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ANNUAL REPORT 2012–13 Hope for Children Healing for Mothers


ANNUAL REPORT 2012–13 Hope for Children • Healing for Mothers 1

A NOTE FROM EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR JULES SHELL 7

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2013 KEY EVENTS

• ‘I am Erik’

• Bike Build 2013

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FOUNDATION RWANDA & PARTNERS

• Dining for Women 15

• Agahozo Shalom

• NYU Capstone

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HOW ARE THE STUDENTS DOING? 22

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HOW ARE THE mothers DOING? 32

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MONITORING, EVALUATION & FINANCIALS 2012 40

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Mother’s Wishes 46


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FOUNDATION RWANDA

ANNUAL REPORT 2012–13


Jules Shell Foundation Rwanda Executive Director

ANNUAL REPORT 2012–13

Seeing one life changed is remarkable, witnessing hundreds of lives changed is magnificent.

FOUNDATION RWANDA

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A NOTE FROM EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR JULES SHELL

A Mother’s Wish

Five Years Later After five years on the ground, we returned to the root of why we started Foundation Rwanda (FR) and asked the FR mothers, “What do you wish for yourself and for your children?” The responses are remarkable to read – some are harrowing and some are hopeful but they remind me of how important our work together is. We have published the full list of mothers’ wishes on the last page of this report – if there is only one thing you have time to review this year – please take a moment to read them. Although each mother’s wish is different, I’ve found at the core they are the same. A mother’s wish is universal – to love and care for her offspring, to provide a safe home, to have a job and to earn an income. Every mother I’ve met through Foundation Rwanda dreams of providing a better future for her children – a future with the possibility of higher education or vocational training and the opportunity to live a fulfilling and happy life. Prospects in Rwanda are limited, and on average only 10% of children attend secondary school. This is why FR’s work is critical to ensuring the students we support can finish secondary school with dignity and look to their futures with hope. We know that for every year a student attends secondary school, they are increasing their earning potential by an estimated 18 percent. Many of the mothers we work with live in different districts where Foundation Rwanda extends operations through our excellent network of partner NGOs: AVEGA East, AVEGA West, Kanyarwanda and Solace Ministries. We are grateful for the ongoing support of these partnerships and the innovative leadership of our program manager Sam Munderere. This past August, we launched our second FR Bike Build. The highest fundraising initiative to date raised over $85,000 for students and their mothers and provided another year of education – tuition, schoolbooks and uniforms – for students. The top 16 fundraisers from across the U.S. also came to Rwanda to build bicycles for the children in the most rural communities, cutting the student’s travel time – 3 hours on average to/from school – in half. Now that the FR program is running smoothly with local partners, including consistent monitoring and evaluations, I will be transitioning from my salaried position as Executive Director to a voluntary role in 2014. Our program manager Sam Munderere will continue operations on the ground in Rwanda and we’ll expand our partnerships with other NGOs that can provide community counselling for the mothers, vocational support for the children, and medical support for both. We hope to hire a full-time development and communications director to help make FR sustainable moving forward. I am proud of the work we’ve accomplished, and pleased to be in a position to rely less on our U.S. administration and more on our tremendous local partners in Rwanda who can continue to deliver the necessary support with sensitivity and authenticity. In 2012, the Foundation Rwanda: An Evening of Food & Fotos Gala in New York City kicked off spring with a huge success, and in the summer of 2013, you helped contribute to the most successful campaign in Foundation Rwanda’s history, raising over $85,000 in just three weeks with the Bike Build Campaign. Let’s do it again for 2014 in an even bigger way and help Foundation Rwanda accomplish our mission – to raise the $1 million necessary to fully fund our program through 2021. Together we have a great opportunity to right the wrongs of the past and fulfill our commitment to our students. Foundation Rwanda is a project that each of you have helped to shape, nurture, and build. We hope you’ll continue to help us bring a brighter tomorrow to these mothers and students. One life changed is remarkable; hundreds of lives changed is magnificent. With gratitude,

Executive Director Foundation Rwanda

Please note: Please note: This, and future reports, will include financial statements for the prior calendar year as well as an update on our current activities. To find out specifics about FR’s Education Program, our partners, and monitoring and evaluation please visit our 2011 Annual Report. (All Foundation Rwanda audited financial reports from 2008–2012 are available online). ANNUAL REPORT 2012–13

FOUNDATION RWANDA

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2 Foundation Rwanda

2013 KEY EVENTS

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“ I am Erik

On our summer visit to Rwanda, we spent time with a remarkable young man named Erik, one of Foundation Rwanda’s first six graduates of secondary school. Erik is an extremely hard working and bright student, who finished school and while waiting to hear if he passed his national exams, found work at a local restaurant. Erik is a smart, driven young man from Kigali and as the eldest man of his household cares for his mother and three sisters. He majored in economics and mathematics in secondary school, and studies English from the dictionary every night after he finishes work and his chores. He dreams of going to university and working in government, but recognizes the importance of having strong computer skills to be successful. When he has time off and enough money, he often travels 20 minutes by bus to the nearest Internet café so he can improve his computer skills. Erik passed his university exams but was not eligible for a scholarship and couldn’t afford university. His nominal wages support his mother and three sisters with food, clothing, basic necessities and transportation to church on Sunday. When meeting Erik, The Bike Build Team saw the light in his eyes and his resolve to rise from poverty and collectively joined together to sponsor him for four years of college! Erik’s response was an eloquent 15 minute speech in the local language of Kinyarwanda. His words were a true testament to his desire for education. He said the investment in him will allow him to invest in his sisters and family, his village, and those in need in the greater community of Rwanda. He passionately declared when saying goodbye:

I am Erik. Now I am someone.

