Health, Mind & Body Winter 2022

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Health, Mind, & Body

CHEROKEE COUNTY DOCTOR HELPS PATIENTS REACH HEALTH GOALS FALL SEASON REMINDS TAHLEQUAH RESIDENTS IT IS THE WAYS WALKING BENEFITS YOUR BODY TIME FOR IMMUNIZATIONS

CALORIES BURNED DURING PHYSICAL ACTIVITIES WINTER SEASON CHANGES TO HEALTHY RESOLUTIONS THAT ARE EASY TO KEEP SHOVEL SNOW SAFELY THIS WINTERIMPACT PEOPLE’S SKIN HEALTH DON’T MISS A BEAT DURING A POWER OUTAGE Winter 2022


It's time to schedule your 3D Call our Women's Clinic today at 918-772-4588. Most insurance accepted, including Blue Cross Blue Shield

ALWASYNHS.ORG | 1400 EAST DOWNING, TAHLEQUAH | 918.456.0641 2

#alwaysnhs Health, Mind, & Body • Winter 2022


Publisher: Ed Choate

Madeline Anele

publisher@tahlequahdailypress.com

news@tahlequahdailypress.com

Advertising: Heather Ruotolo

Cover & Page Design: Abby Bigaouette

hruotolo@tahlequahdailypress.com

Joe Mack

jmack@tahlequahdailypress.com

Contributing Writers: Brian D. King

news@tahlequahdailypress.com

Health, Mind, & Body

WINTER 2022

abigaouette@tahlequahdailypress.com

Health, Mind, & Body is a quarterly publication of the Tahlequah Daily Press. For advertising opportunities, call a member of the advertising team at 918-456-8833.

4 CHEROKEE COUNTY DOCTOR HELPS PATIENTS REACH HEALTH GOALS 5 FALL SEASONS REMIND TAHLEQUAH RESIDENTS IT IS TIME FOR IMMUNIZATIONS 6 WINTER SEASON CHANGES TO IMPACT PEOPLE’S SKIN HEALTH

TAHLEQUAH

DAILY PRESS All nationalities are welcome to apply for Cherokee Elder Care!

Services • Primary Medical & Nursing Care • Medical Specialist • Therapy-Physical, Occupations, & Speech • Home Health Services • Transportation • Social Services • Behavioral Health • Hospitalizations • Medications • Medical Equipment • Adult Day Health Care & Social Activities Winter 2022 • Health, Mind, & Body

Cherokee Elder Care is unique. We provide a coordinated team of doctors, nurses, social workers, dietitians, and therapists to deliver care that addresses the specific medical and social needs of older adults.

PACE

PACE (PROGRAM OF ALL-INCLUSIVE CARE FOR THE ELDERLY) IS A FEDERALLY REGULATED PROGRAM THAT WORKS TO KEEP ELDERS IN THEIR HOMES AND COMMUNITIES FOR AS LONG AS POSSIBLE.

Contact Us (918) 453-5554 | 1387 W. 4th St. Tahlequah, OK 74464 3


Community

Cherokee County doctor helps patients reach health goals By Brian D. King Tahlequah Daily Press Kenneth Gibson is a Doctor of Osteopathic Medicine and works at NEOHealth in Hulbert. He received his Bachelor of Science in zoology at the University of Tulsa and his medical degree at Oklahoma State University’s College of Osteopathic Medicine in Tulsa in 1981. He also received training in addiction medicine at the University of Florida in Gainesville, and he is board certified by the Fellow of the American Society of Addiction Medicine. Originally from Tulsa, he has made Cherokee County his home. “I love it here. I love the creeks and the rivers. It’s my home dirt now,” he said. During his 15 years at NEOHealth, he has served the community by providing treatment in addiction medicine, pain management, and family medicine. He decided to become a doctor because as a young man, he was fascinated with the human body and its ability to heal itself. “It is a fascinating field. There is so much to learn. Just in the time that I have practiced, it has changed so much, but as

