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TABLE OF CONTENTS PRESIDENT’S MESSAGE 3 “When you learn, teach.”

IT’S WHAT WE DO 4

PERFECT PARTNER 50 Crossings Community Church invests in students at John Marshall High School.

TEAM UP 58

FINANCIAL REPORTS 76

Partnership tallies $80,000 in donated school supplies for Teachers Warehouse.

Financial report and program impact for The Foundation for Oklahoma City Public Schools.

The Foundation for Oklahoma City Public Schools is the stories of those we serve.

STARS OF GIVING 78 Celebrating our corporate, foundation and individual donors from 2011.

PURSUING EXCELLENCE 11 One teacher’s pursuit to be the best she can for her students through National Board certification.

A COMPETITIVE EDGE 16 Students focus on the future and build confidence through artistic and academic competitions.

FILLING THE GAP 20 Teachers Warehouse is making sure students and teachers have what they need to be successful in the classroom.

GREAT IDEAS 24 Students are curious by nature. Foundation grants help teachers provide tools and experiences.

A LIVING LEGACY 31 Former OKCPS teacher Nelda Tebow is honored with a gift.

TAKING CHARGE 32 A day in the life of U.S. Grant High School Principal Tamie Sanders.

EDITORIAL STAFF

POSITIVE FORCE: DANIEL BUCKMASTER 34 The 2012-2013 OKCPS Teacher of the Year is committed to making scientists out of his students.

FINALISTS FOR OKCPS TEACHER OF THE YEAR 38 First Runner-Up: Justin Pourtorkan; Second Runner-Up: Diana Dawson; Paul Bianchi, D.J. Bowker, Jamie Buckmaster, Susan Good, Cheryl Halaoui, and Glen Woods.

DREAMING OUT LOUD 48 2011-2012 OKCPS Teacher of the Year Shelly Campbell feels she now has a voice. 1

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A FIRM FOUNDATION 60

VALUABLE VOLUNTEERS 52

An Oklahoma City family credits public education as providing a firm foundation for children’s future success.

Celebrating those who give of their time.

OKCPS TEAM 71

SUPER SUPPORT STAFF 55 Recognizing OKCPS support staff that go above and beyond.

Employees of the OKCPS District increase their giving to the Foundation in 11-12 by 40 percent.

Lori M. Dickinson, Editor in Chief Christy Watson, Chief Writer Michael Lane & Colin Strickland, Contributing Writers Scott Horton (McKinley-Browne Creative), Art Director/Lead Designer Lori M. Dickinson & Michael Lane, Graphic Design/Layout Colin Strickland, Photography Michael Lane, Colin Strickland & Derek Watson (Lampstand Media), Videography

All rights reserved. Reproduction or use without permission of editorial or graphic content in any manner is prohibited. Copyright © The Foundation for Oklahoma City Public Schools, 2012


CHAIRMAN

Robert J. Ross, Inasmuch Foundation

CHAIR-ELECT

Miles Tolbert, Crowe & Dunlevy

SECRETARY/TREASURER

Brent Hensley, KOCO-TV 5

PAST CHAIRMAN

Dave Lopez, Oklahoma Secretary of Commerce & Tourism

2011-2012 BOARD OF DIRECTORS

John L. Belt, John L. Belt & Associates Bill Bullard, OGE Energy Corporation Russell Claus, City of OKC James R. Daniel, BancFirst Bryan Gonterman, AT&T|Oklahoma Stuart Graham, CB Richard Ellis|Oklahoma Dale Hageman, Accord Human Resources Robert E. Hammack, New West Group David R. Harlow, BancFirst J. Clifford Hudson, SONIC, America’s Drive-In Stanley F. Hupfeld, INTEGRIS Family of Foundations Lou C. Kerr, The Kerr Foundation Percy Kirk, Cox Communications Joy LaBar, SandRidge Energy Rusty N. LaForge, Stillwater National Bank & Trust Donna Lawrence, Success Redesigned Jenny Love Meyer, Love’s Country Stores Marcia Matthews Hutton, JP Morgan Chase, N.A. Cristina F. McQuistion, OGE Energy Corporation Michael Morrison, COMTECH, Inc. Xavier Neira, Manhattan Construction Cynda Ottaway, Crowe & Dunlevy Dr. Bill Pink, Oklahoma State University-OKC Tom Price, Chesapeake Energy Corporation Teresa Rose, Chesapeake Energy Corporation Claudia San Pedro, SONIC, America’s Drive-In Wendi Schuur, Devon Energy Tony Shinn, Bank of America Helen Sullivan, Community Volunteer Gary E. Tredway, American Fidelity Group Pam Troup, Healthfirst at St. Anthony’s Hospital Carol W. Troy, Saxum Reggie N. Whitten, Whitten Newman Foundation

PRESIDENT/CEO

Lori M. Dickinson lori@okckids.com

ADVISORY BOARD

Karl Springer, OKCPS Superintendent Angela Monson, Chairwoman, OKCPS Board of Education Mick Cornett, Mayor, City of OKC Drew Dugan, Greater OKC Chamber of Commerce Joyce Henderson, South OKC Chamber of Commerce

STAFF Lisa Reed

Deputy Director lisa@okckids.com Robyn Hilger Chief Programs Officer robyn@okckids.com Christy Watson Director of Media & Public Relations | christy@okckids.com LeaAnn Chandler Program Director leaann@okckids.com Newt Brown Accounting Manager newt@okckids.com Michael Lane Marketing & IT Manager | michael@okckids.com

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Colin Strickland Communications & Development Manager | colin@okckids.com Melissa Scott Executive Assistant mscott@okckids.com Courtnee Rideout Program Assistant |courtnee@okckids.com

MAILING ADDRESS 5225 N. Shartel, Suite 201 Oklahoma City, Okla. 73118 405/879-2007 fax 405/879-2088 www.okckids.com


THE FOUNDATION FOR OKLAHOMA CITY PUBLIC SCHOOLS www.okckids.com

“WHEN YOU LEARN, TEACH” Knowing what I do about the spirit of Oklahoma City, I believe there is enough intellectual and financial power to imagine a different future for our children. – Lori M. Dickinson, President & CEO

She was shy at first. After a quick introduction, Constance silently walked me to the library. She answered my questions with a nod of her head or a simple “yes” or “no.” I’m not sure what I was expecting, but I respected her innocent honesty. Why should she immediately trust me? Every Thursday, we learn a little more about each other. In between practicing vocabulary words and reading exercises, I’ve found out at 8 years old, Constance is the oldest of five siblings. She discovered I have two children and grew up in the country. Her favorite color is yellow. I dreamed of being an artist. She loves to color, and we both enjoy discussing our favorite “journeys.” Maya Angelou wisely reminds us, “When you learn, teach. At our best, we are all teachers.” Working with Constance and in my role at The Foundation for Oklahoma City Public Schools, I’ve learned more about Oklahoma City since I took this job four years ago than I ever imagined possible. I’ve been astonished, inspired and somewhat privately embarrassed by what I didn’t know

about our schools and the lives of thousands of children. I couldn’t hide my surprise when Constance mentioned she’d never visited a zoo. One of the best in the country is only 10 minutes from her home, but for thousands of children in our city, it might as well be Canada. The neighborhood and school is the center of their world. It takes time, transportation and funds to travel and visit various attractions – something that doesn’t come easy to families struggling to make ends meet. I still can’t fathom that close to 2,000 children in Oklahoma City Public Schools have no permanent address and are considered “homeless.” I didn’t know nearly 17,000 of our children speak English as a second language, and their native languages tally more than 40. Once you know the truth, your world changes. You can’t forget the faces, the smiles, the tears and the look of hope. You want to use your hands, heart and voice

to build up, to help and to advocate for them. So many of our children in Oklahoma City have no idea what the statistics say about their future.

They dream, they play, they learn. Knowing what I do about the spirit of Oklahoma City, I believe there is enough intellectual and financial power to imagine a different future for our children. We shouldn’t expect our schools, our teachers and our children to embark on this journey alone. I promise, there is no donation of time, talent or resources too small to impact a child in a lifechanging way. Most important, Constance has taught me to see her through the same eyes I see my own children. I dream for her, hope for her and fight for her as if she were my very own. Because the truth is – Constance is Oklahoma City. These children are our future.

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THE FOUNDATION FOR OKLAHOMA CITY PUBLIC SCHOOLS www.okckids.com

IT’S WHAT WE DO WE ARE THE STORIES OF THOSE WE SERVE

The work of The Foundation for Oklahoma City Public school diploma lacks value. Schools seems simple: We seek to provide for all of Oklahoma Helping these students and teachers is what we do. We are City’s children what we want for our own. the stories of those we serve – the students and teachers of They are children like Cody Ripley, a high school senior Oklahoma City Public Schools. whose childhood has been filled with adult-like The Foundation for Oklahoma City Public responsibility. Cody’s work with the robotics team Schools was founded in 1984 as part of a collabat Northwest Classen High School has helped orative vision to improve educational quality in him focus on a life-changing goal – becoming the our community. The Foundation seeks to provide first high school graduate in his family. educational opportunities for students in “In order to survive, I have to help out my Oklahoma City by supporting work to improve family,” Cody said. “A lot of us when we work, we academic achievement and advocating for transdon’t get the leftover money. It goes to bills and formational change that’s beneficial for children. food. It eases our mind when we know people are Historically, that’s meant financial support of out there trying to help us.” various programs, coordinating tutors, providUpon graduation, Cody will fulfill his enlisting college scholarships and filling other gaps. ment in the U.S. Navy to help him in his goal However, our focus changed with the passage of obtaining a degree from the Massachusetts of the MAPS for Kids school revitalization Institute of Technology. And that’s only part of efforts in 2001. As the work to build or remodel the picture. He believes what he’s learning in nearly every school in the district closes, the robotics, with the community’s support, is creatdaunting challenge of improving performance ing a legacy – “I can give my children a better life inside Oklahoma City’s schools remains. The twoOklahoma City Public Schools one day.” pronged purpose of MAPS for Kids made crystal students aren’t on a level There are children like the little boy in Susan clear success for both is necessary. It will also playing field – not Good’s fifth-grade class at Willow Brook Elementake a more sustained and focused effort on all by a long shot. tary in far northeast Oklahoma City. He was an stakeholders’ parts to create the schools our kids angry first grader when he entered Good’s class as a need. disciplinary measure. After four years of guidance and love, he’s The list of issues we can’t fix for kids is long. Economic doing better. But Good has seen this story before. Children hold insecurity. Frequent housing changes. Not enough food. Too tight to simmering anger due to a parent in prison or economic much responsibility. Not enough accountability. circumstances resulting in frequent moves. She worries what What we can give is opportunity, and in 2011, the vision will become of him and her other students when they leave became clearer for our board and staff. Willow Brook. What we know is Oklahoma City Public Schools’ students And then, there are students at U.S. Grant High School, aren’t on a level playing field – not by a long shot. Other where the principal and teachers are committed to turning metro area school districts face similar challenges in shifting around a school that historically has some of the worst student demographics. It’s the depth of those issues that makes test scores in the state. But they must do so with students who Oklahoma City different. speak English as a second language, face outside pressures to work to help support families and change a culture where a high continued 4

OUR STORY


OUR STORY

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OKLAHOMA CITY PUBLIC SCHOOLS

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OUR STORY


History will remember the last decade in Oklahoma City as a time of tremendous momentum and excitement, when it seemed like impossible dreams came true. The next decade must be one of an all-hands-on-deck approach focused on growing unprecedented hope, support and belief in our children, our children’s children and our schools. – The Foundation

The overwhelming majority of children in our 90 schools don’t just hover around the poverty line – they’re hanging on to it for dear life. Nine of 10 kids in the school district qualify for free- or reduced-priced meals, a common indicator of poverty. Even more shocking is 32,000 of our kids live near or below federal poverty standards. School isn’t a full-fledged escape from reality either. Nearly half of district students don’t finish the school year at the same school they started. Too many hit three, four or more schools in 10 months. Students miss school to translate for parents, to care for ill family members or to find work to help pay bills. Teachers see their kids come to school hungry, angry and reeling from whatever chaos reigned the night before. So they feed them, love them, listen to them, hug them and pray for them. Of course, they also teach them, not just the lessons of the day, but that someone is there for them. Schools can only try to cushion the blows that inevitably come from outside their doors, when the promises of a warm meal and carefree moments on the playground are left behind.

Truckloads of bubble wrap wouldn’t be enough to protect our children from their reality. But working together we can throw them a life preserver buoyed by opportunity. Our city’s children need everyone – families, teachers and community members – locking hands and pulling hard on the same rope so children can grab those opportunities. The Foundation’s programs provide chances for students to dream, to experiment, to discover what they’re good at and what they like to do. We can’t take for granted children walk into classrooms each day with the pencils, paper, markers and whatever other supplies they need for the day. They cannot sell enough candy bars, beef jerky or wrapping paper to travel to far-away band contests, academic meets or dance shows. When families are struggling to keep lights on, food on the table and roofs over their heads, they can’t afford those extra costs. Teachers willingly dig deep into their pockets to help, but there comes a point when they can’t always afford the extras either. These are the areas where community volunteers and donors partner with the Foundation to take care of critical needs. In the past three years, we have provided thousands of pencils, reams

of paper, markers, crayons, tissue and other basics students and teachers need in classrooms through Teachers Warehouse. In only four years of operation, the Foundation expects to pass the $1 million mark in supplies distributed by the end of 2012. The Foundation’s Competitive Edge program attempts to cover much of the costs – fees, food, transportation and lodging – for students to attend academic and artistic competitions near and far on a first-come, first-served basis. Five years ago, the program served fewer than 200 students with approximately $7,000. This year, the Foundation will surpass $145,000 in support of more than 3,500 students. continued

Scan here to see Northwest Classen High School Senior Cody Ripley’s story or visit www.okckids.com


Research shows of the in-school factors impacting education, teacher quality is critical. That’s why the Foundation continues its support of teachers through teaching grants and $2,500 scholarships to cover application fees for those who want to pursue or renew National Board certification.

We want to make sure children don’t get lost in the conversation and that policy makers understand what it means to be a child living and going to school in Oklahoma City. – Lori Dickinson

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“Somebody’s going to see me playing my baritone and think, ‘I need to meet that kid,’” said Savarion King, a freshman member of the marching band at Douglass High School that traveled to a competition at Grambling State University. In addition, research shows of the in-school factors impacting education, teacher quality is critical. That’s why the Foundation continues its support of OKCPS teachers through teaching grants and $2,500 scholarships to cover application fees for those who want to pursue or renew National Board certification. “Politicians and state policy makers do not know what is happening in the lives of our children on a dayto-day basis,” said Marlene White, an Oklahoma City teacher who received her National Board certification last year. “We better be ready every day for the challenges our students bring into our room.” The Foundation also

awarded more than three dozen Great Idea Grants to teachers and teams of teachers in the 2011-2012 school year worth about $90,000. The clarity of focus on students and teachers also has led the Foundation to act as the voice for those who often can’t speak for themselves. Members of the board of directors and staff are active in examining education policies and educating decision makers about the impact new and existing policy has on our city’s children and teachers. “Our children and schools shouldn’t be hostages of a system that, unfortunately, too often focuses on politics and not on what’s best for children. We want to make sure children don’t get lost in the conversation and that policy makers understand what it means to be a child living and going to school in Oklahoma City,” said Lori Dickinson, president of the Foundation. History will remember

the last decade in Oklahoma City as a time of tremendous momentum and excitement, when it seemed like impossible dreams came true. The next decade must be one of an all-hands-on-deck approach focused on growing unprecedented hope, support and belief in our children, our children’s children and our schools. A professional basketball team, a revitalized town and surging community pride are evidence of what happens when Oklahoma City and its people embrace big dreams. The Foundation’s big dream is to marshal so many people pulling so hard for our city’s children that they will emerge from our schools with a future beyond their biggest dreams.


Truckloads of bubble wrap wouldn’t be enough to protect the children from their reality. But working together we can throw them a life preserver buoyed by opportunity. – The Foundation

OUR STORY

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We’d continue to fund innovative learning projects OG&E proudly gives teachers the power to create unique approaches to science, math and reading through our Teacher Grant Program. If you are a public school teacher in the OG&E service territory, you can apply for a grant up to $1,000 for 2012 - 2013 projects. Apply by June 1, 2012. Go to oge.com for eligibility information & application.

It’s what we call …

©2012 OGE Energy Corp.

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PURSUING EXCELLENCE ONE TEACHER’S PATH TO NATIONAL BOARD CERTIFICATION In her mind’s eye, Marlene White’s world was filled with itty-bitty feet making messes, testing her patience and filling her life and heart with joyful noise. She ended up with just that – but not quite in the way she imagined. A bustling, always-busy pre-K classroom, filled with children who struggle to learn and speak English, was not initially part of that dream. But Rockwood Elementary became a home away from home. She embraced those children as her own. In their faces, she saw not just 4-year-olds in need of an educator. She saw herself. White was born in Colorado to parents who emigrated from Mexico to the United States. She struggled to learn English at school while only Spanish was spoken at home. Some teachers cared nothing of her language challenge and refused to help. Others unlocked White’s inner strength, refusing to allow poor speaking skills to serve as an excuse. The classroom is White’s comfort zone. And as she prepares to make the switch from classroom teacher to a teacher of teachers, the classroom is still her home away from home. Like her dreams for a family, her teaching career hasn’t been without unexpected disappointments. White was one of eight teachers in Oklahoma City Public Schools who obtained National Board certification in 2011. But that came only after she fell a mere 25 points short on her first attempt. White was crushed. What did that say about her teaching skills? Maybe she wasn’t the teacher she thought she was. Could it be that she wasn’t meant to be a teacher? Then she remembered: She doesn’t let her students accept defeat and neither would she. White continued

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National Board helped me focus on the child – what it is they need to achieve. I still get excited when I find something from research or mentors I know will help a child. – Marlene White, NBCT

THE JEAN G. GUMERSON ENDOWMENT FOR THE PURSUIT OF TEACHER EXCELLENCE Since 2002, The Foundation for Oklahoma City Public Schools has made investing in teachers one of its top priorities. Private donors to the Foundation established the Jean G. Gumerson Endowment for the Pursuit of Teacher Excellence to honor the late Gumerson for her significant work in public education. A past president of the Foundation, Gumerson was dedicated to improving property, teaching and alternative education in Oklahoma City. Programs Gumerson started evolved into what is known as MAPS for Kids. Funds from the Gumerson Endowment assist teachers financially to pursue National Board certification. The Foundation pays the $2,500 application fee and a $250 stipend to help with application materials. Only Oklahoma City Public Schools teachers who agree to teach in the district for five years are eligible for a scholarship. Certification is good for 10 years. The Foundation also offers scholarships to teachers who want to renew their certification. Eight teachers did so in 2011, and more are on track for renewal in 2012. OKCPS teachers who want to learn more about the National Board process can take a new pre-candidacy class offered by the Foundation. Nearly two dozen teachers are taking the class led by a pair of National Board Certified Teachers working in OKCPS. The Foundation also is looking to form a partnership with a school interested in helping all of its teachers pursue Take One, a yearlong effort that allows teachers to take the first step in the National Board process. The Foundation launched its first Take One partnership in the 2010-2011 school year at Edgemere Elementary. Student test scores that year showed the largest improvement of any OKCPS elementary school, and two teachers scored high enough on their Take One submissions to move to the next step of obtaining national certification.

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also didn’t want to disappoint the mentor teachers who encouraged, disciplined and cajoled her along the way. A year after getting the bad news, good news arrived. Her second attempt at achieving National Board certification was a success. “Sometimes, I just sat at the feet of those veteran teachers who had a wealth of knowledge that no book, certification or website could teach. These are the people I cherish in my heart who pass the torch on to help others around me,” she said. Some of those were nationally certified teachers. Others, just masters of their craft. Like her mentors, White is willing to share and support others. National Board isn’t just about improving one’s skills, although doing so impacts hundreds and thousands of students along the way. It’s also about helping others do the same and creating a multiplier effect for children who desperately need the best teachers possible in the classroom. As the school year closes, White is shifting from the comfort zone of her pre-K classroom to assist other teachers at F.D. Moon Academy, an elementary school with historically poor test scores and the recipient of a federal School Improvement Grant aimed at raising


DREAM BIG! We’re proud to help Oklahoma City students reach for the stars.

student achievement. Those children need her, too. “National Board helped me focus on the child – what it is they need to achieve. I still get so excited when I find something from research or mentors I know will help a child,” she said. “It makes you keep on fighting for our students. Politicians and state policy makers do not know what is happening in the lives of our children on a day-today basis. We better be ready every day for the challenges our students bring into our room.” White said National Board has taught her to be more reflective, always asking herself if each action she takes in class is helping children learn. If not, she must make changes. White’s career is blossoming in unexpected ways. That happened with her family, too. After five years of infertility struggles, White and her husband adopted three children in January 2006. A baby sister joined the family on a permanent basis just two months later. By the time

the adoptions were finalized, White was pregnant – with twins! It seems almost unthinkable that White could juggle the demands of an intensive professional development endeavor while tending to a young family. Her twins weren’t yet one when she embarked on the national certification process. Family members brought dinner, washed clothing and looked after the children. Her husband gave her space and a sympathetic listening ear. She needed all the help her support system could muster through what she called a “brutal process.” She sacrificed precious family time to become a better teacher for her students. She’d do it again. “There were days when I was working on my certification my children’s clothes didn’t match, but I knew I was leaving them a legacy to begin something and finish what was set out before me.” A legacy indeed. TM & © 2012 America’s Drive-In Brand Properties LLC

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OKCPS NBCT LIST Dozens of Oklahoma City Public Schools educators have undergone the rigorous, multi-year process to earn National Board certification in their areas of expertise. The Foundation for Oklahoma City Public Schools is proud to recognize those who have dedicated their time and energy for the betterment of public education.