With Erik’s declaration and all that we have witnessed since starting Foundation Rwanda, it’s clear that both education and vocational opportunities in Rwanda are incredibly important for the students we serve. As we approach the 20th anniversary of the genocide in April 2014, we have a chance to continue to bring education, dignity, and hope to so many.

ANNUAL REPORT 2012–13

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Foundation Rwanda

Bike build 2013 This August, we launched our second Foundation Rwanda Bike Build. This fundraising initiative raised over $85,000 for students and their mothers and provided another year of education – tuition, schoolbooks and uniforms for the students in rural areas. The top 16 fundraisers from across the U.S. also came to Rwanda to build bicycles for the children in the most rural communities, cutting the student’s travel time – 3 hours on average to/from school – in half.

$85,000

raised

Watch the Foundation Rwanda BIKE BUILD video here.

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ANNUAL REPORT 2012–13


FR Students and volunteers at the Foundation Rwanda Bike Build 2013

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Illustrations by

Victor Juhasz The Foundation Rwanda Bike Build team was also joined by illustrator Victor Juhasz, who captured the bike building event through his illustrations. To read the full story and see some his illustrations of the bike build event, please click here.

ANNUAL REPORT 2012–13

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Foundation Rwanda

Partner News

Bringing Mental Health to

280 Mothers

Foundation Rwanda

It is evident among the women and children we help support that access to mental health services and counselling is a luxury in Rwanda. As a postconflict country with some psychologists but not enough to serve the entire population, there is still great stigma toward traditional Western approaches to mental health services. In the five years since FR started, many mothers have sought trauma counselling and help in disclosing the status of their child’s birth. We listened to the mother’s concerns and over the past few years, together with both Rwandan counselors and Western psychologists, conducted focus groups and worked with both the mothers and our local NGO partners to create and pilot a Community Counseling Initiative (CCI) for women with children born of rapes committed during the genocide. That work, the first of its kind, has been a tremendous success. The CCI program helps mothers accept their children, build a network of support amongst peers who experienced similar atrocities, and supports women who wish to disclose the circumstances of their children’s birth. During the pilot phase, Foundation Rwanda has gained best practices and lessons that position the organization as having a comparative advantage in delivering counseling services to this specific population. Additionally, we’ve hired a trained mental health professional capable of growing the CCI in 2013. Although less than one-third of the FR mothers interviewed have ever sought counseling for their child supported by Foundation Rwanda (29%), several mothers expressed the need for mentors or peer support groups for their children. While less than half of the mothers interviewed have disclosed the circumstances of the birth to their child (43%), there may be an increased desire to disclose this information as their children begin engaging in courtship. For a child not to know their birth father prior to marriage is problematic and can have detrimental effects to maintaining healthy relationships within the family structure. Due to the sensitivity of the topic, we have found conversations about disclosure are best handled by a trained Foundation Rwanda counselor.

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Foundation Rwanda Partner News Dining for Women We are proud to announce a partnership with Dining for Women who featured Foundation Rwanda at their September 2013 dinners at over 400 chapters around the U.S. to help expand our Community Counselling Initiative to 200 mothers in 2014. We are also pleased to announce a grant from Survivors Fund (SURF) to help expand our CCI to a further group of 80 women and children in the Western region of Cyangugu, where access to aid is very hard to come by. Both of these organizations understand the value of mental health and addressing the challenges the Foundation Rwanda families face as they grapple with post-traumatic stress disorder, intergenerational inheritance of trauma, and the normal challenges of teenagehood.

For more information on Dining for Women, visit www.diningforwomen.org and for more information on SURF visit survivors-fund.org.uk

Agahozo-Shalom Youth Village The Agahozo-Shalom Youth Village (ASYV) is a residential community in rural Rwanda. Its 144 acres are home to youth who were orphaned during and after the genocide in 1994. The Village is designed to care for, protect and nurture these young people. It is a place of hope, where “tears are dried” (signified by the Kinyarwanda word agahozo) and where the aim is to live in peace (from Hebrew, shalom). The marrying of these two languages and concepts in the name of the Village is intended as a reminder of the success of similar efforts in Israel, where a significant portion of the population had to recover from genocide at the hands of the Nazis in WWII. We are thrilled to report that four Foundation Rwanda students were enrolled in ASYV in 2012. This means the children’s needs are met in a holistic manner, and most importantly they are given an opportunity to socialize with peers and learn from each other how to cope with the circumstances of their childhood. It is a joy to watch these students thrive in such a wonderful environment and we hope ASYV and Foundation Rwanda can continue to work together in the future with more students benefitting from their excellent educational opportunities. For more info, please visit: http://www.asyv.org.

