Page 1

SEPTEMBER 2009 CINEMAÊU CAFÉ U EDUCATIONÊU ARCHIVE

AWAY WE GO SAM MENDES’

SPECIAL EVENTS: RAYMOND CHANDLER SEASON – CULTURE NIGHT SCREENING – NT LIVE RAGE + LIVE SATELLITE Q&A REGULAR EVENTS: STRANGER THAN FICTION PRESENTS – WILD STRAWBERRIES FILM CLUB – IRELAND ON SUNDAY

FREE PROGRAMME

NEW RELEASES: MESRINE: KILLER INSTINCT - MESRINE: PUBLIC ENEMY NO.1 –INGLOURIOUS BASTERDS BROKEN EMBRACES – SLEEP FURIOUSLY – THE YELLOW BITTERN – THE SEPTEMBER ISSUE – FISH TANK – CREATION MISHIMA: A LIFE IN FOUR CHAPTERS – ONCE UPON A TIME IN THE WEST – AM I BLACK ENOUGH FOR YOU


Date 1 TUES

CINEMA 1

CINEMA 2

Title MESRINE: KILLER INSTINCT MESRINE: PUBLIC ENEMY NO. 1 MESRINE: KILLER INSTINCT MESRINE: PUBLIC ENEMY NO. 1

Time 6.15 8.40 6.15 8.40

Title INGLOURIOUS BASTERDS BROKEN EMBRACES INGLOURIOUS BASTERDS BROKEN EMBRACES

Time 6.10 9.00 6.10 9.00

MESRINE: KILLER INSTINCT MESRINE: PUBLIC ENEMY NO. 1 MESRINE: PUBLIC ENEMY NO. 1

6.15 8.40 6.10, 8.45

INGLOURIOUS BASTERDS BROKEN EMBRACES INGLOURIOUS BASTERDS BROKEN EMBRACES

6.10 9.00 6.10 9.00

7 MON

THE BIG SLEEP MESRINE: KILLER INSTINCT MESRINE: PUBLIC ENEMY NO. 1 THE BIG SLEEP MESRINE: KILLER INSTINCT MESRINE: PUBLIC ENEMY NO. 1 MESRINE: PUBLIC ENEMY NO. 1

2.00 4.00 6.10, 8.45 2.00 4.00 6.10, 8.45 6.10, 8.40

8 TUES

MESRINE: PUBLIC ENEMY NO. 1

6.10, 8.40

9 WED

MESRINE: PUBLIC ENEMY NO. 1

6.10, 8.40

10 THURS

MESRINE: PUBLIC ENEMY NO. 1 THE YELLOW BITTERN THE SEPTEMBER ISSUE FISH TANK THE SEPTEMBER ISSUE FISH TANK

6.10 8.40 6.30 8.30 2.00, 6.30 4.00, 8.30

MURDER, MY SWEET BROKEN EMBRACES INGLOURIOUS BASTERDS THE BLUE DAHLIA BROKEN EMBRACES INGLOURIOUS BASTERDS SLEEP FURIOUSLY BROKEN EMBRACES SLEEP FURIOUSLY BROKEN EMBRACES SLEEP FURIOUSLY BROKEN EMBRACES BROKEN EMBRACES

2.00 3.50, 9.00 6.10 2.00 3.50, 9.00 6.10 6.30 8.30 6.30 8.30 6.30 8.30 6.10, 8.40

THE SEPTEMBER ISSUE FISH TANK

2.00, 6.30 4.00, 8.30

BROKEN EMBRACES MESRINE: PUBLIC ENEMY NO. 1 MARLOWE BROKEN EMBRACES MESRINE: PUBLIC ENEMY NO. 1 THE YELLOW BITTERN FAREWELL, MY LOVELY BROKEN EMBRACES MESRINE: PUBLIC ENEMY NO. 1 THE YELLOW BITTERN THE SEPTEMBER ISSUE MESRINE: PUBLIC ENEMY NO. 1 BROKEN EMBRACES MESRINE: PUBLIC ENEMY NO. 1 CHANDLERESQUE: A TALK BY ADRIAN WOOTTON MESRINE: PUBLIC ENEMY NO. 1 BROKEN EMBRACES MESRINE: PUBLIC ENEMY NO. 1 FISH TANK THE SEPTEMBER ISSUE FISH TANK THE SEPTEMBER ISSUE

6.10 8.30 2.00 3.45 6.15 9.00 2.00 3.45 6.15 9.00 6.30 8.30 6.10 8.30 6.30 8.30 6.10 8.30 6.30 9.00 2.10, 6.35 4.40. 9.00

TODAY IS BETTER THAN TWO TOMORROWS THE LONG GOODBYE THE SEPTEMBER ISSUE FISH TANK

12.00 2.15 4.40, 9.00 6.35

THE END OF THE LINE THE SEPTEMBER ISSUE FISH TANK THE SEPTEMBER ISSUE FISH TANK THE SEPTEMBER ISSUE FISH TANK THE SEPTEMBER ISSUE FISH TANK AWAY WE GO + ENOUGH AM I BLACK ENOUGH FOR YOU AWAY WE GO + ENOUGH FISH TANK AM I BLACK ENOUGH FOR YOU AWAY WE GO + ENOUGH FISH TANK FISH TANK CREATION FISH TANK CREATION FISH TANK CREATION

6.30 9.00 6.30 9.00 6.30 9.00 6.20 8.50 6.30 8.50 2.10 4.10, 8.50 6.20 2.10 4.10, 8.50 6.20 6.15 8.40 6.15 8.40 6.15 8.40

2 WED

3 THURS 4 FRI 5 SAT 6 SUN

11 FRI 12 SAT

13 SUN

14 MON

FISH TANK

8.30

15 TUES

THE SEPTEMBER ISSUE FISH TANK THE SEPTEMBER ISSUE FISH TANK THE SEPTEMBER ISSUE FISH TANK AWAY WE GO + ENOUGH

6.30 8.30 6.30 8.30 6.30 8.30 6.40, 8.50

AWAY WE GO + ENOUGH MISHIMA: A LIFE IN FOUR CHAPTERS THE YELLOW BITTERN WILD STRAWBERRIES FILM CLUB THE SEPTEMBER ISSUE AWAY WE GO + ENOUGH MISHIMA: A LIFE IN FOUR CHAPTERS THE YELLOW BITTERN

2.20, 8.50 4.30 6.40 11.00 1.00 2.45, 9.00 4.45 7.00

FISH TANK AWAY WE GO + ENOUGH THE SEPTEMBER ISSUE AWAY WE GO + ENOUGH DOUBLE INDEMNITY AWAY WE GO + ENOUGH AWAY WE GO + ENOUGH RAGE CREATION

6.30 8.50 6.50 8.50 6.30 8.50 6.20 8.30 6.20, 8.40

26 SAT

ONCE UPON A TIME IN THE WEST CREATION

3.00 6.20, 8.40

27 SUN

ONE UPON A TIME IN THE WEST CREATION

1.00 4.20, 6.35, 8.50

28 MON

ONCE UPON A TIME IN THE WEST AWAY WE GO + ENOUGH ONCE UPON A TIME IN THE WEST AWAY WE GO + ENOUGH ONCE UPON A TIME IN THE WEST AWAY WE GO + ENOUGH

6.00 9.10 6.00 9.10 6.00 9.10

16 WED 17 THURS 18 FRI 19 SAT 20 SUN

21 MON 22 TUES 23 WED 24 THURS 25 FRI

29 TUES 30 WED

CINEMA SCREEN IS SUBJECT TO CHANGE.