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for doctor-patient relationships, it hasn’t changed much,” he said. Gibson has found that patients heal better when they have a working relationship with their medical providers. NEOHealth has provided him a space where he has been able to get to know those with whom he works. His patients include youth, children, adults, and seniors. He enjoys working with those who experience pain because it gives him satisfaction knowing he can alleviate pain. Gibson believes the best way to address health is to prevent disease from happening in the first place, which isn’t always possible. However, he gave advice that will increase the likelihood that seniors can live a healthy life. “Get your routine checkups with your family provider. Get your exercise, stay lean, and monitor your blood pressure,” he said. Gibson stays optimistic in his profession and looks forward to helping his patients to achieve their health goals. “There is better treatment now than ever before, especially for those with mental health challenges and addiction. I am also amazed at the advancements in other fields, especially for cancer treatment,” he said. Health, Mind, & Body • Winter 2022


Health

Fall seasons remind Tahlequah residents it’s time to for immunizations

Our Take a Breath Respiratory Program empowers people with COPD to improve quality of life, activities of daily living, reduce exacerbations & hospitalizations. Angels Care Nurses & Therapists help patients: • Recognize early symptoms • Avoid potential triggers • Better manage medications • Learn proper use of inhalers, nebulizers and oxygen • Manage breathing & conserve energy

Sources: 1Behavior Risk Factor Surveillance System 2CDC

CONTACT US TODAY to learn more about our Take a Breath Respiratory Program! Winter 2022 • Health, Mind, & Body

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The sounds of children in school and autumn leaves remind Tahlequah residents that flu season is nigh and for seniors it is of utmost importance they are up to date on their immunizations. Matt Lee, a pharmacist at Tahlequah Drug Co., said that seniors should consider revisiting their influenza, pneumonia, shingles, COVID-19, and tetanus shots. “Right now, September, going into October, we are thinking about flu vaccines and pneumonia,” he said. Flu shots will come out in mid-to-late September, and seniors should consult with their doctors as to when they should get one. For most, they may want to wait until October. Flu season lasts until around February, and vaccines offer immunity for three or four months. Those who get the vaccine too early may have to consider a booster later. “The flu shot should be given annually from October to December,” said Lee. He said that seniors should not wait too long to get the vaccine, because some years, pharmacies experience shortages. Pharmacies choose from 10-15 different flu vaccine manufacturers. Tahlequah Drug Co. uses Fluzone, though Lee said that there are many good options. For seniors over 65 years old, with consultation with their physicians, they should consider getting a high-dose flu vaccine, which provides for better immunity. “It’s the same vaccine, but it helps with the immune system better,” he said. Pneumonia is a pulmonary infection wherein air sacs become inflamed within the lungs. The disease is deadly, especially among seniors, and it can be treated with vaccines. In the past, seniors have had two different vaccine options, Prevnar 13 and Pneumovax 23. In 2021, Prevnar rolled out a new vaccine, Prevnar 20, which is increasingly popular. Pneumovax 23 is a two-dosage vaccine which should be taken five years apart. Seniors who have already received their first dosage should finish their series. Prevnar shots are a one series vaccine. Those who have completed a Pneumovax series can get a Prevnar shot for

additional protection. Those who have had a Prevnar 13 shot should consult with a doctor if they need a Prevnar 20 shot. Seniors should update themselves with the shingles shot. Tahlequah Drug Co. carries Shingrix, which comes in two parts. Between two to six months, they should receive a booster. Lee said it is important to receive a shingles shot, even for those who experienced chicken pox as children. “There is a difference between chickenpox and shingles: Chicken pox typically resolves and goes away. It is not painful. Shingles comes with the same virus, but unlike chicken pox, the disease causes nerve damage, which can become permanent, and the nerve damage is what we are trying to prevent,” he said. “Once you get shingles, it is difficult to treat.” Seniors should consider ensuring they are up to date with their vaccine shots, which means getting the original two shot series of Moderna or Pfizer, plus two boosters. Lee said many seniors forget to update their tetanus shot, which needs to be redone every 10 years. Tetanus can cause whooping cough, which can be fatal. Those who live or interact with unvaccinated children are most vulnerable to catching the disease.