Rikki Abrams, Exceptional Needs Specialist Angela L. Absher, Exceptional Needs Specialist Debbie Adam, Generalist John Allen, Library Media Priscilla Allen, Library Media Adys C. Altstatt, World Languages Other Than English Paula Armstrong, English Language Arts Mindy C. Barmann, English Language Arts Janet L. Basler, Science Sandra L. Bennett, Science Deborah Bentley, Generalist Dorann M. Bickford, Generalist Carolyn Bish, Science Nancy J. Brewer, Social Studies-History Susan Brewer, Generalist Daniel Buckmaster, Science Bill Bullock, Exceptional Needs Specialist Heather Bullock, Generalist Shelly Campbell, Career and Technical Education Cathy Carlson, Library Media Glenda Carlson, Generalist Judith Chalmers, Generalist Lourdes Charry, World Languages Other Than English Beverly Clore, Literacy: Reading-Language Arts Mary Pipps Cloos, Career and Technical Education Rebecca Collins, Art Kara Cordell, Generalist Diane Crepeau, Exceptional Needs Specialist Patrick Dennis, Career and Technical Education Susan Elliott, Career and Technical Education Rebecca Feldman, English Language Arts Sandra Futrell, Generalist Susan Gabbard, Art Helen R. Gilbert, Generalist Donna Greenberg, Exceptional Needs Specialist Marcia Greenwood, Art Jane Guffey, Mathematics Jeffery Gwartney, Career and Technical Education Cheryl V. Halaoui, Generalist Cynthia C. Haney, Science Adrien Haralson, Generalist Doris Harris, Exceptional Needs Specialist Anna Hawkins, Generalist Kathleen Haydon, Career and Technical Education Dusty Hendon, Generalist Linda S. Hickerson, Library Media Tekoa J. Hill, Generalist Alicia Hughes, Literacy: Reading-Language Arts Charlotte Hunter, School Counseling Lee Jones, Exceptional Needs Specialist Jonetta Jonte, English Language Arts

Lisa A. Jordan, Generalist Ann Kelly, Science Virginia Kennedy, Social Studies-History Jenifer Kleyn, Mathematics Rachael Lehman, Generalist Cynthia K. Lindauer, Generalist Valerie List, Physical Education Cecilia Lozano, English Language Arts Jennifer Lynch, Science Laneeta Malone, Exceptional Needs Specialist Sharon M. McFerron, Generalist Linda Meier, Science Mary Miller, Generalist Susan G. Miller, English Language Arts Betty Minton, Library Media Karen Montgomery, Career and Technical Education Michael K. Muller, Art Kelli Packnett, Generalist Michael Payne, Career and Technical Education Jana K. Newsom, Exceptional Needs Specialist Thuy T. Nguyen, Literacy: Reading-Language Arts Carrie Price, Generalist Joy Rainey, Generalist Randa Reiger, Art Donna J. Rice, Mathematics Tracie L. Rivera, Career and Technical Education Sharon L. Scott, Literacy: Reading-Language Arts Bettie B. Shadoan, Exceptional Needs Specialist Virginia Sherman, Exceptional Needs Specialist Jennifer Sinclair, Generalist Cheryl L. Smith, Generalist Lisa Souza, English Language Arts Heather Sparks, Generalist Allison Stark, English Language Arts Diana K. Steele, Literacy: Reading-Language Arts Marilyn Tarron, Generalist Rhonda Taylor, Music Murrell P. Thompson, Career and Technical Education Teresa Trail, Career and Technical Education Martha Twichell, Library Media Samantha Twyman, Generalist Lisa D. Ummel-Ingram, Generalist Vanessa Vantrease, Generalist Jami Veenstra, Generalist Belinda Wall, Social Studies-History Marlene White, Generalist Kristin Whitmore, Literacy: Reading-Language Arts Mary M. Winn, English Language Arts Betty J. Winters, Generalist Glen Woods, Music Meredith Wronowski, Science

*Are you an NBCT and don’t see your name on the list? Let us know by calling Robyn Hilger at 405/879-2007 or robyn@okckids.com. TEACHING EXCELLENCE

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THE FOUNDATION FOR OKLAHOMA CITY PUBLIC SCHOOLS www.okckids.com

A COMPETITVE

EDGE

They sing. They dance. They build robots. They perform karate. Is there anything Oklahoma City Public Schools’ students can’t do? The answer is no, as long as they have opportunities to showCody is a leader on Northwest Classen High School’s robotics case their knowledge and talent. team. He is the brains behind the robot’s brain – providing some That’s at the heart of The Foundation for Oklahoma City muscle but most definitely brainpower to program the biggerPublic Schools’ Competitive Edge program. The school district than-life-size robot to play basketball. He spends long nights can provide limited funds based on state and federal laws for and some weekends working on the robot with his teachers and students to compete in and travel to academic and artistic comteammates during the “build season” that starts in January petitions. However, expenses far exceed what state and federal and runs into spring. Competitive Edge helps fund the robotdollars can cover. And since many Oklahoma ics programs at Northwest Classen, Capitol Hill City students live in communities where families High School and Northeast Academy for Health struggle to pay their bills, candy-selling funSciences and Engineering. draisers simply don’t generate enough money Cody’s commitment to the team helps him get to pay entry fees or travel costs. That’s where through the tough times outside school. He must Competitive Edge comes in. keep his grades up and stay out of trouble to stay Teachers can apply for up to $2,500 in fundon the team. He also is on track for his post-high ing per contest on a first-come, first-served school plans: attending Massachusetts Institute basis to take students to competitions. A new of Technology after fulfilling his enlistment in level – Competitive Edge Plus – is available for the U.S. Navy. Those are big dreams for a student students who win competitions and have earned who will be the first in his family to graduate additional opportunities or for students who high school. have achieved the opportunity to participate in “I want to be able to give my children a future regional and national competitions where the where they don’t have the worry of having to cost to participate may be prohibitive without work so we can live in a house and have food to additional grant support. eat. I want to provide something better for them.” In 2011-2012 alone, Competitive Edge has When Bob Eggeling, who leads the robotprovided $146,100 in support of 3,515 students ics program at Capitol Hill, thinks about what Since 2008, the Foundation has with plans to accommodate more requests prior students gain from the program, technical skills awarded nearly $400,000 in to the end of the school year. Since 2008, the aren’t what comes to mind. grants to send 11,000 students Foundation has awarded nearly $400,000 in “The idea is to teach them to start something to competitions – a 2,000 grants to send 11,000 students to competitions – and then finish it. The idea is to teach them how percent increase in four years. a 2,000 percent increase in just four years. to deal with real-life situations when things don’t go exactly as you want them to.” The Capitol Hill team shares after-school and Saturdaymorning meals. They are a family of sorts, brought together by building a robot and learning to trust each other and the adults NORTHWEST CLASSEN & CAPITOL HILL HIGH SCHOOLS helping them. Cody Ripley describes himself as a computer nerd. But he “I’ve been teaching 39 years, and this is the best thing I’ve also has wisdom far beyond most high school seniors that can’t ever had to help kids learn how to cope with real life. It really is be taught in a classroom. It can’t be taught at all. It comes from something these kids look forward to.” living in less-than-ideal conditions and emerging with the will to do better and be more than circumstances might otherwise continued dictate.

ROBOTICS

COMPETITIVE EDGE

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Scan to learn more about Douglass High School’s Marching Band or visit www.okckids.com

I’ve been teaching for 39 years, and this is the best thing I’ve ever had to help kids learn how to cope with real life. It really is something these kids look forward to.” – Bob Eggeling, Capitol Hill High School Robotics teacher

MARTIAL ARTS

HARDING FINE ARTS ACADEMY

Johny Guerrero, senior, considers karate “a good stress reliever.” 18

COMPETITIVE EDGE

The kicks and jabs are equal parts smooth and crisp. In bare feet, Johny Guerrero moves lightly but his arms and legs finish moves with force and purpose. The demonstration of movements is known as kata. While kata takes physical skill, the art is also evident through its required precision, flow and focus. Johny is learning kata through a first-year martial arts class at Harding Fine Arts Academy, a charter school. Johny, a senior, said the class is a good stress reliever when he’s worried about other classes or problems. And as someone who is competitive, he has enjoyed attending martial arts competitions to see how he and other Harding students measure up. Their competitors are typically learning martial arts at privately run dojos instead of a public school.

Titus Lewis, a senior, said the martial arts program is an incentive for staying out of trouble. He’s also enjoyed the tournaments, where Harding’s students have brought home a slew of medals. In their first three tournaments, Harding students garnered 21 first-place, 14 second-place and 11 third-place awards. The Competitive Edge program helped the school pay for students to attend their first-ever martial arts competition in Lawton, said Jennifer Allman, who teaches photography and martial arts at Harding. The costs included entry fees, a rental van to carry 20 students, fuel and lunch money. Allman said the trip would have been difficult without the program’s help because not all students could have paid the entry fee and transportation would have been difficult. Competitions help Allman’s students understand why she preaches the importance of basics and building a strong foundation. “They love it, and I think

they have a better grasp of why I see it as an art,” Allman said. “What they see at competitions is different than what they see in the movies. I think they have a better understanding of why I made them do the basics over and over again.”

MARCHING BAND

FREDERICK A. DOUGLASS HIGH SCHOOL Football players may get more glory, but as far as Darrin Taylor and Savarion King are concerned, being in the band has its advantages. “We’ve been way more places than football,” said Taylor, a freshman at Douglass. This school year, marching band members traveled to Louisiana, Houston and Dallas. Performances on such a big stage – the Dallas visit was to march in the Cotton Bowl – teach students about remaining calm under pressure. But that’s hardly all they learn. The trip to Grambling State University was special because students learned more about how music can


pave the path to college. Grambling is a historically black university that annually hosts a battle of the bands competition. “They see bands … and see students that look just like them at a college level and they say, ‘Wait a minute I want to do that too,’” said band director Charles Moore. “And they see they can get scholarships doing what they love.” Some students haven’t traveled much outside of Oklahoma City. Even fewer have practice eating at nice restaurants and being in other public places as representatives of the school and community. Moore said those experiences serve students well, and it’s up to him to teach them how to conduct themselves when they’ve been invited to perform at competitions. Traveling is a chance for students to put into practice the five pillars Moore preaches: vision, respect, discipline, integrity and hard work. A recent response from a Cleveland, Okla., family to Moore and Douglass principal Brian Staples sums up the external perception: “The band from Douglass was so talented and so impressive that we wanted to write to thank the school, the parents and boosters for transporting the band to Cleveland. They put on a remarkable half-time show, and their enthusiastic playing during the game was very entertaining.” Without additional funding to attend competitions, Moore said it would be difficult for students to connect what they learn in class and in the band room to the outside world.

tion by traveling to more out-of-state competitions. Although their will to compete is strong, team members know preparation for competitions also depends on their willingness to work hard in and outside the classroom. Team members must keep their grades up. Mosley also requires them to perform dozens of hours of community service. The team created a “Stomp for Success” program to perform at area elementary and middle schools to impress upon students the importance of doing well in school. They also help the community in other ways, including hiding eggs at school Easter egg hunts and reading to elementary school students. The Foundation and other donors made it possible for the team to compete. Mosley figures it’s important for students to give back. “The team has a lot of people backing them,” he said. “I’m teaching them that they need to give back too.” See the complete listing of Competive Edge grants funded by the Foundation through March 2012 beginning on page 62.

BROTHERS OF STOMP

STAR SPENCER HIGH SCHOOL The first time Kenneth Combs stepped on a plane, he was bound for a television appearance in New York City. He isn’t sure when he might have that chance again but is grateful to have had the experience. Combs is a captain of the Brothers of Stomp, a stomp team at Star Spencer High School that performed on the BET network along with other dancers from across the country. Competitive Edge helped pay for the students’ travel costs. “It was scary at first, but then it wasn’t so bad,” Kenneth said of the flight. Before their New York City debut, the team made its first out-of-state trip for a competition to Garland, Texas, with help from the Foundation. David Mosley, the team’s coach, said with every performance, the team gathers more invitations to perform and compete. The only obstacle is funding. The stomp circuit in Oklahoma is small, and Mosley said one of his goals is to raise the level of competi-

The Capitol Hill team is a family of sorts, brought together by building a robot and learning to trust each other and the adults helping them.

COMPETITIVE EDGE

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TEACHERS WAREHOUSE


THE FOUNDATION FOR OKLAHOMA CITY PUBLIC SCHOOLS www.okckids.com

FILLING

THE GAP Because of Teachers Warehouse and community donors, my kids have what they need to succeed. – DeLynn Woodside, Roosevelt Middle School Points deducted, morale diminished, all because of shoes. teaching tools directly to OKCPS teachers, who know exactly William Calvin, vocal music teacher at Oklahoma Centennial what their students need, 10 months a year. New and gently High School, could only do so much. He would say to students, used supplies are donated on an ongoing basis by businesses and “Just go to Payless, get an inexpensive pair of shoes and make community members who believe the community plays a vital sure they are dark.” role in the success of every child. But his students didn’t have the resources to Teachers can access an online catalog and make that happen. place orders once a month during the specified During choir contests, judges not only score ordering period. Then, they collect their orders on singing ability but also score on the group’s on the specific pick-up dates each month. appearance. The Oklahoma Centennial Vocal DeLynn Woodside, a teacher at Roosevelt Choir accepted they would lose points due to Middle School, said, “It enables me and my the lack of formal shoes. Calvin said, “I became students to have peace of mind, to know we can increasingly aware that our kids just don’t have get what we need really lets us know people care. these things.” Because of Teachers Warehouse and the donors, At winter break, things changed. “I got a call my kids have what they need to succeed.” from Robyn Hilger (Foundation chief programs The Foundation’s overall goal with Teachofficer), who said formal shoes had been donated ers Warehouse has been clearly stated: To reach to the Teachers Warehouse by a local bridal more students with free supplies, further bridgshop,” Calvin said. “When I heard that, you could ing the gap between what schools have and what hear my scream from Edmond, simply because students and teachers need to be successful. my prayers were answered! Teachers Warehouse impacted more than 15,500 “The pure fact our kids now have formal students in 2008, its first year of existence. Now, The Foundation will soon shoes for their competition meant so much to in its fourth year, Teachers Warehouse reaches pass $1 million in supplies each one of them. It builds their self-esteem, nearly every school impacting 35,000 students distributed to OKCPS makes them feel special and brings them the annually through the generosity of donors classrooms. attention that they deserve.” and hard work of volunteers. Individuals and Now, Centennial choir students have no corporate volunteers log nearly 600 hours on a excuse to be without proper shoes. “With the complete wardrobe, monthly basis to ensure teachers and students have whatever we are able to compete with others without losing points. The they need to reach their goals. Woodside concludes, “Every donajudges want to see that you’re conscious of your appearance, and tion has a use. Even if it’s something you think isn’t helpful, they always comment on it,” Calvin said. there is always a use for it – so thank you.” Teachers Warehouse, a program of The Foundation for Vickie Stover, a second-grade teacher at Pierce Elementary, is Oklahoma City Public Schools exists for OKCPS teachers and no stranger to Teachers Warehouse. “The Foundation makes it so students. The program provides free classroom materials and continued TEACHERS WAREHOUSE

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TEACHERS WAREHOUSE


Being a teacher for 40 years, I’ve seen firsthand what teachers needs. Being a part of the Foundation allows me to give back to the community where I spent most of my life and gives me a lot of satisfaction. – Carol Anderson, Retired OKCPS teacher easy to use,” Stover said. “My students love using adultlooking materials, paper clips, legal pads – they feel all grown up; or if I give them an ink pen instead of a pencil, it is always something that motivates them. For some of these schools, Teachers Warehouse is the only way they receive free supplies. It makes a difference between getting to do something meaningful for the kids and not getting to do it.” From making telescopes with plastic supports, ghost lanterns out of empty CD cases or rockets using plastic canisters, supplies donated to Teachers Warehouse have proven to be multi-faceted and used to initiate a creative imagination in the minds of students. “Some of the things are weird, for example, I picked up some red file folders, and thought, ‘What am I

going to do with those’” Stover said. “I ordered them at Christmas time, and we used them to make little Santa Clauses – so even though I didn’t need it as a file folder, I could turn it around and use it in a creative way for my kids.” The Foundation wouldn’t be able to give away these valuable supplies without donors, who have given of their time, finances and supplies. As the Teachers Warehouse nears its four-year anniversary, the amount of donated supplies distributed to teachers in OKCPS is climbing toward the $1 million mark. “Teachers Warehouse is a good way the community adopts schools without pinpointing one particular school,” Stover said. “Or, if a smaller business wants to give back to the community

but doesn’t have the time to volunteer in the schools, donating to Teachers Warehouse is an incredible way to get involved!” Carol Anderson, a retired OKCPS teacher of 40 years, wishes she had access to the Teachers Warehouse throughout her teaching career. As a devoted volunteer for the Foundation, you can usually find Anderson in Teachers Warehouse fulfilling order requests, assisting staff members with office duties and enjoying the camaraderie between her fellow retirees. “Being a teacher for 40 years, I’ve seen first-hand what teachers need, and being a part of the Foundation and giving back to the community in which I spent most of my life, gives me a lot of satisfaction,” she said.

TEACHERS WAREHOUSE

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THE FOUNDATION FOR OKLAHOMA CITY PUBLIC SCHOOLS www.okckids.com

GREAT

IDEAS

Students are curious by nature. The best way to let them explore is to give them the proper tools and experiences. – Jennifer Davis & Steven Fletcher, Pierce Elementary As education evolves and researchers learn more about how students learn, one result is inevitable: Good teachers will change the way they teach. The Foundation for Oklahoma City Public Schools’ Great Idea Grants program helps teachers make learning more exciting and relevant for today’s students – which isn’t always an easy task. Individual teachers compete for grants up to $1,000. Collaborating teachers can apply for as much as $5,000. This year, the Foundation awarded $90,000 and 48 grants. Some teachers want to bring lifecycles to life by hatching chickens in the classroom. Others seek to expand classroom libraries. Still others purchase exercise balls for students to sit on instead of regular classroom chairs. Great Idea Grants provide an opportunity for OKCPS teachers to more deeply engage their students and bring their creative ideas to reality.

even more features of the bug or flower. “Science is a little bit abstract and if you can see it, it’s easier to understand it – especially when you’re 5,” said Jennifer Davis, a kindergarten teacher at Pierce Elementary in southwest Oklahoma City. Pierce Elementary recently began implementing the Core Knowledge curriculum. The program and the state’s academic standards require students to learn skills related to science, but no science materials are included. Davis and her colleague, Steven Fletcher, used a $2,100 collaborative Great Idea Grant to stock their classrooms with science materials to meet standards while also integrating writing and reading. The integration is obvious as students study the bug and plant specimens. Each plastic block is labeled. Students must copy the name of the specimen on a piece of paper. But mostly, they’re fascinated by the close-up views they get with the help of a magnifying glass. “Students are curious by nature and the best WIZARDS OF way to let them explore and ask questions is to KINDERGARTEN give them the proper tools and experiences,” the JENNIFER DAVIS & STEVEN FLETCHER teachers wrote in their grant application. PIERCE ELEMENTARY “Science is abstract and if you The grant paid for the specimen blocks, kidJosie DeLeon doesn’t even hesitate. When can see it, it’s easier to size flashlights and binoculars, science games asked which specimen sitting on the round table understand it – especially and a variety of other supplies. The teachers now when you’re 5.” in her kindergarten classroom she likes best, she stock a variety of centers with materials that alquickly holds up a starfish encased in a plastic low students to practice using all of their senses. box. “It’s my favorite,” she said quietly. The children learn about weather and how colors mix to make Other students pick a black, hairy spider or a colorful new colors. “The centers fill out the curriculum and show them butterfly or an orange flower. They use a magnifying glass to get an even closer look, counting legs, looking for eyes or identifying 24

GREAT IDEAS

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GREAT IDEAS

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Jonetta Jonte, Southeast High School, requires students to read The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn and write about whether the themes and discussions are valid in today’s world. “This type of writing is what will be expected at the college level and our students will have practiced while juniors in high school,” Jonte said.

some real-life, tangible things about how science is all around them,” Fletcher said. The students’ favorite science lesson is obvious: the fish aquarium. Fletcher said each day a student helper feeds Spiderman, Princess and Goldfish. “They just love the fish tank and love to watch the fish eat.”

WE LOVE HANDS-ON LEARNING BETH ANN FINT RIDGEVIEW ELEMENTARY

Learning the parts of speech can be a bore. Beth Ann Fint knows it hasn’t always been the favorite part of her fifth graders’ day. What’s so exciting about figuring out whether the Delaware River is a proper noun or Delaware is merely an adjective describing a river? But after a Great Idea Grant paid for Fint, a teacher at Ridgeview Elementary in north Oklahoma City, to buy the Winston Grammar program that includes flash cards to learn the parts of speech, her students now race to correctly identify parts of speech in sentences that directly tie to what they’re learning in social studies and science lessons. The cards are color-coded, and the back of each card includes examples of the particular part of speech. Fint’s class has only been using the cards for a few months, but Arianna Williamson said she much prefers the flash cards. “I like the cards a lot better because I don’t have to write all the time.” 26

GREAT IDEAS

Fint reveals a sentence on the interactive Smart Board at the front of the class. Students working in pairs then pick one flash card to describe each word and line them up on their desk in the proper order. Fint said the students often end up teaching one another. “It’s easier when we have two brains,” said Melissa Florez, one of Fint’s students. Fint taught last school year in Deer Creek, where she used the Winston program. In the short time her Ridgeview students have been using it, she’s seen a huge increase in students’ understanding and ability to identify the parts of speech. “It’s hands on and visual, and it’s definitely made a difference,” she said.

GROWTH SPURT IN ADVANCEMENT JONETTA JONTE SOUTHEAST HIGH SCHOOL

For three years, Jonetta Jonte pinched pennies to buy the books needed for her advanced language and composition class. But after the state’s financial squeeze took its toll on the state’s education budget, the extra funding set aside for Advanced Placement classes dried up. There were no pennies left to count. Eventually, state funding was enough for one classroom set. Jonte’s class at Southeast High School has become so popular that she has 50 students in two classes. Jonte turned to Great Idea Grants. She asked for and received an $834 grant to buy a classroom set of The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn and an an-


thology of classic and modern essays. The grant means each student has a copy of the texts they need. “What frustrates me the most is we talk a lot about kids who need extra help,” she said. “But we don’t talk enough about the kids who are ahead, but want to excel. We need to be funding their classes and invest in them as well as we do those who need remediation.” At the end of Jonte’s class, the students take a test over the coursework. If they score

high enough, they receive college credit. Most of Jonte’s students are juniors who will begin taking college courses their senior year. Jonte’s course requires students to read The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn and write about whether the themes and discussions are valid in today’s world. Students said the books introduce them to different genres, help them learn to properly analyze literature and challenge their critical thinking abilities.

“This is, in essence, a student-written literary criticism, but also essentially an argument. This type of writing is what will be expected at the college level and our students will have practiced juniors in high school,” Jonte wrote in her grant application. “Without the touchstone text of Huckleberry Finn, students will be unable to move forward to this college level writing experience.”

GREAT IDEAS

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STARS OF EDUCATION


GREAT IDEA GRANTS A complete listing of individual and collaborative grants given to Oklahoma City Public School teachers for the 2011-2012 school year.

COLLABORATIVE GRANTS Belle Isle Enterprise Middle School War, Peace and Jazz/Core Knowledge Linda Kerr, David Barnes, Robin Copeland, Daniel Covey, Courtney Crauthers, Angela Lister, Award: $1,723.88 Students Served: 144

Capitol Hill High School Robotics Bob Eggeling, Artie Lowery, Award: $5,000, Students Served: 90

Cleveland Elementary Learning in Motion Collette Fenlason, Diane Crepeau, Deborah Morgan, Sherri Smith, Award: $4,928, Students Served: 140

Hawthorne Elementary In Your Own Words Joanna Couch, Lucila De Loera Esparza, Noemi Loera, Ginger Sherman, Christopher Stofel, Award: $4,904.87, Students Served: 298

Hayes Elementary Power Packed Reading Michelle Halbrook, Tammy Ketch, Rhonda Wingate, Award: $4,079.95, Students Served: 70

John Marshall High School Wii Therapy Mindy Harris-Silk, Julie McMiller, Juliet Williams, Award: $998.49, Students Served: 60

Johnson Elementary Time for Kindergarten Danielle Hogle, Lindsay Hanna, Award: $987.83, Students Served: 37

Lee Elementary Peep Peep, Munch Munch-The Lifecycles of Chickens and Caterpillars Sally Wade, Elaine Carrington, Shelly Deas, Claudia Gayton, Penelope Hale, Derik Hale, Amparo Macias, Award: $4,982.59, Students Served: 199

Linwood Elementary Science Central Rhonda Collins, Ashley Leadford, Award: $4,999.58, Students Served: 67

Linwood Elementary

Pierce Elementary

Capitol Hill High School

Wizards of Kindergarten Jennifer Davis, Steve Fletcher, Award: $2,103.40, Students Served: 36

Reading is Hopeful Cheril Scott, Award: $456.34, Students Served: 60

Pierce Elementary

Capitol Hill High School FCCLA D.J. Bowker, Award: $986, Students Served: 15

War on the Waist Robert Phillips, Jennifer Vesper, Award: $3,412.55, Students Served: 200

Pierce Elementary Common Core Craze Miranda Robinson, Casey Fletcher, Award: $4,981.39, Students Served: 45

Santa Fe South Charter High School Much Ado About Nothing Kimberly Pankhurst, Vickie Kastl, Award: $3,622.76, Students Served: 275

Shidler Elementary Inspiring Readers Christopher Stofel, Da Ce’Beaty, Loretta Galo, Misty Gebhart, Denise Landrum, Kathleen Logan, Award: $3,477.54, Students Served: 80

U.S. Grant High School Business Professionals of America Leadership Grant Susan Turpen, Damon Hornbeak, Christy Reed, Joe Taylor, Beverly Womack, Award: $2,500, Students Served: 25

Classen School of Advanced Studies

Oh What A Tangled Web... Tamia DeBerry, Award: $964.63, Students Served: 17

Monroe Elementary Fifth Grade Friends Bettie Shadoan, Award: $225, Students Served: 40

Prairie Queen Elementary

“Let the Games Begin” Rebecca Collins, Award: $1,000, Students Served: 109

MP3 Reading Keith Lewis, Award: $821.43, Students Served: 17

Classen School of Advanced Studies

Ridgeview Elementary

Listening to Learn: Actors Exploring Another Realm Michael Payne, Award: $1,000, Students Served: 165 F.D. Moon Academy The Building Blocks of Sculptural Understanding Christopher Matlock, Award: $805, Students Served: 250

Hawthorne Elementary Yank My Chain! (and teach me vocabulary) Ginger Sherman, Award: $610.90, Students Served: 60

Heronville Elementary

We Love Hands-On Learning!!!! Beth Ann Fint, Award: $974.66, Students Served: 75

Rockwood Elementary Bring Technology To Students in Need Diana Dawson, Award $528, Students Served: 25

Rockwood Elementary Strings and Strategies Gary Stevens, Award: $959.88, Students Served: 12

Rockwood Elementary Play On My Street Myra Moaning, Award: $995.41, Students Served: 40

Growing Readers with a Growing Library Dusty Hendon, Award: $970, Students Served: 27

Sequoyah Elementary

Write It, Wipe it Quiz Boards Angela Sheehy, Mary Casteel, Award: $399.75, Students Served: 50

Johnson Elementary

Southeast High School

The ART of Reading Kim Iraggi, Award: $999.85, Students Served: 200

Growth Spurt in Advancement Jonetta Jonte, Award: $833.75, Students Served: 50

INDIVIDUAL GRANTS

Johnson Elementary

Stand Watie Elementary

Words Come to Life Jennifer Mech, Award: $952.76, Students Served: 24

Counselor’s Tool Box Bivian Geno, Award: $809.70, Students Served: 1183

Johnson Elementary

West Nichols Hills Elementary

Sensory Angela Absher, Award: $458.17, Students Served: 6

I Am An Eight-Year-Old Teacher Lynn Takahata, Award: $775, Students Served: 62

Kaiser Elementary

Willow Brook Elementary

Loving Literacy and Lyrics Gayla Ouldsfiya, Award: $996.23, Students Served: 80

Project Willowbot Susan Good, Award: $843.70, Students Served: 28

Linwood Elementary

Wilson Elementary

New Library, New Heroes! Kay Childers, Award: $985, Students Served: 200

Natural Resources Cynthia Lindauer, Award: $206.95, Students Served: 25

West Nichols Hills Elementary

Adams Elementary Who Eats Who? A Study of the Barn Owl Kathy Irion, Award: $662.19, Students Served: 100

ASTEC Charter Middle School Slicing Through Science One Starfish at a Time Rachel Farley, Award: $998.20, Students Served: 238

Novel Studies Tammy McMillan, Joanne Harman, Award: $4,607.76, Students Served: 67

Belle Isle Enterprise Middle School

Martin Luther King, Jr. Elementary

Buchanan Elementary

Have Books … Will (Travel) Read Tamia DeBerry, Shlonda Brewer, Felicia Dorsey, Caitlin Hart, Delores Ruffin, Award: $3,405.27 Students Served: 290

Capitol Hill High School

Martin Luther King, Jr., Elementary

Making Biology Come to Life Daniel Buckmaster, Award: $648.85, Students Served: 157

Making it Real Debbie Adam, Award: $337, Students Served: 20

Play to read; Read to play Jennifer Defee, Award: $990, Students Served: 60

Mark Twain Elementary Moving and Grooving Brenda Martindale, Award: $386.32, Students Served: 20

GREAT IDEAS

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Whatever it takes... Sodexo is proud to celebrate this year’s Stars of Education. Like Sodexo, these outstanding support staff, teachers, administrators, partners and volunteers demonstrate each day their commitment to giving Oklahoma City’s children a bright future through the power of education.