MAJOR REDEVELOPMENT AT THE IFI The IFI is currently undergoing an exciting major redevelopment of its landmark Old Quaker Meeting House site to create a third cinema in addition to the existing two cinemas, a major overhaul of the existing public areas, and significant development of the IFI’s Irish Film Archive research facilities. Please note the changes to opening hours during this period.

CONTENTS

The IFI will open from 6pm Monday to Friday, 2pm on Saturdays and all day Sundays. Please note that there will be no disabled access to Cinema 2 during the redevelopment period. Bookings can still be made during regular hours by phone or 24 hours online. Credit/debit cards bookings can be made in our temporary reception office during business hours. We apologise for any inconvenience to our patrons during this time. Redevelopment is due for completion at the beginning of November.

PUBLIC AND CLUB SCREENINGS

MAIN FILMS MESRINE: KILLER INSTINCT

2

MESRINE: PUBLIC ENEMY NO.1

2

INGLOURIOUS BASTERDS

3

BROKEN EMBRACES

3

SLEEP FURIOUSLY

4

THE YELLOW BITTERN: THE LIFE AND TIMES OF LIAM CLANCY 4 THE SEPTEMBER ISSUE

5

FISH TANK

5

AWAY WE GO

6

MISHIMA: A LIFE IN FOUR CHAPTERS

6

CREATION

7

ONCE UPON A TIME IN THE WEST

7

AM I BLACK ENOUGH FOR YOU

8

SEASONS & SPECIAL EVENTS RAYMOND CHANDLER SEASON

9

NT LIVE – ALL’S WELL THAT ENDS WELL

14

RAGE + LIVE SATELLITE Q&A

14

CULTURE NIGHT SPECIAL ARCHIVE SCREENING

15

REGULAR IFI EVENTS STRANGER THAN FICTION PRESENTS

14

WILD STRAWBERRIES FILM CLUB

15

IRELAND ON SUNDAY

15

LATECOMERS POLICY//

Films start at the times stated in this programme. Latecomers may be refused admission after the start of the feature. IRISH FILM INSTITUTE 6 EUSTACE STREET, TEMPLE BAR, DUBLIN 2 BOX OFFICE: (01) 679 3477. WEBSITE: WWW.IFI.IE Designed by

OPENING HOURS:

Dublin

Around ½ of our films are classified by the Irish Film Classification Office and are open to the general public. Unclassified films require membership. You have two options: Annual membership (E25 or E15 concessions) or daily membership (E1 per person each time you visit the cinema). For further details on membership, please see pages 12 and 13.

BOX OFFICE & PRICES ADMISSION FEES: These apply to regular IFI screenings and do not necessarily apply to special events or festivals. Reduced admission fees for annual members and their guests are detailed in brackets. MONDAY – FRIDAY 2pm to 6pm E7.75 (E7) Conc. E6 (E5.40) 6pm to 10pm E9.20 (E8) Conc. E7.75 (E7) SATURDAY – SUNDAY 2pm to 4pm E7.75 (E7) Conc. E6 (E5.40) 4pm to 10pm E9.20 (E8) Conc. E7.75 (E7) Credit card bookings can be taken between 12.30pm and 7.30pm on (01) 679 3477 or 24-hours at www.ifibooking.ie. Online and telephone bookings are subject to a booking fee of 50c per ticket to a maximum of E1 per transaction. There are no booking fees on any ticket purchase made in person at the IFI box office.

NEW LOYALTY & MEMBERSHIP//

Check out our new loyalty and membership schemes on pages 12 & 13. Please remember: no card, no points!

CAR PARKING SPECIAL OFFER//

On presentation of your IFI cinema ticket, the Fleet Street Car Park will offer IFI patrons a special rate of `5.00 for 3 hours parking. Simply present the cinema ticket along with the parking ticket when you pay at the cash desk, prior to collecting your car.

FREE WIFI NOW AVAILABLE AT THE IFI

1


NEW RELEASES// MESRINE: KILLER INSTINCT (MESRINE:

MESRINE: PUBLIC ENEMY NO. 1

DIRECTOR - JEAN-FRANÇOIS RICHET

DIRECTOR - JEAN-FRANÇOIS RICHET

VINCENT CASSEL TEARS UP THE SCREEN IN THIS PULSATING GANGSTER CHRONICLE, WHICH PAYS HOMAGE TO THE CLASSIC HOLLYWOOD CRIME FLICKS OF THE EARLY ’70s — BUT WITH AN EXTRA SHOT OF BADASS GALLIC ATTITUDE.

AS IF HE WAS MERELY WARMING UP IN THE FIRST HALF (KILLER INSTINCT), VINCENT CASSEL PUTS ON THE POUNDS AND DONS MYRIAD DISGUISES IN THIS CÉSAR-WINNING PERFORMANCE AS THE SELF-MYTHOLOGISING SUPERCROOK MESRINE, WHO CUT A SWATHE THROUGH THE HEADLINES IN 1970s FRANCE AS PUBLIC ENEMY NO. 1.

L’INSTINCT DE MORT)// SEPTEMBER 1-3; 5, 6

Downright notorious in his native France, bank robber and prison escapee extraordinaire Jacques Mesrine led such a wildly excessive life that it has taken two separate films, an all-star cast and a `45 million budget to pack it all in. This first instalment opens with Mesrine’s still-controversial assassination by undercover police in late 1979, before whisking us back to its subject’s formative army years in Algeria — an experience which left him familiar with firearms, jobless on his return home, and furnished with an abiding contempt for authority. While Cassel’s electric presence is always centre stage, Gérard Depardieu is in imposing form too as the Paris crime lord who hands this young upstart a few lessons in loyalty and ruthlessness before internecine carnage — and the galvanising effect of gun-toting femme fatale Cécile de France — send Mesrine’s nefarious career into its international phase. Director Jean-François Richet knows his William Friedkin movies inside out and puts the pedal to the floor as the story barrels through the years. It’s an exhilarating ride with no shortage of incident (the whole section in Québec’s toughest prison might have made a movie on its own), yet it’s no slavish imitation. Cassel’s protagonist is swaggering, charismatic, but also capable of the sort of cold brutality Hollywood simply couldn’t countenance from its leading men. Mesrine’s contradictions compel, and part two can’t come soon enough. — Trevor Johnston. , ‡   ÊUÊÓäänÊUÊ-1 // ÊUÊ ""1,ÊUÊ ",* ÊUÊ /ÊUÊ££ÎÊ

(MESRINE: L’ENNEMI PUBLIC Nº1)// SEPT 1-17

It’s a performance to rank with De Niro in his prime, and it grounds the story as Mesrine’s elusive exploits continue to leave us gasping in their wake. Cannily, director Jean-François Richet shot much of this section first, allowing the bulked-up Cassel to shed his impressive gut for the character’s slimmer younger days, while this time the star’s chief playmates include a spry Mathieu Amalric as an understandably wary fellow fugitive, and Ludivine Sagnier as the seductive moll who’ll learn the hard way that the jewelled baubles which come with the territory do so at a heavy price. Since the preceding Killer Instinct has already forewarned us to expect extremes of spontaneous daring and chastening cold steel from the man, the focus here shifts to Mesrine’s need to keep sustaining his flamboyant reputation with yet more snook-cocking illegality — and the quite possibly deluded sense that he was making a political statement in the process. Neither of the films judges their protagonist, though here the timing is especially deft. Just when we’re about to fall for Mesrine’s intoxicating bluster, we see him perpetrating another act beyond the pale of acceptability. With its adrenalin-charged action and freewheeling sense of transgression, this is certainly no heavyweight rumination on moral responsibility, but neither is it some facile hagiography. Mesrine: remember the name. — Trevor Johnston. , ‡   ÊUÊÓäänÊUÊ-1 // ÊUÊ ""1,ÊUÊ ",* ÊUÊ /ÊUÊ£ÎÎÊ

2


INGLOURIOUS BASTERDS//

BROKEN EMBRACES (LOS ABRAZOS ROTOS)//

DIRECTOR - QUENTIN TARANTINO

DIRECTOR - PEDRO ALMODÓVAR

QUENTIN TARANTINO SPENT TEN YEARS TALKING ABOUT THIS FILM AND JUST 16 MONTHS TO WRITE, SHOOT AND EDIT IT — NOT BAD, CONSIDERING THIS WORLD WAR TWO MEN-ON-AMISSION MOVIE ONCE THREATENED TO BALLOON INTO AN EPIC, 12-HOUR BAND OF BROTHERS-STYLE TV MINI-SERIES.

