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DISCOVER SPRING 2021

ALTAVISTA

A LOOK INTO

Top destinations, small business spotlights & an in-depth business directory guide for the city of Altavista & surrounding areas

Surviving a Shipwreck FEATURE STORY BY MARGARET P. LIEBCHEN


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COVER PAGE: Photo by A.J. O’Leary The town of Altavista purchased the historic Vista Theater last year.


Contents

06 08 10 12 15 16 18 20 22 24 28-37

VENDING HISTORY ONE PIECE AT A TIME COOK & MINNIS ANNOUNCE NEW LOCATION YMCA PERSERVERES WOODWORKER HAS ‘ELECTRIFYING’ HOBBY VETERANS CHRISTEN ‘VALOR FARM’ REVAMPING FAVORITE LOCAL PARKS THRIFTY FIREMEN BACK IN BUSINESS THE WILSON FAMILY TREE MOOSE LODGE HOSTS DOG PARADE SURVIVING A CHRISTMAS EVE SHIPWRECK

DIRECTORY


VENDING HISTORY ONE PIECE AT A TIME

By A.J. O’Leary, Altavista Journal Editor

Pictured: (Current) Paintable ceramics are also available in-store. (Top right) Wood Lane collects antiques from yard sales, flea markets and other sources. (Bottom right) Vendor Judy Bobbit makes gnomes. Wood Lane also offers classes on gnome-making. Photos by A.J. O’Leary/Altavista Journal.

6 | DISCOVER MAGAZINE | ALTAVISTA


I

f you can craft it, there’s a good chance it’s at Wood Lane Antiques. Walking into the store, visitors are greeted with a plethora of crafts, antiques, home goods, works of art and more. “It’s a little bit of everything,” Owner Robin Johnson said about her store. Wood Lane also regularly offers crafting classes on everything from ceramics to crocheting. More information is available on the store’s Facebook page, where Johnson regularly posts about items in the store, upcoming classes and the store’s hours. Johnson said the store had to close for three weeks last April, but that the 100-mile yard sale gave business a big boost. The store is now open Fridays and Saturdays from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. and Sundays from 1 p.m. to 5 p.m. Johnson said antiques and crafts are a way of preserving old ways that younger generations are likely unfamiliar with. Johnson gave tobacco sticks, which are often used in crafts but are becoming harder to find, as one such example. “This is a part of history that you’re taking with you,” Johnson said. “Our antiques are the same way. You may not know what it is, but your mom, your grandma knows.” •

ALTAVISTA | DISCOVER MAGAZINE | 7


COOK & MINNIS ANNOUNCE NEW LOCATION By A.J. O’Leary, Altavista Journal Editor

M

any were introduced to Cook and Minnis Funeral Home’s future location in Hurt last October when they held a massive trunk or treat for the community. Houston Walthall, the current families coordinator at Cook and Minnis Funeral Home, said the event was a hit. “We were totally shocked,” Walthall said. Hundreds came to the event for hot dogs, candy and snacks. Walthall said the trunk-or-treat will now be an annual event, and that attendees were extremely thankful to be able to celebrate Halloween with Cook and Minnis. But Walthall, now slated to take over as Cook and Minnis’ funeral director, never expected to be in that position. Two years ago, Walthall was an usher at a local church. He cut grass on the side, and took care of a close friend, Joel Hershel Minnis. Walthall evidently made an impression with his work as an usher. At the church, Hershel Minnis approached him one Sunday to ask Walthall about going into the funeral business with his brother, James Douglas, the current director of Cook and Minnis. Walthall said he gave him a one-word answer: “No.” But, as time went on Walthall grew closer to Minnis, and began working at Cook and Minnis roughly a year ago. The business wasn’t in a position to grow like Walthall hoped it would, until a letter came in the mail one day. It was from Rev. Dwight Steele of Steele Family Enterprises, who was offering to add Cook and Minnis to the Steele Family Enterprises group. 8 | DISCOVER M AGAZINE | ALTAVISTA

Walthall said Steele was able to repeat his own vision for Cook and Minnis back to him word for word the next time the two met. “God puts you with people to take his vision forward,” Walthall said. “I truly believe that.” Since that meeting Cook and Minnis has solidified plans to move to a new location at 241 Main Street in Hurt, under a new name, Unity Funeral Home. They are still preparing the building, but currently have plans to open their new location in May. Walthall said the home is even looking at hiring more help sometime in the near future. Walthall said he loves his job, but said before he was involved in the industry, it was his calling to take care of Hershel Minnis. The two formed a strong bond on many trips to the VA hospital together. Shortly before Minnis passed, Walthall said he asked him to “never let the funeral home down.” On the verge of earning his funeral director’s license, once Walthall takes the reins as funeral director, he seems primed to do more than just keep the trunk-or-treat going every year. “I think it was a gift that was given to me from God,” Walthall said about his work with Cook and Minnis, soon to be Unity Funeral Home. “I think this is where he wants me to be.”•


Pictured: Walthall displays a bracelet he always wears that reads, "Fall down seven times; stand up eight." Photo by A.J. O'Leary/ Altavista Journal.

ALTAVISTA | DISCOVER MAGAZINE | 9


YMCA PERSEVERES, ADAPTS DURING CRAZY YEAR By A.J. O’Leary & Jenny Haugh, Altavista Journal

2

020 was a difficult year for many, and the Altavista Area YMCA was no different. The group has worn many hats during the last year, but has continually striven to

serve the community. Brynn Simons, childcare director at the Y, said the childcare

during the past months and sometimes as many as 30. Simons said the YMCA had to make new hires to keep up with increased childcare demands and rely more heavily on their college-aged employees, many of whom became unavailable once the school year started.

center had to juggle watching kids who go to school in the

During the day YMCA staff created time blocks for students

Gretna, Mount Airy and Hurt areas as well as many Campbell

to work on their online schooling, sandwiched between

County students until students in Pittsylvania County were able

enrichment activities, meal times and breaks.

to return to in-person learning in October. “Each school basically had a different schedule that we were trying to accommodate,” Simons said. Simons said students from different schools had to be kept separate from one another, and that scheduling activities for students from so many different areas could be difficult because of how complex school schedules have become during the pandemic. Simons said these days the childcare center usually has at least 10 students per day, but has had as many as 15 to 20 10 | DISCOVER MAGAZINE | ALTAVISTA

Simons said many YMCA staff members have worked as teachers in the past or are working towards becoming teachers, but operating the childcare center during the pandemic has forced staffers to adapt nonetheless. “We’ve had to be flexible and learn to acclimate to the new normal,” Simons said. Simons said the Y typically only offers before and after school programs in its childcare center during the school year but is now offering 11 different types of contracts to meet parents’ differing needs.