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STARS OF EDUCATION


A LIVING LEGACY We had the benefit of three years with the most amazing teacher. – Suzanne Owens, former student at Longfellow Elementary Nelda Tebow was a young, married mother of two children said Suzanne Owens, a former student who serves as execuwhen she first stepped foot in Longfellow Elementary. It was tive director of the Heart Rhythm Institute at the University of 1961. The school was nearly new. The neighborhood was still Oklahoma. growing up around it. Students walked or rode their bicycles to Integration wasn’t the only reason sixth grade was different. school. Change was on the horizon. Tebow and her students watched on television as the country A series of class photos from Tebow’s four years at learned President John F. Kennedy had been shot. It was also Longfellow illustrate the story. She started with a class of 27 Tebow’s final year at Longfellow and her last year as a traditionthird-grade students. The photo is in black and white. Students al classroom teacher. It would take nearly a half-century before were dressed in their best, some in Cub Scout and Tebow learned she not only walked alongside her Girl Scout uniforms. Tebow wore a striped dress students during a difficult time in history – she – former student Michael Schooling remembers created some history of her own, too. it was a gray sweater dress. “I don’t remember When former students found each other in you ever raising your voice,” Schooling said recent years, they couldn’t convene at their old during a visit with Tebow and some of his former school. It was razed in 2003 to build a new school classmates. “They were definitely the wonder named Martin Luther King Jr. Elementary. years for us.” Instead, they hatched an idea to reunite their The next year, Tebow moved with her classmates and throw their beloved teacher a students to fourth grade. The principal wanted birthday bash. The party was a success and the her to stay with the same students because she classmates decided on a group gift. They made a was teaching School Math Study Group — “the donation in Tebow’s honor to The Foundation for new math” — created as part of the panicked Oklahoma City Public Schools. The money was aftermath of the Soviet Union launching Sputdedicated to the Great Idea Grants program, nik. By then, the class photo was in color and which underwrites individual and collaborative included more students. Tebow was certain of grants for teachers. Tebow selected three grants one thing: “By now, I believed those kids were to fund from their gift. mine.” George Selby, now a doctor at the University In sixth grade, the photo was subtly of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center, said he Former students honored different. For the first time at Longfellow, and wanted to honor the legacy of their teacher in a Nelda Tebow with a gift to The other schools in Oklahoma City Public Schools, way that would help children. Foundation for Oklahoma City Public Schools. African-American students were in the same “We thought if we could help one teacher class with white students. reach one student, we will have done something The principal “wanted me to teach sixth fabulous,” said Becky Rickard, who works at grade because she thought parents would stick around,” Tebow Sonic’s corporate headquarters in Oklahoma City. “Then we remembers. She taught every sixth grader even though it took started thinking we could do even more.” two classrooms to hold all 41 students. “I loved teaching. I just The former students agree — Tebow taught them how to loved it.” think, be creative, be cooperative, be independent and that Integration and forced busing led to large numbers of famischool was fun. And she brought stability to a time of chaos that lies moving out of Oklahoma City and into the suburbs. “We would become a matter of historical record, not just for future had the benefit of three years with the most amazing teacher,” history books, and chronicled by her students’ memories. A LIVING LEGACY

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THE FOUNDATION FOR OKLAHOMA CITY PUBLIC SCHOOLS www.okckids.com

TAKING

CHARGE

A DAY AT U.S. GRANT HIGH SCHOOL This school is going to make it. – Brenda Lyons, Educator/Oklahoma Accreditation Team To say U.S. Grant High School is a school in trouble would be an understatement. Its chronically low student achievement led to a three-year federally funded turnaround plan that called for massive staff and leadership changes. But after one year, the new principal left. Tamie Sanders, longtime principal at Northwest Classen High School, committed to seeing the turnaround plan through at Grant this year even though so many problems persisted. Poor student and teacher attendance. Significant language and cultural barriers at a school where most students are Hispanic. Low test scores that did not improve after one year on the plan. Sanders’ job is tough. Five months in, she realized a significant sacrifice was in order. She loves spending as much quality time as possible with students. But to give them a quality education, her precious time would have to be focused less on interacting with them and more on establishing the structure the school needs to be successful for students. Sanders marvels when people tell her how much the students love her when she feels she hardly knows them. But no matter how busy her day, students and staff have come to feel the calm strength of her presence. One assistant principal has even started a journal of the smart things Sanders says.

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TAKING CHARGE


A day in the life of Principal Tamie Sanders

6:45 A.M.

Tamie Sanders opens her email for the first time to 42 waiting messages. With one hand on the mouse, she scrolls through the list. With the other hand, she’s running her fingers over the qualification of the school’s soon-to-be new math teacher. “She’ll either be great or …,” she says without finishing the thought. Three math teachers quit in one week, requiring Sanders to shift teachers and start a mad dash to fill openings while knowing fantastic math teachers aren’t just waiting around to be found in the middle of a school year.

7:15 A.M.

Sanders has signed off on a building inspection; chatted with a math teacher she moved to take over an algebra class; talked with teachers about how to go about conducting hour-long oral tests that must be given to more than 400 students who are English Language Learners; and consulted with the school’s transformation coach, who Sanders says is so busy she reminds her to schedule a bathroom break. A teacher reports he needs to take his sick baby to the doctor – it turns out to be a double ear infection – but promises he’ll be back in time to administer a sixth-hour test. Sanders gets on the intercom to make an all-call for teachers who man the metal detectors as students file in the building. She grabs a radio and heads to the doors. The five minutes Sanders stands near the detectors talking to students is the most she’ll see or talk to students all day.

7:45 A.M.

Teachers and staff stream in and out of Sanders’ office. The count regularly hits four or five visitors at a time. She listens. She’s also acutely aware that down the hall, a line of parents and students snakes out the office door and into the school’s main entrance. Outside Sanders’ office hangs a chart showing first-semester teacher attendance rates at every Oklahoma City district high school. U.S. Grant’s is the best, but it hasn’t always been. Sanders places priority on attendance for students and teachers. Students who are late to school are sent to in-school suspension unless a parent escorts them to the office. Student attendance is improving. So is teacher attendance, which Sanders monitors closely.

8:15 A.M.

Unread emails are down to 33, a counselor has started a pot of coffee Sanders will never get to and the principal has eaten a protein bar. She’s standing next to the window – cell phone reception in the building is terrible unless by a window – making a call to the district’s central office about a personnel matter.

8:45 A.M.

“I don’t want somebody who doesn’t want to be here,” Sanders says in a conversation about staff relationships. Emails tally 27. She’s asked a staff member to contact the prospective math teacher for a visit with the teacher she’ll be succeeding. Sanders studies the newest economic report on the value of a high school diploma and college degrees. She will make sure all teachers get a copy to remind them: “Look at what you do for students.”

9:00 A.M.

For two hours, assistant principals, a counselor and a consultant on contract with the State Department of Education to assist in the high school’s turnaround meet in Sanders’ office. The principal isn’t afraid to ask for help. She knew coming to Grant would be challenging. This day, Sanders asks for advice on personnel issues before moving on to the major task at hand — helping freshmen who are at academic risk. Some have good grades but too many absences. Others have failing grades. The first priority, they decide, is making sure families of students with three absences are contacted. The team also agrees on a class structure to help students make up missing credit due to absences and figure out which teachers will teaching the freshman academy. The program is for all freshmen and designed to ease the transition from middle to high school.

12:30 P.M.

Sanders has eaten lunch – a veggie sandwich – at her desk while drinking one of the sports drinks she keeps under her desk. She’s met with a peer assistance review educator who works with new teachers and teachers who have been identified as needing extra guidance. The email list is up to 55. Sanders departs to the district’s central office for a meeting with the superintendent about a personnel matter.

2:30 P.M.

The meeting is over and, although she can’t discuss the outcome, Sanders is back at Grant. New emails are up to 64. She talks with staff for the second time today about funding for parent education classes. Then comes big, big news. For two days, a team has been at Grant to decide whether the school should receive national accreditation. A visit occurs only once every five years, and accreditation is hardly a given. Not only has U.S. Grant High School received full accreditation, but it did so with flying colors. The accreditation team heaps praise on Sanders and teachers for their laser focus on improving student achievement. Sanders has “energized the school, boosted morale, created a safer climate and is a role model for staff and students,” said Brenda Lyons, a former Edmond schools administrator leading the accreditation team. In a later meeting with the school’s full leadership team, Lyons said the school’s marks are among the best she’s seen. Teachers applaud. “It’s for kids, and you’re doing the right things for kids,” Lyons said. Teachers applaud again when Lyons shares high praise for Sanders, who humbly defers. “It’s easy when you’re surrounded by brilliance.” Lyons concludes: “This school is going to make it.”

5:10 P.M.

Sanders is back in her office, decompressing from a busy day, but proud a group of outsiders has validated the hard work of her and her staff. The email count has grown to 74. They’ll wait for another day.

TAKING CHARGE

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I’m committed to making scientists out of all my students. Every class is a chance for students to experiment, question and test what they think they know. – Daniel Buckmaster

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TEACHER OF THE YEAR


POSITIVE

+ FORCE DANIEL BUCKMASTER 2012-2013 Oklahoma City Public Schools Teacher of the Year

Students in Daniel Buckmaster’s classroom don’t bury their created, how can it be here in the first place?” asks one girl. “And noses in books. Most days, they don’t even need textbooks. if it can’t be created, then can it be destroyed?” With dimmed lights, sixth-grade science students at Belle Isle This is the kind of thinking that abounds in Buckmaster’s Enterprise Middle School laugh their way through a studentclassroom, where Buckmaster tells students: “Great scientists produced video about electricity. The graphics are great at asking great questions.” have a distinct video-game feel, and the dialogue As students study the flow of electrons from is rife with middle school humor. Many laughs — the negative end of the battery to the positive, Buckmaster laughs loudest — and a few minutes it’s easy to see Buckmaster take his students on of note-taking later, the real work is about to an educational journey. They enter his classroom begin. Today’s assignment: the Energizer Bunny. with very little experience in science. He’s focused The science experiment is a staple. on teaching them to think like scientists. LearnDemonstrate electricity with a wire, a battery ing how to do that was Buckmaster’s own journey and a small light bulb. But that’s not enough in of sorts from the negative to the positive. Buckmaster’s class. Students have to first draw a In his first year of teaching, Buckmaster barely picture of how to light up the bulb in not just one made it to Christmas break in a job he thought way but five. would be his life’s work. “My classroom was not The work is noisy, with shouts of “We have having the worst discipline problems in the buildpower!” and “Give us a hint!” Buckmaster gives ing, so my principal left me alone and told me I students a second battery. The result is brighter was doing a good job,” he said. “I knew better. I bulbs. Before long, students are performing skits was doing a lot of teaching, but there was almost Buckmaster wanted to be and even a rap: no learning.” Brent Peck, his high school Hi, I’m an electron from a battery For years now, Buckmaster had wanted to be biology teacher who inspired Coming through a wire Brent Peck, his high school biology teacher who him to pursue education. “He made me feel smart ... He Make a spark and light the bulb on fire inspired him to pursue education. “Mr. Peck was encouraged me to make the You can watch TV short, wore a white beard and always smelled like most of my future.” The thing is that you can see me coffee,” Buckmaster said. “He made me feel smart Cheers and laughter are everywhere in and challenged me. He encouraged me to make Buckmaster’s classroom, especially as he starts clapping his the most of my future.” hands and singing “This Little Light of Mine.” Students are Buckmaster started working with an instructional facilitahaving fun, thanks in no small part to a teacher who describes tor – a master teacher – and things changed. He incorporated a himself as the biggest sixth grader in the room. But it’s when teaching method that would soon become a staple: singing. “After the teacher asks for questions it becomes most clear this is no that first class, I wanted to cry I was so happy. It took me five regular middle school science classroom. “If energy can’t be continued TEACHER OF THE YEAR

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TEACHER OF THE YEAR


“Mr. B, he just always makes sure we can do it,” said Jesica Trevizo, Belle Isle Enterprise Middle School student. “Not every teacher is that way, but he is. He cares a lot.”

minutes to teach them something I had been trying to get them to learn for weeks, and they were having fun doing it.” Over the next two years, he worked to make sure students were having fun as he taught them to think like scientists. Buckmaster focuses his instruction not on textbooks but on inquirybased learning. Every class is a chance for students to experiment, question and test what they think they know. They know science. But they also know Buckmaster is like no teacher they’ve ever had. “He is a really good teacher,” said Deonte Curry. “He doesn’t just make us read in a book. He uses demonstrations.” Parents can go online to watch the web-based video series and see what their students are learning. Buckmaster also started an engineering fair that draws hundreds of student entries. He brings in botanists, biologists and others to help in the important work of teaching science. He’s still learning himself, having just attained National Board certifica-

tion in his constant quest to become the best possible teacher for his students. The students are pretty sure he’s already arrived. “Mr. B, he just always makes sure we can do it,” said Jesica Trevizo. “Not every teacher is that way, but he is. He cares a lot.”

Scan to learn more about Daniel and his work in OKCPS or visit www.okckids.com

TEACHER OF THE YEAR

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FIRST RUNNER-UP

JUSTIN POURTORKAN I don’t want to be just a music teacher, I want to build up the community – through music. – Justin Pourtorkan

Scan to learn more about Justin and his work in OKCPS or visit www.okckids.com

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There’s a moment in the middle of strings class when a student is off-pitch or the cadence isn’t quite right and Classen School of Advanced Studies’ orchestra instructor Justin Pourtorkan must decide: Do I demonstrate the proper technique? Sometimes the answer is yes, like when he takes the violin from an eighthgrade student and hits the notes with the smoothness of a baby’s skin. But in those moments when he holds himself back – a teachable moment – he picks a different approach. “Stop, stop, stop,” he says in mild frustration his students aren’t hitting the notes with enough force. “This makes me think of a story.” The students groan. Pourtorkan launches into a tale about the intermission of a musical he’d seen the prior night. Instead of dimming the lights as the

intermission closed, he says, “this gigantic, loudest thing I’ve heard, guitar chord blows and drums are crashing. I’m not kidding. I jumped two rows back.” “At 86,” he tells them, referring to the measure, “blow me back with sound.” Just like that, the story is over and instruments are raised. Pourtorkan’s class isn’t so much a lesson in storytelling as it is a lesson in reaching students where they are by explaining complicated concepts in understandable ways. Clearly, reaching teenage and pre-teen students is his gift. In one class period, he tells students to let a note “die like Trinity in the Matrix,” to play one section like “gently stroking a cat’s fur,” and even draws quizzical looks as he mentions the song “Achy Breaky Heart.” (Miley Cyrus’ dad, he reminds them.) When Pourtorkan momentarily

loses the attention of a few students, there’s no scolding. Just a simple, soft-spoken, “I welcome you to join me.” Students understand the purpose of those stories. “He knows it’s difficult to be serious for 85 minutes, so he’ll give us a mental break and tell us stories about his life,” Audrey Matheny, a junior violinist, wrote in Pourtorkan’s teacher of the year portfolio. “These stories make class much more fun and enjoyable.” Pourtorkan isn’t just about teaching notes and rhythms or telling stories. “I don’t want to be just a music teacher,” he explains. “I want to build up the community, find ways to strengthen the community – through music, but … trying to build these kids up emotionally so they have confidence as they go out into the world.”


SECOND RUNNER-UP

DIANA DAWSON “Hocus Pocus,” Diana Dawson says in a sing-song voice. “We must focus,” say the first graders in reply. And they do focus, working out how to pronounce curious and other new words in the day’s reading lesson. They aren’t distracted just from the fact they’re fresh in from recess. The distractions Dawson’s first-graders at Rockwood Elementary face are many. They know too much about violence, prison and the names of illegal drugs. Her classroom — with math facts hanging from the ceiling, brightly colored rugs covering the cold tile and even a few bean bags for reading time — is a haven from the chaos outside. “I can’t control what happens outside these doors,” she said. “But I can control what happens in here.” What may or may not hap-

pen when her students aren’t at school keeps Dawson up at night. They know more than first graders should about life. She desperately wants them to know the world is full of wonderful opportunities. Like many of her students, Dawson and her family emigrated from Mexico when she was a child. She was so smart she went from second grade in Mexico to fourth grade in America. As the oldest child, she helped her younger siblings learn to read and write. Her parents couldn’t speak English. Dawson was closing in on a science degree in college when she wondered whether a career in medicine would fit her need for family time. It was her sisters – the ones she taught to read – who suggested education. She never looked back. Dawson’s personal story makes her a perfect fit for Rockwood, with its high His-

panic population and large numbers of students who are learning English. She also understands parents want to be involved in their child’s education but struggle with language barriers. “I see a lot of parents who are working hard to make ends meet so attending a meeting at school or helping with homework is a huge challenge,” she said. At the end of the day, even the very long ones, Dawson will do whatever it takes to help her students succeed. “Some days, the kids just wake up and you can see it in their eyes,” she said. “The light bulb went on, and they finally understood what I’ve been teaching. I teach for those moments.”

I can’t control what happens outside these doors, but I can control what happens here. – Diana Dawson

Scan to learn more about Diana and her work in OKCPS or visit www.okckids.com

FINALISTS

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SB-24461-0312

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The students need just a few minutes of someone investing in them. – Paul Bianchi

PAUL BIANCHI

JROTC INSTRUCTOR JOHN MARSHALL HIGH SCHOOL TEACHER OF THE YEAR FINALIST Ivan Morgan’s eyes widen and his mouth breaks into a big grin when he sees Paul Bianchi headed down the hallway at John Marshall High School. Ivan grips the walker he uses to guide him safely throughout the school, straightens up and stands ready for an order. “Ten-hut,” barks Bianchi, the school’s JROTC instructor. “March.” Ivan squeals in delight and then carefully but with supreme confidence maneuvers his walker and legs to march in time down the hallway as other students breeze by. Ivan, one of the school’s special education students, isn’t one of Bianchi’s JROTC students. He might as well be. These moments with Ivan Scan to learn more about Paul and his work in OKCPS or visit www.okckids.com

are a highlight for Bianchi. That sort of connection with a student is what education is all about. “He’s become my buddy,” Bianchi said. Cadets see “he is doing the best he can. We’ve sort of adopted him.” Bianchi has in Ivan the sort of relationship he wants to create with as many students as possible. “Just to see them develop from one phase to another and that they’re getting it,” he said, “it matters.” The retired U.S. Air Force officer has learned a lot in his few years of teaching, including classroom management and the importance of keeping students engaged. But that’s not the greatest lesson he’s learned. “The students need just a few minutes of someone investing in them,” Bianchi said. But not only in the classroom or at the times educators are expected to interact with students. The mid-hallway visit with Ivan is a normal part of Bianchi’s day. On his way to class, he stops a student, asking her if

she’s OK. When the affirmative answer comes after a pause, he asks further: “Are you sure? Do you want to talk?” Bianchi’s students face tough challenges. They bring those with them when they come into school, making the job of teachers even more difficult. Bianchi seems energized to step up in the areas where other adults are absent. “Sometimes I blow it — in too much of a rush in 10 different directions to stop and listen! But the good news is special moments are available every day, as long as I watch and wait for them. … These are the rewarding moments — the ones that matter and make teaching noble.”


D.J. BOWKER

FAMILY & CONSUMER SCIENCE CAPITOL HILL HIGH SCHOOL TEACHER OF THE YEAR FINALIST

I make sure that I’m the best thing that happens to students every day at school. – D.J. Bowker

Scan to learn more about D.J. and her work in OKCPS or visit www.okckids.com

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FINALISTS

D.J. Bowker’s students live in a box with an overdose of reality. The box isn’t literal, but it’s easily spotted on a map. Home for Capitol Hill High School’s students is an area surrounded by four major highways. Bowker’s title might be teacher, but her job is to help them learn how to survive the box and climb their way out. “Sometimes when I walk into the classroom, the realization of the opportunity to educate my students is overwhelming,” she said. “The subject matter is real life: money, parenting, nutrition, work skills and how we balance all of these together. There are times I remind myself to listen to what I am teaching.” Every day, the job is tough. Capitol Hill has more than 90 pregnant and parenting

teens. Bowker knows that statistic by heart because she knows the students personally. Many can’t read well and don’t always understand poor reading skills will keep them from properly filling out a job application. She knows that to reach and teach her students, she can’t stand in front of a classroom and lecture. Every day, there are reminders of why, even after 17 years, Bowker keeps coming back to Capitol Hill High School. “We must have a relationship with our students. There are many days we spend more time with them than they spend with their families. We are trying to educate and mold these students to be active, accomplished participants in society.” Bowker’s the teacher who stays just on the right side

of whether to be the friendly adult or just the friend. She’s frank and honest with her students, many who need the compassionate but firm guidance of an understanding adult. Bowker admits to having some discouraging years in Oklahoma City Public Schools. She can recite the number of superintendents, the number of principals and the number of curriculum reforms she’s seen in her tenure. But she also vividly recalls the day her students swept her away on a surprise visit to a restaurant where she was greeted by more students. It was a thank you. “They work so hard just to get here everyday. I make sure I’m the best thing that happens to students every day at school.”


JAMIE BUCKMASTER

ENGLISH AS A SECOND LANGUAGE HILLCREST ELEMENTARY TEACHER OF THE YEAR FINALIST

Being an advocate is a huge part of being an ESL teacher. If I’m not an advocate for my students, who will be? – Jamie Buckmaster

Scan to learn more about Jamie and her work in OKCPS or visit www.okckids.com

With four years of college and a Spanish degree under her belt, Jamie Buckmaster set out to teach Spanishspeaking students at Hillcrest Elementary to thrive in an English-speaking country. She quickly realized teaching Spanish to English speakers is a lot different than teaching English to Spanish speakers. Buckmaster taught children by day and became a student by night. She knew she could truly help her students if she learned more about teaching English. By the time she finished her master’s degree in teaching English as a second language at the University of Central Oklahoma, Buckmaster had discovered something profound: she’d been doing it all wrong. Buckmaster led the charge to change the way Hillcrest educates English language learners. Her students are no longer pulled out to work on vocabulary that has no relevance to their classroom work. Instead, she goes to their classrooms, offering special help to students and empowering traditional classroom teachers to adapt lessons and teaching techniques to help all students. She also shares her knowledge as an instructor in the master’s program. In just a year, some English language learners posted test scores higher than

their native English-speaking peers. Teachers are also coming around. “Five years later, inclusion is no longer a new or scary idea,” she said. “It is simply the way we do ESL at our school, and the ELL students’ test scores continue to

prove that it works. “Being an advocate is a huge part of being an ESL teacher,” Buckmaster said. “If I’m not an advocate for my students, who will be? I think that applies to a lot of teachers. A lot of teachers feel like they need to be advocates for their students.”