PEDRO ALMODÓVAR SAYS THAT HIS LATEST FILM IS “AN EXPRESS DECLARATION OF LOVE TO CINEMA”, WHICH IS NOT MERELY A PROFESSION BUT ALSO “AN IRRATIONAL PASSION”.

SEPTEMBER 1-6

At roughly 150 minutes, it’s still a little on the epic side, but the surprise is not simply that Tarantino — famous for thinking aloud about films that never materialise — finally made it, but that, far from being a dour action movie for guys, Inglourious Basterds [the misspelling is deliberate] is fun. Described by the director as a kind of sister-piece to Tony Scott’s True Romance, which Tarantino scripted, it’s a tense but often very funny thriller in which the Allied Forces and a young, brutally orphaned Jewish girl collide on a dangerous mission: to assassinate the Führer at a movie premiere in Occupied Paris. Publicity for the movie may suggest that this is a Brad Pitt vehicle, but Pitt, playing the charismatic leader of a U.S. guerilla gang of Nazi hunters called the Basterds, is just one of the many pleasures Tarantino’s savage romp offers. A bravura 20-minute opening sequence introduces the previously unknown Austrian actor Christoph Waltz, who steals the film as the insidious Colonel Landa. There’s also Michael Fassbender as the bumbling, stiff-upper-lip British spy Archie Hickox; Daniel Brühl as the seemingly charming Nazi sharpshooter whose biopic is to be premiered for Hitler; and Diane Kruger as the beautiful but useless double agent who threatens to ruin everything. But most of all, there’s a visionary behind the camera, and Tarantino’s confidence, especially after the disappointment of his Grindhouse feature Death Proof, is amazing. — Damon Wise. 1°-°°‡ , 9ÊUÊÓää™

""1,ÊUÊ ",* ÊUÊ " 9Ê /Ê-/ , "ÊUÊÎxÊUÊ£xÓÊ

SEPTEMBER 1-17

The Spanish director’s most self-conscious film to date focuses on a blind ex-director, Mateo Blanco (Lluís Homar), who now leads a double life as pseudonymous screenwriter Harry Caine. The story, told to his young male assistant, traces the ill-fated amour fou between a director and his beautiful married star, Lena Rivero (Penélope Cruz). The complication is that the frothy comedy they are shooting has been financed by Lena’s jealous businessman husband, Ernesto Martel (José Luis Gómez), whose son Ernesto Jnr. is filming a ‘Making of’ documentary. Also, Lena’s suspicious husband is using the son’s raw footage to keep tabs on Lena and Mateo’s burgeoning romance. Hovering in the background is Mateo’s old flame Judit García (Blanca Portillo), now his friend and production manager, who will later embroider the story with some surprise revelations of her own. Flashing back and forth in time, Broken Embraces is a melodramatic film noir that also references specific movies. The desolate volcanic beauty of the island of Lanzarote, to which Mateo and Lena flee when filming is completed, echoes the Pompeii-set scenes in Roberto Rossellini’s Viaggio in Italia (Voyage to Italy), while the film-within-the-film, Girls and Suitcases, is obviously based on Almodóvar’s own Women on the Verge of a Nervous Breakdown. In other hands, this might have been too clever-clever and contrived, but Almodóvar deftly weaves a multi-stranded web of emotionally charged narratives in which each thread is intimately connected to the other. And as he candidly admits: “At times, the best way I can transmit a character’s feelings is by doing so through cinema.” — Nigel Floyd. -* ÊUÊÓää™ -1 // ÊUÊ ""1,ÊUÊ ",* ÊUÊ " 9Ê /Ê-/ , "ÊUÊÎxÊUÊ£ÓÇÊ

3


NEW RELEASES// SLEEP FURIOUSLY// SEPTEMBER 7-9

THE YELLOW BITTERN: THE LIFE AND TIMES OF LIAM CLANCY// SEPTEMBER 10, 12-13, 19-20

DIRECTOR - GIDEON KOPPEL

DIRECTOR: ALAN GILSENAN

DIRECTOR GIDEON KOPPEL SHAPES THE PASSING OF TIME IN THE WELSH HILLSIDES INTO A PIECE OF PURE CINEMA IN WHAT WILL BE, FOR THE GENUINE FILM LOVER, ONE OF THE YEAR’S MOST MEMORABLE CELLULOID EXPERIENCES.

THIS NEW FEATURE DOCUMENTARY FROM ALAN GILSENAN IS A SURPRISING AND DARKLY REVEALING PORTRAIT OF LIAM CLANCY, THE LAST SURVIVING MEMBER OF THE CLANCY BROTHERS AND TOMMY MAKEM, AND THE MAN BOB DYLAN CALLED “JUST THE BEST BALLAD SINGER I’D EVER HEARD IN MY WHOLE LIFE.”

To complete this affectingly communicative first feature, he returned to the Mid-Wales community of Trefeurig where he grew up, capturing the lives of local farmers, the mobile library van and his elderly mother. There’s no commentary. Koppel just lets the camera watch people going about their business, sheep trailing across a mountainside, trees moving in the wind and the clouds rolling by — as the music of Aphex Twin provides ambient counterpoint. Slowly though, we see a pattern emerging, how the agricultural shows bring the scattered locals together now that falling numbers closed the village school, how the Welsh language still clings on amid the old folks, and the library van is a vital connection for culture and conviviality. How much of this will still be here in ten or twenty years time? These are certainly familiar issues in the Irish landscape too, though there’s also a more personal aspect to the film, as we see when the director’s mother visits his father’s mountainside grave. Heinz Koppel was a German-Jewish artist who fled the Nazis and found a refuge in this craggy corner of Wales, and it’s possible to read the film as an evocation, through the camera’s eye, of that sense of home. The result, reminiscent of the great wartime British documentarist Humphrey Jennings’ meditations on Englishness, is heartfelt, achingly beautiful, visually striking, surprisingly funny, and utterly, utterly beguiling. — Trevor Johnston. 1°°ÊUÊÓäänÊUÊ ""1,ÊUÊ /ÊUʙ{Ê

The Clancy Brothers and Tommy Makem have garnered worldwide success and huge popular acclaim, but opinions are still divided about them. To many they are the true embodiment of the Irish popular folksong tradition, while to others they represent the worst excesses of stageIrishness. Yet despite this, their songs remain our songs, the songs of a people. But for all their fame, their story remains largely untold. Myths and legends have grown up around The Clancy Brothers and Tommy Makem, but the legend of Liam Clancy is perhaps the most potent. The Yellow Bittern charts the remarkable rise to fame of The Clancy Brothers from their small-town beginnings in County Tipperary to the folk heyday of Greenwich Village in the 1960s, where they outsold The Beatles and influenced a host of artists. Drawing on unseen and behind-the-scenes footage of the band at their height as well as on Clancy’s own personal archive, the film presents a compelling look at an artist living life to the full. But Alan Gilsenan’s splendid portrait also goes behind the mask of the performer and delves deep into the psyche of Liam Clancy as well as his troubled personal life. “They were legends,” says Gilsenan, “and their songs still stir something deep within us. They are etched upon our soul in some profound way. Their story is our story, the story of a nation.” ,  ÊUÊÓää™ÊUÊ ""1,ÊUÊ /ÊUÊ££äÊ