Pictured: (L) Members of Altavista High School football team lift weights at the Y. Photo by A.J. O’Leary/ Altavista Journal. (R) The YMCA had to greatly expand its childcare services in 2020. Photo courtesy of the Altavista Area YMCA.

CEO Steve Jester agreed that the last year has presented

offer stations, shooting basketball, hopscotch, hula hoop, jump

some unique challenges for the Y, such as the flooding of the

rope, pickle ball and more. It’s ages seven and up, but we limit

childcare center or the fact that there wasn’t any in-person

the number of people participating to keep social distancing

fundraising for the group during the last year because of

in place.”

the pandemic. “You’re more appreciative of what it what it takes to make

Unless children came from the same household, they were kept separate from each other.

it happen,” Jester said about fundraising in 2020. “And also

“We have stations, we have an obstacle court, different

appreciative of the people that come here, and the people that

activities they can do solo. We also have a gym supervisor on

work here, and people that donate money here.”

the premises,” said McCracken.

Altavista is one of the smallest communities in the nation to have a full-facility YMCA, yet the Altavista Y still supports a roughly $2.9 million operating budget and over 140 employees. The Y offers childcare for infants through seventh graders. Over 185 children are enrolled at the Family Center facility in Altavista, and another 250 participate at five Campbell county elementary schools and Gretna. Dues at the Altavista Area YMCA are among the lowest in the state. There is also financial assistance available for all programs and activities at the Y through the E.R. English Scholarship Fund.

The Y also offers a P.E. program on Mondays and Wednesdays from 11 a.m. to noon, and 1 p.m. to 2 p.m. “The pool is also open from one to two those days, and for an additional fee, swim lessons are available from 11:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m.,” said McCracken. Families must call ahead or register at the front desk for the gym to keep numbers within social distancing guidelines, but not for the pool since the pool is set up for social distancing. The programs are free to YMCA members, or available with a punch card. Punch cards are $75 for 15 classes and can also be used for group fitness classes. Parents or guardians are asked to stay on site and to bring a water bottle marked with the child’s name to the gym.

The Altavista YMCA offered several fall options last year to

Jester said the Y is also constantly trying to improve its

keep local kids healthy and busy. One program was a P.E. style

facilities when possible, and recently installed new surfaces

class, offered to all children either enrolled in virtual learning

on two of its playgrounds.

or who are being home-schooled. Program Coordinator Maria McCracken says, “We open the basketball court and

“We still hope that people look at and prioritize what the Y does,” Jester said. • ALTAVISTA | DISCOVER MAG AZINE | 11


LOCAL WOODWORKER HAS ‘ELECTRIFYING’ HOBBY By Jenny Haugh, News Correspondent - Altavista Journal

I

n his 16-by-30-foot basement workshop in Hurt, woodworker Mark Covington can be found running electricity through boards of wood. “I’ve always wanted to do this,” Covington said. “I’ve been woodworking quite a while, and it’s more or less a hobby that is becoming fulltime.” Covington, owner of Coventry Carpentry, creates custom, one-of-a-kind pieces of furniture and art, through a unique process called fractal burning. Fractal burning is an art form in which high-voltage electricity is run through pieces of wood that burns figures that look like lightning or trees into the wood. “It’s dangerous, people have been killed from it,” said Covington. “Electrocuting the wood is dangerous, you have to be very careful. It puts the designs in the wood itself. You can’t control, and you can never produce another one just like it,” he said. Covington uses his own process of connecting a transformer to the wood. “It’s got about 1000 volts of electricity going through the wood,” he noted. Covington uses a special technique, “because wood breathes, and opens up,” he said, so he electrifies the wood, and then uses a special pigment, mixed in with epoxy, to add color to the design. “Epoxy is not that fun to work with,” Covington said. “You look at it all you want on YouTube but it’s not the same, and it has a long drying time.” Covington started out making a table for his daughter when she bought a home a few years ago. “My wife loved it so much that I made her one for a Christmas present one year. And I just kept making things,” he said. He is able to see the finished product sometimes before he 12 | DISCOVER MAGAZINE | ALTAVISTA

even starts a project. “I saw this old hand cultivator out in the barn, and when I saw it, I knew I was going to turn that into a wine or liquor table. When I saw the cultivator, I could already see this table,” he said. Currently, Covington’s work can be found in his booth at Wood Lane Antiques and Crafts in Altavista. “I can’t keep enough stuff to sell, it goes fast,” according to Covington. But even with his business picking up, he likes to take time to give back to others in the community. Coventry Carpentry sponsored a raffle last year, selling one of his hand made tables, to donate proceeds to a local man in the community with special needs. He said, “I’m trying to give back a little bit, and having a good cause gives me inspiration.” Giving back is very close to his heart, especially when it comes to his local community or his family. Covington said, “I am working on a cedar live edge table now for the Monacan Indian Nation, in memory of my wife’s family. They’re members. The Monacan Nation is about to move into a new building, and I am donating the table. I always have my mother-in-law in my mind as I am working on it.”•

Pictured Above: Covington uses a process called fractal burning to create his unique designs. Photo by Jenny Haugh/ Altavista Journal.


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PROMINENT VETERANS CHRISTEN ‘VALOR FARM’ IN ALTAVISTA By A.J. O’Leary, Altavista Journal Editor

“Hooah!” yelled Retired Brigadier General Jeffrey Horn to the crowd that had gathered before him on Veterans Day last year.

C

heers followed as the ceremony for the National Center for Healthy Veterans’ ribbon-cutting and groundbreaking at its new Altavista facility on Wards Road, called Valor Farm, began. Speakers at the event included Lieutenant Colonel Oliver North, former host of War Stories on Fox, the event’s host, General Horn and director of the new facility’s board, Bob Dees. Dees said in an interview that on the day of the ceremony he spoke with Valor Farm’s first resident or “patriot,” as they are referred to, a veteran from Missouri. “He told me today he hasn’t had a bad day here yet,” Dees said. That patriot is the first of what Valor Farm’s leaders hope is many more veterans who will come to call the property home. Valor Farm was designed as a community for veterans to live, gain job skills and receive spiritual guidance and counseling. Construction began on the center’s first homes this year after obtaining the Campbell County Board of Supervisors’ approval this fall. Dees said there was already a long waiting list to get into the center last year. The center’s first homes were completed earlier this year. Several times during the afternoon Dees called veterans an “untapped national treasure.” He said he believes Valor Farm can help veterans achieve health in a holistic way, and also that healthy veterans will help the rest of the country. “We want to put them back on the ladder of opportunity so that they can go be that next generation of great leaders, entrepreneurs, role models, missionaries for racial reconciliation in our country. They understand in the meritocracy of the military, that the person on your right and left regardless of race, color, creed bleed the same red blood,” Dees said. Keynote Speaker Lieutenant Colonel Oliver North said there isn’t enough being done to help veterans.

