Production d’énergie Les usines de pâtes et papiers utilisent des chaudières de récupération pour recycler la liqueur noire et récupérer les agents chimiques qui réduisent le bois en pâte, ainsi que pour produire de la vapeur qui fournit l’énergie requise au procédé. On peut aussi utiliser cette vapeur pour entraîner des turbines afin de produire de l’électricité, même si, au Canada, les faibles coûts à long terme de l’énergie n’incitent pas tellement à utiliser cette possibilité. On a amélioré considérablement la conception des chaudières de récupération au cours de la seconde moitié du 20e siècle, notamment depuis les années 1980, afin qu’elles concentrent les liqueurs à des teneurs supérieures en matières solides; parmi les avancées, il faut noter la capacité de concentrer les liqueurs noires en boues à forte teneur en matières solides et une amélioration des commandes des systèmes qui contribuent à réduire l’accumulation des produits de carbonisation et le colmatage du système. On peut installer dans les scieries des chaudières à vapeur haute pression conçues à l’origine pour brûler surtout de l’écorce, en remplacement des fours wigwams et d’autres processus d’élimination des résidus. Comme c’est le cas pour les chaudières de récupération, on utilise les chaudières à vapeur haute pression pour générer de la vapeur qui peut servir aux besoins du procédé ou à la production d’électricité. On a grandement amélioré ces chaudières par l’introduction de la technologie des lits fluidisés. La figure 5 présente des valeurs compilées par RNCan, qui montrent l’augmentation régulière dans la demande en liqueur usée et en débris ligneux de l’industrie des pâtes et papiers pour la production d’énergie (les pointillés représentent les valeurs prévues, d’après les tendances historiques). Cette augmentation de la demande reflète l’augmentation des coûts de l’énergie décrits dans la section précédente, qui incite encore davantage l’industrie forestière à développer des systèmes d’autogénération de chaleur et d’énergie. Le déclin du nombre d’usines de pâte kraft au Canada depuis la dernière mise à jour de ces données (en 2000) signifie que la demande prévue dépasse probablement les besoins réels de l’industrie.

42

Source : Eng et al. (2005). Provincial-level projection of the current MPB outbreak.

CFIC Forest Science Policy Forum on Transformative Technologies Regional Workshops Summary Report, May 2006.

160


800 700

Energy demand (PJ)

600 500 400 300 200 100 0 1990

1995

2000

2005

2010

2015

2020

Figure 5 Demande en liqueur usée et en débris ligneux pour la production d’énergie Source : RNCan (1996) Perspectives énergétiques du Canada, 1996-2020

Cogénération Dans des conditions économiques appropriées, on peut employer la même technologie que les usines de pâtes et papiers pour obtenir une combinaison de chaleur et d’énergie (ce procédé est connu sous le nom de cogénération, c.-à-d. production combinée de chaleur et d’énergie) dans une usine de production d’énergie indépendante. La plus grande des installations de ce type au Canada est l’usine de cogénération de Williams Lake (Colombie-Britannique), une usine de production d’énergie de 60 MW en exploitation depuis 1993. Elle brûle chaque année environ 600 000 tonnes de débris ligneux, notamment des écorces, des copeaux et de la sciure de bois. Ces déchets ligneux proviennent de cinq scieries du voisinage, et l’électricité ainsi produite est vendue à BC Hydro en vertu d’un contrat d’achat de 25 ans. Cette installation utilise des chaudières standard et une turbine à vapeur à haute pression pour la production d’électricité. Au moment de sa construction, elle était surtout destinée à contrer un problème de brûlage de déchets ligneux. En effet, les scieries du voisinage de cette ville utilisaient des fours wigwams, qui contribuaient à la détérioration de la qualité de l’air. La construction de cette usine était rentable à cause d’une prime à la protection de l’environnement du gouvernement pour les coûts de production l’énergie, qui tient compte de ses effets positifs sur la qualité de l’air de la région. Selon McCloy, on a estimé à 6 cents le kW/h le coût moyen actualisé de l’énergie produite par cette usine 43, ce qui est beaucoup par rapport à des technologies traditionnelles comme les centrales thermiques au charbon. Toutefois, à cause de l’augmentation des coûts du gaz naturel et du pétrole, l’électricité produite par la combustion des déchets ligneux pourrait devenir très compétitive, même à des prix de cet ordre. 44

43

BW McCloy and Associates. (1999). Opportunities for increased woodwaste cogeneration in the Canadian pulp and paper industry 44 D’après les données sur les prix sur le site www.energyshop.com.

CFIC Forest Science Policy Forum on Transformative Technologies Regional Workshops Summary Report, May 2006.

161


Granulats de bois Les granulats de bois sont fabriqués à partir de fibres de bois, souvent sous forme de pâte mécanique. Une fois séchées, ces fibres sont traitées par une machine à agglomérer, qui les extrude sous pression. Les granulats de bois à grande densité ainsi obtenus peuvent alimenter des appareils de chauffage résidentiels qui ressemblent à des poêles à bois, à caractéristiques améliorées de combustion et à faibles émissions atmosphériques. On utilise aussi ces granulats dans des installations de chauffage centralisé en Europe, et on a étudié des plans pour leur utilisation dans des petites centrales électriques. L’industrie canadienne des granulats de bois a connu une croissance remarquable au cours des dix dernières années. L’augmentation des prix de l’énergie dans le monde entier a incité les consommateurs, notamment dans les régions rurales de l’Amérique du Nord, à envisager l’utilisation des granulats de bois pour le chauffage domestique. Toutefois, la croissance des utilisations des granulats de bois est relativement stationnaire en Amérique du Nord par rapport aux fortes augmentations de la demande observées en Europe. Celle-ci est fortement stimulée par les crédits d’« énergie verte » et les subventions offerts aux propriétaires occupants et aux petits producteurs d’énergie. La figure 6 illustre la croissance de l’industrie des granulats de bois (les pointillés représentent des prévisions basées sur des données historiques). Il y a actuellement 19 usines de granulats en production au Canada, ainsi qu’un certain nombre de nouvelles installations en construction. Beaucoup de nouvelles installations dans l’ouest du Canada seront construites en réponse à l’infestation actuelle de dendroctones du pin en Alberta et en Colombie-Britannique. No rth A merican P ro ductio n 7000 No rth A merican Co nsumptio n

6000

Pellet Production (000 tonnes)

Euro pean Co nsumptio n 5000

Other Co nsumptio n

4000

To tal Co nsumptio n

3000 2000 1000 0 2000

2001

2002

2003

2004

2005

2006

2007

2008

2009

2010

Figure 6 Consommation des granulats de bois par région, en fonction de la production nord-américaine Source : Wood Pellet Association of Canada (2005)

Technologie transformante – La conversion thermochimique La plate-forme de conversion thermochimique est la première « technologie transformante » examinée dans ce Livre blanc. Elle permet de liquéfier ou de gazéifier les produits forestiers, de recueillir les composés chimiques qui sont produits et enfin, de fabriquer des combustibles et peut-être aussi des produits chimiques industriels en recombinant ces composés. Cette plate-forme combine les produits des

CFIC Forest Science Policy Forum on Transformative Technologies Regional Workshops Summary Report, May 2006.