SUSAN GOOD

5TH GRADE WILLOW BROOK ELEMENTARY TEACHER OF THE YEAR FINALIST

I walked into Willow Brook Elementary and knew this is where I belonged. – Susan Good

Good taught in public and private schools in San Antonio, Portland, Seattle, Edmond and Oklahoma City.

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A student’s hug. A sweet note. A visit from a former student. In each of those moments, Susan Good wonders: How could I not be here? “Here” is Willow Brook, an elementary school so close to Oklahoma City’s eastern border it’s just a short walk from Midwest City. Good taught in public and private schools in San Antonio, Portland, Seattle, Oklahoma City and Edmond before deciding to stay home with her daughters. When she returned to the classroom in 2005, Good figured she’d end up teaching again in Edmond but also interviewed in Oklahoma City. “After several positive interviews in both districts, I walked into Willow Brook Elementary and knew this is where I belonged,” she said. “Certainly, it would be easier to teach in Edmond. Certain-

ly, the students in Edmond would be easier to work with.” And then she thinks about the boy who year after year is sent to her classroom for disciplinary reasons until he reaches fifth grade. He’s finally hers for keeps – at least for a year anyway. In those years, she’s seen him “hungry mad,” “family mad” and “sleepy mad.” Good has a chance to do for him what her fifth-grade teacher did for her: make learning fun. In a school where student turnover is the norm and not the exception, this boy has stayed. He’s learned to read, which he couldn’t when he showed up in her classroom as a first grader. He’s funny. And he has a knack for science. “I look at this boy and my heart breaks with the struggles he has had in his young life,” she said. His

dad is in prison. He’s one of seven children. She doesn’t know what will become of his future. But she knows this much: the anger is gone. All she sees now is potential. “I’ve had so many more children just like him in my classroom. They come back at every opportunity to see me. They hug me and thank me for pushing them so hard. They thank me for being more than a teacher. How could I not be here?”

Scan to learn more about Susan and her work in OKCPS or visit www.okckids.com


CHERYL HALAOUI

5TH GRADE WILSON ARTS INTEGRATION TEACHER OF THE YEAR FINALIST

I wanted to share my love of learning and inspire others. – Cheryl Halaoui

Cheryl Halaoui will never forget the note from a former second-grade student. “Mrs. H,” she wrote, “I didn’t want to be in your class at first because all of my friends were in the other class. But now I’m so glad you were my teacher. I learned a lot. I love you. Will you teach third grade?” The student had cried the first three weeks of school, but Halaoui never gave up on her. “That’s why we do it,” the teacher said. “That’s why we’re here.” Halaoui believes she was destined to be a teacher. It just took her a while to figure that out. She worked at an oil company making more than enough money when she realized something was missing. She took classes at night for six years to obtain her elementary school teaching certification. She has looked back – but only in ways that have made her a better teacher. She was a child of the military, moving again and again as her dad installed communications equipment. Halaoui admits she was painfully shy, yet she found comfort in school. “School was the stabilizing force for me. Even when I was in a new town, a new house and made new friends, I knew the rules and expectations for school were nearly always the same. And I was good at it.” She remembers a fifth-grade teacher who persuaded her to run for a student leadership position – and she won! The lesson that stuck with her is: Teachers developing relationships with students is critically important. So even though Halaoui is schooled in a variety of programs, it was National Board certification that helped her hone the ability to connect and teach children on an individual level. She learned to cater her lessons and incorporate inquiry-based teaching in the classroom. When students work in teams to act Scan to learn more about out or perform songs about new Cheryl and her work in OKCPS vocabulary words, Halaoui sees or visit www.okckids.com how such active participation leads to more learning. “I was driven to teaching by the desire to accomplish something meaningful in my life. I wanted to share my love of learning and inspire others.”


GLEN WOODS

MUSIC & BAND WHEELER ELEMENTARY TEACHER OF THE YEAR FINALIST “Hello everyone,” Glen Woods sings as a class of second graders settle into their seats. “Hello Mr. Woods,” they sing back. The room is full of smiles. “You’re rockin’ today,” he says. It won’t be the last time the second graders hear his high praise. “Every week in my music classroom, students eagerly wait for their turn to perform the solo for assessment. They have no fear of failure. They know they will experience success and will be praised for their endeavor,” he said. “My praise of a resounding ‘Rockin’ On!’ is real and genuinely felt.” The music room isn’t the only place students find Glen Woods. After school, he’s in the middle of the street, chatting with parents as he guides children to safety. His willingness to serve in that capacity isn’t all that makes him different. Woods can talk intelligently about No Child Left Behind, common core standards and school budgets. But the technique he’s found most useful with his students is far simpler: radical enthusiasm. He seems to never run short on enthusiasm. That’s an accomplishment, considering he splits time at Wheeler and nearby Hayes Elementary. In a week, he leads the singing of some 900 students. He uses seating charts to help him memorize their names. Woods achieved National Board certification, but he took a winding route to the classroom. While in college, he thought teaching might be his future. Then a rock-and-roll band performance left him with a ruptured throat lining. The doctor said his trumpet-playing days were over, and he finished his music degree by taking up percussion, viola and singing in the collegiate men’s glee club. Still, he was traumatized. He enlisted in the U.S. Army. Music, though, stayed with him. The Army accepted him into its band program, and he attended the U.S. Army School of Music in Norfolk, Va. Still, he veered to a different path. After the Army, he pursued business interests as Scan to learn more about restaurant owner/operator. Then he Glen and his work in OKCPS or watched his own daughter perform in visit www.okckids.com an elementary school music production. After all those years, his life came full circle as he found his way to the music classroom, and some times, gripping a stop sign in the middle of the street. 46

FINALISTS

My students have no fear of failure. – Glen Woods


OKCPS BUILDING TEACHERS OF THE YEAR In addition to the OKCPS Teacher of the Year finalists, we would like to congratulate each of the teachers representing individual schools as their building’s Teacher of the Year: Kim Wooldridge, Adams Elementary Sami Hobia, Arthur Elementary Karen Rich, Bodine Elementary Pam Jones, Britton Elementary Sallie Allen, Buchanan Elementary Cherrie Breckenridge, Capitol Hill Elementary Shino Yeager, Cesar Chavez Elementary Lisa Cochrane, Cleveland Elementary Kristi Rickey, Columbus Elementary Victoria Dacalio, Douglass High School Misti Zerger, Edgemere Elementary Jami Byrd, Edwards Elementary Emmitt Brazille, Emerson High School Nancy McCullough, F.D. Moon Academy Sara Lovett, Fillmore Elementary Pam Wallenberg, Gatewood Elementary Susie Esters, Green Pastures Elementary Marica Zangri, Greystone Lower Elementary Sally Holmes-Tinga, Greystone Upper Elementary Tina Sheaffer, Hayes Elementary Amy House, Heronville Elementary Keri Tarrant, Horace Mann Elementary Angelea Borja, Jackson Middle School Joe Hargrove, Jefferson Middle School Steve Berry, Johnson Elementary Michelle Cheney, Kaiser Elementary Sheila Walker, Lee Elementary Ashley Leadford, Linwood Elementary Jane White, Mark Twain Elementary

We salute the Stars of Education

Nakita Green, Martin Luther King Jr. Elementary Jennifer Kremeier, Monroe Elementary Diane Nowakowski, Nichols Hills Elementary Tonda Smith, North Highland Math & Science Academy Katherine Hoskins, Northeast Academy Michelle Buggs, Oakridge Elementary Lia Thomas, Oklahoma Centennial High School Curtis Marshall, Parmelee Elementary Jessica Lee, Pierce Elementary Rachel Harsen, Prairie Queen Elementary Lisa Jefferson, Putnam Heights Academy Lisa Jordan, Quail Creek Elementary Crystal Hoogeveen, Rancho Village Elementary Laura Reynolds, Ridgeview Elementary Gayla Cunningham, Rogers Middle School Gloria Yost, Sequoyah Elementary Faisal Madni, Shidler Elementary Kellie Dickens, Southeast High School Colby Torres, Southern Hills Elementary Sheila Howell, Spencer Elementary Elisabeth Hise, Stand Watie Elementary Tenishea Holbert, Taft Middle School Diane Steele, Telstar Elementary Stephan Balliet, U.S. Grant High School Rebecca Kennedy, Van Buren Elementary Claudette Justice, Webster Middle School Jacqueline Holt, West Nichols Hills Elementary Liliana Michel, Westwood Elementary

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2/16/12 3:15 PM


DREAMING OUT LOUD Being Teacher of the Year has given me a voice that I’ve never had before. – Shelly Campbell, 2011-2012 OKCPS Teacher of the Year

Shelly Campbell sets a 5-minute timer on her classroom Smart Board and makes a beeline to a group of students who are discussing societal problems. She listens as one student reads an argument opposing mandatory drug testing in schools. “Is it good?” the student asks. Campbell’s reply comes slowly. “It doesn’t explore anything,” she says, carefully watching the student’s reaction. “It’s a really nice summary of the ideas we talked about the other day. But I think you can do more.” Campbell then moves to another group of students, repeating a procedure she follows all morning, never stopping to sit down as long as students are in the classroom tucked in a far corner on the second floor of John Marshall High School. Writing persuasively is a skill Campbell’s junior English students will have to demonstrate on the year-end, state-mandated test. Turns out it’s a pretty useful life skill, too. As Campbell wraps her year up as the 2011-2012 Oklahoma City Public Schools Teacher of the Year, she’s found the honor 48

STARS OF EDUCATION

has helped her develop her own persuasive voice and to use it in ways she hopes will better education. She’s appeared on television and radio commercials appealing for school supply donations and been the subject of television and newspaper interviews about education policy. “At church, I’ve had people I don’t know but who know I’m teacher of the year ask me how I feel about different issues,” she said. Being teacher of the year “has given me a voice that I’ve never had before. It’s a validation that my opinion is important.” She’s particularly vocal about the importance of the state’s National Board Certified Teacher program in helping teachers strengthen their classroom practices. She holds the certification and said going through the Teacher of the Year selection process only reinforced how important self-reflection is for teachers to continue honing their craft. But making time for self-reflection and developing a voice is a challenge for any teacher, much less one like Campbell who


treats teaching as a way of life rather than a job. No wonder her students trust her. “Can you teach me how to think faster?” asks one student who goes on to explain she needs more time to develop her argumentation ideas before putting them to paper. “It’s not a race,” Campbell explains. “It’s important to think about what you want to write.” Campbell’s students don’t see her just in the classroom. She’s with them elsewhere in the school – planning prom, taking them through leadership activities, introducing them to guest speakers who talk about life after high school, helping other teachers with technology questions and, even in the hallway, helping wrap students in cling wrap as they prepare for the afternoon’s pep assembly. She’s also a fixture at basketball games, where her husband Chad coaches the high school boys team. “I

have these kids in class. And they’re his kids, too.” Together, they’re important role models. The Campbells have been married 18 years and have shared the last decade as teachers at John Marshall. “It is awesome for kids to see a relationship like ours,” she said. “Some of them have never seen a marital relationship that works.” But the students the couple shares learn early on not to expect a break from their English teacher just because they might play basketball. Her high expectations know no bounds – not on the court or in life. Scan to learn more about Shelly and her work in OKCPS or visit www.okckids.com

OKCPS Superintendent Karl Springer congratulates Campbell on being named 2011-2012 Teacher of the Year.

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A quality education makes every dream possible ACE is proud to honor Oklahoma City Public Schools’ outstanding educators and the programs of The Foundation that remove barriers to learning www.aceatlas.com STARS OF EDUCATION

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A PERFECT PARTNER The real reason we do this is to equip young people to make better choices in school, in family and life. – Pam Millington, Crossings Community Church Club director When Leo Scicery isn’t sure about whether a choice he’s about to make is a good one, he knows where to find the answer: Thursday church. That’s what the freshman at John Marshall High School calls a special partnership between his school and Crossings Community Church formally known as The Club. “They tell us what we should and shouldn’t do,” Scicery said of the Club’s volunteers. “They’re all nice, and teach you bad from good.” Crossings started the program five years ago. The Club accepts 50 John Marshall students on a volunteer basis. Volunteers driving a rented airport bus pick students up every Thursday after school and bring them to the church’s community center, which is a former Wal-Mart. Some students catch a ride later after athletic practices or other after-school activities. As students enter the community center, they’re greeted by the smiles of volunteers. Hugs are aplenty, as are special handshakes and fist bumps. The warmth between volunteers and students is obvious. They trade small talk about their day as students file through the snack line and split up into groups for conversation and prayer time with group leaders. All students come together for a Bible study time and another lesson on varied topics. Students learn about manners or hear from guest speakers. Former gang members have talked about making good decisions and how turning their lives around motivated them to turn away from gang life. They’ve learned about why it’s important to think as early as middle school about college plans and the importance of making good grades early on. They also talk about nutrition and sensitive topics including abstinence. Practical skills like managing money also are taught. Students then go back into their small groups before spreading out into elective activities. Students typically have a variety of activities to choose from on a six-week rotation, including 50

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basketball, cooking and jewelry making. ready to move on. Several sophomore girls keep coming back. A new batch of volunteers closes out the evening, serving din“I like to come here because it’s a safe place,” said Kiara ner to the students and family members who wish to attend. Hogg, a sophomore who started attending Club as a freshman. Volunteers also organize a variety of Saturday and special She said the program has helped her develop leadership skills. activities for the students and their families. Students have After a father who lost his son to suicide because of bullying volunteered at the Regional Food Bank, taken came and spoke to Club students last school year, college visits and attended special dinners Hogg decided to take a stand. She was among where they can practice manners and etiquette those who spoke at an anti-bullying school Club volunteers have shared. Crossings also is assembly. involved in other ways at John Marshall, includ“I wouldn’t be the same person,” said Darian ing providing new blazers for the choir, stocking Wrice, who has been attending the Club for four the clothing room and providing Christmas gift years. “I was just really mean before.” cards for faculty and staff. Millington wasn’t always sure the Club would Pam Millington, the Club’s director, has seen reach students in the way she had hoped. The the program change lives, but it takes time. first weeks were overwhelming. The students Many students come to the Club untrusting of clearly had many unmet needs. The table of boys the volunteers. Millington said their first prayer she kept eyeing had no volunteers. She worked requests – if they make any at all – are basic: up the nerve to sit with them and quickly discova dog, finishing homework or a doing well on a ered why they sat alone. test. Over time, she said, they evolve. Students They behaved poorly. Not because they didn’t seek spiritual help as they cope with parents know any better, Millington thinks, but out of or other family members on drugs or in prison self-protection because they put so little trust in or for desperate needs like clothing, food and adults. Over time, teachers and parents report utilities. better grades, fewer discipline issues, and Volunteers organize a “We’re more than a Bible club,” she said. students act more respectfully toward adults. variety of Saturday and “We’re investing in these kids from the bottom The students aren’t the only ones changed. special activities for the up.” Millington describes herself as “someone who students and their families. The time spent with the children and doesn’t even like kids,” but she stepped out in often their parents allows volunteers to see and faith that the Club is what students need. It’s address needs others might miss. Through the Club, Crossings changed her, as well as other volunteers. They’re more aware of has helped pay utility bills, stocked empty kitchens and provided the daunting challenges students face, and the ways they can clothing. The community center also houses a clinic where help. students and their families can receive some medical treatment. “The real reason we do this is to equip young people to make The Club limits attendance to students in seventh, eighth better choices in school, in family and life,” she said. and ninth grades. But some students who aged out weren’t quite

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DONORS OF TIME

CELEBRATING 2011-2012 VALUABLE VOLUNTEERS

LINDA ANTONIO

JOHN MARSHALL HIGH SCHOOL

VALERIE CARTER

DOVE SCIENCE ELEMENTARY Valerie Carter’s daughter ended up at Dove Science Academy Elementary School almost by accident. But it’s no accident Carter is now a mainstay at the school she’s grown to love. “I saw how much they were putting into the children, and I had to be part of that,” she said. Carter serves as the Parent-Teacher Organization’s parent liaison, but that’s just the beginning. She helps organize events like the annual community health and career fair, the black history assembly, grant applications for playground improvement and numerous fundraising activities. She and another parent also maintain the school’s Facebook page and create school newsletters. They also organize teacher appreciation initiatives and help with field trips. “I’m constantly coming up with things to do,” Carter said. Teachers and fellow parents notice her efforts. “She has made sure the communications process has been smoothed out over the years, and everyone is kept on the same page when it comes to school policies and programs,” said Amber Hallaba, who also serves on the PTO board. “She has become the cohesiveness between the groups and created a consistency in our programs and the process in which they are implemented.” 52

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There’s no paycheck with Linda Antonio’s name on it when she shows up at John Marshall High School. She’s there simply because she wants to be. “Anything they need, I’m here,” she said. Antonio, who has two children at John Marshall and two at Greystone Upper Elementary, can be found nearly every day in John Marshall’s front office. But no two days are the same. John Marshall Principal Aspasia Carlson said Antonio’s volunteerism started out mostly with clerical work. She runs errands, assists with scanning, makes copies and escorts or directs parents visiting the school. But with such a consistent presence and her help

with events like the winter dance that included special needs students, Carlson said Antonio has “become a part of our family at John Marshall.” The dance was an exceptional event for the special needs students, who make up about 20 percent of John Marshall’s student population. “In fact, on the days she is gone, we really miss her,” Carlson said. “She is always quick with a smile, kind word and helpful hand.” Teacher Shelly Campbell said Antonio is well liked by students because she is friendly and helpful. She’s also an extra set of hands in an office that only has one person to receive guests but serves about 1,000 students over the course of a school year.


“I threw myself in with both feet,” Ann Matheny said of the year she started volunteering at Wilson Elementary. She was a stay at home mom, and her oldest daughter was entering kindergarten. That was 11 years ago. “I’ve just stayed active with it,” she said. “You always hope other parents will step up. Sometimes they do. Sometimes they don’t.” Matheny has always been one of those parents to step up. “If I ever need anything, I know she is just a phone call away and the job will be done and done right. I truly do not know what I would do without her,” said Principal Kirk Wilson. Matheny’s youngest is now in fifth grade, and she works full time. She describes herself as less connected now but that seems an overstatement. Her activities over the years included acting as the parent advisor for the student council, helping with student elections, hosting turkey and

valentine bingo events, spearheading winter and spring dances and the school talent show. She’s also a Girl Scout leader, a volunteer with the chess club and the organizer of myriad other events. As a landscape architect, she’s also led the school’s beautification effort. “Ann’s impact on the physical and human school environment, the student body and the staff of Wilson Arts Integration is so ingrained in our day-to-day expectations, that we take for granted how smoothly things run,” said teacher Karolyn Corbett. Matheny also has simultaneously held leadership positions in the parent-teacher-student group at Classen School of Advanced Studies. “This is her last year with us … and her recognition is long overdue,” Corbett said. “We just can’t let her go without showing her how much her dedicated service to our school is so deeply appreciated.”

HELEN PRILLIMAN LINWOOD ELEMENTARY

ANN MATHENY

WILSON ARTS INTEGRATION

Helen Prilliman tried once in the 1990s to volunteer at Linwood Elementary. She was turned away, never making it past the office. A few years later, then-principal Marci Brueggen invited local church members – specifically grandmother-type women – to come work with Linwood students, and Prilliman again found herself at the school. That was 16 years ago. “I love the kids, of course, and it keeps me young,” said the 75-year-old Prilliman. “I just want to see them succeed. It’s a thrill to see their little faces when they finally catch on to something.” Prilliman works with kindergarten students. She helps them learn their letters. Eventually, they graduate to phonics, sight words, and finally, reading. She also helps them learn their numbers. “We just kind of cover it all,” she said. They are foundational skills that elude many of the students, especially those Hispanic students whose parents don’t speak English and have limited exposure to either properly written or spoken English. “Mrs. Prilliman helps the kindergarteners bridge the transition from being home most of the day or part of the day to staying at school all day,” said Linwood teacher Laurie Cochran. “She has that grandmotherly smile and touch the children love.” When she isn’t working with students, she’s helping teachers. Tearing out workbook papers. Making journals. Hanging student artwork. Prilliman visits the school most Mondays and Tuesdays. She’ll do anything to help. “It is very important that Mrs. Prilliman volunteers her time giving each child some one-on-one time to gain knowledge they will need to be successful in school,” said Cochran. “She is very valuable to our Linwood teachers and kindergarteners.” “I always said that if I felt like I wasn’t making progress, I’d stop coming,” Prillman said. “That hasn’t happened yet.” VALUABLE VOLUNTEERS

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CHRISTI SAVAGE

CLASSEN SCHOOL OF ADVANCED STUDIES

MATTHEW WEAVER CLEVELAND ELEMENTARY

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When Christi Savage walked in Classen School of Advanced Studies for the first time, she thought it would also be the last. It was large and very different from where her children attended elementary school. But at a family meeting, her objection was overruled. She now has three children at Classen and is president of the ParentTeacher-Student Association. “I just decided if my kids are going to be here and I’m going to be here, then I’m going to fix the things that bother me,” Savage said. “I’m just trying to make Classen the best that it can be.” Much of her work has been accomplished through the PTSA. She reinstituted the group’s sports booster committee. Even though the school is largely focused on academics and the performing arts, she wanted students and parents involved in sports to enjoy the support of the entire school community. Savage also established a system assigning a parent liaison to each teacher to keep open

communication and track of individual teacher needs. “The needs of the teachers just blew me away. They need so many basics,” she said. She used her experience being overwhelmed on her first visit to Classen to influence changes in the way parents are introduced to the school. Savage also organizes the school’s open house and e-mails the weekly newsletter. She’s also always on the lookout for needs of the school and its families that need attention. Savage has embraced the diversity of the school, but bringing together parents who had been highly involved at different elementary schools hasn’t always been easy. Neither is being a vocal advocate and sometimes critic, roles Savage embraces with zeal. “The culture here is what keeps me going,” she said. “It is so diverse and so respectful. You can’t buy that, and it’s more important than a pretty building.”

Matthew Weaver is such a regular fixture at Cleveland Elementary, he figures most students think he works there. He’s OK with that. “They all know Mr. Matthew,” he said. “They all wave to me in the hall, and I tell them to have a good recess.” On the days they don’t, he surely knows. Weaver has been volunteering at Cleveland since his daughter was in kindergarten. She’s now in third grade. As a cafeteria and recess monitor, he sees all the students every day. Weaver is self-employed and is at the school most every day during the extended lunch break he gives himself. He also volunteers as a classroom reader. Among all his volunteer duties that include opening milk cartons and settling playground disputes, he’s keenly aware of the one that may be most important: male role model. Weaver and the nighttime custodian are the only men in the school for a prolonged period on a daily basis. “The boys have really responded well, especially the ones that can be a handful. They respond to me giving them some guidance, in the lunchroom, recess or in class. It’s neat to watch that happen,” he said. When Cleveland unexpectedly lost its science teacher, Weaver stepped up. He taught fifth-grade students about forestry, papermaking and recycling. Teachers appreciate that the time he spends tending the lunchroom, recess and helping with classroom needs allows them to focus elsewhere. “A different face, a voice of quiet authority is especially welcome to our committed and hardworking teachers,” said Cleveland teacher Marcia Greenwood.


HELPING HANDS

CELEBRATING 2011-2012 SUPER SUPPORT STAFF ANAYANSI BRANTLEY ELL PARAPROFESSIONAL HERONVILLE ELEMENTARY

The principal at Heronville Elementary describes Anayansi Brantley as a “fireball of energy.” She darts around the classroom, helping one student and then another. In between, she gives a stern, grim-faced look to one student who’s talking out of turn and then embraces a crying little girl who quietly says she wants to wear a coat to recess. Brantley’s official title is English Language Learner paraprofessional. What she does is help. She helps students who aren’t yet fluent in English, parents who often are struggling with the language and teachers with a classroom of students whose abilities to speak and write and English vary greatly. Leon Hill, Heronville principal, said Brantley simply does whatever is needed. And she’s especially good at anticipating the needs of those around her before they even know to ask. Brantley is a Panama native who has been working in schools for 16 years. While she is not credentialed teacher, Heronville teacher Laura Hughes says Brantley is an educator and more. “Mrs. Brantley instructs through her dedication, passion and love for students and their education,” Hughes said.