4


THE SEPTEMBER ISSUE//

FISH TANK//

DIRECTOR - R. J. CUTLER

DIRECTOR - ANDREA ARNOLD

UNPRECEDENTED ACCESS TO VOGUE MAGAZINE’S NEW YORK INNER SANCTUM BRINGS US THIS MUST-SEE OBSERVATIONAL DOCUMENTARY, WHICH SHOWCASES FAMED EDITOR ANNA WINTOUR IN ALL HER GLACIAL GLORY, WHILE OFFERING A FASCINATING INSIGHT INTO THE AGE-OLD BATTLE BETWEEN ART AND COMMERCE.

IF ANDREA ARNOLD’S GLASGOW-SET SURVEILLANCE THRILLER RED ROAD ANNOUNCED THE ARRIVAL OF A PROMISING NEW BRITISH TALENT, THIS IMMERSIVELY POWERFUL COMING-OF-AGE STORY CONFIRMS THE PRESENCE OF A MAJOR FILMMAKER.

SEPTEMBER 11-24

Few bosses are as feared as the woman they call ‘Nuclear’ Wintour (on whom it’s rumoured the Meryl Streep character in The Devil Wears Prada was based), whose underlings tread on eggshells lest they meet with the death-glare from their capricious supreme leader. Only one brave soul presents any resistance, and that’s Vogue’s veteran fashion editor Grace Coddington, a former model who’s become an industry legend for her keen eye and ongoing commitment to creative integrity. For her it’s about artistry, colour, line, yet ultimately Wintour has the final say on what makes it into the key September 2007 issue — and her decision to put celebrities into the magazine has proved a commercial winner. Confrontation looms on a daily basis. Even those who profess no interest in the prima donnas of the fashion world will be drawn in by this piquant character conflict — Coddington can only push her superior so far, yet Wintour also knows that her key lieutenant is virtually irreplaceable. Director R. J. Cutler captures every nuance in a film which adeptly balances a sceptical take on his subjects’ self-importance with a gradual appreciation of the skills which keep them at the height of their profession. Unexpectedly engrossing viewing, and the bitchy highlights are a treasure as Wintour lets fly. Never has the simple phrase “That’s pretty” dripped with such implicit scorn. — Trevor Johnston.

FROM SEPTEMBER 11

Winner of the Jury Prize in Cannes, Fish Tank is shaped around brilliant newcomer Katie Jarvis as 15-year-old Mia, who’s feeling increasingly hemmed in by life on an estate where her supposed friends are pretty lame, her mum (Kierston Wareing) always has a new man on the go, and her wee sister’s an absolute pain. We certainly understand her frustration, but everything’s about to change when her mother brings home Connor (Michael Fassbender, thankfully filled out a little after the privations of Hunger). He’s kind, handsome, has great taste in music, and he really listens to her, encouraging her to work on her dance moves and make something more of herself. But he’s still her mum’s boyfriend. Arnold’s script cajoles us into thinking we know where all this is leading, but life, of course, is messier and tougher than that. A combination of utterly vivid performances, a believably ordinary milieu, and a seemingly innate grasp of how and why human beings mess up in the way they do, ushers the story from somewhat scuffed innocence to fraught, increasingly sexualised experience. Superficially, it’s the sort of naturalistic working-class drama British directors do so well, yet Arnold’s collaboration with gifted cameraman Robbie Ryan brings a heightened visual expressivity, signalling how the film’s apparent spontaneity has actually been adroitly shaped for full-on emotional intensity. It takes a certain kind of mastery to bring that off — and here it is. — Trevor Johnston. 1°°ÊUÊÓää™ÊUÊ ""1,ÊUÊ " 9Ê /Ê-/ , "ÊUÊ£ÓÓÊ

1°-°°ÊUÊÓää™ÊUÊ ""1,ÊUÊ /ÊUʙäÊ

5


NEW RELEASES// AWAY WE GO//

MISHIMA: A LIFE IN FOUR CHAPTERS//

DIRECTOR - SAM MENDES

DIRECTOR - PAUL SCHRADER

SAM MENDES’ FILMS — AMERICAN BEAUTY, ROAD TO PERDITION — ARE OFTEN STUDIED TO THE POINT OF AIRLESSNESS, WHICH MAKES THE LOOSE, RAGAMUFFIN ATMOSPHERE OF HIS LATEST, AWAY WE GO, A WELCOME RELIEF.

“IT’S THE FILM I’D STAND BY,” SAID PAUL SCHRADER ABOUT MISHIMA, AND THIS WELCOME REISSUE IN A NEW PRINT AFFORDS A CHANCE TO RE-EVALUATE ONE OF THE MOST UNUSUAL HOLLYWOOD FILMS OF THE 1980s — OR ANY OTHER PERIOD.

FROM SEPTEMBER 18

Though somewhat unimaginatively appropriating American Indie hallmarks — right down to Alex Murdoch’s insistent Nick Drake-ish acoustic guitar ballads — Mendes casts aside his rigid directorial formalism for this tale of a couple, Burt (John Krasinski) and Verona (Maya Rudolph), taking to the road on the eve of their first child’s birth to find a new home and, with it, a clearer idea of how to cope with impending adulthood. Working from a script by A Heartbreaking Work of Staggering Genius author Dave Eggers and his wife Vendela Vida, Mendes exhibits a generally nimble touch as he guides his story through its succession of alternately humorous and poignant episodes, and if his material occasionally succumbs to broad farce and bathos, its sincerity is nonetheless endearing. An early standout sequence involving Verona’s former co-worker (Allison Janney) manages to overcome its condescension with sharp bons mots, a feat Mendes fails to replicate with his protagonists’ later visit to the home of Burt’s new age-y childhood friend (Maggie Gyllenhaal), who’s merely an easy-target caricature. Still, despite such missteps and a borderline-precious Eggers/Vida script, the film never lingers on scenes long enough for its comedy to deflate or its melodrama to turn exploitative, its naturalism aided by two leads who craft an authentic rapport through wordless exchanges and offhand banter. Mendes locates the hope, fear, excitement and regret that accompany maiden parenthood with an assured restraint absent from his prior work. In doing so, Away We Go proves his first film to feel relaxed, messy, alive. — Nick Schager. 1°-°°‡1°°ÊUÊÓää™ÊUÊ ""1,ÊUÊ ",* ÊUÊ " 9Ê /Ê-/ , "ÊUÊÎxÊUʙÇÊ

6

Irish Shorts @ IFI This screening includes Barrry Dignam’s Enough (2008), an IFB funded short drama set in a busy restaurant where a young couple’s screaming row goes unnoticed. (Ireland, 2008, 3 min)