North is himself a combat decorated veteran of the Marine Corps, who also served as the Counter-Terrorism Coordinator on the National Security Council staff and as the president of the National Rifle Association, according to his website. According to the National Center for Healthy Veterans, only about half of the veterans who need mental health treatment have received it from the VA, despite high suicide rates among veterans. “Organizations like this are absolutely essential to recovery of veterans and then returning them to the rest of society as productive people,” North said about the new facility. Congressman-elect Bob Good also attended the event. “I’m very thankful to the Board of Supervisors in Campbell County, my former board, for approving this exciting adventure to honor and care for our veterans,” Good said in an interview after the event. “It’s so impressive to have such a huge crowd turnout, especially on a stormy, rainy day. And it is a privilege to be a part of honoring those most deserving of honor, our veterans.” Others present at the ceremony included the Campbell County Sheriff’s Office, the Altavista Police Department, members of the Altavista Town Council and town staff members, Liberty University ROTC members, Virginia State Police, VDOT and Daniel Gade, a veteran who recently ran for the US Senate and has served in President George W. Bush’s administration and taught at the United States Military Academy. Some at the event, like Helen Jackson, travelled from several states away just to see the new facility. Jackson travelled from Georgetown, Texas, where she runs an organization called Troopers Hope that is working on new medical techniques to help veterans. “I’m just so proud of what they’re doing,” Jackson said. “This was an amazing event, and I feel as an American, I’m privileged to be here.”• ALTAVISTA | DISCOVER MAGAZINE | 15


Pictured: The town of Altavista has conducted surveys showing local trails to be very important to area residents. Photo by A.J. O’Leary/ Altavista Journal. 16 | DISCOVER MAGAZINE | ALTAVISTA


REVAMPING FAVORITE LOCAL PARKS By A.J. O’Leary, Altavista Journal Editor

A

ltavista made numerous improvements to local parks early this year and throughout 2020—with many more to come. Several improvements were added to Eagle Trail in English Park. “Most of it is very, very well, used from first light in the morning to dusk in the evening,” said Town Council Member Tim George about the trail. The trail was briefly closed to allow the removal of potentially hazardous ash trees from the area. The town also added a large concrete pad that will serve as an overlook from the trail, in addition to a bike turnaround at the trail’s current terminus to better accommodate cyclists in the area. The town also laid plans to extend the trail, and will ultimately create a much larger loop extending from the existing Eagle trail, giving locals more walking options. The town also approved the addition of a story walk to English Park and the dedication and renaming of two local parks to John Mosley Memorial Park and Leonard Coleman Memorial Park, in honor of two historic leaders in the local black community. Progress was also made on a project that has taken several years now—the Dalton’s Landing Canoe Launch on Bedford Highway, which at the time this story was printed was on the verge of opening. George said the canoe launch will look something like a driveway going into the water, with rails to aid boaters. He said it will be similar to an existing canoe launch near the Leesville Lake Dam. Boaters will soon be able put their canoes in the water at the new launch off Bedford Highway, and float down the Staunton River to the boat ramp in English Park. George said the project has encountered many unavoidable delays, but he thinks in the end it will all be worth it. “It makes the river a lot more accessible,” George said.• ALTAVISTA | DISCOVER MAGAZINE | 17


THRIFTY FIREMEN BACK IN BUSINESS By Jenny Haugh, News Correspondent - Altavista Journal

A

fter massive flooding last fall, Thrifty Firemen opened back up for business early this year. Manager Dawn Hall says, “Mid November it rained so much that

water covered everything. It basically wiped through the store. There was two feet of water. The next day the water was gone, but everything in the store was pretty much no good anymore.”

Hall says, “While we were closed people would come by. They still needed things. So we would go back and grab things like jeans and winter coats, and still try to help them whenever we could.” The store looks different in some areas, but is once again full of clothes, toys, home goods and much more.

Located at 613 Pittsylvania Ave in Altavista, Thrifty Firemen

“We had an awesome floor cleaner.” Hall said. “Everything

was formerly known as the EMS Thrift Store. Two years ago,

is so clean. The Fire Department guys have been painting and

the Hurt and Altavista Fire Departments teamed up to get the

knocking down walls.”

store running again.

Hall mentioned that after the flood, “Everything was all wet

Thrifty Firemen takes donations, sorts them, and sanitizes

and moldy. Everyone pitched in. We had lots of volunteers

them for resale, with the profits going to the local fire

to come in and clean up. New Prospect Baptist Church sent

departments. The store had intended on fully reopening a little

help and the youth group came and helped clean mud off

later in the year because of the COVID-19 pandemic. “We’re

the fixtures.”

glad that we are able to open sooner than we thought,” said Hall. Thrifty Firemen initially only opened a portion of the store but has reopened much more of it since. 18 | DISCOVER MAGAZINE | ALTAVISTA

The store only employs one full time person and two part time people who come in to take donations and sort items. Volunteers handle everything else. “Sometimes we have volunteers, but with COVID we don’t want to jeopardize


Pictured: (L) Hall said the store is grateful for the support shown by the community. (C) Hall said the store has reopened more sections since its initial reopening this winter. (R) Manager Dawn Hall behind the store’s counter with a mural painted by a local youth group in the background. Photos by A.J. O’Leary/ Altavista Journal.

anyone’s health. A lot of our volunteers are in the more vulnerable category,” said Hall. The store is currently taking donations. “We can definitely use everything, and anything that would help others in the community,” Hall said. The store does not accept mattresses, box springs, or big box televisions. The store will also pick up furniture donations. “The fire departments will come pick it up, they can call and schedule it, and it’s usually within a few days,” Hall said about furniture donations. Hall said she and local firemen are grateful for the community’s response over the last several weeks. “The community has been great, we have gotten messages every day to see if we need donations. We want to thank everybody for their patience, for their kind words. Everyone’s pitched in, the community has helped out and even held donations until we could reopen,” Hall said. For now, the store’s hours are Monday through Friday, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m., and Saturday from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Thrifty Firemen is closed on Sundays.• ALTAVISTA | DISCOVER MAGAZINE | 19