SUPER SUPPORT STAFF

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JACKIE BOWENS CUSTODIAN CLEVELAND ELEMENTARY

As the students at Cleveland Elementary head out the schoolhouse doors for the day, Jackie Bowens’ work is just beginning. Bowens is the school’s night custodian. He spends the afternoon and evening doing all the things one would expect of a custodian: cleaning bathrooms, sweeping, mopping and taking out the trash. Bowens isn’t one to brag on himself. He said he enjoys the work, the teachers and the children. But to know Bowens is to understand that he doesn’t just do the job. “He has the best attitude,” said Nancy Potts, one of the Cleveland teachers. “He’s so pleasant and he just goes above and beyond.” Ongoing construction at the school has meant big and

ALICE CRAWFORD BILINGUAL ASSISTANT LINWOOD ELEMENTARY

Alice Crawford isn’t a classroom teacher, but from outward appearances, that’s difficult to tell. “She understands the culture more than most classroom teachers do, so she can plan the lessons in a way that gets students interested in learning,” said Laurie Cochran, a teacher at Linwood Elementary. Crawford isn’t a native Spanish speaker. She learned the language while doing volunteer work with her church. That Spanish is a learned language for her is of little concern to the students she works with. “I feel like they see me as one of them,” she said. “They’ll ask when I came here and what part of Mexico I’m from. To them, I’m just one of them.” Crawford said because of the language connections, students open up to her and tell her more about their lives. Her job is to help students who don’t speak English as their first language understand tough concepts that sound foreign like summarizing a story or drawing inferences from passage of text. She’s found that hands-on activities often work best. She also helps translate letters and information for parents when needed. Cochran recalled a time when Crawford volunteered to help unpack boxes of books for the school’s new library. “Her helpful, smiling attitude boosted our moral. Not only did she enthusiastically help us, she kept offering her help until we didn’t need her anymore. It was very refreshing to have someone offer rather than begrudgingly helping when asked,” she said.

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unexpected messes. Bowens always steps up to help, even if it isn’t part of his typical job responsibilities. Many nights, Principal Marsha Stafford leaves the school long after the sun has set. Bowens always escorts her to her car, makes sure it starts and won’t go back inside until she’s safely on the road, Potts said. Even though he doesn’t interact often with students, they all know “Mr. Jackie.” Potts said she hopes students see his dedication, how he always does more than he is asked and always has a cheerful attitude “He is an inspiration to those who come in contact with him every day,” Potts said.


DEBBIE WILLIAMS MEDIA ASSISTANT SEQUOYAH ELEMENTARY

Sequoyah Elementary revolves around Debbie Williams and the library she keeps well-stocked, clean and always ready for students and teachers. The school, her principal said, simply wouldn’t be the same without her. “She starts the day off with morning duty in the cafeteria with a smile,” Principal Montie Koehn said. “She goes above and beyond to develop a strong relationship with students. They can’t wait to see her every morning. If a student happens to come in after having a rough morning, Debbie is the first person to try and find out what is going on.” “Walking the halls with Williams is like being in the presence of a rock star,” said her colleague, Gayla Goff. “Children of all ages run up to Debbie to give her hugs, tell her about the books they are reading and what is happening in their family.” Goff calls Williams the best media assistant in the district and a model for those in the same position at other schools. Sequoyah’s library has one of the highest book circulations in the district. Every student checked out at least 22 books in the first quarter of the school year. She’s also helpful to teachers, finding resources that support curriculum, reading to students and helping with an early childhood program to make sure students arrive at school ready to learn.

Think Globally... Teach Locally. Independent Insurance Agents of Greater Oklahoma City are proud to support the work of The Foundation and its positive impact on Oklahoma City children.

SUPER SUPPORT STAFF

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Michael Morrison (middle) and Joe Penhall (right) of ComTech deliver the supplies to Foundation president Lori Dickinson (left) gathered during the 2011 Team Up Campaign.

TEAM UP

PARTNERSHIP TALLIES $80,000 IN DONATED SCHOOL SUPPLIES

“I was aware of the need, but I had no idea the extent of what’s needed.” 58

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Katie Gillian’s first visit to Teachers Warehouse came on a windy, chilly Wednesday when boxes of tissue were stacked to the ceiling, pencils filled clear plastic tubs and sacks upon sacks of white copy paper stood ready for teachers to stake their claim. Outside, a truck filled with more boxes of school supplies idled, ready for unloading. “I was aware of the need for more school supplies,” said Gilliam, a senior marketing specialist at FAA Credit Union. “But I had no idea the extent of what’s needed.” That increasing awareness may be the most powerful outcome of Team Up OKC, a two-week school supply drive spearheaded by Michael Morrison, who serves on the board of The Foundation for Oklahoma City Public Schools and owns Comtech. He’s also a dad whose son attends Linwood Elementary.

For the last two years, Morrison has recruited metro-area businesses to host internal school supply drives and to ask their customers to donate supplies to benefit the Foundation’s Teachers Warehouse. But supplies, though badly needed, weren’t all he was after. The situation, of course, is that students need more than schools are able to provide. Morrison’s moment of clarity came the day he saw his son’s schoolmate at Linwood Elementary carrying his school supplies in a pillow case. “I really want to bring additional awareness to the poverty levels and other challenges facing the children of our city,” Morrison said. “You tell one business leader who tells another who tells another. They want to help once they understand the situation.”

Business leaders approached as potential partners in the drives needed to do more than put out a box for donated supplies. They needed to listen because Morrison had some important things to say about why their participation is important. Among them: *About 90 percent of Oklahoma City Public Schools’ students live at or near the poverty line. *The number of OKCPS students classified as homeless tops 1,700. *Changing demographics and a lack of community support contributed to a decadeslong decline of the schools that must change. *Donating school supplies for children in need is an easy way to help, as is spreading the word about the need for even more aid. Morrison launched the first Team Up drive in 2009


I want to bring additional awareness to the poverty levels and other challenges facing the children of our city. – Michael Morrison, ComTech President & OKCPS Parent

and collected about $3,000 in supplies. But in year two, Panera Bread decided to merge its local school supply drive with the Team Up effort, and many more businesses signed on to help. The payoff was enormous. The estimated value of supplies collected during the 2011 drive exceeded $80,000 – an impressive amount for only the second such drive. Feed the Children kicked off the drive with a 5,000-pound supply delivery of book bags, pencils, notebooks, books and much more. The final delivery of donations collected from drop-off boxes will help students lacking all sorts of supplies ranging from glue to small dry erase boards to calculators to construction paper. Media partners – Clear Channel Communications, Journal Record and Tierra Media Group – donated nearly $50,000 in promotional advertising space. Clear Channel’s donation of more than 600 30-second radio spots reached listeners on several stations, featuring Morrison and 2011-2012 Oklahoma City Teacher of the Year Shelly Campbell talking about the need for more supplies. “In years past, Panera Bread has enjoyed helping The Foundation for Oklahoma City Public Schools,” said Panera spokeswoman Aubrey Iasiello. “However, by teaming up with other local businesses, we felt we could make a bigger impact and provide even more needed supplies for Oklahoma City’s kids. One of the main reasons we choose to support the Foundation is because we can impact a very real need right here in our own community. We aren’t giving money away to a large national organization where we can’t really see an impact. We are influencing the lives of children in our neighborhoods. We also enjoy giving our guests the opportunity to help local children.” The corporate partners weren’t compelled just because of the statistics or Morrison’s story about the pillow case. Morrison is so respected among his business colleagues that when he asks for help, people know the cause must be worthy of their time and effort.

That’s why when Morrison reached out to Ideal Homes, Kristy Boone was eager to answer the call. Boone, whose daughter attended Classen School of Advanced Studies and who serves as a Big Sister for an OKCPS student, has seen the need up close. The company placed donation boxes at its model homes in Norman, Oklahoma City, Edmond and Yukon and stands ready to help again this year. “Ideal Homes wants to solidly contribute to the health and vitality of the schools in all of the communities we serve and make sure all students have their needs met,” she said. Vonnie Anderson, assistant vice president of community relations for Bank of Oklahoma, said she was impressed with the grassroots nature of the drive. “I know the need because my mom was an elementary school teacher,” she said. “We were very excited to be involved.” The drive featured more than 20 corporate partners and more than two dozen supply drop-off locations. Sponsors of the Team Up OKC drive included Comtech, Panera Bread, Farmers Insurance Group, Oklahoma City Barons, Oklahoma Employees Credit Union, Bank of Oklahoma, FAA Credit Union, T&S Web Design, American Cleaners, Ideal Homes, Oklahoma Gazette, OKC Biz, Clear Channel, Feed the Children, SportClips, Hertz, Red Bud Financial Group, The Journal Record, Social-ism.biz and Jason’s Deli. “More students will have the supplies they need to help them succeed,” said Lori Dickinson, president of the Foundation. “We are grateful for Michael and all of the corporate partners who want the children of Oklahoma City to have the same access to supplies and opportunities as their own children.” Morrison isn’t finished yet. A fundraising golf tournament is in the works for early summer. Feedback from participating corporate partners is they now better understand the need and want to become even more involved in the next drive.

Ideal Homes is thrilled to support the teachers who provide the foundation for excellence in education.

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THE FOUNDATION FOR OKLAHOMA CITY PUBLIC SCHOOLS www.okckids.com

A FIRM FOUNDATION We feel indebted to Oklahoma City Public Schools and the education it provided our children. It was a gift. – Ben & Shirley Shanker

Their children graduated from Harvard, Yale, Colorado College and Stanford. But when Ben and Shirley Shanker talk proudly about schools, those elite colleges merit only a secondary mention. The schools that first pop to mind are much closer to home: Nichols Hills Elementary, Eisenhower Junior High and John Marshall High School. The teachers in Oklahoma City Public Schools educated four Shanker children at a time when integration and the turmoil that followed led many families to withdraw from many of the city’s public schools. Not the Shankers. Ben said the family couldn’t afford private education for their children. But they likely wouldn’t have picked that route anyway. “We weren’t concerned about integration,” Shirley said. Their children received outstanding educations, and all went on to successful careers. Their coffee table is filled with photos of their children and grandchildren with each other, friends and international dignitaries. Jay Shanker is a veteran entertainment industry attorney who joined McAfee & Taft in 2005 after practicing law for nearly 25 years in Los Angeles. He and his wife returned to Oklahoma City to raise their daughters, and their eldest is enrolled in Oklahoma City Public Schools. Mark Shanker and his wife live in London and the South of France. He is involved in hotel and real estate development. Thom Shanker is a correspondent covering the Pentagon, the military and national security for The New York Times. He recently co-authored “Counterstrike: The Untold Story of America’s Secret Campaign Against Al Qaeda.” Thom, his wife and two sons live in Virginia. Their daughter, Sandra Ben David, is a social worker with her own practice in Jerusalem. She has six children and two grandchildren. The Shankers never let their children forget the importance of education. Shirley is an Oklahoma City native who attended Wilson Elementary, Harding Junior High and Central High School. Ben spent most of his childhood in a New Orleans children’s home, attending school at a school affiliated with the home. Shirley attended the University of Oklahoma, but Ben joined the U.S. Navy while attending the University of Texas and went 60

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on active duty as an officer at the onset of World War II. He never finished. “I wanted so much for our children to get their college degrees,” he said. The Shankers are proud but clearly humble of their children’s pursuit of higher education and successful careers. Ben attributes that success directly to their days in Oklahoma City Public Schools. “We feel indebted to Oklahoma City Public Schools for the education it provided our children,” he said. “How could anyone not have some feeling of gratitude for those who laid the foundation of education that is so important? It was a gift.” The Shankers have long been concerned about children other than their own and have supported The Foundation for Oklahoma City Public Schools in its work to provide opportunities for children and to bridge the gap between students and teachers have and what they need to be successful. Ben said instead of volunteering so much at his children’s schools, his wife could easily have provided any extra help they needed at home. But by being at the school, her work benefited all of the school’s children and set an example – for their children and other parents. Likewise, long after his children became adults, Ben found himself back at Nichols Hills Elementary, tutoring students who needed help. “He wanted to make an impact, and that kind of impact carries forward as children see how to treat people,” said longtime Nichols Hills Principal Carol Berry. The Shankers will celebrate 62 years of marriage this year. Ben wants to see a return to a high level of community support for Oklahoma City’s schools but acknowledges the struggles ahead. “There is never going to be the level of community support you would want,” he said. “But when we read about disunity and conflict in schools, it takes away from things being in the interest of children.” The Shankers understand times are different. But they also believe if the gift of public education worked for their children, it is still waiting for others. “We had four different children setting their own goals and making their own way,” Ben said. “It worked for us. It can work for others.”


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COMPETITIVE EDGE LISTING A full listing of all the support provided by The Foundation for Oklahoma City Public Schools to support students and teachers in attending and participating in academic and artistic competitions during the 2011-2012 school year in Oklahoma and across the United States. Listed is the name of the competition, school name, teacher name, funding provided, and number of students served.

ACADEMIC Business Professionals of America, Capitol Hill High School, BPA State Leadership Conference, Tulsa, Teacher: Adam Rogers Award: $1,000, Students Served: 20 Business Professionals of America, Classen School of Advanced Studies, BPA State Leadership, Tulsa, Teacher: Cassie Petty Award: $1,975, Students Served: 25 Business Professionals of America, John Marshall High School, BPA State Leadership Conference, Tulsa Teacher: Sharon Marker Award: $2,000, Students Served: 15 Business Professionals of America, Northwest Classen High School, BPA Spring Leadership Conference, Tulsa, Teacher: Chris Treadway Award: $1,300, Students Served: 10 Business Professionals of America, Oklahoma Centennial High School, BPA Spring Leadership Conference, Tulsa Teacher: Fayetta Freeman Award: $1,100, Students Served: 3 Business Professionals of America, Oklahoma Centennial High School, BPA Spring Leadership Conference, Tulsa Teacher: Deirdra Roberts Award: $805, Students Served: 5 Business Professionals of America, Southeast High School, BPA Spring Leadership Conference, Tulsa Teacher: William Chamberlain Award: $1,000, Students Served: 25 Business Professionals of America, Southeast High School, BPA National Competition, Chicago, IL Teacher: William Chamberlain Award: $3,000, Students Served: 2 Business Professionals of America, Southeast High School, BPA State Leadership Conference, Tulsa Teacher: Valerie Bryant Award: $1,000, Students Served: 30 Business Professionals of America, Star Spencer High School, BPA State Leadership Conference, OSU Okmulgee/Tulsa Teacher: Karen Montgomery Award: $1,300, Students Served: 16 Business Professionals of America, U.S. Grant High School, BPA State Leadership Conference, Tulsa Teacher: Beverly Womack Award: $1,925, Students Served: 10 Delta Epsilon Chi, John Marshall High School, DECA State Conference, Tulsa Teacher: Todd DeArmon Award: $2,000, Students Served: 20

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Family, Career and Community Leaders of America, John Marshall High School, FCCLA Star Event, Oklahoma City Teacher: Erica McCollum Award: $360, Students Served: 10

Family, Career and Community Leaders of America, Star Spencer High School, ProStart Invitational, Norman Teacher: Sharon Love Award: $1,000, Students Served: 10

Family, Career and Community Leaders of America, John Marshall High School, FCCLA STAR Event, Oklahoma City Teacher: Erica McCollum Award: $350, Students Served: 8

Health Occupations Students of America, Northwest Classen High School, HOSA State Leadership Convention, Oklahoma City Teacher: Cynthia Haney Award: $1,000, Students Served: 15

Family, Career and Community Leaders of America, Oklahoma Centennial High School, District FCCLA Competition, Oklahoma City, Teacher: Carrie Snyder-Renfro Award: $410, Students Served: 12

Odyssey of the Mind, ASTEC Charter Middle School, Teams A & B, Odyssey of the Mind, Yukon Teacher: Daniel Smith Award: $815, Students Served: 14

Family, Career and Community Leaders of America, Oklahoma Centennial High School, FCCLA Regional Competition, Oklahoma City Teacher: Carrie Snyder-Renfro Award: $410, Students Served: 12 Family, Career and Community Leaders of America, Oklahoma Centennial High School, FCCLA State Competition, Stillwater Teacher: Carrie Snyder-Renfro Award: $1,500, Students Served: 15 Family, Career and Community Leaders of America, Oklahoma Centennial High School, FCCLA State Culinary Competition, Stillwater, Teacher: Carrie SnyderRenfro Award: $1,500, Students Served: 8 Family, Career and Community Leaders of America, Star Spencer High School, FCCLA STAR Event, Oklahoma City Teacher: Christyne Yeldell Award: $1,000, Students Served: 10 Family, Career and Community Leaders of America, U.S. Grant High School, FCCLA District STAR Event, Oklahoma City Teacher: Stefanie Renfro Award: $410, Students Served: 20 Family, Career and Community Leaders of America, Oklahoma Centennial High School, ProStart Student Invitational--Culinary Team, Norman Teacher: Carrie Snyder-Renfro Award: $650, Students Served: 5 Family, Career and Community Leaders of America, Oklahoma Centennial High School, ProStart Student Invitational--Management, Norman Teacher: Carrie Snyder-Renfro, Award: $650, Students Served: 5 Family, Career and Community Leaders of America, Oklahoma Centennial High School, ProStart Student Invitational--Quick Service, Norman Teacher: Carrie Snyder-Renfro Award: $650, Students Served: 5

Odyssey of the Mind, Cleveland Elementary, Odyssey of the Mind Regional Competition, Yukon Teacher: Marcia Greenwood Award: $560, Students Served: 28 Robotics Team, Capitol Hill High School, OK BEST Robotics Competition, Edmond Teacher: Artie Lowery Award: $280, Students Served: 15 Robotics Team, Capitol Hill High School, US First Robotics Alamo Regional, San Antonio, TX Teacher: Bob Eggeling Award: $2,500, Students Served: 20 Robotics Team, Northeast Academy, First Lego League Qualifier, Stillwater Teacher: Jonathan Roberts Award: $1,500, Students Served: 10 Technology Student Association, Capitol Hill High School, TSA State Competition, Stillwater Teacher: Artie Lowery Award: $1,000, Students Served: 10 Technology Student Association, Capitol Hill High School, National TSA Competition, Nashville, TN Teacher: Garry Montgomery Award: $2,500, Students Served: 1 Technology Student Association, Jefferson Middle School, State TSA Conference, Stillwater Teacher: David Wehba Award: $1,000, Students Served: 20 Technology Student Association, Northeast Academy, State TSA Conference, Stillwater Teacher: Jonathan Roberts Award: $1,500, Students Served: 15 Technology Student Association, Southeast High School, TSA State Conference, Stillwater Teacher: Bradley Corn Award: $1,000, Students Served: 8 Youth and Government Team, Oklahoma Centennial High School, Youth and Government Debate, Oklahoma City Teacher: Michael Baldwin Award: $1,000, Students Served: 11

ARTISTIC Advanced Drama, Oklahoma Centennial High School, Marlow Speech Competition, Marlow Teacher: Michael Hocking Award: $600, Students Served: 10 Advanced Drama, Oklahoma Centennial High School, Latta Invitational, Latta Teacher: Michael Hocking Award: $650, Students Served: 10 Advanced Drama, Oklahoma Centennial High School, Muskogee Invitational, Muskogee Teacher: Michael Hocking Award: $1,065, Students Served: 10 Advanced Drama, Oklahoma Centennial High School, American Christian Invitational, Bartlesville Teacher: Michael Hocking Award: $960, Students Served: 10 Art Students, John Marshall High School, 2012 Youth Impressions, Edmond Teacher: Renee Rich Award: $101, Students Served: 27 Band (High School), Classen School of Advanced Studies, OSSAA District Band Contest, Edmond Teacher: Reginald Irons Award: $700, Students Served: 40 Band (High School), Douglass High School, Grambling Battle of the Bands, Shreveport, LA Teacher: Charles Moore Award: $2,500, Students Served: 65 Band (High School), Douglass High School, Langston Battle of the Bands, Langston Teacher: Charles Moore Award: $1,500, Students Served: 65 Band, Harding Charter Preparatory High School, CODA/ First Round All-State Band Auditions, Edmond Teacher: Kelli Taylor Award: $135, Students Served: 4 Band, Harding Charter Preparatory High School, OBU Honor Band Auditions, Shawnee Teacher: Kelli Taylor Award: $194, Students Served: 8 Band, Harding Charter Preparatory High School, OSSAA District Band Contest, Edmond Teacher: Kelli Taylor Award: $875, Students Served: 41 Band, John Marshall High School, Arbuckle Wilderness Festival, Davis Teacher: Kenneth McCool Award: $1,500, Students Served: 45

continued on page 64


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Planned Giving can leave a legacy for generations.

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STARS OF EDUCATION

63


COMPETITIVE EDGE LISTING Band (Advanced), John Marshall High School, Peak Music Festival, Arlington, TX Teacher: Kenneth McCool Award: $2,500, Students Served: 35

Band, Santa Fe South High School, OSSAA District Solo & Ensemble Contest, Oklahoma City Teacher: Scott Filleman Award: $1,000, Students Served: 15

Band, Kaiser Elementary, Arbuckle Wilderness Festival, Davis Teacher: Christiaan Osborn Award: $1,360, Students Served: 30

Band, Santa Fe South High School, All-State Band Second Round Auditions, Moore Teacher: Scott Filleman Award: $160, Students Served: 1

Band, Kaiser Elementary, Pawnee Band Day, Pawnee Teacher: Christiaan Osborn Award: $1,170, Students Served: 30 Band, Kaiser Elementary, Heartland Music Festival, Oklahoma City Teacher: Christiaan Osborn Award: $1,000, Students Served: 30 Band, Northwest Classen High School, Northern OK College Honor Band Auditions, Ponca City Teacher: Rheuben Green Award: $1,320, Students Served: 35 Band, Northwest Classen High School, OSSAA District Solo & Ensemble Contest, Mustang Teacher: Rheuben Green Award: $180, Students Served: 35 Band, Northwest Classen High School, Lawton Superior Marching Contest, Lawton Teacher: Rheuben Green Award: $1,500, Students Served: 50

Band, Santa Fe South High School, OSSAA State Solo & Ensemble contest, Stillwater Teacher: Scott Filleman Award: $400, Student Served: 4 Band, Santa Fe South Middle School, Deer Creek Solo & Ensemble contest, Edmond Teacher: Scott Filleman Award: $1,000, Students Served: 55 Band (Beginning & Concert), Deer Creek Band Festival, Santa Fe South Middle School, Edmond Teacher: Scott Filleman Award: $1,000, Students Served: 96 Band, Southeast High School, Music Across Texas, San Antonio, TX, Teacher: David Nixon Award: $2,500, Students Served: 43 Band, Southeast High School, State Fair Band Contest, Oklahoma City Teacher: David Nixon Award: $770, Students Served: 40

Band, Northwest Classen High School, CODA/First Round AllState Band Auditions, Edmond Teacher: Rheuben Green, Award: $1,000, Students Served: 30

Band, Star Spencer High School, Langston Battle of the Bands, Langston Teacher: Torrey Purvey Award: $1,325, Students Served: 65

Band, Santa Fe South Elementary School, Deer Creek Solo & Ensemble Contest, Oklahoma City Teacher: Scott Filleman Award: $1,000, Students Served: 20

Band, Taft Middle School, Northern Oklahoma College Honor Band Auditions, Ponca City Teacher: Rheuben Green Award: $1,600, Students Served: 50

Band, Santa Fe South High School, Heartland Music Festival, Oklahoma City Teacher: Scott Filleman Award: $1,000, Students Served: 39 Band, Santa Fe South High School, CODA/First Round AllState Band Auditions, Edmond Teacher: Scott Filleman Award: $1,000, Students Served: 11

64

COMPETITIVE EDGE

Band, Taft Middle School, Marlow Solo Contest, Marlow Teacher: Rheuben Green Award: $1,100, Students Served: 30 Band, Taft Middle School, Arbuckle Wilderness Festival, Davis Teacher: Rheuben Green Award: $440, Students Served: 50

Band, Taft Middle School, CODA Band Auditions, Edmond Teacher: Rheuben Green Award: $860, Students Served: 30 Choir (7th & 8th grade), OSSAA State Vocal Competition, Classen School of Advanced Studies, Oklahoma City Teacher: Jessica Wheeler Award: $950, Students Served: 70 Choir, Harding Charter Preparatory High School, OSSAA District Vocal Competition, Mustang Teacher: Carrie Hoipkemier Award: $800, Students Served: 50 Choir (Middle School), OSSAA District Vocal Competition, John Marshall High School, Oklahoma City Teacher: Denise Caton Award: $216, Students Served: 24 Choir, Northwest Classen High School, OSSAA District Vocal Competition, Oklahoma City Teacher: Rheuben Green Award: $900, Students Served: 30 Choir, Northwest Classen High School, Heritage Festival, San Antonio, TX Teacher: Rheuben Green Award: $500, Students Served: 30 Choir, Northwest Classen High School, All-Region Honor Choir Auditions, Altus Teacher: Rheuben Green Award: $1,450, Students Served: 30 Choir, Northwest Classen High School, First round All-State Auditions, Chickasha Teacher: Rheuben Green Award: $1,150, Students Served: 30 Choir, Oklahoma Centennial High School, Worlds of Fun Choral Competition, Kansas City, MO Teacher: William Calvin Award: $2,500, Students Served: 30 Choir (Advanced), Oklahoma Centennial High School, Little Dixie Choral Festival, Ada Teacher: William Calvin Award: $922, Students Served: 25