SEPTEMBER 19 & 20

The great Japanese writer and self-styled warrior, Yukio Mishima achieved lasting notoriety in 1970 when, after storming a military headquarters in Tokyo with his private army and delivering a speech demanding a return to the values of Japan’s imperial past, he proceeded to commit ritual suicide. Although focusing mainly on the last day of Mishima’s life, the film has an audacious structure that also contains black-and-white flashbacks of his early upbringing that afford an insight into his future character, and stylised dramatisations of episodes from his novels that allude to the complexity of his inner life and his repressed homosexuality. John Bailey’s photography and Eiko Ishioka’s design are stunning. “If Mishima had not existed,” said the critic Kevin Jackson (who edited the collection Schrader on Schrader), “Schrader might have been obliged to invent him.” Certainly Schrader’s interest in Japanese culture had already manifested itself in his screenplay for Sydney Pollack’s The Yakuza (1975) and his influential critical writing on the films of Yasujiro Ozu, but it is the nature of the hero that is most characteristic: like Travis Bickle (Schrader’s most famous creation) in Taxi Driver, though on a higher intellectual plane, Mishima is a narcissistic extremist driven by a personal code of honour that evolves into a suicidal fantasy of symbolic self-definition. Ken Ogata’s leading performance is properly charismatic, and Philip Glass’s plangent score sweeps the film forward like a tempestuous sea. Not to be missed. — Neil Sinyard. 1°-°°ÊUÊ£™nxÊUÊ-1 // ÊUÊ ""1,ÊUÊ " 9Ê-/ , "ÊUÊÎxÊUÊ£Ó£Ê

These screenings of the definitive director’s cut of Mishima are presented in association with the ScreenLit Festival of Film, TV and Writing, organised by Broadway, Nottingham. Special thanks to Linda Pariser.


CREATION//

ONCE UPON A TIME IN THE WEST//

DIRECTOR - JON AMIEL

DIRECTOR - SERGIO LEONE

HIS THEORY OF EVOLUTION MAY BE AMONG THE MOST SIGNIFICANT IDEAS IN THE HISTORY OF HUMAN THOUGHT, BUT THIS INCISIVE BIOPIC REMINDS US HOW LITTLE MOST OF US KNOW ABOUT CHARLES DARWIN THE MAN.

A WELCOME REISSUE — IN A NEWLY RESTORED VERSION — FOR SERGIO LEONE’S EPIC FRONTIER TALE, ENCOMPASSING RAILROADS, SIX-SHOOTERS AND STANDOFFS IN THE HORSE OPERA TO END THEM ALL.

Adapted from the book Annie’s Box written by his great-great grandson Randal Keynes, the picture here is of a scientist whose personal life is almost destroyed by the enormity of his own discovery. Back home in the English countryside, years after his voyages in the South Seas, Paul Bettany’s Darwin has actually been putting off writing On the Origin of Species because he knows his theories will hurt his religious, dearly beloved wife Emma (Jennifer Connelly, the off-screen Mrs Bettany as well). Meanwhile, he’s also haunted by the memory of the beloved daughter the couple lost to pneumonia — and since he no longer has a God to pray to, what resources does he have to fall back on?

While his groundbreaking Clint Eastwood ‘spaghetti westerns’ were all shot in Europe, here Leone got to film in Utah’s Monument Valley — where John Ford etched the celluloid iconography of the West — and the result has the euphoric intensity of a dream achieved. Compared to the flash-cut pacing of today’s action cinema, it’s just so refreshing to experience Leone’s highly individual sense of time: you feel it right away in the legendary opening sequence, where three hit-men await the arrival of their target at a remote railway station. The clock stands still, but heartbeats race, and violence comes as swiftly as a speeding bullet with the arrival of Charles Bronson’s enigmatic harmonica-playing stranger. Vengeance is afoot, and it will corral the destinies of wanted gunslinger Jason Robards, grieving widow Claudia Cardinale, and Henry Fonda as the exterminator easing the railway west by clearing any human obstacles in its path.

FROM SEPTEMBER 25

Director Jon Amiel does well throughout to stop the film getting bogged down in the despondency which obviously afflicted Darwin himself, instead moving nimbly back and forth in time to startling effect, using stop-motion to bring Darwin’s ideas visually to life, and daringly making his visions of his dead daughter a key part of the story. Bettany has a delightfully light touch in the family scenes but he leaves us in no doubt of the character’s inner turmoil, while Connelly’s resilience never turns fustian. Awed by Darwin’s fundamentally humanitarian compassion, yet never blind to the comforts of faith, this is a surefire end of year awards contender. See it here first. — Trevor Johnston. 1°°ÊUÊÓää™ÊUÊ ""1,ÊUÊ " 9Ê /Ê-/ , "ÊUÊÎxÊUÊ££äÊ

FROM SEPTEMBER 26

Usually seen as the face of moral integrity, here Fonda’s piercing blue eyes are like some pitiless void. It’s a truly choice example of casting against type, but then again Leone’s trademark use of concentrated close-ups requires actors of the finest calibre to withstand the scrutiny. With Ennio Morricone’s all-time greatest score upping the intensity at every juncture, it’s a film of grandiose emotions — greed, passion, revenge — but also an elegiac sadness that the coming of civilisation means the end of an era for these mythic tumbleweed warriors. Don’t dare miss the opportunity to catch this one on the big screen. — Trevor Johnston. /9‡1°-°°ÊUÊ£™Èn

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7


COMING SOON //

NEW RELEASES// AM I BLACK ENOUGH FOR YOU// SEPTEMBER 26, 27 (2.10)

COMING SOON

DIRECTOR - GÖRAN HUGO OLSSON

LE DONK & SCOR-ZAY-ZEE

HE MAY HAVE HAD A THING GOING ON WITH “MRS JONES”, BUT THERE’S A LOT MORE TO PHILLY SOUL SINGER BILLY PAUL THAN HIS CHART-TOPPING 1972 SINGLE, AS THIS ENGROSSING AND WORTHWHILE MUSIC DOC MAKES CLEAR.

Director Shane Meadows teams up again with actor Paddy Considine (Dead Man’s Shoes) for a Christopher Guest-style mock documentary about an obnoxious roadie (Considine) and his rapper protégé ‘Scor-zay-zee’.

This Swedish-made documentary follows the now seventysomething performer around old Philadelphia haunts and on tour in South America and Europe, allowing director Göran Hugo Olsson to interview the man and his collaborators — including legendary songwriter Kenny Gamble — and ponder quite why Billy Paul never went on to bigger things. As soul aficionados and pop historians alike will tell you, it didn’t quite happen for him, and the suggestion here is that his record company frightened off mainstream radio by following the classic ballad Me and Mrs Jones with a militant agit-groove follow-up, Am I black enough for you — a record which takes no prisoners, conjuring up images of direct action to frighten off the white folks, but more or less accusing the post-Panthers black community of complacency along the way. “Freedom?” he sings, “My kids could dig it more if I could feed ’em.” It almost goes without saying that social conscience-raising ’70s tracks have since won Paul a new audience among the current rap cognoscenti. A jazz inflected stylist rather than a gospel shouter, he’s still in remarkably good voice even now, as the film’s nimbly shot concert highlights make clear — though it’s the rich seam of archive material which might just have you seeking out his back catalogue. In the meantime, you can certainly feel the love in this affectionate portrait of a talent deserving wider recognition. — Trevor Johnston. -7 ÊUÊÓäänÊUÊ ""1,ÊUÊ /ÊUÊnxÊ

From October 9.

GOODBYE SOLO The best film to date from Iranian-American director Ramin Bahrani (Man Push Cart, Chop Shop), Goodbye Solo is a moving tale about a gregarious immigrant taxi driver and his relationship with a 70-year-old man seemingly bent on ending his life. It’s a wonderful study of friendship and its obligations. From October 9

THIRST Winner of the Jury Prize at Cannes, Korean director Park Chan-wook (Old Boy, Sympathy for Mr Vengeance) adapts Thérèse Raquin — Emile Zola’s 19th century novel of murder and adultery — into “a scandalous vampire melodrama” with a modern setting. From October 16.