162


traitements de pyrolyse, de gazéification et de conversion catalytique de ce procédé. On peut aussi produire de la bioénergie par pyrolyse et par gazéification, sans catalyse; toutefois, la gamme des produits possibles est beaucoup plus grande si on met en oeuvre toutes les possibilités de cette plate-forme. Pour la première étape de la conversion thermochimique, la pyrolyse (ou chauffage en l’absence d’oxygène), on utilise des copeaux de bois qui ont été réduits en pâte ou broyés assez finement. Elle se fait à des températures comprises entre 450 et 600° C. On peut obtenir différents produits selon la rapidité de l’étape de la pyrolyse. Un processus de pyrolyse rapide, qui se déroule dans la plage inférieure des températures (de 450 à 550 °C), produit une huile de pyrolyse liquide avec très peu de gaz. Idéalement, cette huile de pyrolyse rapide contient de 60 à 75 % de la masse combustible initiale, et elle peut être utilisée comme matière première pour la fabrication de produits chimiques à valeur ajoutée, ou comme biocombustible. 45 Si la pyrolyse se fait dans la plage de température supérieure (de 550 à 600 °C), il se forme un gaz composé de monoxyde de carbone, d’hydrogène, de méthane, de bitumes volatiles, de gaz carbonique et d’eau. La pyrolyse à haute température laisse un résidu solide de produits de carbonisation (du charbon de bois), qui correspond à environ 10 à 25 % de la masse initiale de combustible. On peut gazéifier cette matière à des températures de 700 à 1 200 °C; le charbon réagit alors avec l’oxygène et produit du monoxyde de carbone. 46 On appelle habituellement « gaz de synthèse » les divers produits gazeux de la pyrolyse et de la gazéification. On a rapporté que ce procédé de pyrolyse et de gazéification était beaucoup plus efficace pour la récupération de l’énergie, en termes de production d’électricité, par rapport aux procédés thermiques traditionnels. On a estimé à environ 30 % le niveau d’efficacité qui peut être atteint par des centrales électriques à biomasse typique, contre jusqu’à 60 % pour le cycle combiné intégré. 47 On a mesuré les efficacités de systèmes de cocombustion (selon lequel la biomasse est gazéifiée avec un combustible fossile comme le charbon ou le gaz naturel, dans des chambres séparées ou combinées), ainsi que des procédés spécialisés de gazéification de la biomasse. 48 Parce que leur potentiel de récupération de l’énergie est très supérieur, les systèmes de gazéification qui n’utilisent aucun catalyseur en aval pourraient permettre d’augmenter la production de bioénergie avec un minimum de répercussions sur le flux actuel des produits des scieries ou des installations de trituration du bois. Ce type d’application technologique « évolutionnaire » constitue une étape logique pour accroître l’efficacité du procédé et celle de l’autogénération d’énergie. Il reste encore d’importantes difficultés techniques à résoudre, notamment pour la détermination des exigences relatives à la purification du gaz de synthèse produit à partir de biomasse et pour limiter l’accumulation de produits de carbonisation. Biocombustibles obtenus à l’aide des plates-formes thermochimiques Il est possible de créer un biocombustible à partir de la plate-forme thermochimique sans étape catalytique. On a recommandé l’utilisation de biohuile comme substitut pour le mazout lourd, et ce combustible a été approuvé pour les chaudières des installations de chauffage centralisé en Suède. Aux États-Unis, on l’a mélangé avec succès à du charbon dans une installation de cocombustion. Le Centre de la technologie de l'énergie de CANMET étudie un procédé brûlant une microémulsion de biohuile qui permet de la mélanger et de l’utiliser dans des moteurs diesel ordinaires. 49 45

Garcia, L. et al. (2000). Applied Catalyse A : General 201(2) : 225-239. Cetin, E. et al. (2005). Combustion Sci. Technol. 177(4) : 765-791. 47 DOE. (2006). http://eereweb.ee.doe.gov/biomass/electrical_power.html 48 Gielen, D.J. et al. (2001). Energy Policy 29(4) : 291-302. 46

49

CANMET, Centre de la technologie de l’énergie (2006),

http ://www.nrcan.gc.ca/se/etb/cetc/pdfs/bio_oil_diesel_mixture_fuels_f.pdf

CFIC Forest Science Policy Forum on Transformative Technologies Regional Workshops Summary Report, May 2006.

163


On peut utiliser d’autres biocombustibles en ajoutant une étape de catalyse. L’aspect vraiment « révolutionnaire » de cette plate-forme thermochimique est son aptitude à utiliser cette approche pour convertir le gaz de synthèse en composants chimiques de base et, éventuellement, en produits finis. 50 Il existe des procédés catalytiques éprouvés pour la conversion du gaz de synthèse en combustibles et en produits chimiques, qui utilisent des gaz de synthèse produits commercialement à partir de gaz naturel et de charbon. On peut appliquer ces technologies de conversion éprouvées aux gaz de synthèse dérivés de la biomasse. Avant la catalyse, on doit purifier les gaz de synthèse bruts afin d’éliminer les substances inhibitrices qui pourraient inactiver le catalyseur. Ce sont notamment les bitumes volatiles et les composés soufrés, azotés et chlorés. Il peut être nécessaire d’ajuster le rapport de l’hydrogène et du monoxyde de carbone, ou d’éliminer le gaz carbonique sous-produit. Le méthanol est l’un des biocombustibles possibles qu’on peut produire par catalyse; toutefois, la plus grande partie du méthanol produit aujourd’hui est dérivé du gaz naturel. Le méthanol a un nombre d’octane élevé (129), mais une teneur en énergie relativement faible (environ 14,6 MJ/L) par rapport à l’essence (91 à 98 octanes, 35 MJ/L). 51 On utilise le méthanol surtout pour produire le MTBE, qui est utilisé aujourd’hui comme remonteur d’octane, mais il pourrait être utilisé dans des mélanges plus énergétiques ou comme carburant indépendant non mélangé. Parce que le méthanol a un rapport hydrogène/carbone élevé (4 : 1), il est souvent vu comme une source possible d’hydrogène pour les futurs systèmes de transport. Un autre biocombustible possible qui peut être produit par la plate-forme thermochimique est le carburant diesel Fischer-Tropsch (ou carburant diesel biosynthétique). Mis au point en 1923, ce carburant commercial est fabriqué à partir de gaz de synthèse obtenu à partir du charbon, mais on pourrait utiliser ce procédé pour traiter le gaz de synthèse dérivé de la biomasse. Ce procédé à catalyseur de métaux de transition, qui convertit des mélanges de CO et de H2 en hydrocarbures liquides, est appelé synthèse de Fischer-Tropsch (FT). La plus grande partie du carburant diesel FT était produite en Afrique du Sud, en partie à cause des sanctions commerciales imposées par l’ONU pendant plusieurs années alors que ce pays ne disposait d’aucune source de pétrole. Il a donc construit cinq usines de ce type au cours des années 1980 et 1990, et un certain nombre d’autres ont été mises en service ou construites dans d’autres pays vers la fin des années 1990. Les alcools à chaîne longue, notamment l’éthanol, sont d’autres produits possibles de la conversion catalytique du gaz de synthèse extrait de la biomasse. L’éthanol et d’autres alcools à chaîne longue sont obtenus à l’état de sous-produits du procédé Fischer-Tropsch et du procédé de synthèse du méthanol, et on peut améliorer leurs rendements à l’aide de divers catalyseurs. 52 Autres produits des plates-formes thermochimiques La plate-forme thermochimique produit simultanément un certain nombre de coproduits supplémentaires, ainsi que de l’énergie sous la forme de chaleur ou d’électricité, et enfin, des biocombustibles. Chacun des composants des gaz de synthèse (c.-à-d. le CO, le CO2, le CH4, le H2) peut être récupéré, séparé et utilisé. Des entreprises canadiennes comme Ensyn et Enerkem ont utilisé le bitume volatile, qui est considéré