Choir, Oklahoma Centennial High School, OSSAA District Solo & Ensemble Competition, Oklahoma City Teacher: William Calvin Award: $578, Students Served: 25 Choir, Santa Fe South High School, OSSAA State Solo & Ensemble contest, Shawnee Teacher: Martha Stallings Award: $300, Students Served: 3 Choir (6th grade boys & girls), Santa Fe South Middle School, Arbuckle Wilderness Festival, Davis Teacher: Martha Stallings Award: $1,500, Students Served: 52 Choir (Jr. Saints & Jr. Singers), Santa Fe South Middle School, Arbuckle Wilderness Festival, Davis Teacher: Martha Stallings, Award: $1,500, Students Served: 32 Choir (6th-8th grade), Santa Fe South Middle School, Tri-State Festival, Enid Teacher: Martha Stallings Award: $1,000, Students Served: 20 Chorale, Santa Fe South High School, Heartland Festival, Oklahoma City Teacher: Martha Stallings Award: $1,000, Students Served: 25 Chorale, Santa Fe South High School, OSSAA District Solo & Ensemble Contest, Oklahoma City Teacher: Martha Stallings Award: $1,000, Students Served: 10 Chorale, Santa Fe South High School, First round All-State Auditions, Lawton Teacher: Martha Stallings Award: $1,500, Students Served: 5 Chorus (High School), First round All-State Auditions, Classen School of Advanced Studies, Lawton Teacher: Rebecca Lindley Award: $375, Students Served: 25 Chorus, Kaiser Elementary, TriState Festival, Enid Teacher: Susie Bratcher Award: $810, Students Served: 40


COMPETITIVE EDGE LISTING Dance Team, Jefferson Middle School, ASC Regionals, Oklahoma City Teacher: Juan Iglesias Award: $1,000, Students Served: 16

Mariachi Ensemble, Adams Elementary, Heartland Music Festival, Oklahoma City Teacher: Christiaan Osborn Award: $1,000, Students Served: 30

Dance Team, Jefferson Middle School, Sooner Showdown, Tulsa Teacher: Juan Iglesias Award: $1,000, Students Served: 17

Mariachi Ensemble, Adams Elementary, Arbuckle Wilderness Festival, Davis Teacher: Christiaan Osborn Award: $1,270, Students Served: 30

Dance Team, Jefferson Middle School, OSDTDA State Competition, Oklahoma City Teacher: Juan Iglesias Award: $1,000, Students Served: 20 Dance Teams (Freshman and Varsity), ASC Regionals, John Marshall High School, Oklahoma City Teacher: Sherri Smith Award: $505, Students Served: 25 Guitar, Classen School of Advanced Studies, OSSAA District Competition, Bethany Teacher: Matthew Denman Award: $1,000, Students Served: 40 Guitar, Classen School of Advanced Studies, UT-Dallas Youth Competition, Dallas, TX Teacher: Matthew Denman Award: $2,500, Students Served: 20 Guitar, Classen School of Advanced Studies, Brownsville Guitar Competition, Brownsville, TX Teacher: Matthew Denman Award: $500, Students Served: 12 Guitar, Harding Fine Arts Academy, OSSAA District Solo & Ensemble Contest, Oklahoma City Teacher: Jeff Hicks Award: $762, Students Served: 32 Honor Choir, Band, & Piano, Linwood Elementary, Seiling Music Festival, Seiling Teacher: Jack Mitchell Award: $750, Students Served: 45 Karate, Harding Fine Arts Academy, OctoberFist Tournament, Lawton Teacher: Jennifer Allman Award: $1,500, Students Served: 38

Mariachi Ensemble, Capitol Hill Elementary, Heartland Music Festival, Oklahoma City Teacher: Christiaan Osborn Award: $1,000, Students Served: 30 Mariachi Ensemble, Capitol Hill Elementary, Arbuckle Wilderness Festival, Davis Teacher: Christiaan Osborn Award: $1,360, Students Served: 30 Mariachi Ensemble, Fillmore Elementary, Trills and Thrills Competition, Arlington, TX Teacher: Christiaan Osborn Award: $2,500, Students Served: 15 Mariachi Ensemble, Fillmore Elementary, Arbuckle Wilderness Festival, Davis Teacher: Christiaan Osborn Award: $1,470, Students Served: 30 Music students (3rd-6th grade), Adams Elementary, All-City Counting Bee, Oklahoma City Teacher: Caroline Hatfield Award: $54, Students Served: 10 Music students, Northwest Classen High School, OMTA State Theory Test, Edmond Teacher: Dena Frankenfield Award: $500, Students Served: 10 Music students, Northwest Classen High School, OSSAA State Theory Test, Shawnee Teacher: Dena Frankenfield Award: $500, Students Served: 10 Orchestra (High School), Classen School of Advanced Studies, OSSAA Full Orchestra Contest, Edmond Teacher: Justin Pourtorkan Award: $1,000, Students Served: 55

Orchestra (High School), Classen School of Advanced Studies, OSSAA State String Orchestra Contest, Edmond Teacher: Justin Pourtorkan Award: $1,000, Students Served: 55 Orchestra (High School), Classen School of Advanced Studies, OSSAA District Solo & Ensemble Contest, Bethany Teacher: Justin Pourtorkan Award: $968, Students Served: 55 Orchestra (Middle School), Classen School of Advanced Studies, OSSAA State String Orchestra Contest Edmond Teacher: Justin Pourtorkan Award: $1,000, , Students Served: 51 Orchestra (Middle School), Classen School of Advanced Studies, Sandy Lakes FunFest, Dallas, TX Teacher: Justin Pourtorkan Award: $2,000, , Students Served: 51 Orchestra (Middle School), Classen School of Advanced Studies, OSSAA State String Orchestra Contest Edmond Teacher: Justin Pourtorkan Award: $1,000, Students Served: 51 Orchestra, Harding Charter Preparatory High School OSSAA Solo & Ensemble Contest, Bethany Teacher: Carrie Hoipkemier Award: $690, Students Served: 18

Orchestra, Northwest Classen High School, OSSAA State String Orchestra Contest, Edmond Teacher: Samantha Sampson Award: $700, Students Served: 12 Orchestra, Northwest Classen High School, OSSAA State String Orchestra Contest, Edmond Teacher: Samantha Sampson Award: $1,000, Students Served: 35 Orchestra, Northwest Classen High School, OSSAA District Solo & Ensemble Contest, Oklahoma City Teacher: Samantha Sampson Award: $550, Students Served: 10 Orchestra, Southeast High School, Music Across Texas, San Antonio, TX Teacher: David Nixon Award: $2,500, Students Served: 16 Orchestra, Taft Middle School, TriState Music Festival, Enid Teacher: Samantha Sampson Award: $1,500, Students Served: 43 Orchestra, Taft Middle School, OSSAA Orchestra Contest, Edmond Teacher: Samantha Sampson Award: $1,000, Students Served: 46 Piano, Northwest Classen High School, District Achievement Piano Competition, Edmond Teacher: Dena Frankenfield Award: $1,000, Students Served: 35

Orchestra, John Marshall High School, OSSAA Solo & Ensemble Contest, Bethany Teacher: Richard Smith Award: $350, Students Served: 15

Piano, Northwest Classen High School, Tri-State Music Festival, Enid Teacher: Dena Frankenfield Award: $500, Students Served: 35

Orchestra (Advanced), John Marshall High School, Music in the Parks, Dallas, TX Teacher: Richard Smith Award: $2,500, Students Served: 25

Piano, Northwest Classen High School, COMTA Music Festival, Edmond Teacher: Dena Frankenfield Award: $1,000, Students Served: 35

Orchestra, John Marshall High School, Arbuckle Wilderness Festival, Davis Teacher: Richard Smith Award: $1,150, Students Served: 55

Pom Pon Squad, U.S. Grant High School, American Spirit Championship Northern Nationals, St. Louis, MO Teacher: Tracey Smith Award: $1,000, Students Served: 12

continued on page 67

COMPETITIVE EDGE

65


66

STARS OF EDUCATION


COMPETITIVE EDGE Step Teams, Star Spencer High School, Garland Step Competition, Garland, TX Teacher: David Mosley Award: $2,320 Students Served: 28 Step Team (Sisters of Stomp) Star Spencer High School, Youth Step National Championship, Harrisburg, PA Teacher: Sandra Moore Award: $3,000 Student Served: 14 Dance Team (Varsity), ASC Regionals, John Marshall High School, Oklahoma City Teacher: Sherri Smith Award: $785 Students Served: 15

COMPETITIVE EDGE PLUS ACADEMIC Delta Epsilon Chi, John Marshall High School, DECA Leadership Training, Oklahoma City Teacher: Todd Dearmon Award: $175 Students Served: 20 Robotics, Capitol Hill High School, Competition Support, multiple locations Teachers: Bob Eggeling and Artie Lowery Award: $3333 Students Served: 20 Robotics, Northeast Academy, Competition Support, multiple locations Teacher: Jonathan Roberts Award: $3,333 Students Served: 20

CONGRATULATIONS

OKCPS NURSE OF THE YEAR LARINDA SKAGGS

SINCE 2005, LARINDA’S CARE AND COMPASSION HAS MADE A DIFFERENCE IN THE LIVES OF OKLAHOMA CITY PUBLIC SCHOOL STUDENTS.

THANK YOU LARINDA FOR A JOB WELL DONE!

Robotics, Northwest Classen High School, Competition Support, multiple locations Teachers: Cliff Parrett and Bill Hixon Award: $3,333 Students Served: 20

ARTISTIC Guitar Ensemble, Classen School of Advanced Studies, Austin City Limits Performance, Austin, TX Teacher: Matt Denman Award: $3,000 Students Served: 20 Band, Douglass High School, Kirk Herbstreit Football Classic, Arlington, TX Teacher: Charles Moore Award: $475.98 Students Served: 50 Choir, Classen School of Advanced Studies, OMEA All-State Choir, Tulsa Teacher: Rebecca Lindley Award: $1,350 Students Served: 9 Choir, Classen School of Advanced Studies, OMEA All-State Choir, Tulsa Teacher: Jessica Wheeler Award: $654.54 Students Served: 4 Step Team, Star Spencer High School, BET 106 & Park’s W.O.W., New York City, NY Teacher: David Mosley Award: $3,000 Students Served: 13

COMPETITIVE EDGE

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68

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O K C P S DIST RIC T E M P L OY EES w h o ple dg e d $ 1 2 0 -$ 2 3 9 to th e 2 0 1 1 -2 0 1 2 T E A M C am pai gn OKCPS D I S T R I C T E M PL O Y E E S wh o pledg ed $240 o r m o r e t o t h e 2011-2012 T E AM C a m p a i g n Sharon Arganbright Karen Baker Sher yl Barnett Carol Berr y Paul Bianchi Julie Boyington William Buck Heather Bullock Cathy Carlson Robert Chambers Brenda Christian Brandy Clark Norma Cole-Simpson Christine Cooper Wanda Cudjo DeAnn Davis John Divelbiss Robert Eggeling Eugene Field Elementar y Students Judith Evans Terry Fraley Shannon Freeman Susan Gabbard Stacey Garcia Susan Gee Mar y Geurin Pamela Greathouse Julie Grissom Charlotte Hamon Rubye Harrington Mike Harris Rachel Harsen Hartley Hartzog Crawley Jean Haynes

Pamela Jameson Michael Jennings Edith Jones Jonetta Jonte Scott Kaufman Sher y Kishore Beth Moakley Laura Morris David Nixon Della Orr Sandra Park Holly Partin Ryan Patten Kelly Pearson Linda Pelton Carol Perr y Sandra Phillips Felisha Pinkston Sandra Rose Kelly Sehon Michael Shanahan Shidler Elementar y Students Richard Smith Heather Sparks Karl Springer Martha Sturm - Sawyer Melissa Sullivan Debra Thomas Mar y Tran Samantha Twyman Lisa Ummel-Ingram Troy Vance Linda Ware Toure Iva Wetzel Meredith Wronowski

Angela Adams Hal Adamson John Addison Angela Allen R.P. Ashanti Alexander Joseph Astafan Vincent Atkins Everett Baker Jan Barrett Donald Bell Carolyn Bish Barbara Blanton Melita Bowman Jessica Bragg Michael Branch Susie Bratcher Susan Brewer Bud Brooks Charles Brown Cynthia Brown Earnest Buch Kari Caldwell Chad Campbell Jennifer Campbell Aspasia Carlson Karen Carothers Tammy Carter Denise Caton William Chamberlain Brenda Christian Terr y Christian David Clark Wayne Clark Jessica Clay Marlys Colin Dawn Collums Susan Combs Clifton Conaster Evelyn Conder Nikki Coshow Mar y Coughlin Tamula Craig Phil Cunningham Debora Curr y Jacquetta Davis Meredith Davis Sharland Deitz Mario Delgado Freda Deskin Kathr yn Draper Kelly Dugan D’Mondre Ealy Linda Edgell Heather Elias

Susie Esters Amy Fillman Evon Finklea Jennifer Garland Vickie Garrett Glen Gean Nancy Gibson Dennis Giddens Lee Ava Gooch Susan Good Katrinka Greear Lynn Green Glenda Greenhoward Marcia Greenwood Jeannie Haas Cynthia Hamilton Valerie Harris Jean Hartmann Sandy Henr y Stephen Henr y Barbara Hess Leon Hill Tenishea Holbert Linda Holder Penelope Holloway William Hughes Marian Hulsey Rena Hurd Susan Hurst Kimberly Iraggi James Jacob Leslie James Matthew Johnson Natalie Johnson Susan JohnsonStaples Brittani Keeton Ashley Kellert Marilynn Kellert Kathleen Kennedy Virginia Kennedy Linda Kerr Cher ylann Kidd Thanh Le Joanne Little Ronald Lodes Curtis Long Stacy Long Susan Malloy Verna Martin Pedro Martinez Lindsey Matthews Cherr y Mays Gloria McClure Brenda McCracken

Rex McGehee Rose Marie Miranda Jack Mitchell Jerr y Moore Michael Muller Angela Nealy Dee O’Brien Kasey Organ Christiaan Osborn Kelli Packnett Robin Parker Timothy Pelletier Erich Petersen Joyce Peterson Shamon Pickens William Pool David Rackley Kimberly Randall Scott Randall Rena Randle Brian Raper Michelle Roberson Beverly Rosenberg Theodore Ross Angela Sanders Ralene Sarrington Regenia Saulsberry Tina Scott Linda Sexton Bettie Shadoan Catherine Sherman Lisa Sielert Mary Siria Cheryl Smith Sherri Smith Koleta Snyder Alex Souza Lisa Souza Brian Staples Gar y Stevens Eva Stevenson Cynthia Sullivan Teresa Tedder Heidi Tuers Jackson Lisa Ummel-Ingram Jami Veenstra Edith Vickers Nancy Wall Tracy Wapaha Susan Wilkerson Annette Williams Betty Winters Cassi Yarbrough Sheila Zummer OKCPS TEAM

69


WATCH BRANDON’S STORY:

Or watch at www.fate.org

CONTACT US | VOLUNTEER | DONATE

70

STARS OF EDUCATION


OKCPS TEAM

DISTRICT STAFF INCREASE GIVING BY 40 PERCENT The students know her as Grandma. And when they need a listening ear or help raising money for the soccer team, Louella Brownlow is there, sitting at a small desk just inside the front doors at Northwest Classen High School. “I try to help them be young women and men and help them see the right things to do,” said Brownlow, an office assistant who greets visitors and students as they enter the school. She also wants students to have opportunities they might not otherwise have, which is why a box of chocolate candy bars sits on her desk and why she donates to the TEAM (Together Everyone Achieves More) campaign, a workplace giving program for Oklahoma City Public Schools employees that benefits The Foundation for Oklahoma City Public Schools. “I want them to grow up and be somebody, be some-

thing,” she said. So whether that’s a few dollars here and there in financial support, a kind word or even an occasional admonition, Brownlow wants to help. TEAM donors can give a one-time gift or throughout the year via payroll deduction. During 2011-2012, OKCPS employees contributed nearly $91,000 and comprised about 90 percent of The Foundation’s annual individual donors. Next to a few local corporations, school employees are the largest block of donors. TEAM donations fund The Foundation’s programs, including those that pay for teacher grants, entry and travel fees for student academic and artistic competitions and training for teachers pursuing National Board certification. During the TEAM campaign, schools competed against each other in a friendly contest to see whether they

can get all of their school employees to give. Nine schools reached the 100 percent giving level. Five of those schools were selected through a random drawing to enjoy a visit from the Clydesdale horses from Express Ranch. “School district employees tell us they know their donations directly benefit Oklahoma City’s kids, and they want to help provide opportunities for students to experience success and to have great teachers,” said Lori Dickinson, president of the Foundation. “They already give to the students every day, whether teaching, driving a bus, serving a meal, or bandaging a finger, and we are so grateful for all of the ways they support and prepare our children for the future.” The Foundation seeks to expand workplace giving to Oklahoma City area businesses. For more information, call 405.879.2007.

I want them (students) to grow up and be somebody, be something. – Louella Brownlow, Northwest Classen High School

OKCPS TEAM

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72

STARS OF EDUCATION


THANK YOU TO STARS VOLUNTEERS OKCPS TEACHER OF THE YEAR

GREAT IDEA GRANTS

SELECTION COMMITTEE

SELECTION COMMITTEE

Debbie Adam Buchanan Elementary; District Teacher of the Year Finalist 2007-2008 Mary Best Oklahoma City American Federation of Teachers Passion Bradley OKCPS District Office Liasion Cynthia Brown Nichols Hills Elementary Nikki Coshow Edgemere Elementary; 2nd Runner-Up District Teacher of the Year 2010-2011 Greg Eskridge Wilson Elementary; 1st runner Up District Teacher of the Year 2009-2010 Barbara Hutchison Hillcrest Elementary; District Teacher of the Year Finalist 2009-2010 Kimberly Iraggi Johnson Elementary; 2nd runner Up District Teacher of the Year 2010-2011 James Payne Classen School of Advanced Studies; District Teacher of the Year 2006 Virginia Sherman Hawthorne Elementary Heather Sparks Taft Middle School; District Teacher of the Year 2008; Oklahoma State Teacher of the Year 2009 Christopher Stofel Hawthorne Elementary/Shidler Elementary; District Teacher of the Year Finalist 2009-2010 Mary Tran Northeast Academy; District Teacher of the Year Finalist 2008-2009 Lisa D. Ummel-Ingram Wheeler Elementary; 1st Runner-Up District Teacher of the Year 2010-2011 Meredith Wronowski Capitol Hill High School; District Teacher of the Year 2010

Kari Allison Santa Fe South High School Heather Bullock Wheeler Elementary Cathy Carlson Emerson High School Lourdes Charry Capitol Hill High School Kay S. Childers Linwood Elementary Beverly Clore Hayes Elementary Angela Doss Northwest Classen High School Greg Eskridge Wilson Elementary Marcia Greenwood Cleveland Elementary Caroline Hatfield Adams Elementary Tekoa J. Hill North Highland Math & Science Academy Kyla C. Kaufman Rogers Middle School Virginia Kennedy Southeast High School Patricia Morgan Dove Science Academy Wanda Jane Pierce Northwest Classen High School Randa Pirrong Metro Technology Centers Jennifer Sinclair Nichols Hills Elementary Martha Steger Rockwood Elementary Vickie Stover Pierce Elementary Karen J. Walker ASTEC Charter High School

STARS OF EDUCATION SELECTION COMMITTEE

Kari James Whiz Kids, 2011 Perfect Partner Honoree Marcia Matthews Hutton JP Morgan Chase N.A., Foundation for OKC Public Schools Director Teresa L. Sneed Monroe Elementary, 2008 Super Support Staff Honoree Miles Tolbert Crowe & Dunlevy, Foundation for OKC Public Schools Director Gary E. Tredway American Fidelity Group, Foundation for OKC Public Schools Director

STARS OF EDUCATION

73


Rotary Club of Oklahoma City

HVAC • SHEET METAL • PIPING PLUMBING SERVICE CONSTRUCTION • ENGINEERING

4100 NORTH WALNUT | OKLAHOMA CITY, OK 73105

OFFICE 405-528-3333 FAX 405-528-3359

74

STARS OF EDUCATION


STARS OF EDUCATION

75


FINANCIAL OVERVIEW

STATEMENT OF ACTIVITIES AND CHANGE IN ASSETS FOR JULY 1, 2010-JUNE 30, 2011

Revenues, Gains and Support

Expenses

$142,250

Programs

Corporate contributions

$741,494

Management & general

Individuals

$122,779

Fundraising

In-kind contributions

$369,352

Total Expenses

Investment income

$351,571

Total revenues gain and support

$1,727,446

* Teachers Warehouse began during the 2008-2009 school year

76

ANNUAL REPORT

Change in net assets

$1,265,942 $97,881 $70,117 $1,433,940 $293,507

Net assets, beginning of year

$2,015,192

Net assets, end of year

$2,308,698

as of March, 2012

as of March, 2012

Grant making foundations

as of March, 2012


DIRECT PROGRAM IMPACT

Adams Elementary Arthur Elementary ASTEC Charter High School ASTEC Charter Middle School Belle Isle Enterprise Middle School Bodine Elementary Britton Elementary Buchanan Elementary Capitol Hill Elementary Capitol Hill High School Cesar Chavez Elementary Classen School of Advanced Studies Cleveland Elementary Columbus Elementary Coolidge Elementary Douglass High School Dove Science Academy Dove Science Academy Elementary Edgemere Elementary Edwards Elementary Emerson High School Eugene Field Elementary F.D. Moon Academy Fillmore Elementary Gatewood Elementary Green Pastures Elementary Greystone Lower Elementary Greystone Upper Elementary Harding Charter Preparatory High School Harding Fine Arts Academy Hawthorne Elementary Hayes Elementary Heronville Elementary Hillcrest Elementary Horace Mann Elementary Independence Charter Middle School Jackson Middle School Jefferson Middle School John Marshall High School Johnson Elementary Kaiser Elementary KIPP Reach College Preparatory Lee Elementary Linwood Elementary Marcus Garvey Charter School Mark Twain Elementary Martin Luther King Jr. Elementary

x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x

x x x x x x x x

x

x

x

x x

x x

x x

x x x x x x x x

x

x x

x x x

x x

x x x

x

x x

x

x x

Monroe Elementary Nichols Hills Elementary North Highland Math & Science Academy Northeast Academy Northwest Classen High School Oakridge Elementary Oklahoma Centennial High School Parmelee Elementary Pathways Middle College High School Pierce Elementary Prairie Queen Elementary Putnam Heights Academy Quail Creek Elementary Rancho Village Elementary Ridgeview Elementary Rockwood Elementary Rogers Middle School Roosevelt Middle School Santa Fe South Elementary School Santa Fe South High School Santa Fe South Middle School Seeworth Academy Sequoyah Elementary Shidler Elementary Southeast High School Southern Hills Elementary Spencer Elementary Stand Watie Elementary Star Spencer High School Taft Middle School Telstar Elementary The Stanley Hupfeld Academy at Western Village Thelma R. Parks Elementary U.S. Grant High School Van Buren Elementary Webster Middle School West Nichols Hills Elementary Westwood Elementary Wheeler Elementary Willow Brook Elementary Wilson Elementary

x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x

Competitive  Edge  Grants

Great  Idea  Grants

School

Teachers  Warehouse

Competitive  Edge  Grants

Great  Idea  Grants

School

Teachers  Warehouse

GRANT AND SUPPLY DISTRIBUTIONS DURING THE 2010-2011 AND 2011-2012 SCHOOL YEARS*

x x

x x x x

x x x

x x x x x x x x x

x x x x

x x

x

x x x x x x x x

x

x x x x

*as of March 2012 ANNUAL REPORT

77


STARS OF GIVING MAKING A DIFFERENCE IN THE LIFE OF A CHILD The important work of supporting the children and teachers of Oklahoma City Public Schools wouldn’t be possible without our generous corporate, foundation and individual donors. Every donation gives our children the opportunities and tools they would otherwise go without. It gives them the confidence and encouragement they need to rise above their sometimes difficult circumstances. The Foundation and the children and teachers we serve are grateful for the support of each donor.