ANNUAL REPORT 2012–13

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Foundation Rwanda Partner News NYU CAPSTONE – PAVING THE WAY FORWARD With our programs operating efficiently with local partners, 2012-13 was a year of reflection and assessment. We embarked on a wonderful partnership with NYU Wagner Capstone to identify how Foundation Rwanda can better serve the mothers and children we work with. In January 2013, the NYU Wagner Capstone team traveled to Rwanda for two weeks and conducted 43 interviews, including with 13 students and 21 mothers who are currently benefitting from our services. Interviews were also conducted with four of our local partners: AVEGA Eastern Region (AER), Kanyarwanda, Solace Ministries (“Solace”), and Survivor’s Fund (SURF). The team planned and carried out additional interviews with two Government Ministries (the Ministry of Gender and Family Promotion and the Ministry of Local Government), one secondary school teacher, as well as three nongovernmental organizations that are working to improve the livelihood of youth in Rwanda. All interviews encompassed four different regional locations: Kigali, Kibuye, Nyamata, and Rwamagana.

The results of the study were impactful for us, and the experience was clearly meaningful for the students that traveled to Rwanda from NYU. In their own words:

Foundation Rwanda fills a unique void left by the Rwandan government’s post-genocide recovery programs and policies. Children born from rape during the genocide are not eligible for the same social safety nets that the Rwandan government provides for genocide survivors. To support this underserved population, FR currently provides school fees to 735 students born from rape. We found the program to be incredibly impactful and commend Foundation Rwanda for its extraordinary work.

The Foundation Rwanda NYU Capstone Team Alyson Wise, Eras Chong, Laura M. Roberts, Shalane M. Yuen, Priscilla Addison.

Specifically the

Foundation Rwanda Capstone team was able to

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Identify how Foundation Rwanda can further serve its beneficiaries by conducting a needs assessment in country.

FOUNDATION RWANDA

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Verify Foundation Rwanda’s program budgets, by determining the resources and capabilities needed in order to refine its fundraising goals.

3

Present the organization with various budgets for a number of recommendation packages based on the findings and research.

ANNUAL REPORT 2012–13


The Foundation Rwanda NYU Wagner Capstone Team visiting the FR families in Kibuye, near Lake Kivu.

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Foundation Rwanda Partner News Foundation Rwanda’s work is not only valuable to the individuals and families it serves, but to the greater landscape of peace-keeping and nation-building in Rwanda. By targeting an otherwise forgotten population, Foundation Rwanda’s work embodies the UN’s vision for “bridgebuilding” or leveraging non-profit organizations to address unmet needs of marginalized groups. The NYU Capstone team administered student questionnaires designed to understand and document our students’ expressed educational needs; psychosocial needs; perceived barriers to post-secondary school opportunities, level of health, and hopes and dreams. The Capstone research looked first and foremost at the lives of students, and what burdens they face attending and performing well in school. Throughout the interviews, many students spoke of the great distances they traveled in the morning and afternoons just to get to and from school. Their willingness to travel such great distances to learn shows how important obtaining an education is to both the students and their mothers. The barriers do not stop with getting to school, however. The Capstone research found that only 62% of students interviewed have electricity in their home and are able to use this kind of lighting to complete their schoolwork. And the extra time spent getting to and from school each day means many miss a lunchtime meal that they would otherwise get if they could walk home during midday.

An excerpt from the Capstone Report: “While one student reported using a kerosene lamp to study, 15% reported having no electricity in the home. The lack of basic utilities diminishes students’ ability to continue learning once they return home from school, and threatens to negatively impact their performance. We noted that many students did not have access to a computer and/or their access was limited. Even though technology is a rare commodity for the students we interviewed, they seemed to understand the importance of information communications and technology (ICT), particularly when it came to finding a job or getting into university. Many of the students said they enjoyed using a computer, and some made use of internet cafes or computer labs when possible. 85% noted having used a computer, while 62% reported having used the internet for research, homework, or social networking.

ICT is a policy area in which the Rwandan government is pushing for greater expansion. While we may not yet be seeing the effects of this expansion for Foundation Rwanda’s beneficiaries, it is clear that greater accessibility to computers and technology is highly desired.

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THANK YOU NAJA! With deep gratitude to Catalina Girald, Naja Co. and JetBlue for donating and successfully transporting 1400 pairs of panties from Medellin, Colombia to New York for delivery to the FR female students. Each student received a 3 pack of underwear that said “Hope”,”You did great!” and “She who helps herself” printed in Kinyarwanda (words that the students suggested themselves). Through this project Naja Co. employed 3 single mothers in Colombia full time for one month, trained 10 single mothers to sew, and made hundreds of girls smile when they received their new underwear in Rwanda.