50

OBP. (2003). Multiyear Plan – 2003 to 2008. Washington, D.C. : U.S. Department of Energy. Davenport, B. (2002). Chemical economics handbook marketing research report, SRI International, Menlo Park, CA. 52 Putsche, V. (1999). NREL Milestone Report. 51

CFIC Forest Science Policy Forum on Transformative Technologies Regional Workshops Summary Report, May 2006.

164


comme un obstacle à la production à grande échelle, comme matière première pour la fabrication de produits chimiques à valeur ajoutée. La figure 7 présente un diagramme des opérations de la plate-forme thermochimique, ainsi qu’une gamme de produits possibles.

Figure 7 Plate-forme thermochimique Source : Mabee et al. (en préparation)

Technologie transformante – La bioconversion La plate-forme de la bioconversion est la deuxième « technologie transformante » examinée par ce Livre blanc. Elle utilise des agents biologiques, sous la forme d’enzymes et de micro-organismes, pour dégrader les composants de la lignocellulose de façon prévisible. Cette plate-forme utilise une combinaison d’éléments du procédé de prétraitement par l’hydrolyse enzymatique pour libérer des hydrates de carbone et de la lignine du bois, puis un processus de fermentation pour obtenir les produits finis. Essentiellement, cette plate-forme est un procédé hybride qui utilise un mélange de technologies des pâtes et papiers et de procédés biotechnologiques commerciaux actuellement utilisés par le secteur des produits agricoles. L’étape du prétraitement est destinée à optimiser la matière première de la biomasse pour d’autres traitements. Dans le cadre de la plate-forme de la bioconversion, cette étape utilise des techniques non traditionnelles pour la réduction en pâte afin d’exposer la cellulose et l’hémicellulose à une hydrolyse

CFIC Forest Science Policy Forum on Transformative Technologies Regional Workshops Summary Report, May 2006.

165


enzymatique subséquente, de manière à augmenter la surface du substrat disponible pour l’activité enzymatique. Comme dans la méthode habituelle de réduction en pâte, la lignine est amollie ou enlevée, et les fibres cellulosiques individuelles libérées forment la pâte. Le prétraitement de bioconversion est basé sur les procédés de réduction en pâte existants, bien que les paramètres de la méthode habituelle de réduction en pâte soient déterminés par les propriétés et les rendements souhaités pour le papier. Cependant, les conditions optimales du prétraitement de bioconversion sont établies en fonction de l’accessibilité de la pâte obtenue par l’hydrolyse enzymatique. Après le prétraitement, il est possible de séparer les composés de base de la cellulose, de l’hémicellulose et de la lignine afin de faciliter leur traitement industriel. À cette fin, on peut décider de produire de la bioénergie à partir des fractions de lignine et de convertir la cellulose et l’hémicellulose en produits du bois traditionnels ou non. On peut effectuer les séparations les plus efficaces en combinant à l’hydrolyse enzymatique des prétraitements appropriés. 53 La valeur de la lignine utilisée pour la production de bioénergie est un facteur significatif. En juin 1996, le coût de gaz naturel était d’environ $1/GJ ($CAN), mais en 2005, son prix était passé à environ $7/GJ. 54 De plus, les coûts de l’électricité ont augmenté, rendant l’autogénération de plus en plus rentable. On a estimé qu’une tonne de lignine de résineux représente entre 22,2 et 23,5 GJ d’énergie (PCI/PCS). 55 Pour cette raison, une tonne de lignine sèche peut représenter environ 155 $/tonne ($7 x 22,2) en valeur énergétique dans une usine qui utilise actuellement du gaz naturel, contre seulement 22 $/tonne en 1996. À ce prix, l’autogénération de chaleur et d’énergie pour une utilisation interne peut être rentable, même si l’industrie des produits du bois a tendance à considérer que les projets d’énergie ne sont pas dans ses cordes. On note un certain appui du gouvernement pour les investissements dans des technologies d’autogénération plus efficaces. Par exemple, on peut avoir recours au Programme d’encouragement aux systèmes d’énergies renouvelables (PENSER), lancé par Ressources naturelles Canada en 1998, pour financer 25 % des coûts d’achat et d’installation de systèmes de production d’énergie à base de biomasse, jusqu’à concurrence de 80 000 $CAN par installation. 56 L’exemple de l’application de technologies « évolutionnaires » afin d’améliorer la récupération de la lignine de l’étape du prétraitement, combinée à un traitement de cette matière par gazéification afin d’augmenter l’autogénération d’énergie, montre assez bien la complémentarité de la plate-forme de la bioconversion et de la plate-forme thermochimique, du point de vue pratique. Biocombustibles obtenus par la plate-forme de la bioconversion L’élément « révolutionnaire » de la plate-forme de la bioconversion est son aptitude à combiner les technologies de trituration avec des biotechnologies avancées. À l’aide de mélanges d’enzymes extraits de diverses sources, on hydrolyse la cellulose et l’hémicellulose du bois, ce qui libère les sucres, notamment le glucose, le galactose, le mannose, l’arabinose et le xylose, qui sont les éléments constitutifs de la cellulose du bois. Ces sucres sont un produit intermédiaire qui peut être traité par fermentation pour produire de l’éthanol, un carburant de transport renouvelable, qui entre aussi dans la fabrication d’autres produits. L’éthanol est le principal produit énergétique de cette plate-forme de bioconversion; il s’agit d’un combustible polyvalent qui peut être utilisé comme carburant, seul ou mélangé à l’essence. Presque tous les programmes d’hydrolyse commerciaux d’aujourd’hui utilisent des enzymes afin d’obtenir une bioconversion rapide, efficace et économique du bois. L’hydrolyse enzymatique des 53