CO RP O RAT ION S A N D F OU N D AT I ON S $200,000+

Chesapeake Energy Corporation Devon Energy Corporation

$100,000-$199,999 Feed The Children OGE Energy Corporation

$35,000-$49,999 Clear Channel Communications Independent Insurance Agents Association of Greater OKC

$20,000-$34,999

American Fidelity Group Bank of America INTEGRIS Health New View Oklahoma Skirvin Hilton Hotel SONIC, America’s Drive-In

$10,000-$19,999

Anonymous BancFirst Harris Foundation, Inc. The Hertz Corporation 78

STARS OF GIVING

Kirkpatrick Family Fund Love’s Travel Stops & Country Stores, Inc. Sodexo Whitten-Newman Foundation

$5,000-$9,999 ARINC Engineering Services LLC Ethics and Excellence in Journalism Foundation Express Employment Professionals IBC Bank Inasmuch Foundation National Cowboy and Western Heritage Museum Oklahoma City Retailers Foundation Oklahoma City Thunder SandRidge Energy, Inc. U.S. Cellular In support of the Craig R. Kennamer Legacy Fund

$2,500-$4,999 ACE Transfer & Storage Company AT&T C & C Bowen Charitable Foundation

The Center for Educational Law Christmas Connection Cox Communications Inc. Crowe & Dunlevy Foundation Inc. Elliott + Associates Architects The Episcopal Diocese of Oklahoma Hudiburg Auto Group Linn Energy Mathis Brothers Furniture Meinders School of Business at Oklahoma City University RK Black, Inc. Rotary Club 29 Foundation Smith & Pickel Construction, Inc. Sony Pictures Television

$1,500-$2,499 Accord Human Resources Chi-X Global Technology, Inc. Farmers Insurance Help Point Federal Reserve Bank, Oklahoma City Branch First National Bank of Oklahoma Fred Jones Family Foundation The Greater Oklahoma City Chamber of Commerce Ladies Music Club MidFirst Bank Moliere Bridal Republic National Distributing Company


C O RP O RAT I ON S A N D F OU N D AT I ON S Ron Ward Investments Science Museum of Oklahoma 7-Eleven Stores The Stanley Hupfeld Academy at Western Village Whataco Companies - Whataburger

$500-$1,499 Accel Financial Staffing/Meg Salyer Alan C. Greenberg Philanthropic Fund American Business Women’s Association Art Form LLC Capitol Abstract & Title Co. CDR Global Inc. C.L. Frates and Company Clements Foods Foundation Clyde R. Evans Charitable Trust CPSI, Ltd. DCP Midstream

Foundation Management Inc. Grand Dental Nichols Hills Harpo Studios Harrison-Orr Air Conditioning LLC Impressions Printing KO C O - T V 5 The Meinders Foundation, Inc. Mercy Health Center Metro Technology Centers Metro Transit Bus System Oklahoma City Community College Oklahoma Publishing Company Potts Exploration, LLC Quad Graphics, Inc. Quail Creek Bank, NA Renaissance Learning St. Anthony Hospital Seawater Trucking, Inc. Southwest Cleaning Service Southwest Homebuilders Association

Teachers Federal Credit Union The Tom and Lisa Price Charitable Foundation US Food Service YMCA of Greater Oklahoma City Ziffren Brittenham

$250-$499 American Cleaners Independence Charter Middle School Junior Achievement of Greater OKC Junior League of Oklahoma City Moisant Promotional Products New West Group Oklahoma City American Federation of Teachers Payne Education Center, Inc. Sigma Gamma Rho

F RI E ND S OF T H E F OU N D AT I ON $7,500-$9,999 Joy Kennamer In suppor t of the Craig R. Kennamer Legacy Fund

$5,000-$7,499

Mrs . He n r y Fr e e de Joann a Ha t t o n Don a n d P a t t i L e e m an

$2,500-$4,999

New t B r o wn Walla ce J o h n s on Percy a n d B e cky K i r k Nan cy a n d G e o r ge Recor d s Karl a n d Ca t h e r ine S p r in g e r

$1,000-$2,499

John Belt and Joy Reed Belt Jeff and Lo ri Blumen t h a l T he Braver Family In honor of A.K.M.

Jim and Caro ly n Cl ark Steve and Nikki Co sh ow Michael and Lori Dickinson R ober t and Mar y Je n k in s F rank and Cathy Ke at in g T heres a Lee D av e and Lana Lo p e z Board of Director/Foundation Staff

Fra n k a n d N adin e Mc P h e rson Mr. an d Mrs. Rob e r t Z . N aife h In honor of t he 2011 Wal l of Fa m e honore e s

Me h me t an d L isa O z J oe P h il l ip s J on a t h an Sc h war t z Be n a n d Sh irl e y S h a n k e r J e a n e t t e a n d Ric h a r d S i a s Robert and Helen Sullivan Ric h a rd an d G l e n n a Ta n e n b a um L in da Wa re Toure In honor of Op io Tou re

L ou C . Ke rr/ T h e K e r r Foun d a t ion

$750-$999

Mr. & Mrs. G . T. B l a n k e n s h i p J . Wil l ia m an d Su e H o o d Bob a n d Be t t y McC o y Te re sa Moisan t P a ul a n d Ke l l y P e a r s o n

$500-$749

An n S. Al sp a ug h Sk ip Bayl e ss I n honor of t he l at e, g re at L iz B urdet t e, my jour na li s m t eacher at N.W. Cl ass e n

C a rol Be rr y Bob & De b b ie Bl a c k b u r n Sc ot t Borc h e t t a I n honor of Erik L og an OKCPS Employee

John and Sharon Bozalis Bill and Lisa Bullard Cathy Carlson Candy Dulaney Carl and Susan Edwards D r. & M r s . R o b e r t S . E l l i s Barbara Eskridge Bill and Kris Frankfurt Jane B. Harlow Matt Johnson Sher yl Kishore Bruce and Donna Lawrence George and Cristin McQuistion John Meyer and Jenny Love Meyer Laura Morris Larr y and Cynda Ottaway Darrel and Abbie Palmer To n y a n d K e l l y S h i n n Jeanne Hoffman Smith Lee Allen and DeAnn Smith Colin Strickland I n me mo r y o f my f ath e r

Anonymous Barr y and Becky Switzer Ralph and Barbara Thompson M i l e s a n d M o l l y To l b e r t I n h o n o r o f B e ve rly Sto r y

G a r y a n d S h e i l a Tr e d w a y E d d i e a n d P a m Tr o u p C a r o l a n d M a c Tr o y L a r k i n a n d J e a n Wa r n e r M a x a n d Ay a k o We i t z e n h o f f e r M r. a n d M r s . D i c k Wo r k m a n

C a p i t o l H i l l E l ement a r y Students

$250-$499

She r yl Bar ne tt Paul Bianchi R ichard and Ma r y C lem ent s R oy and Shirle y C o b b Bob D avis D e A nn D avis Bruce and Tina D a y Euge ne Fie ld Elem ent a r y Stude nts A lle n and She rron Ev a ns Te rr y Frale y Susan Gabbard Susan Ge e Lilianne Glast In honor of Neld a Teb o w Stuar t and D arsi G ra ha m D avid and A im e e Ha rlo w Bre nt He nsle y D avid and R obyn Hi lg er J one tta J onte Sam Ke nnam e r In su ppor t of th e C ra ig R. Kennamer Legacy F u n d R usty and Mandy L a F o rg e Mark Twain Ele m ent a r y Stude nts Le w and J e nnife r Mc G i nni s Clark and Kay Mu s s er Suz anne Owe ns In honor of Neld a Teb o w Carol Pe rr y Gar y Pe te rson In honor of Neld a Teb o w

STARS OF GIVING

79


S an d r a P h i l l i p s M ar i l yn P i c k B il l a n d L o r i P i n k R ay a n d P a t r i c i a P o tts B ecky R i c ka r d I n ho no r o f N e l d a Te b ow Ter es a R o se B o b a n d He a t h e r R o ss P au l S u n d a n d Cl a u d i a Sa n P ed r o Ter r y a n d We n d i S c h uur Geo r g e a n d Ma r g a r e t Selb y I n ho no r o f N e l d a Te b ow M i ch a e l S h a n a h a n S h id l e r E l e me n t a r y S tud ents B r ian S ta p l e s a n d S u s a n J o hn so n - S t a p l e s Stephen Smith and Lisa Reed J o s ep h a n d Ma r g a r e t Strea ly I n s u p p o r t o f t h e C r a ig R . K e nna m e r L e g a c y F u nd C l ay to n a n d Ma r n i e Ta y lor J o h n Te mp l e I n ho no r o f N e l d a Te b ow M ar y Tr a n A l an I n g r a m a n d L i sa Um me l - I n g r a m R us se l l a n d K a t h e r i n e Wa lk er West N i c h o l s Hi l l s E l e menta r y S tu d e n ts Iv a We t z e l C h ar l e s W h i t e I n ho no r o f N e l d a Te b ow

$100-$249

J oan A c kl ey In h o no r o f Ne l d a Te b ow Ange l a A dams Hal A damson J ohn A ddison Ange l a A l l en Bob and N anc y A nthon y S haron A r g anbr ig ht R.P. A shanti - A l ex ande r J oseph A stafan Vince nt A tkins Everett Baker Freder ic k and Kar en Ba k e r J an Bar r ett D ona l d Bel l Robe r t and D eD e Benha m Carol y n Bish Char l es and C ar ol Bl ac k w o o d Barb ar a Bl anton M aj. G ener al Bow den M el it a Bow man J ulie Boy ing ton D el and P eg g y Boy l es J essic a Br ag g M ich ael Br anc h S usie Br atc her J ohn and L inda Br edeho f t In h o no r o f Ne l d a Te b o w S usa n Br ew er Bud Br ooks S usa n Br ooks Cynthia Br ow n Wil l Br uder and L ouise R o m a n Ear nest Buc h Wil l iam Buc k Heat her Bul l oc k Kari C al dw el l

80

STARS OF GIVING

Ch a d a n d S h e lly Ca m pb e ll Ch ri s t y Ca p o ra l In h o n o r o f N e l d a Te b ow A s p a s i a Ca r ls o n K a re n Ca r o t h e r s Ch ri s a n d Ma r y Ca r t er Ta m m y C a r t e r De n i s e Ca t o n Wi lli a m Ch a m b e rla i n Robert Chambers Te rr y a n d B r e n d a Ch ri sti a n B r a n d y Cla r k Da v i d Cla r k Wa y n e C la rk J e s s i c a C la y N o r m a Co le - S i m p s o n Ma r ly s C o li n Da w n C o llu m s S u s a n Co m b s Cli f t o n Co n a s t e r E v e ly n Co n d e r Ch ri s t i n e Co o p e r Ma r y Co u gh li n Ta m u la Cra i g Wa n d a C u d j o P h i l C u n n i n gh a m De b o ra C u r r y J a c q u e t t a Da v i s Me re d i t h Da v i s S h a r la n d De i t z Ma r i o De lga d o F re d a De s k i n A lla n De Vo r e In h o n o r o f N e l d a Te bow J o h n Di v e lb i s s K a t h r y n Dr a p e r K e lly Du ga n D’ Mo n d re E a ly L i n d a E d ge ll B o b a n d Cy n t h i a E ggeli ng H e a t h e r E li a s S u s i e E s t e rs Judith Evans A m y F i llm a n E v o n F i n k le a Shannon Freeman S t a c e y Ga r c i a J e n n i f e r Ga rla n d Vi c k i e Ga r re t t Gle n Ge a n Ma r y Ge u r i n N a n c y Gi b s o n De n n i s Gi d d e n s K a y Go e b e l B r y a n a n d A n d r e a Gonte r ma n R o n a n d L e e Av a Go o ch S u s a n Go o d P a m e la Gre a t h o u s e K a t r i n k a Gr e e a r Ly n n Gre e n Gle n d a Gre e n h o w a rd H a l a n d Ma rc i a Gr e e nwood J u li e Gri s s o m Jeannie Haas Cy n t h i a H a m i lt o n R o b e r t a n d L a u r e n H a mma c k Ch a r lo t t e H a m o n R u b y e H a rri n gt o n Mi k e H a rri s Va le r i e H a r ri s Rachel Harsen Jean Hartmann H a r t le y H a r t z o g Cra wle y L e i gh A n n H a r v i lle

Je a n Ha yne s Sa nd y He nr y Ste p he n He nr y Ba rb a ra He ss Le on Hi ll Te ni she a Holb e r t Li nd a Hold e r P e ne lop e Hollowa y Si ssy Hollowa y D a vi d a nd Lu c i nd a Hu ffma n Wi lli a m Hu g he s Ma ri a n Hu lse y Re na Hu rd Su sa n Hu rst K i mb e rly I ra g g i Ja me s Ja c ob Le sli e Ja me s P a me la Ja me son Mi c ha e l Je nni ng s Ja me s a nd Vi vi e n Johnson Ma rla nd a nd Ba rb a ra Johnson In honor of m y w ife Ba rb a ra L . J ohnson Ma tthe w Johnson N a ta li e Johnson Ed i th Jone s Sc ott K a u fma n Bri tta ni K e e ton Ora K e e ton A shle y K e lle r t Fra nk a nd Ma ri lynn K e lle r t K a thle e n K e nne d y Vi rg i ni a K e nne d y Li nd a K e rr Rona ld a nd Che r yla nn K i d d C.F. a nd N a nc y K i mb e rli ng A li c e K i rkma n In honor of N eld a Teb ow Owe n a nd C.W. La ffe r ty Tha nh Le K a y Li nd se y A l a nd Je re Li tc he nb u rg Wa yne a nd Joa nne Li ttle Rona ld a nd Su sa n Lod e s Cu r ti s Long Sta c y Long Ji m a nd Be tte Ma c K e lle r Ca rol Ma g ne ss Su sa n Ma lloy Ve r na Ma r ti n P e d ro Ma r ti ne z Li nd se y Ma tthe ws Che rr y Ma ys Sc ot a nd She li Mc A d oo G lori a Mc Clu re Bre nd a Mc Cra c ke n Re x Mc G e he e Me li ssa Mi lli g a n Rose Ma ri e Mi ra nd a Ja c k Mi tc he ll Eli z a b e th Moa kle y Cha rle s Moore Je rr y Moore Su i Sa n Mu i In honor of N eld a Teb ow Mi c ha e l Mu lle r A ng e la N e a ly D a vi d N i xon D e e O’ Bri e n K a se y Org a n D e lla Orr Chri sti a a n Osb or n K e lli P a c kne tt Ma rk a nd Sa nd ra P a rk

Rob i n P a rke r Holly P a r ti n Rya n P a tte n Ti mothy P e lle ti e r Li nd a P e lton Eri c h P e te rse n Joyc e P e te rson Rob e r t P hi lli p s Sha mon P i c ke ns Fe li sha P i nkston Ste p ha ni e P olla rd Wi lli a m P ool John P u nd sa c k D a vi d Ra c kle y K i mb e rly Ra nd a ll Sc ott Ra nd a ll Re na Ra nd le Bri a n Ra p e r Re ne e Ri c h Mi c he lle Rob e rson Sa nd ra Rose Be ve rly Rose nb e rg The od ore Ross Li nd a Rosse r Ma r y Ru ffe l A ng e la Sa nd e rs Ra le ne Sa rri ng ton Re g e ni a Sa u lsb e rr y Sa lly Sa u nd e rs Mi ke Sc hooli ng I n honor of N e ld a Tebow Ti na Sc ott K e lly Se hon Li nd a Se xton Be tti e Sha d oa n Mi c ha e l a nd Ci nd i Shelby Ca the ri ne She r ma n Li sa Si e le r t Jose p h Ja nkowsky and Janice Si ng e r Ja nkowsky Ma r y Si ri a Che r yl Smi th Ri c ha rd Smi th She rri Smi th K ole ta Snyd e r A le x a nd Li sa Sou z a He a the r Sp a rks Ron a nd Ma rsha Staf f ord Bri a n Sta p le s a nd Sus an Johns onSta p le s Ma r tha Ste g e r Lu lu Ste p he ns G a r y Ste ve ns Eva Ste ve nson Ma r tha Stu r m - Sa wyer Cynthi a Su lli va n Te re sa Te d d e r D e b ra Thoma s She i la Ti a rks He i d i Tu e rs Ja c kson Troy Va nc e Ja mi Ve e nstra Ed i th Vi c ke rs N a nc y Wa ll Tra c y Wa p a ha Ti m a nd Chri sty Wat s on Tonya We lls E.D . We rri e s Mi lla r a nd Be tsy Whit e Cha rle s a nd Re na te Wiggin Su sa n Wi lke rson A nne tte Wi lli a ms Ma r vi n Wi lli a mson Be tty Wi nte rs


D avid and D eLy nn Woo d s i d e Ben a nd M er edith Wr on o w s k i Cassi Yar br oug h D on and C ar ol y n Z ac hr i t z Claranel l Z immer man S heil a Z ummer

Gle n n a B e r r y

Te re si ta Ca rre on

Je nni fe r D e fe e

J a m e s B e rr y

Ela i ne Ca rri ng ton

Ma tthe w D e nma n

Ma r s h e t t a B e r r y

Su z a nne Ca r te r

G a yle D e nni s

Do n n a B e r r y h i ll

A le xi s Ca r te r - Bla c k

Ma r y Su sa n D e nni s

Patti Bessen

Ma r y Ca ste e l

Ma rc e lle D e Sp a i n

Leota Betts

Sa ra h Ca te s

Ste p ha ni e D e ve ro

S h a r o n B i lli n g

Je nni fe r Ce vi lle

P e g g y D e vi to

$24-$99

J a n e B i llu p s

Ju d i th Cha lme rs

Ed wa rd D i a l

J odi A br aham

De b ra B i lly

A ni ta Cha mb le ss

K e lli e D i c ke ns

Do n a n d C o n n i e B i s h o p

Ca rly Cha mb le ss

Ja me s D i xon

Chri sti na Cha nc e llor

Bi c h- Hu ye n D oa n- N g u ye n

Kandy Bishop

Mr. Au d i e Cha nd le r

P a me la D ob b s

B e t t y B la c k b u r n

Ma rk a nd Myr na Cha ne y

A ng e la D or mi a ni

J a n e e n e B la lo c k

D a wn Che r ni c ky

Lyd i a D owd e ll

A m a n d a B la n c h a rd

Be li nd a Chri st

Tra c y D owe ll

A s h le y B la n k e n s h i p

Ja c ki e Chri sti a n

Ba rb a ra D oz i e r

N a t a li e B la s d e l

Sha wn Chu rc hma n

Ma ri e a D ra i n

B r e n d a B lu m

Ja ne t Ci mb a lo

She rri D r we nski

Janessa Bointy

Eli z a b e th Cla rk

Li nd a D u d le y

Tu y e t B o li n

Ja mi e Cla rk

Ti na D u e na s

Vi c k i e B o n n e r

La u ra Cla rk

Lonz e tta D u ke s

Te rri B o r gf e ld

K ri ste n Cle ve ng e r

Si lvi a D u ra n

Nancy Boudreau

Ste p ha ni e Cob b

Sa nd ra D u ty

Stephanie Bowman

La u ri e Coc hra n

Sa ra h D vora c e k

Du s t i n a n d L i s a B o z a r t h

John a nd Li sa Coc hra ne

Su sa n D ye

S a r a h B ra d f o r d

Li nd a Coe

D onna Ea g le ston

P a s s i o n B r a d le y

He a the r Coffe y

Anni e Ea stma n

Le Ann Brady

G a r y Colb e r t

He le n Ea te r

Vi c k i i B ra s h e a r s

Sha ron Cole ma n

Ru th A nn Ec ke l

L i n d a B ra s s e ll

Tra c e y Cole ma n

JoA nn Ed d y

J a n i c e B ra x t o n

Rosa li nd Cole ma ro

Anne Ed wa rd s

N o le n B re c k e n ri d ge

K i m Colli ns

Rob e r t a nd Cynthi a Eg g eling

P a i ge B re s s m a n

Lou rd e s Colli ns

Sha ron Elki ns

J a m e s B re w e r

D i a ne Comb e st

Cla u d ya Elli ott

N a n c y B re w e r

A le xi s Comb s

Eli z a b e th Elli s

Ta m e r a B re w s t e r

Chri ste n Cong e r

Mi c ha e l Elli s

Do n n a B r i c e

Thoma s a nd A nne Conove r

She lle y Elli s

J am es and A ng el a A bsh e r S hauna A bston Cath y A dams M ildr ed A dams J eanette A ker s Leah A ker s Claudia A l amil l o M ich el e A l bany s D aniel a A l eman D e C l a n t o n Carol y n A l ex ander Ann A l l en G l enda A l l en J am es A l l en J ohn A l l en LaRadius A l l en Prisc il l a A l l en Ed and S al l ie A l l en M ars ha A l l ison M ari a A l var ez S andy A l var ez Faye A mos J ose A nay a S am uel A nay a Edw ar d A nder son S tephanie A ng ier Kristin A ng l e Anon y mous Ar t A nthony S uzy A r mishaw D ebra A r ms G .W. and P aul a A r mstr o n g D arla A r nol d Brenda A sher Rosa Baeza Cand ic e Bail ey Hel ene Bail ey Hezekiah Bakar e Arl in g ton Baker Rosemar y Baker Roxanne Baker Vana Baker M argr et Bal l ar d Cr ystal Bar ber Cynthia Bar c hue M indy Bar mann D avid Bar nes Tonye Bar nes Val er ia Bar r ett M ar ty and C hr istie Bar r i s Clarebel Bar r on J anet Basl er Kathr y n Bass Tara Bassett Tobytha Battl e D aCe Beady Keren Beasl ey Teri Bel l Lil l ia n Benefee S andr a Bennett S hamar ky Bentl ey Thom as Ber kel ey