TALES FROM THE GOLDEN AGE Cristian Mungiu, director of the acclaimed 4 Months, 3 Weeks and 2 Days, conceived, produced and wrote this portmanteau film about life during the hardscrabble years of Romanian communism. From October 30.

8


RAYMOND CHANDLER AND THE MOVIES//

RAYMOND CHANDLER AND THE MOVIES// Raymond Chandler (1888-1959) died 50 years ago, leaving a lasting legacy as one of the three or four most influential and widely read crime writers in the history of the genre. American born but educated at an English public school, his reputation rests on a writing career that didn’t properly begin until he was a middle-aged man and only produced fourteen short stories, seven completed novels — all of which feature his most famous creation, Los Angeles-based detective Philip Marlowe — and a small number of screenplays. Yet Chandler’s Marlowe became the blueprint for what we think of as the hardboiled detective. The author’s dazzling prose, his mythologising of Los Angeles, his acerbic, witty tough-guy dialogue and his adoption by Hollywood all combined to make him part of crime fiction’s very DNA. It was Chandler’s extraordinary success in Hollywood, especially during the period 1943 to 1947, that made him world famous. The public’s appetite for contemporary, hard-edged adult drama made Chandler’s books hot properties, especially after the success of the 1944 film adaptation of Farewell, My Lovely (aka Murder, My Sweet). Chandler was employed to adapt other novels and lucked

CHANDLERESQUE: AN ILLUSTRATED TALK BY ADRIAN WOOTTON//

out on his first collaboration with writer-director Billy Wilder on the magnificent film version of James M. Cain’s Double Indemnity. Chandler fought with Wilder, just as he would fight with Alfred Hitchcock while adapting Patricia Highsmith’s Strangers on a Train, but he remained much sought after as a screenwriter. Indeed, it is difficult to overstate Chandler’s success. None of his contemporaries or any of his successors — even if we include blockbuster authors like Stephen King or John Grisham — managed to author novels, have those novels made into classic films and write other highly acclaimed movies not based on their own material. Chandler’s utterly original style and language cast a long shadow over the crime genre, but his popularity through the movies is also crucial in explaining his longevity. There have been few recent adaptations of his work, but his influence is still felt in everything from the phraseology of modern crime writers to the clichés of TV advertising. In modern cinema, the term ‘Chandleresque’ can be applied to the mood and atmosphere conjured up in films as diverse as Blade Runner, L.A. Confidential and Sin City. — Adrian Wootton.

SEPTEMBER 16 (6.30)

To commemorate the 50th anniversary of Raymond Chandler’s death, Adrian Wootton (director of ‘Crime Scene’ and CEO of Film London) presents an illustrated talk, featuring film/audio clips and chronicling the author’s extraordinary life and career. The talk will last approximately 100 minutes. Normal cinema admission prices will apply.

MURDER, MY SWEET//

The first real adaptation of a Raymond Chandler crime novel was this remarkably faithful version of Farewell, My Lovely, which features former song and dance star Dick Powell as a surprisingly convincing Philip Marlowe. Hired by ex-con Moose Malloy (Mike Mazurki) to find his former girlfriend Velma (Claire Trevor), Marlowe is bribed, beaten up and drugged as he finds himself caught up in a web of corruption, blackmail and murder. Made roughly in parallel with Double Indemnity, but for much less money, this was a chance for the creative team involved to demonstrate that they could make a serious mainstream movie which would tap into the public’s desire for strong adult entertainment. Chandler’s brilliant prose, gallery of grotesque characters and scintillating dialogue were sensitively rendered into a lean, mean script by John Paxton and director Edward Dymtyrk. Dymtyrk, whose later career was blighted by the McCarthyist anti-communist witch hunts, brought all his stylistic fair and energy to bear on Murder, My Sweet. The result was a critical and commercial hit that had the effect of making Chandler the hottest scribe in Hollywood.

SEPTEMBER 5 (2.00)

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DIRECTOR - EDWARD DMYTRYK 9


RAYMOND CHANDLER AND THE MOVIES//

RAYMOND CHANDLER AND THE MOVIES//

THE BIG SLEEP//

Private eye Philip Marlowe (a mesmerising Humphrey Bogart) mixes with L.A.’s hoi polloi as he tries to extricate a rich family from a blackmail attempt. Intrigues, dirty deeds and murders pile up in this most convoluted of Chandler’s tales, in which nothing is straightforward. A terrific team was assembled for this mainstream adaptation of Chandler’s first Philip Marlowe novel. Director Howard Hawks hired top screenwriter Leigh Brackett and legendary novelist William Faulkner to create what turned out to be a follow-up vehicle for the on-screen romantic pairing of Bogart and Lauren Bacall, following their success in Hawks’ previous film To Have and Have Not. Even after consulting the author himself, Hawks and his team failed to make sense of the plot. After producing a very dull first cut, they went back to re-shoot and re-edit the whole movie. The plot made even less sense in the finished version, but with the emphases now placed on the Bogart-Bacall romance and the stars burning brightly in their roles, few people complained. It’s the wonderful performances and the innuendo-ridden, wise-cracking repartee that makes the film a classic.

SEPTEMBER 5, 6 (2.00)

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DIRECTOR - HOWARD HAWKS

THE BLUE DAHLIA// SEPTEMBER 6 (2.00)

A tough murder mystery thriller set against the backdrop of Hollywood’s nightclub scene, The Blue Dahlia continued the teaming of noir stars Alan Ladd and Veronica Lake following their success in This Gun for Hire and The Glass Key. A suitably hardboiled affair about a war veteran whose homecoming coincides with the murder of his unfaithful wife, this is the only original script Chandler wrote for the movies and was made under unusual circumstances. A ridiculously tight shooting schedule had to be devised to allow Ladd to complete his military service. In order to meet these demands, the alcoholic Chandler did a deal with producer John Houseman whereby he was supported by a retinue of secretaries and nurses so he could write and drink at the same time! Amazingly, the script was completed as planned, the film got made and its success further enhanced Chandler’s aura as one of the greatest scriptwriters in Hollywood. The author kept working on movie scripts for another three years, but The Blue Dahlia was really his last great screenplay and thus his last hoorah in Tinseltown. 1°-°°ÊUÊ£™{ÈÊUÊ  Ê Ê7/ ÊUÊÎxÊUʙÈÊ

DIRECTOR - GEORGE MARSHALL The only big-screen version of Chandler’s work made during the 1960s, Marlowe is also the only adaptation to date of his 1949 novel The Little Sister, in which he provided a very unflattering portrait of the movie industry. Neatly scripted by prolific writer Stirling Silliphant (In the Heat of the Night), who sets the action in modern Los Angeles and substitutes the TV world for that of cinema, it has James Garner playing Marlowe as a private eye whose old fashioned values find him wandering somewhat bemused though the fag end of the swinging sixties. Hired for $50 a day by a demure blonde to find her missing brother, Marlowe soon finds himself sinking into ever more murky waters as he’s dragged into a scam involving a TV star and some blackmail photos. Paul Bogart’s stylish direction captures a strong sense of time and place, and Garner brings considerable verve and charm to his playing of Marlowe as a man out of time. This undervalued item in the Chandler movie canon is also notable for an early appearance by kung fu star Bruce Lee.