Mabee, W.E. et al. (en préparation). Appl. Biochem. Biotechnol. RNCan. (2005). Gaz naturel canadien : Revue de 2004 et perspectives jusqu’en 2020. 55 ECN. (2005). Phyllis, database for biomass and waste. 56 RNCan. (2006). Programme d’encouragement aux systèmes d’énergies renouvelables . 54

CFIC Forest Science Policy Forum on Transformative Technologies Regional Workshops Summary Report, May 2006.

166


composés lignocellulosiques utilise des cellulases habituellement produites par des champignons comme Trichoderma, Penicillum, et Aspergillus. 57 Il faut utiliser un cocktail de cellulases pour dégrader d’une manière efficace la structure cellulosique des composants glucidiques, ce qui n’est pas le cas pour le procédé de bioconversion de l’amidon, dont la structure chimique est plus simple. L’étape de l’hydrolyse enzymatique peut être complètement séparée des autres étapes du procédé de bioconversion, ou elle peut être combinée à la fermentation de glucides intermédiaires en produits finis. Le procédé d’hydrolyse et de fermentation séparées (HFS) garantit une plus grande souplesse à cette plate-forme et facilite en théorie les modifications du procédé pour obtenir différents produits finis; toutefois, un procédé séparé nécessite des travaux supplémentaires d’ingénierie qui se traduisent par de plus grands coûts de construction et d’exploitation. 58 On a constaté que le procédé de saccharification et de fermentation simultanées (SFS) était très efficace pour l’obtention de produits finis spécifiques. 59 Une fois qu’ils ont été hydrolysés, les sucres à six carbones peuvent être convertis en éthanol par fermentation à l’aide de procédés traditionnels à base de levures. Par contre, la fermentation des sucres à cinq carbones est plus difficile; on travaille au développement de nouvelles souches de levures à cette fin, mais il faut améliorer l’efficacité des procédés et accélérer la fermentation. Selon un examen de la documentation, on estime que les rendements d’éthanol obtenus à partir des matières lignocellulosiques sont compris entre 0,12 et 0,32 L/kg de matières premières non asséchées, selon l’efficacité de la conversion des divers sucres à cinq carbones. 60 Dans un article qui doit être publié, Mabee et al. ont estimé les volumes possibles de production de bioéthanol à partir de lignocellulose au Canada. Les résultats indiquaient que la production durable de bioéthanol pourrait être très importante, parce que le traitement des résidus de l’industrie de transformation du bois assurerait une production annuelle comprise entre 480 millions et 1,6 milliard de litres d’éthanol, alors que les déchets ligneux des exploitations forestières pourraient contribuer, pour leur part, entre 2,3 et 10,4 milliards de litres de bioéthanol par année. De plus, des plantations à vocation bioénergétique sur des terres agricoles difficiles à exploiter pourraient produire entre 1,9 et 11,0 milliards de litres de bioéthanol par année. On pourrait remplacer toute la consommation de combustibles fossiles du Canada par celle d’éthanol dérivé de la lignocellulose sans répercussions notables sur l’agriculture ou sur l’exploitation forestière. La plate-forme de la bioconversion offre de grandes possibilités de production de combustibles à partir de la biomasse. 61 Autres produits des plates-formes de la bioconversion L’un des avantages les plus extraordinaires de la plate-forme de la bioconversion est que les sucres, qui sont l’un des principaux produits de l’hydrolyse, peuvent être convertis en divers produits à valeur ajoutée. De plus, pour beaucoup de ces produits, le secteur agricole est déjà rendu à l’étape de la démonstration ou de la production commerciale. L’application de ces technologies au secteur forestier nous fournit une feuille de route prometteuse pour le développement des bioproduits. Dans le Livre blanc sur la biochimie commandé par le CCIF, on examine le cas de beaucoup de ces produits, notamment des applications pour la production de polylactides (PLA) 62 et d’autres polymères produits en masse 63. La figure 8 présente un diagramme des opérations de la plate-forme thermochimique, avec toute une gamme de produits possibles. 57

Galbe, M. et Zacchi, G. (2002). Appl. Microbiol. Biotechnol. 59(6) : 618-628. Mabee, W.E. et al. (en préparation). Appl. Biochem. Biotechnol. 59 Gregg, D.J. et al. (1998). Bioresource Technol. 63(1) : 7-12. 60 Ibid.; Wingren, A. et al. (2003) Biotechnol. Prog. 19(4) : 1109-1117; Lawford, H. G. et al. (2001). Appl. Biochem. Biotechnol. 91-93 : 133-146; Lawford, H. G. et al. (1999). Appl. Biochem. Biotechnol. 77-79 : 191-204. 61 Mabee, W. E. et al. (en préparation). Appl. Biochem. Biotechnol. 62 Natureworks LLC. (2006). Site Web de Natureworks LLC Corporate : www.natureworksllc.com. 63 DOE. (2006). New platform intermediates. 58

CFIC Forest Science Policy Forum on Transformative Technologies Regional Workshops Summary Report, May 2006.

167


Figure 8 Plate-forme de bioconversion Source : Mabee et al. (2005)

Obstacles à la mise en œuvre Obstacles technologiques observés pour la plate-forme thermochimique Le principal problème technique touchant la production thermochimique de combustibles et de produits chimiques est la qualité du gaz de synthèse biologique, qui est plus hétérogène que celle du gaz de synthèse à base de gaz naturel. Alors que les approches techniques pour la production de l’hydrogène, du méthanol et des combustibles liquides obtenus par le procédé FT à partir de gaz de synthèse sont bien documentées, les gaz d’alimentation doivent être relativement propres pour que ces procédés soient rentables. À cause de la nature hétérogène de la biomasse, le nombre de substances inhibitrices et la composition générale des gaz de synthèse sont plus variables et donc, leur traitement est plus complexe. Il y a un autre problème, le déploiement à grande échelle nécessaire afin de profiter des économies d’échelle possibles pour la plupart de ces procédés, ce qui fait que le coût de la production du gaz de synthèse peut facilement dépasser 50 % du coût total du procédé. 64 L’un des principaux problèmes que présente la synthèse du méthanol est que le gaz de synthèse extrait de la biomasse a tendance à être pauvre en hydrogène par rapport au gaz de synthèse à base de gaz naturel. 64

Spath, P. et Dayton, D. (2003). Preliminary screening - technical and economic assessment of synthesis gas to fuels.