TAKE A BR

By Brian D. King Tahlequah Daily Press

COPD Numbers in Oklahoma

7.7%

of adults have been diagnosed with COPD (prevalence) 1

245,100

adults have been diagnosed with COPD 1

63.1

people out of every 100,000 die per year 2

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Health

Winter season changes to impact people’s skin health and wellness By Madeline Anele news@tahlequahdailypress.com As winter approaches the changes in the air can dramatically affect the health and wellness of peoples’ skin. Having a good skin care routine and taking small preventative measures can not only improve the feeling and texture of the skin during the winter months but can greatly increase an individual’s level of comfort. Before the cold air begins to dry out skin, there are a few steps that can be taken to prepare at home. Check the soaps being used and make sure products that are gentle on the skin are being used. There are many cleansing products that contain a moisturizer or are formulated for dry skin, such products can be purchased locally from businesses, like Clear Creek Wellness. Nancy James is the owner. “My soaps are all very good for the skin and leave no chemical residue,” said James, who makes all her products from natural and healthy ingredients. Using a moisturizer that is light and not overloaded with unnecessary ingredients daily is also a great way to promote skin’s natural elasticity, moisture, and resilience. Other products like SPF protection are a must for skin health. Holly Kirk is an esthetician and owner of the Skin Spa & Boutique in Tahlequah. “We always recommend wearing a daily sunscreen [no less than SPF 35] even on those dreary winter days,” said Kirk. “Wearing SPF daily is essential to protecting your skin from the sun’s harsh UV rays and slows down the signs of aging.” Repeated exposure to sunlight without protection can cause a number of issues including premature aging, dark spots, and even cancer. “We carry a great lightweight serum that targets dark sun spots. Circadia Bright White Serum is formulated with potent antioxidants to brighten skin and reduce the appearance of sunspots,” said Kirk. “The Skin Spa & Boutique offers Circadia’s signature treatment, the SWiCH facial. It is a unique alternative to chemical peels. This treatment activates the body’s natural repair and renewal system. It is an immediate boost to the look and feel of skin. This treatment is recommended for ages 40 and up.” In addition, what a person puts into their body can affect 6

The ABCDEs of skin care helps people to notice changes in dark spots on their shoulders, face, hands, legs, and arms.

their skin’s wellness. Drinking plenty of water and other fluids are essential to keeping supple skin, especially during the winter months. Furthermore, adding vitamins, such as biotin and vitamin E, to a daily diet may contribute to healthier hair, nails, and skin. Limiting caffeine intake is also known to help promote healthier, less dry skin. Aside from daily practices, such as administering creams or consuming a healthy diet, it is a good idea to utilize what the National Institute for Aging refers to as the ABCDEs of skincare. This is the practice of noticing different changes in dark spots in the skin, especially in areas traditionally exposed to the sun – arms, legs, face, hands, and shoulders. “A” stands for asymmetry; if one side of the marking begins to look different or larger than the other side, it may be something to get examined by a healthcare professionHealth, Mind, & Body • Winter 2022


Holly Kirk, an esthetician and the owner of the Skin Spa & Boutique, recommends individuals need to apply sunscreen daily to protect themselves from the sun’s UV rays.

al. In addition, if the borders – “B” – of any skin marking begin to look irregular, if the color – “C” – changes or the marking begins to have color variations, or the diameter – “D” – begins to spread greater than a pencil eraser, then have a physician examine the marking. Finally, if the marking is continually evolving – “E” – in size, shape, begins

itching, becomes tender, or has bleeding, a doctor should be consulted. Protection and prevention of skin issues through the winter begin with making small changes and intentional steps in the daily regimen before the harsh winter air sets in for the season.

Cherokee Nation Home Health Services Inc.

Out Reach 800-307-4768

Home Health 888-281-6910

Hospice 877-792-7372

“Services are not limited to Native Americans” Winter 2022 • Health, Mind, & Body

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Schedule your mammogram today. WELCOMING NEW PATIENTS AT THE SAINT FRANCIS HOSPITAL MUSKOGEE BREAST CENTER Early detection is your best defense against breast cancer, and that’s why scheduling your annual mammogram is so important. Schedule your appointment today at the newly renovated Saint Francis Hospital Muskogee Breast Center located at 101 South Rockefeller Drive, Suite 101. We offer advanced 3D digital mammography and ultrasound services so you can get the screenings you need, closer to home. To schedule your mammogram, call 918-494-6900. Appointments can also be scheduled online through your Saint Francis MyChart account. Safety measures for COVID-19 are in place for patients and staff.

SAINT FRANCIS HOSPITAL MUSKOGEE BREAST CENTER Xavier Building 101 Rockefeller Drive, Suite 101 Muskogee, Oklahoma 74401 918-494-6900

saintfrancis.com/breastservices