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patrick

peter 4

lilian

How are

THE STUDENTS doing? irene

lilyane

donathile ANNUAL REPORT 2012–13

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Donathile “I love studying, especially chemistry and I feel extremely privileged to be in school.” Donathile is in high school senior six. Before receiving support from Foundation Rwanda, Donathile attended a school in her village, but had to be absent frequently. “Before my mother started getting support from Foundation Rwanda my attendance was not good. I was not able to pay school fees or afford school uniforms, and this affected my performance because I was often chased from school.” “Now that I have a sponsor, I am not sent out of class for failing to pay school fees anymore. As a result I study hard to get good grades and move on in life.” Having been given a chance to pursue her education uninterrupted, Donathile has more confidence in making a better future for herself.

– Donathile

ANNUAL REPORT 2012–13

I am not sent out of class for failing to pay school fees anymore.

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Irene “Education is what I want. It is an essential component of my life”. Irene is a high school sophomore. She is particularly interested in studying geography. She began attending her current high school four years ago. Prior to that she attended another school, which was not as challenging. Since she joined FAWE Girls’ School, Irene has been much happier and studies hard. “I knew what I wanted to do with my life since I was in the 6th grade. Not only did I want to attend secondary school, an opportunity nobody in my family was ever given, but I also knew I wanted to study geography. When I received the letter informing me that I was accepted to the FAWE Girls’ School, I felt as if it was a dream come true”. Originally, Irene’s mother was not able to afford the school’s tuition so Irene attended a school not of her mother’s choice. This changed when Foundation Rwanda began supporting her. Irene likes to spend most of her time studying. “I follow my dreams, and I am optimistic even though at times it may seem impossible to imagine. Also, I try to talk to my teachers as much as possible because they are basically there for me whenever I need help. I am doing my best and I believe I will get the best grades that will allow me to attend a university.”

Education is what I want. It is an essential component of my life.

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– Irene

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Peter Peter is a high school junior. Before being supported by Foundation Rwanda, Peter’s mother was struggling to pay his education fees and Peter was forced to drop out of school. Because of the substantial economic burden, Peter’s mother hoped he would not pursue his education. Peter would often stay with other family members while attending school. Since he began receiving support from Foundation Rwanda, Peter hopes to attend university after graduating from secondary school. “Before I began receiving educational support from Foundation Rwanda I was having a rough time paying school fees and paying for school materials. Foundation Rwanda has given me the opportunity to pursue my education and has helped me to improve the relationship with my mother because she does not have to worry about providing for my educational needs”.

Lilyane Lilyane is an active 17-year old student from Nyamata receiving Foundation Rwanda educational sponsorship. Lilyane is ranked 3rd in her class (out of 46 students) and plays basketball. However, she suffers from eye problems and headaches, which could be brought on from eyestrain, and is not getting any relief even after being moved to sit at the front of her classroom. She does her homework at school before going home, a 30 minute walk away, because her family has no access to electricity and any unfinished studying at school will have to be completed using a candle at home. Lilyane is studying hard so she can attend university in the hopes of becoming a fashion designer one day.

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Patrick Patrick is an above-average student. He has a passion for learning and a hunger for success. Being raised by a single parent, he has faced many challenges, but always refused to let these challenges win. Instead he faces life head-on. He is not only an honors student but also a youth leader in his community. In between these responsibilities he also supports his mother financially during the holidays Before getting help from Foundation Rwanda, Patrick had dropped out of school and spent his time cultivating his family’s land with his mother. When his mother began receiving support from Foundation Rwanda she took Patrick to one of the best schools in the area. She wants her son to grow up to be a successful person and she gets peace of mind knowing that her son is adequately supported.

Lilian Before she was supported by Foundation Rwanda, Lilian attended four different schools in a seven year period. Prior to receiving Foundation Rwanda’s support, Lilian could not afford to pay school fees or purchase school materials. When she was expelled from one school for not being able to pay the fees, she would simply attend another one. With support from Foundation Rwanda, Lilian is now able to pursue her education without these interferences and no longer worries about being expelled for not paying school fees. Despite her difficult past, Lilian is very positive about her future and the doors education will open for her. “I am the oldest student in my class, having been forced to take the same classes again. I study with students who are younger than me but I am not embarrassed: my future is more important.”

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1 bike helps

5 pEOple ANNUAL REPORT 2012–13

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annet constance beatha 5

How are

THE MOTHERS doing?

teddy anasarie

justine ANNUAL REPORT 2012–13

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Annet Annet’s past is horrific but she is very cheerful, positive and optimistic about life. Since she began receiving Foundation Rwanda educational support, Annet helps other mothers like her to form support groups. The group meets once a month to discuss issues affecting their lives and to share their experiences. The members of the group also support each other psychologically. Annet does not have much training in counselling, but the other mothers in her village believe in her and often go to see her when they need support. Annet’s son Peter is a hardworking student. He hopes to become a valued citizen in the future. With Foundation Rwanda’s support he is able to attend boarding school and concentrate on his schoolwork. Annet encourages him to study hard and like other mothers must meet not only the financial needs of the child, but also provide them with emotional support.