CFIC Forest Science Policy Forum on Transformative Technologies Regional Workshops Summary Report, May 2006.

168


Pour être rentable, la synthèse du méthanol nécessite un rapport hydrogène/monoxyde de carbone de 2:1. Des travaux en cours portent sur l’utilisation de gaz de synthèse avec un rapport plus faible. 65 Certains problèmes communs associés notamment au procédé Fisher-Tropsch concernent la faible sélectivité des produits synthétisés (et de la production inévitable de coproduits qui peuvent être non souhaitables, notamment des oléfines, des paraffines et des produits oxygénés), ainsi que la sensibilité du catalyseur à la contamination dans le gaz de synthèse, qui peut inhiber la réaction catalytique. Afin de réduire les coûts de production à des valeurs acceptables, il faut des travaux supplémentaires pour améliorer la capacité des catalyseurs à résister aux substances inhibitrices. 66 Obstacles technologiques observés pour la plate-forme de bioconversion Les défis les plus sérieux qui touchent la plate-forme de bioconversion concernent notamment l’amélioration de l’efficacité de l’étape du prétraitement, la diminution des coûts de l’étape de l’hydrolyse enzymatique et l’amélioration de l’efficacité d’ensemble du procédé, en tirant profit des synergies qui existent entre les diverses étapes des procédés. il faut aussi améliorer la rentabilité du procédé en fabriquant des coproduits qui peuvent augmenter les revenus. Afin d’améliorer la capacité de l’étape du prétraitement à optimiser la biomasse pour l’hydrolyse enzymatique, un consortium de chercheurs du Canada et des États-Unis, notamment ceux de notre groupe de l’Université de la Colombie-Britannique, examinent un certain nombre de techniques inhabituelles de réduction en pâte. Le Biomass Refining Consortium for Applied Fundamentals an Innovation (CAFI) s’est donné pour objectif d’améliorer l’efficacité et la base de connaissances sur les technologies de prétraitement. 67 Les prétraitements examinés par le consortium sont notamment des systèmes à base d’eau, comme le prétraitement trituration à la vapeur-explosion, des traitements par des acides comme l’acide sulfurique (H2SO4), concentrés ou dilués, des traitements alcalins qui utilisent de l’ammoniac recirculé ou un traitement modifié vapeur-explosion (AFEX), ainsi que des systèmes de trituration à solvant organique, utilisant par exemple de l’acide acétique ou de l’éthanol. Des recherches fondamentales portant sur les caractéristiques dynamiques de la bioconversion ont aussi examiné en détail les coûts de l’hydrolyse enzymatique, qui doivent tenir compte de la complexité de la matrice lignocellulosique. En quatre ans, des projets coordonnés de Novozymes, Genencor et du National Renewable Energy Laboratory des États-Unis ont permis de réduire par un facteur d’environ 30 les coûts de l’hydrolyse enzymatique de substrats idéaux. 68 L’intégration des diverses étapes des procédés et l’efficacité croissante de ceux–ci sont améliorées par des programmes de recherche intégrés, réalisés en collaboration par des unités de développement des procédés et par des installations pilotes ou de démonstration du monde entier. Les unités de développement des procédés sont situées à l’Université de la Colombie-Britannique, à l’Université Lund (Suède), ainsi qu’au National Renewable Enegy Laboratory des États-Unis (NREL). Les autres installations sont notamment l’installation pilote d’Etek Etanolteknik en Suède, les usines de démonstration d’Abengoa en Espagne et aux États-Unis, et l’usine de démonstration d’Iogen au Canada. Les chercheurs qui travaillent en réseaux à différentes échelles des procédés ont combiné leurs efforts pour résoudre ces problèmes. Il faut souligner que la plupart de ces installations avaient été conçues pour produire du bioéthanol comme principal produit, mais qu’elles peuvent être configurées pour l’étude de divers coproduits. 65

Bhatt, B.L. et al. (1999). Preprints - American Chemical Society, Division of Petroleum Chemistry 44(1) : 25-27. DOE. (2006). Catalytic conversion. 67 Wyman, C. E. et al. (2005). Bioresource Technol. 96(18) : 1959-1966. 68 Novozymes. (2005). Novozymes and NREL reduce enzyme cost. Communiqué de presse, 14 avril 2005. 66

CFIC Forest Science Policy Forum on Transformative Technologies Regional Workshops Summary Report, May 2006.

169


Problèmes au niveau des organisations Afin de mettre en oeuvre de nouvelles plates-formes technologiques, l’industrie forestière doit faire un effort significatif en formation. Les dirigeants de cette industrie doivent adopter une toute nouvelle attitude et il faut recruter les experts nécessaires pour divers secteurs, notamment en agriculture, en énergie et en biotechnologie. Les entreprises de produits du bois doivent aussi former des partenariats stratégiques afin de se tailler une place dans de nouveaux marchés situés en marge des marchés des produits traditionnels. Il faudra vraisemblablement créer des partenariats avec des sociétés internationales qui font affaire dans le monde entier, ainsi qu’avec des petites entreprises qui travaillent au développement de technologies et de procédés qui peuvent jouer le rôle de locomotive dans l’industrie de demain. Le gouvernement a un rôle important à jouer en réduisant au minimum les risques et en encourageant les investissements, à mesure que les nouvelles technologies seront adoptées par le secteur forestier canadien. Il est essentiel que les programmes d’assainissement de l’air, d’énergie renouvelable, de carburants de transport renouvelables, d’emploi rural et de diversification économique du secteur et des ressources soient bien coordonnés afin de permettre à l’industrie d’obtenir le plus d’avantages possible. Les universités et les instituts de recherche du Canada ont aussi un rôle important à jouer en créant une nouvelle image pour le secteur forestier, car ce sont eux qui propagent une bonne partie des nouvelles idées et des nouvelles technologies. Leur mission est de créer des programmes de recherche efficaces répondant aux besoins du secteur forestier au cours des vingt prochaines années. Il est essentiel que les universités, les instituts de recherche, le gouvernement et l’industrie collaborent pour garantir que la recherche est bien ciblée et orientée vers les avenues les plus prometteuses. Comment on peut surmonter les obstacles au bioraffinage Ce Livre blanc a insisté sur le développement de technologies de bioénergie en fonction de deux plates-formes technologiques, qui sont toutes deux capables de produire des biocombustibles liquides en plus de plus des types habituels de bioénergie. Ces technologies sont aussi capables de produire un certain nombre de produits chimiques et de matières premières. En bref, il est proposé que le bioraffinage devienne un modèle pour l’industrie forestière canadienne de demain. L’utilisation du modèle de bioraffinage permet à l’industrie forestière d’exploiter les meilleures et les plus récentes technologies en cours de développement. Le bioraffinage du bois peut offrir à la société mondiale, et notamment au Canada, beaucoup d’avantages touchant l’environnement, l’économie et la sécurité. Par exemple, l’énergie, les combustibles et les produits chimiques fabriqués à partir de biomasse renouvelable sont caractérisés par des émissions réduites de gaz carbonique, par rapport au pétrole, et ils peuvent ainsi contribuer à répondre aux défis du changement climatique. 69 Le Canada peut utiliser les produits de bioraffinage pour s’acquitter de ses engagements dans le cadre du protocole de Kyoto, ou pour atteindre les objectifs nationaux de salubrité de l’air établis par des politiques nationales. Les installations de traitement qui sont obligées de convertir la biomasse en produits à valeur ajoutée peuvent créer des emplois directs et indirects, contribuer au développement régional et économique, et augmenter les revenus qui dépendent des ressources dans les régions rurales du pays. 70 Et, ce qui est peut-être plus important, le bioraffinage ouvre de nouvelles voies à l’industrie forestière, en lui fournissant l’occasion de se diversifier bien au-delà des limites des produits traditionnels de la forêt. 69