MARLOWE//

SEPTEMBER 12 (2.00) DIRECTOR - PAUL BOGART 10

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RAYMOND CHANDLER AND THE MOVIES//

RAYMOND CHANDLER AND THE MOVIES//

FAREWELL, MY LOVELY// SEPTEMBER 13 (2.00)

The third screen version of Chandler’s famous novel, this stylish 1975 production retains the original’s 1940s setting, which is evoked though some splendid art direction in affectionate homage to the whole classic film noir/ detective story tradition. Thus the casting of Robert Mitchum, who might seem rather long in the tooth to be playing Marlowe, actually makes perfect sense. As a Los Angelino who knew Chandler and loved the books, Mitchum inhabits the role as comfortably as the battered raincoat he wears throughout the movie. Another imposing presence is ex-prize fighter Jack O’Halloran, who towers over every other character as Moose Malloy, the ex-con who fell in love with a hooker named Velma (Charlotte Rampling) some years back and now hires Marlowe to track her down. Marlowe’s quest leads him through multiple homicides as he explores the lurid underbelly of Los Angeles nightlife. In marked contrast to Robert Altman’s radical treatment of The Long Goodbye, director Dick Richards takes a more traditional approach which has its own rewards. It’s a wonderfully atmospheric, even nostalgic piece which never lapses into sentimentality or parody. 1°-°°ÊUÊ£™ÇxÊUÊ ""1,ÊUÊÊ /Ê6 "ÊÊUʙxÊ

DIRECTOR - DICK RICHARDS

THE LONG GOODBYE// SEPTEMBER 20 (2.15)

During the golden age of new wave American cinema in the 1970s, director Robert Altman made a terrific series of films that were fairly radical re-workings of Hollywood genres. Perhaps the finest was his controversial adaptation of Chandler’s last Philip Marlowe novel. Aided and abetted by legendary scriptwriter Leigh Brackett, who had co-written The Big Sleep nearly thirty years earlier, Altman saw Chandler’s detective as ‘Rip van Marlowe’, a 1940s gumshoe hopelessly adrift in the ‘Me Generation’ Los Angeles of 1973, with its new permissiveness and New Age nonsense. Played with scruffy charm by Elliott Gould, this Marlowe is a laid-back slob whose attempts to protect a friend lead him into a world of blackmail, suicide, betrayal and murder. Altman’s Marlowe actually embodies some of the same ideals as Chandler’s original, but the director views such values as being comically at odds with the freakish, uncaring world of modern L.A. Brilliantly constructed, with highly sophisticated visuals and sound mixing as well as superb performances, The Long Goodbye is one of Altman’s masterpieces, but it leaves most Chandler fans waiting for a more faithful rendering of the novel. 1-ÊUÊ£™ÇÎÊUÊ ""1,ÊUÊ ",* ÊUÊÎxÊUÊ££ÓÊ

DIRECTOR - ROBERT ALTMAN

DOUBLE INDEMNITY// SEPTEMBER 23 (6.30)

A salesman (Fred MacMurray) is lured by an avaricious sexual siren (Barbara Stanwych) into murdering her husband for his life insurance. On their trail is a razor-sharp claims investigator (Edward G. Robinson) who is too close to the culprit to see the truth under his nose. The characterisations of James Cain’s novella are perfectly performed and enriched by Billy Wilder and Raymond Chandler’s scintillating screenplay. Chandler and Wilder were like oil and water, but they drew out the best in each other. Chandler used his brilliant ear for dialogue to embellish this dark tale, while Wilder taught Chandler how to structure a screenplay. The result is a lexicon of crackling lines expertly framed within a fatalistic flashback. The memorable moments are legion: a murder shown only through the reaction of the victim’s wife; the moment when the getaway car stalls; a forlorn conversation at the Hollywood Bowl across which Schubert’s music casts a melancholy pall; a startling climax of double double-cross; and a routine between two men involving a match and a cigar that becomes finally the film’s solitary spark of compassion. 1°-°°ÊUÊ£™{{ÊUÊ  Ê Ê7/ ÊUÊÎxÊUÊ£äÇÊ

DIRECTOR - BILLY WILDER 11


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Fancy building points each time you make a purchase at the IFI? Want to convert those points into free tickets?

Earn points on all of your purchases at the IFI! t

t Now you can with the IFI Loyalty Card! With points for everyone who spends at the IFI, and with double points for members, you’ll be able to reap the rewards of all your visits to the IFI!

t

Spend at IFI Cinemas, IFI Filmshop or IFI Restaurant and Bar and collect 4c back in points to redeem against free cinema tickets for every €1 you spend. With our regular double points events and extra points offers, you’ll have enough points to treat yourself in no time. Plus IFI members will automatically get double points on all their purchases – and that even includes double points on all our bonus point offers!

4c back in points at the IFI for every €1 spent Our special introductory offer will allow you to earn 4 points for every €1 spent up until December 31st 2009!

Sign up for an IFI Loyalty Card and you’ll be going to the cinema for free in no time...


membership scheme now available Free tickets, discounts on tickets, free screenings and a host of other benefits... It can only be the new IFI Membership! The IFI membership has been re-launched, with a host of new benefits on offer. Membership Benefits Members €25 (€15 concessions): t One free preview screening every month t Free cinema ticket (off peak use) t Double loyalty points which can be redeemed against more free tickets t Discount on tickets (approx. 15% cheaper evening tickets) t Monthly programme posted to your home (free of charge) t 10% discount in the IFI Film Shop t 10% discount on food at the IFI Bar (over €10)* t Discounts on tickets for up to 3 accompanying friends t Concession prices on selected film courses and special events t Priority notification of special events t Dedicated Members’ Pages on the IFI website with latest news and updates t Weekly ezine sent direct to your inbox with all the latest releases and news from the IFI. *

maximum two diners per membership can avail of discount

Best members (€99): All of the above plus: t Special invitation to the Annual Members’ Evening with an exclusive free screening, private programme review by the IFI Director and drinks reception t Invitation for you and a guest to one Festival Opening Night per annum, which includes cinema tickets plus access to the drinks reception t Free membership of the Tiernan MacBride Library at the IFI (worth €20) t Annual tours to the Irish Film Archive at the IFI t Listing on the IFI website as a Best Member t Listing in one monthly programme per annum as a Best Member.

Corporate Membership: Contact the membership office on 01 679 5744 for more details on customised corporate packages which include: t Discounted membership rates for your employees t Discounted tickets for your employees t Private screenings or special events for your clients or staff t Presentations/meetings in a unique environment t Unique opportunities for corporate entertainment and staff socials t Recognition for your organisation as a supporter of the arts through IFI publications, website etc. The IFI Corporate Membership packages can fit perfectly within any company’s CSR policy, internal marketing plans or sports and social calendar!


IFI STRANGER THAN FICTION//

IFI STRANGER THAN FICTION PRESENTS...// The first major feature documentary film revealing the impact of overfishing on our oceans, The End of the Line examines the imminent extinction of bluefin tuna, brought on by increasing western demand for sushi; the impact on marine life resulting in huge overpopulation of jellyfish; and the profound implications of a future world with no fish that would bring certain mass starvation. Filmed over two years by director Rupert Murray (Unknown White Male), the film follows the investigative reporter Charles Clover as he confronts politicians and celebrity restaurateurs, who exhibit little regard for the damage they are doing to the oceans. From the Straits of Gibraltar to the coasts of Senegal and Alaska to the Tokyo fish market – featuring top scientists, indigenous fishermen and fisheries enforcement officials, The End of the Line is a persuasive wake-up call to the world.

THE END OF THE LINE// SEPTEMBER 21 (6.30)

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We hope to welcome special guests for a Q&A following this screening.