THE WILSON FAMILY TREE By A.J. O’Leary, Altavista Journal Editor

M

ost people would say the same thing when they saw the red oak in Mark Wilson’s yard. “Man that’s a big tree,” Wilson said. “That was the comment from everybody.” Wilson, a longtime resident of the Gretna area, had to have a roughly 70-foot-tall red oak tree chopped down earlier this month because it posed a safety risk. Many wouldn’t have batted an eye at removing an old tree, but to Wilson, it meant a little more. Wilson has many fond memories of family gatherings under the tree’s shade. Several generations of his family grew up playing beneath it. “When it was in full bloom in its time, you could see it from half a mile around above everything,” Wilson said. The tree was already a formidable size when Wilson’s family moved to their farm in the Piney Grove community in 1949. It was there for Wilson’s entire life, and long before—Wilson counted between 135 and 150 rings in its stump, dating it back to well before 1900. Wilson measured the stump at six feet and seven inches across. “When we wrapped the tape measure around it, it was 22 feet around,” Wilson said. Virginia Big Trees, a statewide program that keeps track of the state’s most impressive trees, lists some of the state’s largest red oaks as between 270 and 290 inches around—Wilson’s measurement places his tree just outside that neighborhood, at

20 | DISCOVER MAGAZINE | ALTAVISTA

roughly 264 inches. “It was a monster,” Wilson said. Over the last few years the tree’s branches, some as big as trees in their own right, threatened to fall and injure Wilson or his family, or damage his house. Eventually Wilson had little choice, and after talking with family, decided it was for the best to remove it. When David Mason from Wisecarver Tree Services came to the farm, he said he had never seen anything quite like the old tree. “I’ve been with Wisecarver Tree Services since 1977,” Mason. “That’s probably the biggest tree we’ve cut down.” Mason said the tree’s shear size made it difficult to remove. Insects had bored into the tree, causing it to rot as they ate its sap. Its lengthy limbs had to be removed in segments, to avoid damaging nearby trees or Wilson’s home. Mason said it took over a day to chop the tree down, longer than it had ever taken he and his crew to remove a single tree. Wilson said several family members visited just to see the tree one last time. Once the job was done, it took at least another day to clean all the debris up. Too big to be processed and turned into lumber, the tree was left in the woods nearby. Though he knew it had to go, Wilson said it now feels strange to look out his window. “I really miss the old tree,” Wilson said.•


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ALTAVISTA MOOSE LODGE HOSTS DOG PARADE By A.J. O’Leary, Altavista Journal Editor

O

ne weekend last fall, the Altavista Moose Lodge had an unusual event—on Saturday, November 21, the group hosted a dog parade. Altavista Moose Lodge Senior Regent Crystal Jennings said her daughter’s favorite thing to do is usually to spend time with her dog. “So we decided to give the dogs a day out,” Jennings said. The event took place starting at 12 p.m. Participation cost $10. Participants were asked to pre-register and pay ahead of time, but on-site entrants were accepted too. Participants lined up six feet apart and each paraded their dogs past a representative from Campbell County Animal Control who came to judge the event. Roughly fifteen dog owners took part in the event. “I’m happy to see the participation,” Jennings said. “I’m 22 | DISCOVER MAGAZINE | ALTAVISTA

loving seeing the kids and their pets.” Jennings said one girl brought her dog to the event but didn’t want to participate at first because she was nervous. After a quick word with Jennings, she decided to join. “She was hesitant because it doesn’t know tricks. It’s not about that. This is just getting you and your animal out,” Jennings said. Nine trophies were handed out after the parade for accolades like the best puppy eyes, best costume, the dog the judge would most likely take home, best trick, the overall hound of the town, best groomed and most obedient. Janine Lascell, a Campbell County Animal Control Officer, served as the judge for the event. Lascell said the trophies were awarded just for fun. “Nothing that makes them feel like they’re better than the rest,” Lascell said about the trophies.


Pet owners of all ages came out to the event. “Who Let the Dogs Out,” and other dog-themed music played in the background as each dog and their owner prepared for their turn in the parade, or celebrated after their moment in the spotlight. “I think it is totally amazing,” Lascell said about the event. “Everybody has got their dogs under control. It gets everybody out to socialize and it gets their dogs out.” Jennings said the Moose Lodge hosted the event just to try something new, and that the group hopes to host another, possibly bigger dog parade next year. For her part, Lascell said she thinks it was nice to give pet owners something to do in a year when reasons to celebrate have been hard to come by. “Everybody loves their dogs and some activity that they can do with their animals,” Lascell said. “Major thumbs up.”•

Pictured: (L) Dog owners of all ages came out to the event. (R) Contestants lined up six feet apart to show off their dogs. Photos by A.J. O’Leary/ Altavista Journal.

ALTAVISTA | DISCOVER MAGAZINE | 23


SURVIVING A CHRISTMAS EVE SHIPWRECK By Margaret P. Liebchen

M

y uncle, Leonard Jones, born and reared in Altavista, first saw the coast of France while he lay draped over the throbbing engine of a rescue boat. He was one of the lucky ones. He had been fished from the icy waters of the English Channel like so much flotsam, and hung out to thaw in the warmest place his rescuers could find – across one of the boat’s 1,500 horsepower Packard gasoline engines. It was Christmas Eve, 1944, and the Germans had just torpedoed the SS Leopoldville, a Belgian troopship under temporary British command. The Leopoldville was in a convoy, churning across the English Channel from Southampton to Cherbourg when she was hit. She carried 2,237 American troops of the 66th Infantry Division, also known as the “Black Panthers,” so named for their ability to be aggressive, alert, and strong. In the icy disaster that followed the attack, in water below 50 degrees Fahrenheit, 764 American soldiers died. Leonard Jones survived because of his woolen long johns. Earlier that evening, he had mulled over the possibility of submarine attack, but after looking at the high waves in the Channel, had concluded that “any sub out in that water was crazy.” However, he and his cabin mate, a fellow second lieutenant from South Carolina, recalled what they’d been told about wearing wool in cold water and decided to put on long underwear just in case. The cabin mate, Michael, drawled what later proved to be the understatement of the evening: “I think it’s going to be cold outside.”