Braune, I. (1998), Ber. Landwirtsch. 76(4), 580-597. Morris, D. (2000), Carbohydrate Economy Newsletter, Fall 2000 Issue, Institute for Local Self Reliance, Washington, DC. 70

CFIC Forest Science Policy Forum on Transformative Technologies Regional Workshops Summary Report, May 2006.

170


Concept du bioraffinage Le concept du bioraffinage du bois s’inspirera en grande partie des procédés actuels de bioraffinage de l’amidon, qui sont répandus dans le monde entier. Il est peut-être possible de modifier les usines de pâte par l’ajout de nouvelles étapes destinées à libérer les composés chimiques du bois ou à produire de la chaleur et de l’énergie de façon plus efficace. Toutefois, il est sans doute plus opportun de mettre l’accent sur les scieries modernes, qui sont en pleine expansion, par l’ajout de nouvelles installations de traitement qui nous permettraient d’utiliser leurs résidus sans coûts de transport supplémentaires. Dans certains cas, des considérations économiques peuvent dicter la mise en œuvre de nouvelles installations « vertes » construites sur mesures pour des traitements de thermochimie ou de bioconversion. Les décisions dépendront en grande partie des économies d’échelle possibles. Bien que des technologies comme la bioconversion fonctionnent bien à des échelles relativement petites, d’autres, par exemple la conversion thermochimique, nécessitent de grandes installations. Une installation de bioraffinage doit pouvoir fabriquer directement des produits finis ou des composés intermédiaires qui peuvent être convertis en produits finis dans d’autres installations. À cause de la complexité de leur structure chimique, l’isolation des constituants chimiques des composés lignocellulosiques est difficile et relativement coûteuse. Les technologies de bioraffinage privilégient l’option de la compensation de ces coûts par la coproduction de produits à valeur élevée fabriqués en petits volumes pour certains créneaux du marché, parallèlement à des produits de moindre valeur obtenus par les plates-formes industrielles habituelles, par exemple des produits chimiques, des combustibles ou de l’énergie. Bioraffinage horizontal et vertical La plus grande partie de la documentation décrit le bioraffinage comme un procédé « horizontal », c.-à-d. un procédé à installation unique capable de produire, à partir d’une seule matière première, une combinaison souhaitée d’énergie, de combustibles et de produits chimiques, en même temps que des matières à valeur ajoutée. Toutefois, il faut noter que le bioraffinage est aussi un procédé « vertical », car il peut augmenter la recyclabilité à chacune des étapes du traitement des produits de la forêt. Le bois est une matière à recyclabilité inhérente. En effet, les fibres de papier peuvent être recyclées et réutilisées plusieurs fois pour la fabrication de nouvelles rames de papier, et on sait que le bois d’oeuvre peut être récupéré et réutilisé plusieurs fois par des artisans qualifiés. Une stratégie intégrée qui créerait des normes de recyclabilité dans toute la chaîne de valeur des produits de la forêt permettrait aux fibres de passer successivement des utilisations de bois massif aux produits de panneautage et aux poutres, aux biomatériaux, aux produits de carton et de papier et enfin, aux applications de fabrication de produits chimiques et de combustibles, et enfin, aux systèmes de récupération d’énergie. En utilisant les fibres dans le cadre d’un processus de « bioraffinage vertical », il est possible de prolonger les utilisations de chaque arbre pendant plusieurs siècles. Ce type de stratégie améliorerait grandement l’aptitude des forêts canadiennes à répondre aux nombreuses demandes en matières premières, en produits chimiques, en combustibles et en énergie. Fondée sur la réputation de bonne gérance environnementale de l’industrie forestière, cette stratégie contribuerait à créer de nouveaux débouchés dans l’ensemble de la gamme des usages traditionnels et non traditionnels. Les stratégies combinées de bioraffinage vertical et horizontal constitueraient, pour l’industrie forestière canadienne, une feuille de route prometteuse pour un avenir réinventé, à la fois dynamique et responsable.

CFIC Forest Science Policy Forum on Transformative Technologies Regional Workshops Summary Report, May 2006.

171


Recommandations Nous avons formulé sept grandes recommandations de politique pour développer au Canada un secteur des bioénergies fondé sur les ressources forestières. Elles portent aussi bien sur des principes généraux que sur des points particuliers concernant des combustibles spécifiques. 1.

Tous les paliers de gouvernement devraient envisager la possibilité d’une approche à trois volets pour le développement d’une capacité bioénergétique au Canada : a.

b.

c.

Utilisation des modèles existants de programmes gouvernementaux qui peuvent réduire au minimum, du point de vue des investisseurs, les risques économiques associés à l’établissement d’une infrastructure bioénergétique au Canada. Introduction, sous forme d’allègements fiscaux ou de crédits aux producteurs, d’incitations économiques pour la production de bioénergies, qui tiennent compte de leur provenance et des coûts de production, ainsi que des possibilités de fabrication de coproduits ou d’activités de bioraffinage. Introduction, sous forme d’allègements fiscaux ou de subventions, d’incitations économiques pour l’utilisation de bioénergies par les consommateurs, qui se traduiraient par des prix inférieurs pour cette forme d’énergie.

2.

Le financement gouvernemental de tous les aspects de la RD et D liés aux technologies transformantes devrait être distinct de celui des technologies traditionnelles, et il devrait être lié au développement des installations de bioraffinage. La plate-forme technologique à choisir ne devrait pas être déterminée par une politique, mais son choix doit tenir compte de l’évaluation des capacités techniques de l’industrie, des coproduits possibles et du rendement économique dans son ensemble.