Annet also counsels other children in the community during school holidays, and encourages other mothers to take the time to build a healthy relationship with their children.

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Justine Justine always has a smile on her face. She believes that bad days never last. She is one of many mothers struggling with the HIV virus. Prior to receiving Foundation Rwanda support for her daughter she always felt alone. Through the support of Foundation Rwanda she was able to meet other mothers who face the same challenges. With the support provided by Foundation Rwanda, Justine was able to send her daughter to a boarding school. She then wanted to get her life on track and find a job. After weeks without work she went to the health center next to her residence to ask for a job. She now works there as a custodian.

Foundation Rwanda support helped me meet other mothers in my position. It also allowed me to support my daughter through boarding school. I can now work without worrying about my child’s school fees.

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– Justine

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Teddy Teddy makes necklaces, bracelets, and handbags from paper and banana fiber. “Before getting Foundation Rwanda support I was busy taking odd jobs to earn money and pay my child’s school fees. After I began receiving Foundation Rwanda’s support I finally had time to join the women’s groups in my village and they introduced me to an NGO that teaches women to make crafts. I joined immediately and learned the necessary skills. I was able to attend training because I was no longer forced to work the land and pay for my child’s educational fees now that he was being sponsored by Foundation Rwanda.” Teddy was introduced to other mothers who share her experience and she meets with them regularly. Members of the group provide emotional support for each other. Teddy is able to earn about $80 a month from selling her products. She works from home and takes the products to the market. She has HIV and all the hard work makes her feel very weak at the end of the day, but the work she does now is less labor-intensive and more profitable than the work she was doing before. Teddy hopes to soon have or eventually have enough money to rent a small place in her hometown.

Constance Constance joined Foundation Rwanda three years ago. She has a long lasting dream of owning a restaurant and a lodge. For a long time she worked as a waitress at a restaurant and eventually she saved enough money to open a small kiosk selling bread, bananas and tea. She also offers catering services for weddings and parties in her village. “Without Foundation Rwanda’s educational support for my child I would not have been able to save enough to start up a small business. Before getting Foundation Rwanda’s support, all the money I earned went to pay the educational needs of my child”. She believes Foundation Rwanda played an important role in realizing her dream. “Foundation Rwanda is partnering with me by paying my child’s education needs, hence enabling me to save and engage in business”.

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Anasarie Anasarie is a 40-year-old HIV positive mother and widow. She resides in a small village in Cyangugu, located in the western province of Rwanda. For three years she received nutritional support from Africa Rights, a local NGO in Rwanda. She received 10,000 RWF to buy milk and 24 kilograms (kg) of rice, 6 kg of maize flour, a bucket of small fish, 1 liter of cooking oil, salt, and sugar. One day, she was informed that she could no longer receive this support because the program had ended. Foundation Rwanda was able to link her to a donor who helped her buy a small plot of land.

Beatha Four years after her divorce, Beatha’s life now has a new focus. Beatha was raped and impregnated during the genocide, which made her marriage very hard. “The funding from Foundation Rwanda allowed me to support my child and save enough money to buy a new sewing machine”. Beatha now earns about Rwf 30,000/$44.00 a month. She uses this money in addition to her Foundation Rwanda support to send her child to a good school in the hope that he will attend university. In addition to tailoring, Beatha also sells food on the side. She rents a small space in her village, which allows her to offer her tailoring services and her food in the same place. Her dream is to save enough money to buy a machine that also knits, so that she will be able make school sweaters for schools around her village. Beatha believes that her son will be able to pursue his education and return to support her, allowing her to expand her business and employ other women in her village.

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Foundation Rwanda Monitoring & Evaluation The decrease in the number of students sponsored in 2012 compared to 2011 is due to a number of reasons: The first, and most difficult, is due to the tragic deaths of two of our students which occurred at the end of 2011. In addition, three students were forced to drop out of secondary school due to pregnancy. Secondly, six FR students graduated secondary school in 2012; one of those students, Erik, is currently attending university as the first Foundation Rwanda student to go on to higher education.

Breakdown Costs Per Child (Average) School Fees breakdown per student for the year 2012 (in $US)

Project Costs Secondary

2012

Project Costs Primary

Descriptions Tuition Scholastic materials Transport

Third, during the re-verification process we found some of the students did not meet the criteria for receiving Foundation Rwanda support and were therefore removed from the program. Lastly, some students have received educational support from other sources.

1st TERM

2nd TERM

3rd TERM

0

0

0

10,000

10,000

10,000 0

0

0

School uniform

10,000

0

0

Essential personal supplies

10,000

10,000

10,000

Subtotal

30,000

20,000

20,000

Tuition

30,000

20,000

20,000

Scholastic materials

10,000

10,000

10,000

Transport

5,000

5,000

5,000

School uniform

15,000

0

0

Essential personal supplies

10,000

10,000

10,000

70,000

45,000

45,000

Subtotal

*In-person visits by our partner organizations and our Rwanda staff to monitor each student’s progress further increase the costs per child. In sum, the total average cost per child per year is $350.