24 | DISCOVER MAGAZINE | ALTAVISTA

The torpedo explosion came late at night, waking Leonard and sloshing the water out of the wash basin. He pulled on his uniform and ran up on deck. There, he saw that another ship in the convoy had already pulled up alongside the Leopoldville and was attempting to take on troops. It was a dangerous task because the high waves kept crashing the two ships together. Soldiers were leaping from the Leopoldville onto the second ship. “The boys were trying to jump … and some of them were falling between the two ships,” my uncle said. “I remember shouting, ‘Michael, I’m going to get my platoon up toward the end of the ship. Some of these people going over are throwing their helmets into the water, and they’re going to kill those people down below. I’m going to get my men where there won’t be so many going over at the same time.’ ” Uncle Leonard recalls seeing the crew leaving the ship with their personal belongings, but he doesn’t remember hearing an abandon ship order. “The ship’s captain kept announcing we would all be taken off,” he said. “I went back down below to see if I could get some extra life jackets. The duffel bags were all floating about, and you could see the water coming up in the hold like a geyser.” He knew something had to be done. “I went back up and said, ‘Michael, this ship’s going down, I don’t care what anybody says!’” A few minutes after he and Michael took their men forward, the Leopoldville went under, “and we all went over the side,” my uncle said. The Leopoldville sank five-and-one-half miles outside


Cherbourg Harbor less than three hours after she was hit. No attempt had been made to tow her to shore, nor had the American troops ever been told that she was going to sink. The rescue boats that came out from the harbor were undermanned, as most of the crews were still at Christmas parties. Leonard remembers sailors “yelling in slightly inebriated voices, ‘Merry Christmas!’ as they caught whatever they could with hooks.” Many of the soldiers that the rescuers pulled from the water were already dead. “It was the cold that got them,” my uncle said. Leonard was unloaded in Cherbourg where he shared Christmas dinner with a stevedore battalion. For about 10 days he stayed at a French seaman’s boardinghouse until he could locate his dispersed unit. Cabin mate Michael also survived. My uncle came late to the war. After graduating from Virginia Tech, (then known as the Virginia Polytechnical Institute) in 1943, he and his fellow cadets had been cranked out three months early and sent to Officers’ Candidate School. They had emerged 17 weeks later as second lieutenants,

ungraciously known as “90-day wonders.” Of Virginia Tech’s 414 cadet graduates of that year, 36 died in the final months of the war. My uncle hadn’t exactly chosen the military as a way of life. He remembers his undergraduate days in the cadet corps with mixed feelings. Mostly he remembers the cold. Even though Virginia Tech is Southern, it is located in the mountains where temperatures drop so low in the winter that neighboring colleges at more pleasant climes refer to the school and its adjoining town of Blacksburg as “Bleaksburg.” Then, as now, the cadets strode about in heavy blue overcoats that were more than a dashing leftover from a bygone era ¬– they were also extremely functional. The short cape over the long coat gave the wearer additional warmth. Perhaps as a hint of things to come, my uncle remembers

Pictured in background from left to right: Malcolm McGregor, Leonard F. Jones and Julian Pauline Mitchell in 1945. Courtesy of Margaret P. Liebchen ALTAVISTA | DISCOVER MAGAZINE | 25


pouring water around the inside of the windows of his cadet quarters to freeze into a caulking of ice. “It kept the wind out,” he said. When Leonard rejoined his unit after the unscheduled swim in the English Channel, his company commander commented when his returning lieutenant walked through the door: “I thought you were dead.” But he was used to cold weather. “Captain, you can’t kill me that easily,” my uncle said. All his life he kept the letter he received from my grandfather after the mail caught up with him in France. The letter quoted an Associated Press report from London: “The German radio speculated today that the Leopoldville, former Belgian passenger liner, has been sunk between England and France while in use as an Allied troop transport. Berlin said two lifeboats bearing the liner’s name have been washed ashore in the Channel Islands and that one of them yielded military equipment ‘establishing that troops of the 262nd U.S. Infantry (the overseas designation of Leonard’s unit) had been shipwrecked.’ There was no Allied report of such an event.” My grandfather added in his letter: “This is evidently a fake report sent out by the Germans to make the hometown people uneasy and worried.” The New York Times carried the release the following June on page five in an article five-and-one-half lines about ships taking more than four million men to Europe. The reference to the Leopoldville said that it was the second highest loss of life in the sinking of a troopship during World War II. Other than a brief government press conference announcing that a troopship had been sunk in European waters due to enemy action, no publicity was given the sinking of the Leopoldville. The Leopoldville’s wreckage was located by underwater searchers in the early 1980s. She was found sitting upright in about 150 feet of water where the crew had dropped anchor to await the tugs that never came. Leonard believed the disaster of the Leopoldville may have saved him and other members of the Black Panthers from being thrust into the Battle of the Bulge. After the war, he occasionally returned to Virginia Tech to attend football games and said he didn’t see one iota of change. It still got cold there, and he assumed the same of the English Channel.• 26 | DISCOVER MAGAZINE | ALTAVISTA

A YMCA For Everyone Since 1971

Child Care Youth Sports Summer Camps Wellness Aquatics Group Exercise Senior Activities Arts Council Ballet & Tap

434-369-9622 Mon.-Fri. 4:30am - 9:30pm • Sat. 8am - 5pm • Sun. 1pm - 5pm

Steve Jester, Executive Director

www.altavistaymca.org

Altavista Area YMCA

Family Center, 1000 Franklin Ave. Child Care, Aquatics, Tennis

Athletic Center - 718 7th St.

Gymnasium, Walking Track, Group Exercise Room, Racquetball, Wellness Center, Multi-Purpose Room, Conference Room, Child Watch, Administration Offices


What better place to have a healthful & intimate lifestyle than Altavista? Altavista offers a laid back atmosphere without the inconvenience of country living. Plentiful sidewalks take you down tree-lined streets coupled with Victorian-era homes to quaint shops full of antique treasures, unique local finds and natural remedies. Make a splash at the splash pad at English Park, walk, bike or jog along our trails or visit one of our playgrounds for exercise.

Mission Statement A progressive community of excellence, second to none, committed to providing the best pace to live, work, worship and grow. At all times, we will serve the best interests of all citizens. All citizens are challenged to practice involvement in doing their part to accomplish our mission.

Town of Altavista 510 7th Street • PO Box 420 • Altavista, VA 24517 • 434 369 5001

Visit us online! AltavistaVa.gov • townhall@altavistava.gov

Treasured Past, Innovative Future


PARKS & RECREATION

* DUE TO COVID-19 RE-OPENING PHASES, PLEASE CALL OR CHECK THE WEBSITES TO CONFIRM DATES AND TIMES.