81

SECTION TITLE Board of Director/Foundation Staff

In h o n o r o f N e l d a Te b ow

Ca r o l B r o ga n

Ca rson

Ma tthe w Emd e

E li z a b e t h B r o o k s

Se ni a Contre ra s

She i la Enni s

L i n d a B ro o k s

Ti e r ne y Cook- Ti nni n

Re j e a nna Eski

L i s a B ro o k s

Be tty Coop e r

Li sa Este s

Ca r ri e B r o w n

K a rolyn Corb e tt

Ha rold Fa c tor y

Rick Brown

K a ra Cord e ll

Bi ll a nd Ca rol Fa nkhou ser

Tr e n a B ro w n

Ma r y Cor ne li u s

Ja ne Fa r me r

Whitney Brown

Se nd y Corp e s

Bi ll Fa r nha m

Harr y Br yant

Ja me s Cou rse y

K yle Fa rri s

Va le r i e B r y a n t

Je a ni e Cox

Ja son a nd Me li ssa Fa rri s

Vi c k i B r y a n t

Joe Cox

Re b e c c a Fe ld ma n

Jackie Buchanan

K a rla Cra g e r

Colle tte Fe nla son

Yo la n d a B u c k le y

Ce c i li a Cra i g

G i ng e r Fe nwi c k

Da n i e l a n d J a m i e B u c k m a ste r

Conni e Cra wford

Ca the ri ne Fe rg u son

R o n a ld a n d Ma r le n e B u l la rd

Le ti a Cra wford

Rob e r t Fi nne y a nd Sha wn

R o b e r t B u llo c k

Ma ri a Ce c i li a Croc e

De n n i s B u r le s o n

Che le Crosb y

Bre nd a Fi nne y- Fe nne r

Josephine Burton

N a nc y Cru z

Je a nne Fi she r

Jeri Bush

D orothy Cru z e n

Ca rla Fi tz g e ra ld

K e n n e t h B u t le r

A d e ll Cu d j oe

Ma rc i a Fle tc he r

S t e v e n a n d L a u ra B u x t o n

Chri stop he r Cu d j oe

Ste ve n Fle tc he r

Ta r a B y f i e ld

P a tri c k Cu d j oe

Ma r y Flore s

F e li c i a B y k e

Ja ne t Cu rre n

Ca r me n Flori s

De lo i s B y r d

D i a ne D a rb y

Re b e c c a Flowe r

De b o ra h B y r n e

Y c e d ra D a u g hty

Je nni e Fond re n

Janet Caesar

Ma r tha D a vi d son

Ca rle tta Ford

A m a n d a Ca ld w e ll

A ma nd a D a vi s

She ri d a n Fowle r

Gle n d a C a lla h a n

Che r yl D a vi s

Ma r tha Fra i re

J i lli a n Ca m p b e ll

Je nni fe r D a vi s

Lynd si Fra nc oi s

Ma r y a n n C a m p b e ll

Ta j u a na D a vi s

Howard and Dena Frankenfield

N e i l C a m p b e ll

She lly D e a s

Mi c ha e l Fra z i e r

K e lly C a rd w e ll

Ta mi a D e Be rr y

Floyd a nd Fa ye tta Fre e man

R i c k a n d De b b i e C a rli n

Mi c he lle D e c ke r

Sha la nd a Fre e ma n

Sarah Carnes

P a u la D e d mon

Oma i ra Fre i te s

OKCPS Employee

Fi tz g e ra ld

STARS OF GIVING

81


Debor ah F r enc h

S h e rri H a r ri s

Ti na Je nni ng s

D onni e Le wi s

Ravo nne F r enc h

Ca i t li n H a r t

Ste p he n Je ntoft

Sa ne ste lle Le wi s

Sarah F r enc h

Keta Hartman-Pope

K a ron Je te r

Thoma s Le wi s

Jenni fer F r ikken

Ca r o li n e H a t f i e ld

Li sa Job e - Elki ns

Rog e r a nd K a thle en Lienk e

Barr y F ug ett

Ga rla n d a n d A n n a H a wki ns

Susan F ul ks

Juanita Hayes

D a na Johns

Mi c he le Li nd le y

Susan F ul l er

S h a r i H a y go o d

Esthe r Johnson

Re b e c c a Li nd le y

Eyvo nne F ul som

B a rb a ra H a y w o r t h

G i lb e r t Johnson

Rob i n Li nd se y

Sandr a F utr el l

L a u ra H e a d

He a the r Johnson

Fra nkli n Li ttle

Mich ael G al l mor e

Cy n t h i a H e c k m a n

Joa n Johnson

Le sli e Li ttle j ohn

Christy G ammon

Ca r ri e H e lm

La N i ta Johnson

She lly Lloyd

Janet G ar r ett

Sharon Henderson

Li sa Johnson

Bi lly Loc h

Jul ie G athr ig ht

Du s t y H e n d o n

Sherr ie G atl in

R h o n d a H e n s le y

Mar y anne G entr y

To n i H e n s o n

Wend y G entr y

S a m a n t h a H e rb e l

Dana G eor g e

B r a d H e rz e r

Jenny G il ber t

Monta Johnson

Su sa n a nd Rona ld Lodes

Wi lli a m a nd P or ti a Johnson

Emi ly Long o

Wi lla Johnson

Ra c he l Loop

Wra y Jolle y

Be r t a nd Ju a na Lopez

Ba rb a ra Jone s

Ju a ni ta Lop e z

Ga r y H e y d

Ba rb a ra Jone s

Sha ron Love

Jenni fer G il l ey

P a m e la H i b b s

Ca rol Jone s

Ba rb a ra Lowe r y

Stephanie G il l iam

J o h n a n d P a t ri c i a H i c kson

Ca rolyn Jone s

Joyc e Lowre y

Conn ie G ivens

L i n d s e y H i ggi n s

Conni e Jone s

Ce c i li a Loz a no

Sharhonda G ivens

G.J . H i ll

Cu r ti s Jone s

Li nd a Lu the r

Kate G l asson

J o h n H i ll

D a vi d Jone s

D e b ora h Lync h

Veron ic a G l over

K e n d ra H i ll

Ri c c i a nd D e b b i e Jone s

Je nni fe r Lync h

Wanda G l over

Te k o a H i ll

Li sa Jone s

Wi lli a m Lync h

Jenni fer G ol dman

Ta y lo r H i lle a r y

M egan G ood

Rebecca Hines

Ma d e li ne Jone s

D i a ne Ma c e

J am ie G oodw in

Do u g H i n k le

P a me la Jone s

Ja ni c e Ma d d ox

Sue Gr aham

Ca m i H i s e

Rob e r t Jone s

Lond a Ma d ron

Anna G r aven

E li z a b e t h H i s e

Roc he lle Jone s

Je re my Ma lwi c k

Casey G r ay

Jamie Hite

A lma Jose p h

D onna Ma nle y

J am es G r ay

A li c e H i x e n b a u gh

K e nd ra K a va n

K a y Ma nni ng

Lindsay G r ay

N gu y e n H o

Chri sti ne K e i th

P a tri c i a Ma ra b le

Ri c ki K e lle y

D e li a Ma ra nd

She lly K e lle y

Ti m Ma re k

Rita G r ay -M ar tin Loret ta G r ay son G ene l l a G r een Liesl G r een D onn a G r eenber g Karen G r eenfiel d J eanne G r iffin M oni c a G r iffin J ennifer G r izzl e Cynthia G r undy D enn is G uinn D ol or es G unter

Suzanne Hobson L i n d a H o lla rs My r n a H o lli d a y S a r a h H o llo w a y S a m a n t h a H o lm a n - Dowd y Ma r s h a d e H o lm e s Ma d e ra H o ls t e i n J a c q u e li n e H o lt J u n e H o lt Cr y s t a l H o o ge v e e n J a c q u e li n e H o r t o n

Kim ber l y G unter-S ites

Katherine Hoskins

Patti Hag er man

Amy House

Cher y l Hal aoui

B a rb a ra H o u s t o n

M ich el l e Hal br ook

Ga le H o w a rd

D erik Hal e

Scott Howard

April Hal l bac k

S h e i la H o w e ll

J acquel ine Hamil ton

Cla u d i a H o y o s

Kevin Hamil ton

Ch a r le e n H u d s o n

M ar y Hamil ton

Suzanne Hudson

S onya Hamil ton Royc e and Kir k Hammon s Lisa Hammons Paul a Har deman J ennifer Har den S haron Har din J ack Har ding Wendy Har l and D ebra Har mon Robina Har mon Tara Har p-Br ow n Kathe r ine Har per

Do n a ld H u f f Homer Huff K a t h y H u gh e s H a r o ld a n d S o n d ra H u nte r B a rb a ra H u t c h i s o n Ma r i o n H u t t o n K a t h y Iri o n K e n t a n d S u s a n Is b e ll Ly n d a Iz e v b i n gi e Ca r o l J a c k Gr i z e t t e J a c k s o n

Thom as Har r ing ton

S a n f o rd J a c k s o n

Al iso n Har r is

Ve ra J a n t z

Betty Har r is

B a rb a ra J a r a m i llo

D oris Har r is

S h e lly J a r v i s

J am es Har r is

Susan Jeffreys

Pam el a Har r is

Brooke Jenkins

82

STARS OF GIVING

N e a l K e llog g

Cynthi a Ma ri g ny

P a tri c i a K e lly

Ca lle y Ma ri ne z

Tommi e K e lly

Sha ron Ma rke r

Mi c he lle K e me r y

Cu r ti s Ma rsha ll

Ca the ri ne K e nd a ll

Bu d a nd P a t Ma rs hall

G e org e K i mb a ll

Amy Ma r ti n

Bre nd a K i ng

D e Anna Ma r ti n

Ja yna K i nse l

J. K . a nd D orc ha M ar t in

K a thy K i sse lb u rg

Ei le e n a nd Ja me s M ar t in

Ca thy K la se k

Su sa n Ma r ti n

D orothy K le i n

Bre nd a Ma r ti nd a l e

Rob i n K lu c k

Lyd i a Ma r ti ne z

Ta ma ra Su e K na p p

Sa nd ra Ma sop u st

K a re n K oc h

Ma r y Ma the son

Monti e K oe hn

Li nd a Ma thi e son

Wa nne tta K ohl

Be r na rd Ma tthe ws

Li sa K ong s

D a ni e l a nd Ja ni c e M at t hews

Ja mi e K oz loski

Ma rg u e ri te Ma yabb

N i c ole K ra me r

D e b b i e Ma yo

Vi c ki La nd

D i a ne Mc Bri d e

Je nni fe r La ng

Ma ri lyn Mc Ca ll

Vi nc e La rse n

The lma Mc Cla i n

A lfre d a La ske y

Lori Mc Coy

A le xa nd e r La u

Bla nc a Mc Cra c ken

K i mb e rly La vi e lle

Ja ne l Mc Cu lly

Ja me s La wre nc e

Ashle y Mc D ona ld

P a u l La wre nc e

Sta c e y Mc Fa rla nd

D onna La y

Su sa n Mc G owa n

A shle y Le a d ford

Rhond a Mc G u i re

A my Le a z e r

Ela i ne Mc I lroy- Hargrove

D e a nne Le e

Su sa n Mc K e e

Ma rc e lla Le e

Te e na Mc K e own

K i mb e rly Le ona rd

Cynthi a Mc K i nne y

Ba rb a ra Le she r

He rb e r t Mc K i nne y

Ca me ron Le wi s

Lynd a Mc K i nne y


S andr a M c Kinney -L ee

K ri s t i n N i c h o la s

Wi lli a m Re nsha w

Me la ni e Si mms

Roxanne M c Knig ht

Cher yl Nieves

Ta he re h Re ya hyAsl

Tre y Si mms

S haw na M c L el l an

K a r li t a N o r t h

Ju li e Re ynold s

K a re n Si mp ki ns

Laura M c L eod

N o r t h w e s t B a p t i s t Ch u rc h P a trons

N or va Re ynold s

Ca rol Si mp son

J ohn M c M ahan

J o h n a n d Di a n e N o w a kowski

Te re sa Re ynold s

Re na Si te s

M ari e M c M ahan

K a r e n Oh lh e i s e r

D onna Ri c e

G owr y Si va ne sa n

Andr ea M c M il l an

P a u l O lgu i n

K a re n Ri c h

Ja yne Si va rd

Tam m y M c M il l an

Gi lb e r t O li v e r

Ang e la Ri c ha rd son

Lu e lla Skop a k

S tacey M c M il l ian

Ti f f a n y O lv e r a - Ma ge e

Bre e Ri c ha rd son

P a u la Sma r t

Eil een M c R oy

R o n a ld a n d N a n c y Org a n

Eric M eador

A n a O r t e ga

Kim ber l y M eans

Sundae Osborn

Em ily M edder s

C a n d i P a d f i e ld

G ene va M eel y

Lacy Pappano

M ark and L inda M eier

Joyce Parham

J anna M el ton

C a ro ly n P a rk e r

Brandi M er c er

De lo re s P a r k e r

Bevra M er r itt

Lori Ri c ha rd son- Morp he w

Ra ymond Smi le y

Su sa n Ri c hi son

A mb e r Smi th

K i m Ri c ke tson

A nni e Smi th

K ri sti na Ri c ke y

Ja me s a nd D ori Sm it h

Cynthi a Ri e d l

Fra nc e s Smi th

Molly Rob b i ns

Jove ta Smi th

Jona tha n Rob e r ts

K e nne th Smi th

K a r mon Rob e r ts

Lori Smi th

D e b ora h Rob e r tson

Ma rg re t Smi th

C li f f o r d P a r re t t

Mi ke a nd Su sa n Rob e r tson

Rhod a Smi th

J ay Mer r itt

Joby Patchen

Ce d ri c Rob i nson

Tond a le ri a Smi th

Linda M er r iw eather

K a t h y P a t t e rs o n

Je nni fe r Rob i nson

John Smythe

Ted M etsc her

C a ro le P e e r y

K ri sti e Rod ri g u e z

Te re sa Sne e d

Khrista M ey er

Mi c k a e la P e re z

Lori Rod ri g u e z

P a u la Snyd e r

Richar d M eza

Ti m a n d Vi c k i P e rk i n s

Ste p ha ny Rog e rs

Li sa Solb e rg

S helly M ic hael

Do ri s P e rr y

D e li a Rola nd

John Somme rs

J ulia M ic hel

Do n n a P e rr y - Gr i f f i t h

Ma r tha Rolle r

Bi ll a nd Cle d a Spaet h

Patric ia M ic k

Di a n e P e rr y m a n

Bi a nc a Rose

Tom Sp a ll

Kindr ed M il es

E ri c P e v e h o u s e

Wi lli a m a nd Li l Ross

K a ti e Sp e nc e r

Kare n M il l er

A n d r e w P i e rc e

She rr y Rowa n

Te rr y Sp e nc e r

Lauri sa M il l er

Laurel Pierce

Se p te mb e r Rowle tt

K a ri n Sta fford

M ax M il l er

Da n n a P i p p i n

Rebe c c a M il l er

R a n d a P i r ro n g

Am y M inton

Mi c h e lle P la t t

Myra M oaning

P a u la P lu e s s

Caron M onday

J o s e p h P o i n t e r a n d Ma r y

D aniel M onks Kather ine M onr oe Linda M ontel ong o Ashl ey M ontg omer y Karen M ontg omer y Sara h M oody Char l es M oor e D el or is M oor e D eve r a M oor e S usa n M oor e Debor ah M or g an Joshua M or g an

B la n k e n s h i p - P o i n t e r Di a n a P o lle y L i li a n a P o n c e Susan Postier In h o n o r o f N e l d a Te bow To d d P o t t e r Nancy Potts K e lli P o w e ls o n K i m P o w e rs J o h n n y a n d S h e r y l P r i b yl C a rri e P r i c e Wa n d a P r i c e Amy Proctor

Christie M or r is

Ma rd i n a P u lle n

Paula M or r ow

L i s a P u r c e ll

S helley M or se

Jane Putnam

Yol an da M osel ey

Wa n n e t t a Q u i c k

Charl es M osl ey

J o s e p h Qu i gle y

D avid M osl ey

Jovette Quinn

S hari M osl ey

Antonia Ramirez

Paul M uel l er

S c o t t R a n d a ll

Kevin M y er s DeJu an Naff Dann y and D ebbie N eit z e l Sara h Nel son Wendy Nel son Nath an N er o Jana New som Ha N g uy en Nguy et and L uc Ng uy en Phuo ng Ng uy en Tam N g uy en Thuc Ng uy en Trien N g uy en

83

In h o n o r o f N e l d a Teb ow

S usa n M il l er

SECTION TITLE Board of Director/Foundation Staff

K e lly R a n d le B ra n d t R a t c li f f B e v e r ly R a y K a t h e ri n e R a y Ma r y R a y A n a R a y go z a Sherr y Read K a t y R e a ga n A n ge la R e e d C la u d e t t e R e i d P h i li p R e i d

D onna Roy

Mi c ha e l Sta fford

Mi c ha l Ru nd e ll

Thoma s Sta nke

Ang e la Ru sso

Ci nd y Sta nle y

Rob e r t Ru the r ford

A lli son Sta rk

Sha ron Ryste d

Sha rle ne Sta r ne s

She rr y Sa hi

D i a na Ste e le

Sa ma ntha Sa mp son

Tonya Ste e le

Bre nd a Sa nd e rs

K a re n Ste p he ns

K a ra Sa nd e rs

Sta c e y Ste ve ns

Fra nc i ne Sa nd e rson

She lle y Ste ve nson

Ta hi ra Sa ylors

Ve le a sha Ste wa r t - Johns on

Cha na Sc a ntli n

Ste p ha ni e Stoc kton

Sc ott Sc ha e re r

Chri stop he r Stofel

K a thle e n Sc hmi d t

Ste p he ni e Stoke s

P a i g e Sc hmi e d e b e rg

Me a g ha n Stor y

P a tri c i a Sc hra d e r

Vi c ki e Stove r

Rob e r t a nd Ju d y Sc hu ltz

Le na rd Stre e t

Alma Sc ole s

Joyc e Stri p li ng

N . Sc ott a nd N a d e a n Me lton

Ba rb e e Stu e ve

Sha ron Sc ott

A i me e Stu tz ma n

P e nny Se d e ri s

D e lore s Styron

P a tri c i a Se i tz

Be nj a mi n Swa g e r t y

Va si thy Se ng d a ra

Li nd a Swa nson

Ju d i th Sha d i x

Rog e r Swa r t

La u ri e Sha nnon

Ta mmy Swi nne y

Le on Sha w

Lynn Ta ka ha ta

Ang e la She e hy

Li z Ta te

Va le ri e She e sle y

Ta mmy Ta u b e r

Eli z a b e th She lton- Woolse y

Evg e ni ya Ta ylor

Ma rla She p he rd

Je ssi c a Ta ylor

Vi rg i ni a She r ma n

Rhond a Ta ylor

Ju d i th a nd Lloyd She rrod In m em or y of M yr na Dee M oore Ja me s a nd Lu c y Shi e ld s

Sa ra Te a l

She rri e Shoe ma ke r

D a rle ne Te h

Ja ni s Shu e

Ella Tha rp

Che r yl Shu lts

Ja me s Tha tc he r

Ti ffa ni Shu lts

The lma R. P a rks E lem ent ar y

Be c ky Shu ltz

Wi lli e R e i d C h e r i R e i lly De a n n a R e m y

OKCPS Employee

Ta ni sha Ta ylor Ti ffa ny Ta ylor

Stu d e nts

Bi ll Si lk a nd Mi nd y Ha rri s- Si lk

Ba rb a ra Thoma s

K e lly Si lve rs

Ca rolyn Thoma s

Ju li e a nn Si mms

Le sli e Thoma s

STARS OF GIVING

83


Caroline Blakey

Wil l ie Thomas

K e lly We s t

Er nes t Thompson

Wa n d a We s t

John and Sharon Bozalis

J ock and C indy Thomps o n

J e s s i c a W h e e le r

P.B. and Georgann Bradford

Anna White

Sharon Brandt

Lisa T hompson

Ma rle n e W h i t e

Cynthia Braun

M urrel l Thompson

S a ra W h i t e

Virginia Calame

Wand a Thompson

B e r t h a W h i t le y

Lechelle Calder wood

Rona l d Thor son

K ri s t i n W h i t m o re

Dave Clements and Neila Crank

M ars ha Tidw el l

Robert Whitney

S hannon Tig er

J o h n W h i t t i n gt o n

Diane Coady

Lesla Til l ey

B a r b a ra Wi lk i n s

Ann Tinnin

Do n n a Wi lli a m s

Pamela Cross

Linda Tol er-C hampl in

Ge n e Wi lli a m s

In m e mo r y o f K a re n H i l g e r

In h o no r o f Ne l d a Te b o w

J e rr y a n d K a re n Wi llia ms

Cle me nts

Rober t Cross Devon Energy Corporation Vesta Edwards

Charl es Tompkins

L i n d s a y Wi lli a m s

Hai Tonthat

Me li s s a Wi lli a m s

M ar ta Tor r es

P o r t i a Wi lli a m s

Chris Tow l es

Ti n a Wi lli a m s

Elizabeth Tr eadw ay

L o u i s e Wi lli f o r d

S heil a Tr ipp

A n d r e w Wi ls o n

Charl otte Tr obaug h

A n ge li a Wi ls o n

Patric ia Tr otter

A s h le y Wi ls o n

Nanc y Tr uel ove

C h a d Wi ls o n

Kyle Sweet & Associates, P.C.

Karla Tr umbul l

Glo ri a Wi ls o n

Peggy McCormick

Erin Tr ussel l

Vo n c i le Wi ls o n

Ryan Knapp and Rene McNall-Knapp

J ohn Tsotig h

Iri s Wi ls o n - Di a z

Kyl ah Tuc ker - F isk

S h e lb y Wi n t e rs

The Merrick Foundation In Honor Of Mason & Kiley Coe

S herr ie Tul g etske

K ri s t i Wi r e

S am antha Tw y man

In h o n o r o f N e l d a Teb ow

Joseph and Debra Evans First Unitarian Church of OKC Malinda Frangione T. Greenman and H. Mead Don and Mar y Ann Haskins Inasmuch Foundation Kirkpatrick Foundation, Inc.

Dennis and Rober ta Nauman John and Helen Nolan

Tam m y Tw y man

A s h le y Wi s d o m

Jennifer and Brent Payne

Am y U pc hur c h

To n y Wi s e

Scott and Kendra Plafker

J o D ean Vail

C a rla Wi s h o n

Dennis Rainwater

M ike and Nanc y VanD e Ve i re

Gli n Wi t t

Mark and Angela Reap

M ich el l e VanS w ear ing e n

Di a n a Wi t t e n

Christie Rober ts

J udy Var nado

B e v e r ly Wo m a c k

Susan Savage

G rovel l a Vasek

P e t r a Wo o d a r d

Yale Scurlock

J ohn and S har on Vaug h a n

Gle n Wo o d s

Richard and Jeannette Sias

Narc esa Vaug hn

Vi c k i e Wo o d s

J ill Vaug ht

De b r a Wo o d y

Skir vin Hilton Hotel

J ean Vaw ter

K i m b e r ly Wo o ld r i d ge

Terr y Veal

Da r le n e Wo o le r y

J err y L ea Venz

Te r i Wo o le y

J ennifer Vesper

P a y t e n Wo o lf

Kristin Viney ar d

J o d y Wo r k m a n

D orothy Viol ett

Gre g Wo r le y

Charl es Waddl e

E li z a b e t h Wo r t h y

Carol y n Wade

J a n e t Wr i gh t

Charl es Wal ker

J u d i t h Wr i gh t

Erika Wal ker

Ma t t h e w a n d S h i n o Ye a g e r

How ar d Wal ker

Me li s s a Ye a r w o o d

Karen Wal ker

C h r i s t y n e Ye ld e ll

Lena Wal ker

S a ra h Yo u n g

Cal l ie Wal l er

Ti m o t h y Yo u n g

Leslie War den

Kim Zacher y

G l im er ine War e

Ma ri c a Z a n gri

Rochel l e War e

Jessica Zanniky

J am es War ner

Mi s t i Z e r ge r

S teve Washam

S h e i la Z o lt o w s k i

Frank and P aul a Washin gt o n M arjor ie Water s M ar y Watkins-Br adl ey M aria Watl ey Patric ia Watson S usan Watts-Bow ker J anet Weaver J ason Webster M ar y Weeter D ave Wehba D ebo r ah Wel c h

PASS-THROUGH GIFTS In recognition of donors who have given to the Oklahoma City Public Schools utilizing The Foundation for a pass-through donation. Car yn L. Adams

M isti Wel c h

Edward and Sue Addington

Rebe c c a Wel c h

Gretchen Bar tee

Lisa Wer nic k

David and Susan Bize

84

STARS OF GIVING

Southeast High School Alumni Class of 1972 Patrick and Karen Stephens Stuar t Hall Proper ties Clayton and Marnie Taylor Vera Taylor Ralph and Barbara Thompson The Tommie Harris Foundation Jon Trushenski

Bockus, Payne & As s o c i a t es A rchite cts The Boldt Com pa ny Cobb A rchite ctu re L . L . C . / Engine e ring C o . Com m e rcial Car p et Contractors Conne lly Paving J im Coole y Cons t ru c t i o n, I nc . D ole se Brothe rs C o m p a ny E.V. Cox Constru c t i o n Com pany Elliott + A ssociat es Arc hi t ec t s Mark Eudale y S t ru c t u ra l Engine e rs, Inc. Fox Building Sup p ly Frankfur t-Shor t-Bru za A ssociate s, P.C . Globe Construct i o n C o . C.H. Gue r nse y & C o m p a ny Harrison-Orr A ir Conditioning L L C Howard-Fairbair n S i t e D es i g n, Inc. J .L. Walke r Cons t ru c t i o n J ivide n and Com p a ny, P. L . L . C . Lippe r t Brothe rs , I nc . LWPB A rchite cts & P la nners , P.C. MBK A rchite cts/ P la nners , P C Me the ny Concre t e P ro d u c t s , Inc. MA + A rchite cture L L C HSE A rchite cts Nashe r t Constru c t o rs , I nc . Osbor ne Ele ctric C o m p a ny Powe rSm ith Cog enera t i o n Proje ct, LP PSA Consulting Eng i neers The Sm all Group , L L C Sm ith & Picke l C o ns t ru c t i o n, I nc . Sm ith, R obe r ts & Baldischwile r, L L C Southwe ste r n R o o f i ng & Met a l Standard Roofin g C o . , I nc . Triad D e sign Gr o u p , I nc . R on Ward Inve st m ent s Z ahl-Ford, Inc.

Warren and Katherine Vieth Dan and Nicolle Walters

MAPS FOR KIDS ANNUAL GIVING FROM CONSTRUCTION COMPANIES In recognition of companies fulfilling multi-year commitments to the Foundation during the constr uction phase of MAPS for Kids. A lbright Ste e l & Wire Com pany A nde rson & House , Inc. A rchite ctural D e sign Group, Inc. A ssociate d Glass Com pany Be ck A ssociate s A rchite cts The Be nham Com panie s, Inc. Board of Director/Foundation Staff

OKCPS Employee


5225 N. Shartel, Suite 201 Oklahoma City, OK 73118

II

SECTION TITLE


Stars of Education Magazine 2012-2013  

Celebrating those who make a difference

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