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Foundation Rwanda Monitoring & Evaluation N0. OF STUDENTS EXPECTED TO GRADUATE 2012–2014

60

GENDER OF STUDENTS 2012–2013

48 39

40

821

815

MALE STUDENTS

FEMALE STUDENTS

20

0

YEAR 2012–2013

YEAR 2014

No. of students in Primary and Secondary School 2012–2013

234

PRIMARY SCHOOL students

1402

SECONDARY SCHOOL students PRIMARY SECONDARY

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Foundation Rwanda FINANCES 2012 END OF YEAR BLANACE SHEET, REVENUES & EXPENSES Foundation Rwanda STATEMENT OF ACTIVITIES FOR THE YEAR ENDED DECEMBER 31, 2012 Revenue and support Contributions & fundraising activities

223,844

Donated services

15,620

Other income, including income interest

23,511

Total unrestricted revenues

262,975

Functional expenses Program services

442,477

Management & general expenses

39,909

Development

52,798

Total expenses

535,184

Change in net assets

-272,209

Statement of Position at December 31, 2012 Assets Cash and investments

348,385

Contributions receivable

0

Prepaid expenses & other current assets

7,501

Fixed assets & website, net

89,246

Total ASSESTS

445,132

Liabilities Accounts payable & accrued expenses

19,195

Grant payable

0

Total liabilities

19,195

Net assets

42

Unrestricted

425,937

Temporarily restricted

0

Total net assets

425,937

Total liabilities and net assets

445,132

FOUNDATION RWANDA

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Foundation Rwanda

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AN EVENING OF FOOD & FOTOS

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2012 vs 2011 and the Demographic Challenge

a note from

Dan KUSNETZ Foundation Rwanda Board Member/Finance Chair

2012 was a positive year financially for Foundation Rwanda, including very successful fundraising and grant-generating activities. These successes, however, are not sufficient to permit Foundation Rwanda to rest on its past efforts to raise funds. We face an increasing expense load due to the education progress of the older students that we now support. As more of the Foundation Rwanda sponsored students transition from primary to secondary school the cost of educating them increases. The government provides subsidies for primary school students and Foundation Rwanda has always provided the balance to ensure these students are able to attend school. The government does not provide stipends for secondary school education and, as a result, the cost of educating them increases dramatically. In response, Foundation Rwanda has undertaken several steps to help ensure our funds are sufficient to support the students who already receive school fees from our organization. First, we redoubled our efforts to ensure that all students continue to remain eligible for Foundation Rwanda aid by monitoring their school attendance records and making sure that they are not “double dipping” from other education aid sources. Second, we engaged in new fundraising initiatives, including the “Bike Build” campaign and a partnership with Dining for Women. Third, we stopped adding new students to our group and are examining the availability of tapping into some newly created funding programs that provide stipends for students who pursue vocational education options.

FR Board Member and Finance Chair Dan Kusnetz with FR Counselor Emilienne Kambiembi at the FR Bike Build 2013 in Rwamagana, Rwanda.

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Through these efforts and a continued push to raise more funds in conjunction with the upcoming 20th anniversary of the genocide in 2014, we expect to continue to provide the support we have committed to, even as our annual expenses per student rise.

ANNUAL REPORT 2012–13


FUNDRAISING ACTIVITIES Last year, we were proud to present Foundation Rwanda: An Evening of Food & Fotos NYC 2012, an evening of award-winning photography combined with fine cuisine from some of NYC’s top chefs. The event took place at Bonhams on April 4th, 2012 and featured tasting tables from some of NYC’s most celebrated chefs, an auction of rare rock photography from a juried group of world famous rock photographers, and live music by special guest Marco Benevento. The benefit was sponsored by Starbucks Coffee Company & La Brea Bakery-Aryzta. Special thanks to our other key sponsors: Gabe & Katherine Thompson (L’Artusi/ dell’anima/Anfora/L’Apicio), Nancy Olson (Gramercy Tavern), Recette, Tia Pol, Char No. 4, Fatty ‘Cue, Kuma Inn, French Culinary Institute, Nunu Chocolates, Patrón Tequila & Brooklyn Brewery. Our Food & Fotos benefits have been extraordinary events thanks to the generosity of our amazing volunteers, sponsors and artist partners. We thank all of you for your continued support. In 2013, we tried our hand at online fundraising with the Foundation Rwanda: Bike to a Better Future Campaign. In partnership with Causes.com, participants were asked to help sponsor a bicycle and a year of education for 125 Foundation Rwanda students. Ten team leaders led the effort and with the generous support of their donor base we raised over $85,000. The team leads traveled to Rwanda in August, 2013 to build the bikes with the Foundation Rwanda sponsored families. Special thanks to the Chapman Family Foundation, Stephen Shell, and the anonymous donors who made matching contributions to help our team leaders achieve their goals! Our 2014 Bike To a Better Future Campaign will be even more ambitious, and in conjunction with the 20th anniversary commemoration of the genocide we hope to exceed last year’s efforts.