KARATE CLASS

MEN’S SOFTBALL DOUBLE ELIMINATION CHURCH TOURNAMENT

CLASS FEE: $40 per student 6 years and up per 5-wk session.

TOURNAMENT FEE: $75 per team

REMEMBER - IF YOUR NAME DOES NOT APPEAR ON THE CLASS ROLL YOU WILL NOT BE ALLOWED IN CLASS.

REGISTRATION DATES: June 1-July 9, 2021

LOCATIONS: BROOKNEAL COMMUNITY CENTER Instructors: Ronnie Scott Class Days: Mon. & Wed. 6:30 p.m. **May 17th – June 21st **June 23rd – August 2nd

TOURNAMENT DATES: Saturday, July 17, 2021@ 9:00 a.m. Sunday, July 18, 2021 @ 2:00 p.m.

RUSTBURG MIDDLE SCHOOL Instructor: Rufus Rice, Larry Bailey and Dana Hogan Class Days: No Class at this Time TIMBROOK PARK LIBRARY BASEMENT Instructors: Ronnie Scott, John Pascale and Margaret Scott Class Days: Tues. & Thurs. 6:30 p.m. ** May 18th – June 17th **June 22nd – July 29th To register and pay online go to www.co.campbell.va.us *THE DATES ARE SUBJECT TO CHANGE DUE TO WEATHER OR SCHOOL FUNCTIONS. PLEASE REGISTER IN ADVANCE. 28 | DISCOVER MAGAZINE | ALTAVISTA

TEAM LIMITS: 8 Men’s Adult Church Teams

*Adult Application Form must accompany Tournament fees. Rosters must be turned in to the Recreation Office prior to team’s first game. To qualify to play in this tournament, at least one half (1/2) of the team members must live or work in Campbell County.

MEN’S FALL SOFTBALL REGISTRATION LEAGUES OFFERED: Men’s Church & Men’s Independent LEAGUE FEES: $385 per team ($110 refundable forfeit) TEAM LIMITS: 6 Teams - Church & Independent LEAGUE PLAY DAYS: Church League - Mondays Independent League - Tuesdays or Thursdays *Leagues maybe combined & teams may play on Monday, Tuesday, and Thursday nghts)


MEN’S FALL SOFTBALL REGISTRATION (CONTINUED) LEAGUE START DATES: Church League - Monday, August 9, 2021 Independent League - Thursday, August 12, 2021 *Adult Application Form must accompany league fees. Rosters must be turned in to the Recreation Office prior to team’s first game. To qualify to play in this league, at least one half (1/2) of the team members must live or work in Campbell County.

NAYS FALL SOCCER COACHES TRAINING (INITIAL LEVEL) TRAINING FEE: $20 REGISTRATION DEADLINE: Friday, September 10, 2021

LADIES FITNESS CLASS Join Melanie Turpin for twenty sessions of low-impact, fat-burning, metabolism boosting aerobics! Classes are filled with great music, fun, and fellowship, so please sign up now! Advance registration is required. CLASS FEE: $45.00 per student REGISTRATION DEADLINE: Friday, September 17, 2021 CLASS DATES: September 20 – November 29, 2021 Mondays and Wednesdays, 7:00 p.m. - 8:00 p.m. (Tentative Dates-depending on availability) LOCATION: Rustburg Elementary School *This is a low impact fitness program for ladies, ages 18 and up.

TRAINING DATE: Sunday, September 19, 2021 TIME: 2:00 p.m. - 6:00 p.m. LOCATION: Campbell County Recreation Department Office *This training is for all Campbell County Recreation Department Youth Soccer Coaches. It is provided by the National Alliance for Youth Sports. Coaches who successfully complete the Initial Level Membership training will automatically receive: Youth Sports Journal, Certificate of Completion, $1,000,000 excess liability insurance, membership card, exclusive online member area, annual subscription to SportingKid magazine, monthly newsletter and exclusive Corporate Discount/ Programs.

ELEMENTARY SCHOOL TRACK MEET FEE: $5 per participant and participants can only do a maximum of 2 running events and must choose events when registering. REGISTRATION DEADLINE: Friday, June 5, 2021 *Age Groups (Boys and Girls): 1st and 2nd Grade, 3rd and 4th Grade, 5th and 6th Grade (Current School Year) DATE OF MEET: Thursday, June 10, 2021 @ 6:00 p.m. ALTAVISTA | DISCOVER MAGAZINE | 29


PARKS & RECREATION

* DUE TO COVID-19 RE-OPENING PHASES, PLEASE CALL OR CHECK THE WEBSITES TO CONFIRM DATES AND TIMES.

ELEMENTARY SCHOOL TRACK MEET (CONTINUED) EVENTS INCLUDE: Long Jump, 50 meter low hurdles, 100 meters, 200 meters, 400 meters, 800 meters, 4 x 100 Relay (Participants doing the relay must be in the same age division and register as a 4 person teambatons will be provided) LOCATION: Brookville High School Track *Participants must wear running shorts, t-shirts and running shoesno open toe shoes or bare feet will be allowed.

ELEMENTARY FALL CROSS COUNTRY LEAGUE The Campbell County Recreation Department will hold an Elementary Fall Cross Country League and a one (1) mile race. AGE GROUPS: 1st - 3rd Grade 4th - 6th Grade

ELEMENTARY FALL CROSS COUNTRY LEAGUE (CONTINUED) REGISTRATION DEADLINE: Friday, August 13, 2021 The program will officially end on Saturday, October 23rd with a one (1) mile cross country race site to be determined. More information will be provided concerning the race. Each registered runner will receive a team t-shirt. Everyone must wear running shorts, t-shirts or sweats and running shoes- no open toed shoes or bare feet. Participants will learn proper running form and long distance training techniques. Coaches will be needed for each team at the different sites. Participants must register at the Recreation Office. For more information call 434-332-9570.

ADULT CO-ED OPEN GYM - VOLLEYBALL AGE GROUP: 18 & over FEE: $25 DATES: Mondays, October 11, 2021 - March 28, 2022

FEE: $20 per participant

TIME: 7:00 p.m. - 9:00 p.m.

DATES: August 16th - October 23, 2021, 6:15 p.m. - 7:15 p.m. *Days will very depending on when coaches can meet.

LOCATION: William Campbell Middle School

LOCATION: Brookville, Rustburg, Altavista and William Campbell (Sites will combine if necessary)

30 | DISCOVER MAGAZINE | ALTAVISTA

This program is coordinated by Frankie Booker and is for those wanting to enjoy a fun game of volleyball. Contact the Recreation Department at 434-332-9570 for registration information.