3.

Dans la mesure du possible, le financement des installations de bioénergie devrait être harmonisé avec les programmes d’énergie renouvelable et d’autres programmes synergiques, par exemple les programmes d’emploi rural et d’aide à l’agriculture, afin de soutenir le plus possible le développement des infrastructures. À cette fin, il faut un dialogue et une collaboration continuels entre les ministères, ainsi qu’entre les divers homologues des gouvernements fédéral et provinciaux. On faciliterait ainsi la détermination des plates-formes technologiques optimales pour des applications spécifiques. a.

b.

Dans les cas où on met l’accent sur le développement à court terme de l’économie rurale en favorisant des nouveaux produits à valeur ajoutée, la plate-forme de la bioconversion est l’option de choix pour les activités de bioraffinage. Dans les cas où les bioénergies doivent répondre à des besoins immédiats en électricité ou en énergie, la plate-forme thermochimique est l’option de choix pour les activités de bioraffinage.

4.

Tout au long du développement de ces technologies transformantes, il est important que tous les paliers de gouvernement continuent à fournir le financement requis pour faire face aux défis et aux obstacles technologiques. Ce financement devrait tenir compte des recherches nécessaires pour la production en aval de biocombustibles, de produits chimiques à valeur ajoutée et de bioénergie.

5.

Afin de promouvoir l’utilisation du bioéthanol produit à partir du bois au Canada, les gouvernements devraient envisager la possibilité d’appliquer l’approche suivante :

CFIC Forest Science Policy Forum on Transformative Technologies Regional Workshops Summary Report, May 2006.

172


a.

b.

c.

6.

Afin de promouvoir l’utilisation des carburants diesel biosynthétiques produits à partir du bois, les gouvernements devraient examiner la faisabilité de l’approche suivante : a.

b.

c.

7.

Introduction de mécanismes visant à encourager la fabrication et/ou l’importation de véhicules multicarburants pouvant utiliser des mélanges à forte teneur en bioéthanol (E85), ainsi que de mécanismes visant à encourager les consommateurs et les propriétaires de parcs de véhicules à passer aux véhicules à moteur diesel. Établissement de liens entre la politique pour les combustibles renouvelables et une politique pour les bioproduits verts afin de promouvoir autant que possible la création d’infrastructures fondées sur la bioconversion. Maintien de liens étroits avec les États-Unis, afin de profiter des avancées de leurs plates-formes de bioconversion dans les secteurs agricole et chimique.

Introduction de mécanismes visant à encourager la fabrication et/ou l’importation de véhicules à moteur diesel pouvant utiliser des mélanges à forte teneur en mélanges de carburants diesels biosynthétiques, ainsi que de mécanismes visant à encourager les consommateurs et les propriétaires de parcs de véhicules à acheter des véhicules à moteur diesel. Créer un dialogue entre les gouvernements fédéral et provinciaux pour examiner la possibilité d’adopter un modèle de taxation du carburant de type européen, qui favorise le carburant diesel en augmentant le prix de l’essence. La promotion de l’utilisation du carburant diesel est une première étape essentielle pour une plus grande utilisation du carburant diesel biosynthétique au Canada. Établissement de liens entre la politique de l’énergie renouvelable et la politique des carburants renouvelables afin de promouvoir autant que possible la création d’infrastructures fondées sur l’énergie thermochimique.

Établissement d’un Centre d’innovation qui regrouperait l’ensemble des compétences canadiennes pour la recherche en bioraffinage, notamment en obtenant la participation des intervenants du gouvernement, de l’industrie et des universités. Nous croyons que ce centre devrait être établi dans une université canadienne et utiliser les services d’experts des secteurs du commerce, de l’ingénierie, des biotechnologies et des politiques. a.

b.

c.

d.

Soutien du Centre par un mode de financement qui tienne compte des améliorations techniques possibles permettant d’augmenter les capacités de production de bioénergie, notamment par des activités de bioraffinage « horizontales » et « verticales ». Promotion des occasions de partenariat de recherche dans des domaines interdisciplinaires entre des universités et des entreprises du Canada et des ÉtatsUnis, qui devraient permettre l’application des leçons apprises dans les secteurs agricole et chimique aux secteurs de la foresterie et de l’énergie du Canada. Établissement d’une capacité de démonstration et d’application à grande échelle des procédés pour fournir à l’industrie des données concrètes sur les applications commerciales de ces procédés. Création au sein du Centre d’une direction des recherches sur les politiques, qui travaillerait en étroite collaboration avec le gouvernement, qui diffuserait l’information dans le réseau de recherches technologiques et qui établirait la priorité des nouvelles avancées en fonction de leur capacité à répondre aux objectifs des politiques canadiennes.

CFIC Forest Science Policy Forum on Transformative Technologies Regional Workshops Summary Report, May 2006.

173


B-5 International Perspectives: European Vision and Strategies Prepared by: Dr. Patrice Mangin, Director General, Centre Intégré en Pâtes et Papiers; and Past Chairman of the Confederation of European Paper Industries (CEPI) Research Group

Vision and strategies for the pulp & paper industries… a European perspective (selected slides) Patrice Mangin, Director General, Centre Intégré en Pâtes et Papiers Printing and Communication Quebecor Chair, UQTR

Confederation of European Paper Industries - Some statistics… 400 MM € 95 MT paper/board 279,000 employees (direct) Entire Forestry Wood Chain : 4 million employees 1,280 mills 42% recovered (57% recovery), 43% wood-pulp, 1% others, 14% non-wood 29% world production (31% North America and 30% Asia) 49% graphic papers, 40% board/packaging and 11% household & sanitary, and specialty grades.

CFIC Forest Science Policy Forum on Transformative Technologies Regional Workshops Summary Report, May 2006.

174


CEPI Standing Committees Î Forest Committee Î Environment Committee Î Recycling Committee Î Association Directors Committee Research Group

Confederation of European Paper Industries Members : 19/25 Membres: Austria, Belgium, Czeck Republic, Denmark, Finland, France, Germany, Hungary, Ireland, Italy, The Netherlands, Norway, Poland, Portugal, Slovak Republic, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, and UK.

CFIC Forest Science Policy Forum on Transformative Technologies Regional Workshops Summary Report, May 2006.

175


CEPI RG Objectives are to‌ 1. Represent pulp, paper and board industry research interests at EU level and nationally 2. Identify industry research needs and research opportunities 3. Communicate identified needs to EU and national governmental bodies 4. Promote industrial awareness of availability of international funding for research

CEPI RG Objectives 5. Develop R&D cooperation between CEPI countries 6. Supervise CEPI Comparative Testing Service Working Group 7. Provide considered opinions on matters of technical concern 8. Maintain collaboration with EUCEPA (European Pulp & Paper Technical Liaison Committee) ‌

CFIC Forest Science Policy Forum on Transformative Technologies Regional Workshops Summary Report, May 2006.