Capstone Study and Move to Partner Based Initiatives Due to the results of our NYU Capstone assessment, Foundation Rwanda has begun moving toward a partnership model where we work with local partners to provide vocational training, income generating activities and holistic support for the women and children we work with. We are seeking partnership opportunities in secondary education, vocational training, counseling and income generating activities for Foundation Rwanda mothers. It is our expectation that by leveraging our reach with partner organizations our funds will be used more efficiently and will provide a “bigger bang for each buck”. To help support these initiatives, please be in touch at Jules@foundationrwanda.org

Increased Development Activity Foundation Rwanda is looking for an experienced Director of Development to help us reach our $1 million fundraising goal to ensure all of the students we support can complete secondary school or seek vocational training opportunities by 2021. For more on the role, click here, and please send any amazing candidates our way!

For more information, please be in touch at Mackenzie@foundationrwanda.org

Thank you We thank all of our financial supporters of every size – without you we wouldn’t be able to provide the support that our Foundation Rwanda families desperately need. If you have any questions about our financial performance, condition or otherwise, or if you have any suggestions for new sources of revenue that we should pursue, please contact: jules@foundationrwanda.org.

ANNUAL REPORT 2012–13

FOUNDATION RWANDA

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– M. J. 40 years

7 Foundation Rwanda

MOTHER S ’

WISHES

My wish for my child is that he may be given support up to university. My wish for myself is to be empowered to meet the needs of my family. My wish for the future is for me to die in dignity and not a beggar.

– U. C. 46 years

My child has had the chance to study because of FR. He’s not illiterate like me. I wish him to become one of the managers at the airport. My wish is to have my house renovated and also acquire a piece of land that I can farm. My wish for the future is to see my son graduate and working.

– M. M. R. 42 years

We were raped. We were infected with HIV/AIDS. Our relatives were slaughtered. We suffered injustice enough. As such, my wish is that my child will be able to attend university so that he may become a judge who will do us justice because genocide crime never expires. My wish is to find capital to expand my bakery business. In future, my wish is to build up my savings so that, once I am very old, I may not become a burden for my children.

– M. B. 45 years 46

FOUNDATION RWANDA

My child studies in Automobile Mechanics. I wish him to become a mechanic. If he becomes a mechanic, he can earn a living. I wish I could become a professional tailor. I have been trained in tailoring. My wish for the future is to have my own house because my child and I are at risk by living in a rented house.

– U. T. 45 years

My wish for my child is to study and go up to university so that he may become a doctor. Doctors are needed in the country, they cannot be jobless and they are well paid. I wish, for myself to be empowered to meet my child’s needs. That he would not lack and ask about his father. In future my wish is to have a restaurant because I like customer care – I can supervise my employees well.

ANNUAL REPORT 2012–13


ANNUAL REPORT 2012–13

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I have two children in the project, and I wish them to study up to university so that they may become good leaders, and of value to their governed people and human beings in general. I wish to have an income-generating activity so that I may be able to meet the needs of my family. My wish for the future is to have a decent old age life without begging. – N. B. 34 years I wish my child to study and to find support which can allow him to enter university. I live in a hired house with my children. I wish to have a house. I wish to have an income-generating activity, selling crops so that I may earn a living for me and for my children. – M. G. 57 years

I wish my child to study in a good school. I wish to extend my project of chicken rearing so that I may become a senior entrepreneur. Now I have 76 hens and I wish to have at least 300. I wish to get older having assets to give my children when I die. – J. K. 49 years

I wish my child to study up to university and to become a doctor in medicine. I was raped when I was in S4, after I completed secondary education. My wish is to study law at university so that I may secure justice for women. I wish to have a small business in future and be self reliant. – U. Y. 40 years My entire family was slaughtered. The wish for my child is for him to become a doctor. My wish is to find a stable partner and have a good marriage. My wish for the future is to have a house that I can call my own. – M. C. 35 years I wish my child to keep studying and to get support up to university so that he may become an entrepreneur. I live with HIV/AIDS. I live in a hired house. I am not healthy. My wish is to get a house as well as another health insurance because mutual insurance does not allow us to have access to all medicines. In future, my wish is to have an income-generating activity so that my children and I may be able to earn a living. – M. A. 56 years

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ANNUAL REPORT 2012–13


I wish my child to become a doctor. He can treat me and treat others. I am still young. I would like to study sewing or knitting or art. When I have a profession, I can work by myself in such a way that, in future, I can train my fellow women who have never had professions. – K. A. 40 years I wish my child to study up to university so that he will become a policeman so he can defend me. I live with HIV. I suffer with my kidney and liver. I have no energy to work. I need support to get treatment. In future, I would like to own land and give it to my child when I die. – M. M. 47 years I wish my child to study up to university and become a doctor. I live with HIV/AIDS. I have no house. I am always moving from house to house due to lack of rent. When I have means, I can build a house. I am like a crazy person because of poverty and HIV/AIDS that I was infected during Genocide. I wish God would change my history and let me feel at ease with myself so that I may live like others. – M. V. 45 years