SENIOR ADULT CO-ED OPEN GYM - VOLLEYBALL AGE GROUP: 50 & over FEE: $20 DATES: Wednesdays beginning on August 25, 2021 TIME: 7:00 p.m. - 9:00 p.m. LOCATION: Tomahawk Elementary School This program is coordinated by Hannah Brooks and is for those wanting to enjoy a fun game of volleyball. Contact the Recreation Department at 434-332-9570 for registration information.

CHALLENGER FISHING PROGRAM This program inspires individual fishing techniques encouraging participants to develop friendships in a family oriented setting. AGE GROUP: Ages 6 & up REGISTRATION DEADLINE: August 6, 2021 DATES: Thursdays beginning on August 12, 2021 TIME: 6:00 p.m. - 8:00 p.m.

FALL SOCCER LEAGUE SIGN-UPS For Brookneal, Brookville, Concord & Rustburg areas. AGE GROUP: Boys & Girls, ages 4 - 17, as of birth year • U6: 4 & 5 years | Born in 2016 & 2017 • U8: 6 & 7 years | Born in 2014 & 2015 • U10: 8 & 9 years | Born in 2012 & 2013 • U12: 10 & 11 years | Born in 2010 & 2011 • U15: 12 - 14 years | Born in 2007, 2008 & 2009 • U18: 15-17 years | Born in 2003, 2004, 2005 & 2006 REGISTRATION DATES: May 3 - July 23, 2021 REGISTRATION FEES: $55 - 1st child $50 - 2nd child $45 - each child thereafter * To receive discounts children must reside in same household. All participants must go to www.co.campbell.va.us and register and pay online.

KDR Convenience GAS • DELI • BEVERAGES ...and much more!

LOCATION: Lyn-Dan Heights Ruritan Club Fish Pond For more details, including registration fees and schedules, please contact Jeff Reynolds at 434-942-5649.

1205 Main St. • Altavista, VA

(434)608-2255


CIVIC GROUPS

LYNCH STATION RURITAN CLUB LYNN DAVID PRESIDENT

434-221-6434

GRIT RURITAN CLUB BARBARA CALDWELL PRESIDENT

434-335-5116

ALTAVISTA ROTARY CLUB EST. 1939 LOU REVELLE PRESIDENT

(H) 434-369-2143 (C) 434-485-1013

HABITAT FOR HUMANITY 434-309-2688

AMERICAN LEGION ALTAVISTA MEMORIAL POST 36 DEAN JENNINGS COMMANDER BRIAN K. DAVIS PUBLIC INFORMATION OFFICER

434-485-3998

STAUNTON RIVER GARDEN CLUB EST. 1928 KAREN COTTRON GEORGE MARY ELLEN TANT CO-PRESIDENTS

32 | DISCOVER MAGAZINE | ALTAVISTA

(KAREN) 434-851-6962 (MARY ELLEN) 434-369-5490


LIBRARIES

RUSTBURG 684 Village Highway • Rustburg, VA 24588 • rb@co.campbell.va.us •434-332-9560 • 434-332-9697 (fax)

TIMBROOK 18891 Leesville Road • Lynchburg, VA 24501 • tbl@co.campbell.va.us • 434-592-9551 • 434-237-6784 (fax)

STAUNTON RIVER (ALTAVISTA) 500 Washington Street • Altavista, VA 24517 • srml@co.campbell.va.us • 434-369-5140 • 434-369-1723 (fax)

PATRICK HENRY (BROOKNEAL) 204 Lynchburg Avenue • Brookneal, VA 24528 • phml@co.campbell.va.us • 434-376-3363 • 434-376-1111 (fax)

All four branches are open to the public to use our computers, check out materials, and use our Wi-Fi. Curbside PickUp is still available and we are happy to assist. Details here: https://campbellcountylibraries.org/2020/05/19/ccpls-reopening-story/ and here: https://campbellcountylibraries.org/curbside-pick-up/ Need some back to school support for your family? The library can help! Details here: https://campbellcountylibraries.org/school/

ALTAVISTA | DISCOVER MAGAZINE | 33


REAL ESTATE DIRECTORY

AGNES DOWDY & ASSOCIATES REAL ESTATE 1003 Main St. • Altavista, VA 24517 434-369-4224 434-369-6880

CENTURY 21 | ALL SERVICE 20886 Timberlake Rd. • Lynchburg, VA 24502 434-237-7777

LYNCHBURG BOARD OF REALTORS 3639 Old Forest Rd. • Lynchburg, VA 24501 434-385-8760

RED DOOR REALTY, LLC. 186 Campbell Highway • Suite B • Rustburg, VA 24588 434-609-7200

REMAX 1ST OLYMPIC 20395 Timberlake Rd. • Lynchburg, VA 24502 434-832-1100

SHORTT AUCTION & REALTY CO. 616 Campbell Ave. • Altavista, VA 24517 434-369-6678

WATTS AUCTION REALTY APPRAISAL 7661 Wards Rd. • Rustburg, VA 24588 434-821-5263

34 | DISCOVER MAGAZINE | ALTAVISTA


RESTAURANTS ALTAVISTA/HURT Applebee’s 169 Clarion Rd., Altavista 434-309-1157 Chef’s Drive – In 1101 Main St., Altavista 434-369-5590 China Wok Supper Buffet 1307 Main St. Ste L, Altavista 434-369-8268 Dairy Freeze 910 Main St., Altavista 434-369-5479 Domino’s 1000 Main St., Altavista 434-369-6767 El Cazador 911 Main St., Altavista 434-369-7953 El Cerrito Mexican Restaurant and Grill 1297 Main St., Altavista 434-309-1237 Hardee’s 1022 Main St., Altavista 434-369-5323 Main Street Buffet 1410 Main St., Altavista 434-309-1113 Main Street Cafe & Coffee 600 Main St., Altavista 434-369-2233 McDonald’s 404 Main St., Altavista 434-369-5885 Pizza Hut 105 Clarion Rd., Altavista 434-369-0111 Peace of Pie Pizzeria 519 Broad St., Altavista 434-309-1008