DIRECTOR - RUPERT MURRAY

RAGE//

RAGE// Following on from the IFI’s recent success with ‘live’ and satellite events, this month will see audience members participate in an interactive Q&A with the cast and director of Rage, all of whom will be based in London. Using SMS and Skype, audience members will be able to put questions to the cast who will be participating in this unique Q&A beamed direct from London to all participating cinemas.

RAGE//

+ LIVE, INTERACTIVE SATELLITE Q&A WITH SALLY POTTER, EDDIE IZZARD, JUDE LAW AND LILY COLE SEPTEMBER 24 (8.30)

NT LIVE – ALL’S WELL THAT ENDS WELL// 14

Described as ‘radical’ and ‘defying the usual conventions of film’, Sally Potter’s latest film, Rage, takes place during a New York fashion show where an accident on the catwalk has evolved into a murder investigation. Fourteen actors play characters who each have a role in the show, from the designer (Simon Abkarian) and his models (Lily Cole and Jude Law), the fashion critic (Judi Dench) and photographer (Steve Buscemi) to the financier (Eddie Izzard) and his bodyguard (John Leguizamo). The film is structured as a series of interviews, as seen through the eyes of Michaelangelo, the film’s protagonist, who speaks with each character as the murder investigation slowly unfolds behind the scenes.

NT LIVE – ALL’S WELL THAT ENDS WELL// After the sell-out success of Phèdre in June, the IFI in association with the Ulster Bank Dublin Theatre Festival presents All’s Well That Ends Well, the second production in the NT Live series – a new initiative to broadcast live performances of National Theatre plays onto cinema screens around the world.

ALL’S WELL THAT ENDS WELL//

The feisty but lowly Helena falls in love with Bertram, a haughty count. To gain his hand she is set a string of impossible tasks. Even if accomplished, they can hardly guarantee his love. He refuses to bed her and yet says he’ll only be hers if she bears his child; and he lusts after another. Nevertheless, our heroine, whether wisely or not, refuses to give him up. A wondrous, bittersweet story, All’s Well That Ends Well will be performed in London on Thursday, 1st October, 2009 and broadcast live in high definition across Europe.

OCTOBER 1 (6.45)

Presented by Irish Film Institute in association with Ulster Bank Dublin Theatre Festival with the international support of Travelex.

BY WILLIAM SHAKESPEARE

Tickets cost `15. Tickets must be collected by 6.45pm, with the live performance starting strictly at 7pm.


WILD STRAWBERRIES FILM CLUB//

WILD STRAWBERRIES FILM CLUB// Wild Strawberries is our film club for older people. During the present refurbishment of the IFI, we regret that we’re unable to run our bi-monthly screenings. However, we will schedule one Sunday screening per month and also offer `5 tickets for Wild Strawberries members to all films within the Raymond Chandler Season. Bookings for the Sunday screening can be made from September 1st through the box office on 01 679 3477. Tickets for the Wild Strawberry screening costs E4 which includes a regular tea/coffee.

DOUBLE INDEMNITY// SEPTEMBER 20 (11.00)

This month’s choice, Double Indemnity, comes directly from the IFI Raymond Chandler season. Fans of film noir, femmes fatales, detective stories, Chandler’s writing or Billy Wilder’s direction won’t be disappointed with this hardboiled thriller. Fizzing with one-liners, it’s the story of demonic platinum blonde Phyllis Dietrichson (Barbara Stanwyck) and insurance salesman Walter Neff (Fred McMurray), who plot to murder her husband and make off with the insurance money. But they don’t bank on Barton Keyes, the cigar-chomping bulldog insurance investigator played by Edward G. Robinson in this unmissable classic.

DIRECTOR - BILLY WILDER

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IRELAND ON SUNDAY//

IRELAND ON SUNDAY// Ireland on Sunday, the exciting monthly showcase for new Irish fiction and documentary films, continues with Today Is Better Than Two Tomorrows. Shot over the course of four years in an unknown corner of Laos, South East Asia, director Anna Rodgers’ film tells a simple story of friendship between two boys, Leh and Bo, who leave home at the age of eleven to become novice monks. Gently unfolding like a Buddhist fable, this intimate and meditative film takes us on a journey down the Mekong into a world caught between Eastern wishfulness and Western dreams.

TODAY IS BETTER THAN TWO TOMORROWS// SEPT 20 (12.00) DIRECTOR - ANNA RODGERS

Rodgers started the film as a young Irish backpacker who happened upon this family and spent years working with no crew or translator, determined to bring their story to life. One of the few documentaries to come out of the People’s Democratic Republic of Laos, Today Is Better Than Two Tomorrows presents a window onto a unique and fading culture. ,  ÊUÊÓäänÊUÊ-1 // ÊUÊ ""1,ÊUÊ /Ê6 "ÊUÊnxÊ

MEETING HOUSE SQUARE SCREENING//

MEETING HOUSE SQUARE SCREENING// The Irish Film Archive, in collaboration with Temple Bar Cultural Trust, celebrates Culture Night with an al fresco screening of This Other Eden, a caustic Irish comedy from the early days of Ardmore Studios.

THIS OTHER EDEN// SEPTEMBER 25 (10:30PM) DIRECTOR - MURIEL BOX

The first Irish feature to be directed by a woman, This Other Eden is a comedy set in 1945 where the erection of a statue of patriot martyr Jack Carberry creates problems in a small town. With the return of strong-willed Máire McRoarty (Audrey Dalton) following her exile at an English school to protect her from an unsuitable suitor, and the arrival of Englishman Crispin Brown (Leslie Phillips), long-held secrets begin to emerge that explode the mythology surrounding Carberry’s and Ireland’s past. With a fine supporting cast of Abbey players and star turns from Milo O’Shea and Hilton Edwards, This Other Eden is not just a critique of the past but a witty and complex comment on an emergent modern Ireland. ,  ÊUÊ£™x™ÊUÊ ""1,ÊUÊÎxÊUÊnxÊ -

Venue: Meeting House Square. This is a free event. For more info: www.culturenight.ie

15


the

RTÉ Concert Orchestra presents

ACROSS THE STARS THE MUSIC OF JOHN WILLIAMS Excerpts from

Star Wars, SUPERMAN, Jaws, Harry Potter, Indiana Jones, E.T. and more Also includes music by film composers who influenced John Williams

John Wilson conductor Saturday 3 October, 8pm | National Concert Hall Tickets: `11–`38 (conc. `10–`34) Book: 01 417 0000twww.rte.ie/performinggroups


Take a bow! The arts really matter to us in Ireland; they are a big part of people’s lives, the country’s single most popular pursuit. Our artists interpret our past, define who we are today, and imagine our future. We can all take pride in the enormous reputation our artists have earned around the world. The arts play a vital role in our economy, and smart investment of taxpayers’ money in the arts is repaid many times over. The dividends come in the form of a high value, creative economy driven by a flexible, educated, innovative work force, and in a cultural tourism industry worth A5 billion a year. The Arts Council is the Irish Government agency for funding and developing the arts. Arts Council funding from the taxpayer, through the Department of Arts, Sport and Tourism, for 2009 is A75 million, that’s about A1 euro a week for every household. So, at the end of a memorable film, don’t forget the role you played and take a bow yourself! Find out what’s on at

www.events.artscouncil.ie You can find out more about the arts here:

www.artscouncil.ie


“DOWNEY JR AND FOXX RAISE THE BAR WITH TWO OF THE YEAR’S BEST PERFORMANCES” PETER TRAVERS, ROLLING STONE

“A MOVING, INSPIRATIONAL STORY” REX REED, NEW YORK OBSERVER

IN CINEMAS SEPTEMBER 25

IFI Programme  

September 09 Irish Film Institute

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