I wish my child to have a chance to study at university. I attended a Teacher Training Course at secondary level but I could not pursue that at university. Now my wish is that if I get support, I can join university. In the future, my wish is to be a head teacher. – K. J. 32 years I wish my child to study up to university so that he will be able to earn a living by himself by cultivating mushrooms and being self-reliant. After genocide I got married, but my partner hates my child. He threatens him and beats him in such a way that the child lives under trauma. My wish is that this conflict should end so that I may live in peace in the future. – M. C. 39 years I wish my child to study up to university and become a priest so that he may not encounter day-to-day married life family problems. I have not attended school. If I get someone who can give me a cow, I can breed it and carry out modern agriculture, and furthermore, my children and I can drink milk. I wish to see my child working for money to earn a living. – M. G 41 years

ANNUAL REPORT 2012–13

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I wish my child to study up to university and become a leader in charge of social affairs. My wish is to get a supporter who can build me a house, whichever size it may be. I live with HIV/AIDS. I am poor. I have no wish because I am like a dead person. – M.A. 49 years I wish my child to attend school and become a lawyer. I wish to have a house. My partner does not like to live in our home village because of what happened to him there during Genocide. I wish that my child and I should be given treatment as regards to trauma because we have lived too miserably, and we still suffer the consequences. – M. L. 41 years I wish my child to get support in such a way that he will study up to university and become a politician. I wish to buy a boattaxi. I live near Lake Kivu, and I know how to operate a boat and to swim very well. As such, I can use it to extricate myself from poverty. When my wish comes true, and when I get benefits, I can support uncared orphans. – M. E. 38 years

My child studies accountancy. I wish him to be a professional accountant. I wish to do a business of selling sorghum and rearing a cow so that my child may get milk to drink. In future, I wish to tell my child how he was born. He has to know that he is by himself when I die. – M. E. 37 years I wish my child to study up to university, get married and become a man who loves his children – he has not to be like his father. My house is about to collapse. I wish to get support to repair it. In Genocide, Interahamwe have spoilt some of my sexual organs. I still suffer this problem. I wish I get support to get treatment because, with HIV/AIDS, I always worry. – U.V. 41 years I wish my child to become an entrepreneur. My wish is to get treatment for asthma. I got some treatment, but due to lack of sufficient treatment I do not feel better. With the help of FR my fistula was treated after 17 years. When I get treatment, I think I can do business of selling crops in future. – M. A. 52 years

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ANNUAL REPORT 2012–13


I wish my child to study up to university so that he will be a political leader. I was infected with HIV/AIDS in Genocide, and I have become blind. My wish is to find a supporter who can finish works on my house. Though I am blind, my wish is to get older without being a beggar like some blind people. – M. B. 39 years I wish my child to study up to university and to become a lawyer. I am HIV positive. My wish is to have a small incomegenerating activity that can help me to earn a living and build myself a house. For the future I wish to have a house to give my child when I die. – N. M. 35years

My child is still studying accountancy. I wish her to study up to university so that she will be a professional accountant. I am studying sewing. I wish to be good at sewing so that I will become a professional tailor. I wish to have my own workshop. – N. H. 42 years

I wish my children to live well – the older should be a minister in charge of women’s development. The other two are twins. One should be a spokesperson and the last one should be a doctor treating women’s disease, particularly gynecological problems. I would like to study a skill enabling me to take care of my children. – M. B. 44 years I wish my child to study up to university so that he may become a doctor taking care of orphans and widows. I have studied sewing but I am not good at it. My wish is to get more training. In the future, I hope to become a professional tailor. – K. O. 50 years

ANNUAL REPORT 2012–13

I wish my child to study up to university and get a job. My wish is to get a good house to live in. I live with HIV/AIDS. I see no hope for the future because there is no foundation for it. – M. B. 39 years

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I wish my child to study up to university and to become a doctor treating mental diseases because they have increased after Genocide in our country. My wish is to get another health insurance for me and my children because our ordinary mutual insurance does not allow us to have access to good medicines. I wish for peace to continue to prevail in my country. – N. F. 35 years

ANNUAL REPORT 2012–13


ANNUAL REPORT 2012–13

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Hope for Children Healing for Mothers www.foundationrwanda.org Please help us spread the word and join us on

Photographs copyright: Jonathan Torgovnik/Foundation Rwanda Design by Philippa Terblanche

Profile for Jules Shell

Foundation Rwanda Annual Report 2012-13  

Foundation Rwanda Annual Report 2012-13

Foundation Rwanda Annual Report 2012-13  

Foundation Rwanda Annual Report 2012-13

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