Perky’s Restaurant 802 Wards Rd., Altavista 434-369-9908

Domino’s 1051 Village Hwy, Rustburg 434-332-1135

Carol’s Cafe 21700 Timberlake Rd., Lynchburg 434-266-1066

Yamazato 221 Main Street Ste B, Hurt 434-324-8288

Hardee’s 889 Village Hwy, Rustburg 434-332-3800

Wendy’s 167 Clarion Rd., Altavista 434-309-2666

Rosie’s Cozy Kitchen 7943 Brookneal Hwy, Gladys 434-283-3000

Country Cooking 20584 Timberlake Rd., Lynchburg 434-239-1996

The Tuscan Italian Grill 2600 Dearing Ford Rd., Altavista

LaCarreta 69 Barricks Ln. Ste D, Rustburg 434-332-1600

Taste of Italy 105 Clarion Rd. Ste 2, Altavista 434-309-1743

Long Mountain Grill 69 Barricks Ln., Rustburg 434-332-4582

Taco Bell 165 Clarion Rd., Altavista 434-309-1723

The Lunch Box and Catering 619 Village Hwy, Rustburg 434-332-1428

Two Sisters Tap Room & Deli 2181 Lynch Mill Rd., Altavista 434-369-7476

McDonald’s 11059 Wards Rd., Rustburg 434-821-3227

Scoops 504 Pittsylvania Ave., Altavista (434)608-2456

Napoli’s Italian Restaurant 486 Village Hwy, Rustburg

La Carretta 8004 Timberlake Rd., Lynchburg 434-239-9701

Star East Chinese Restaurant 1051 Village Hwy, Rustburg 434-332-3394

TGIF Fridays 7815 Timberlake Rd., Lynchburg 434-237-9260

Subway 1301 Main St., Altavista 434-369-2366 Subway 125 Clarion Rd., Altavista 434-309-1085

RUSTBURG/ GLADYS Angela’s Italian Restaurant 39 Barracks Ln., Rustburg 434-332-4474 Colonial Restaurant 8790 Wards Rd., Rustburg 434-821-2511 Courthouse Cafe 880 Village Hwy, Rustburg 434-332-3301

Bojangles 1755 Callahan Rd., Rustburg 434-821-3344

TIMBERLAKE Arby’s 21717 Timberlake Rd., Lynchburg 434-582-1902 Biscuitville 8123 Timberlake Rd., Lynchburg 434-237-0329 Bojangles 126 Old Graves Mill Rd., Lynchburg 434-485-7016

Dairy Queen 8021 Timberlake Rd., Lynchburg 434-237-7030 El Cabrito’s 21104 Timberlake Rd., Lynchburg 434-239-8226 OIP The Original Italian Pizza and Restaurant 3412 Waterlick Rd., Lynchburg 434-239-1113 KFC 20250 Timberlake Rd., Lynchburg 434-237-2758

Crown Sterling 6120 Fort Ave., Lynchburg 434-239-7744 Porter House Restaurant and Lounge 7819 Timberlake Rd., Lynchburg 434-237-5655 Yamazato Japanese Restaurants 21039 Timberlake Rd., Lynchburg 434-237-9557 Wendy’s 7909 Timberlake Rd., Lynchburg 434-237-4543

ALTAVISTA | DISCOVER MAGAZINE | 35


NUMBERS TO KNOW TOWN OF ALTAVISTA

Chamber of Commerce........................................434-369-6665 Town Hall..............................................................434-369-5001 Police Administration.............................................434-369-7425 After Hours Police Department............................434-369-4488 Public Works ........................................................434-369-6045 Treasurer’s Office ................................................434-369-5002 Voter Registration...................................................434-592-9579 Water Treatment Plant............................................434-324-7251 Wastewater Treatment Plant ...............................434-369-6284 After Hours Public Works Emergencies..............434-369-4488 Altavista Economic Development Authority .......434-401-9729 Zoning ..................................................................434-369-5001

CAMPBELL COUNTY

General Information......................................................332-9500 Animal Control................................................................332-9574 Building Inspections.......................................................332-9596 Circuit Court Clerk..........................................................332-9517 Circuit Court Judge.........................................................332-9515 Commissioner of Accounts............................................332-9522 Commissioner of the Revenue........................................332-9518 Commonwealth’s Attorney............................................332-9520 Community Development..............................................332-9597 Economic Development.................................................332-9595 Environmental Health....................................................332-9550 Erosion & Sediment Control..........................................332-9506 Farm Service Agency....................................................332-6640 Farmers Home Administration........................................332-5147 Fire/Rescue....................................................................332-9540 Forestry...........................................................................946-7955 General District Court Clerk..........................................332-9546 Geographic Information Systems..................................332-9819 Human Resources..........................................................332-9500 Industrial Development Au...........................................332-9595 Jail..................................................................................332-9583 Juvenile Court Service Unit...........................................332-9533 Landfill.............................................................................821-7125 Magistrate.....................................................................332-9563 Maintenance..................................................................332-9528 Management Services..................................................332-9667 Mental Health.................................................................332-5149 Parks & Recreation.........................................................332-9570 Public Safety (Animal Control.......................................332-9574

36 | DISCOVER MAGAZINE | ALTAVISTA

Public Safety (Non-Emergency)...................................332-9540 Public Works...................................................................332-9528 Purchasing......................................................................332-9670 Real Estate......................................................................332-9568 Registrar..........................................................................332-9579 Schools - Administrative Office....................................332-3458 Sheriff’s Department......................................................332-9580 Social Services...............................................................332-9585 Soil Conservation...........................................................332-9534 Treasurer ........................................................................332-9590 Victim Witness Assistance Program..............................332-9520 Virginia Cooperative Extension....................................332-9538 Virginia Stormwater Management Program...............332-9506 Voter Registration...........................................................332-9579 Water and Sewer (CCUSA) ........................................239-8654 Youth, Adult, and Community Services (YACS)...........332-9572 Zoning, Planning & Subdivisions..................................332-9597

CENSUS FOR ALTAVISTA, VA (2019 CENSUS) Population: 3,443 (Incorporated in 1912) Median Home Income: $32,527 Median Home Value: $120,000 Square Miles: 4.89 People per Square Mile: 704

CENSUS FOR CAMPBELL COUNTY (2018 CENSUS) Population: 55,158 Median Home Income: $48,823 (2013-2017) Median Home Value: $154,300 (2013-2017) Square Miles: 503.87 (2010) People per Square Mile: 109.5 (2018)

TAX RATE INFORMATION Campbell County Personal Property: $4.40/$100 (Current Rate) Real Estate: $0.52/$100


Pictured: Altavista has historically been a magnet for industry, but has added many other attractions in recent years. Photo by A.J. O’Leary/ Altavista Journal.

Pictured: The Sheriff, and representatives from the Altavista Area Chamber of Commerce, the U.S. Military and the U.S. House of Representatives participate in a ribbon-cutting at Valor Farm. Photo by A.J. O’Leary/ Altavista Journal.


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