176


CEPI Research Group Strategy Report On pulp and paper oriented research A discussion paper (November 2000) Objectives of the report were : To review R&D in the light of the challenges facing the European pulp and paper industry. To provide CEPI Board with informed views on the role of CEPI in the R&D field. Report was presented to CEPI CEOs Discussed in workshops Implementation still on-going : securing competencies, education, image, 6th and 7th EU-FP,‌

Main facts (1) Big and fast-moving changes are currently taking place in the European pulp and paper industry, e.g. due to globalisation, low profitability, environmental awareness and the information revolution. The current technological pre-eminence of Europe in the pulp and paper field is not guaranteed to continue indefinitely.

CFIC Forest Science Policy Forum on Transformative Technologies Regional Workshops Summary Report, May 2006.

177


Main facts (2) The image of the pulp and paper industry, both as an investment and as a career, is poor. The role of R&D in image building is not well understood or exploited. Only a small amount of R&D investment goes into radically new developments and new types of fibre-based products. Transformative Technologies EU funding supports only a small proportion of total pulp and paper R&D.

Main conclusions (1) The long-term prosperity of the European pulp and paper industry is in danger if long-term competence building is not secured. R&D is essential to meet both short-term & long-term challenges to the industry. A European approach is appropriate and also important in essential R&D areas, particularly environmental issues related to the entire supply chain.

CFIC Forest Science Policy Forum on Transformative Technologies Regional Workshops Summary Report, May 2006.

178


Main conclusions (2) Pulp and paper R&D must have a stronger multidisciplinary component, including nontechnological aspects. Pulp and paper R&D must incorporate the entire forest industry cluster. Proponents of R&D must work much more effectively to make its rewards evident to industry.

Main conclusions (3) The questions are: What type of research? basic-applied, forest-market, technical other disciplines, transformative technologies-incremental Performed by whom? P&P companies , suppliers, institutes, universities... Integration & cooperation? How? And paid by whom? Industry

- public

CFIC Forest Science Policy Forum on Transformative Technologies Regional Workshops Summary Report, May 2006.

179


6th Framework Programme (ends 2006), an instrument to implement European Research Area

(a) INTEGRATING EUROPEAN RESEARCH AROUND KEY OBJECTIVES

(b) STRUCTURING ERA

(c) STRENGTHENING THE ERA FOUNDATIONS

EURATOM

“Wood industry” as a component in EoI’s Materials research: packaging Process control, automation

Renewable Materials

Materials research: Materials drying research: coating

Pulp&Paper

Printing

Biotechnology

Wood, Textile

CFIC Forest Science Policy Forum on Transformative Technologies Regional Workshops Summary Report, May 2006.

180


Knowledge-based multifunctional materials Leading edge RTD partnerships High knowledge content materials High-risk and long term research Breakthroughs through new materials including renewable raw materials Paper products

Knowledge-based multifunctional materials Development of fundamental knowledge ÎUnderstanding materials phenomena Transformation and processing ÎMastering chemistry & creating new processing pathways ÎSurface & interface science and engineering Engineering support ÎNew materials by design ÎNew knowledge-based higher performance materials

CFIC Forest Science Policy Forum on Transformative Technologies Regional Workshops Summary Report, May 2006.

181


New production processes and devices Towards a knowledge based and added value industry, improved competitiveness & sustainability Collaboration between research & industry to work on future manufacturing and production concepts Breakthrough organisational, quality & technological developments

Processes and devices : priorities Flexible & intelligent manufacturing systems ÎNew production technologies ÎNew and user-friendly production equipment & technologies ÎCreation of “knowledge communities” incl. supply chain management ÎKB added value products & services in traditional industries Systems research and hazard control ÎRadical changes in the “basic materials” industries for cleaner, safer & more eco-efficient production ÎSustainable waste management & hazard reduction Life-cycle of individual systems, products & services ÎOptimisation of production-use-consumption interactions ÎIncreasing user awareness

CFIC Forest Science Policy Forum on Transformative Technologies Regional Workshops Summary Report, May 2006.

182


Global change and Ecosystems Strategies for sustainable land management, including agricultural land and forests : Development and application of integrated approaches and tools for long term sustainability of forest status and productivity Role and impact of the complete forestry/wood chain taking into account multi-functionality aspects, including regional and international dimensions and the societal needs Integration and sustainability of the different stages of the complete forestry/wood chain and the targets for the environmental, economic and social objectives (local, regional, global) should be included in the systems of forest production and technological and industrial processes analysis

Southern Europe Central Europe Northern Europe

The Forestry Wood Product Chain

Pulp and paper Wood products New products and bioenergy

Version 020806

CFIC Forest Science Policy Forum on Transformative Technologies Regional Workshops Summary Report, May 2006.

183


Main objectives B. Societal impact

A. Environmental impact + Global change: CO2, other pollution + Biodiversity, + Regional, + Local

+ Regional development, employment + SME + Culture, recreation + Forestry, agriculture +‌

C. Economic impact + Better products + Wider use + Competetiveness + Recycling +‌

General programme User demands and relations

Forest management

Common data

ha ng e

ts en em uir

Integrated analysis Acquisition

Ex c

q Re

Productoriented use

Industry to end-user operations Recycling

Industrial production

Forest to industry operations

CFIC Forest Science Policy Forum on Transformative Technologies Regional Workshops Summary Report, May 2006.

184


7th European Framework Program

1. Health 2. Food, Agriculture and Biotechnology 3. Information and Communication Technologies 4. Nanosciences, Nanotechnologies, Materials and new Production Technologies 5. Energy 6. Environment (including Climate Change) 7. Transport (including Aeronautics) 8. Socio-Economic Sciences and the Humanities 9. Security and Space

7th European Framework Program Main aspects

CFIC Forest Science Policy Forum on Transformative Technologies Regional Workshops Summary Report, May 2006.

185


Concluding remarks‌ EU integrates its pulp and paper R&D Scandinavia (STFI, Packforsk, IMT, Acreo and PFI‌now enlarged STFI Long process Challenges similar to Canada as far as Transformative Technologies are concerned Integrated multiculturalism and multidisciplinary approaches might be an asset EU funding mainly for ERA integration Low funding ratio for P&P industries and/or forestrywood chain High goals/objective Scandinavia perceived as R&D leader

CFIC Forest Science Policy Forum on Transformative Technologies Regional Workshops Summary Report, May 2006.

186


Forest Science Policy Forum on Transformative Technologies - Summary Report