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The Newsletter of Chelmsford Advanced Motorists

Can you overtake safely? www.iamchelmsford.org.uk Issue 104 February & March 2014 IAM Group 7223 Registered Charity No 1059372


Congratulations Here are some of our successful members receiving their certificate from our Chairman Scott Bannister Graham Whicker A member of my family passed their IAM test and I felt that the gauntlet had been thrown down! Clifford taught me many new aspects of safe driving techniques and I would like to express my sincere thanks to him and Scott for their time and encouragement.

Observer Clifford Murira

Bert Tolaini My Observer made the whole experience a pleasure. His knowledge of Essex roads, and the routes he chose, covered a wide variety of highways and their associated hazards, and were great fun to drive. I offer my many thanks to Scott for his time, knowledge, and perseverance; and to Pat Clements for her input on my mock test.

Observer Scott Bannister

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Forthcoming Group Meetings These are usually held on the 2nd Monday of each month at the Essex Police Sports and Social Club, Which is through the Police vehicle park at the very end of St. Margarets Road, Chelmsford. Group Meetings start promptly at 8pm, so please arrive at around 7.45pm.

CM2 6DS

http://www.essexexplorer.co.uk/cam.kmz

Associates, Full Members & Guests Welcome Date

Topic

Speaker

Monday 10th March

Autoglym

Grant Widdowson

Monday 7th April

Watch this space

Make a note in your diary and please be there! Disclaimer—Please note that the views and opinions expressed in this Newsletter are those of the individual writers and they do not necessarily reflect those of the Institute of Advanced Motorists, nor those of the Chelmsford and District Group of Advanced Motorists. Their accuracy has not been verified. Notice—Data Protection Act: records are held of members personal details submitted on their application form. The information will be used solely for the Group’s administration purposes and will not be passed to any third party.

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to our new Associate and Full Members. We look forward to seeing and talking to them at our monthly Group nights David Sheppard

Braintree

Ray Crowther

Tolleshunt Major

Brian Skelton

Chelmsford

Ivan Conner

Chelmsford

John Williams

Chelmsford

Adam Harkin

Brentwood

Andy Cooper

Chelmsford

Craig Fowler

Wickford

We are a friendly bunch, so don’t be worried about coming to our Group nights if you are on your own. Make yourself known to John who will greet you at the desk, he will find one of us to come and talk to you. John will also try to get you to part with some money for the raffle. There will be Senior Observers, Observers and generally an Examiner at the evening and you will be able to get answers to any questions that you have. Please come along, we’ll even give you tea or coffee and there is a bar - for light refreshments obviously! Terry Joyce

VED No it’s not a new sexually transmitted disease. Vehicle Excise Duty or what we used to call car tax. You have probably heard that from October you will no longer need to display your tax or should I say Vehicle Excise Duty Disk (VEDD) in your car but did you know that you can pay for it by direct debit? See http://www.hmrc.gov.uk/tiin/vehicle-excise-dd.pdf You can pay either monthly, bi-annually or annually and enjoy the administrative convenience of having their licence renewed automatically. At present, paying VED bi-annually attracts a surcharge of 10 per cent. Biannual and monthly payments made by direct debit will attract a lower 5 per cent surcharge. Terry Joyce Page 4

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Congratulations to these latest Members of our Group who have Passed

‘The Test’. Roll No

Name

Test Date

Observer

1007

Simon Poluck

24th November

Scott Bannister

1008

Gavin Whitelaw

4th December

Scott Bannister

1009

Bert Tolaini

7th December

Scott Bannister

1010

Sam Milchem

20th December

Scott Bannister

1011

Gary Wells

23rd January

Scott Bannister

To all those people who have passed their test: It would be appreciated if you could write a few words thanking your Observer and maybe something about the process and your test, to give those New Associates an insight into the process of learning Advanced Driving.

Please remember: Do telephone both your Observer and Scott Bannister ( Associates Co-ordinator ) immediately after your test. Page 5

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From the Chairman Hi there all and welcome to 2014. As I write this, Chinese New Year has hit so welcome to the year of the horse too. I don’t know if it’s the horse that has brought us all this wet stuff but it’s getting a bit tedious. Don’t you yearn for the good old days of threatened droughts. Remember when the underground reservoirs were practically exhausted and it would take 100 years to replenish them? I suspect everything is fine on that front now. I don’t know why I’m complaining – given the choice of water or sub-zero temperatures it’s water every time for me, and it makes life interesting on drives with associates. You never know what level of flooding is round the next bend. Several parts of my well-trodden routes have been deep enough to force an about turn and I have to think where to go. Not easy thinking at my age!! I don’t know if we are some kind of economic barometer that would be of use to the Bank of England, but during the depths of the recession, numbers coming through our doors fell off a cliff, but now things seem to be picking up a little which is very encouraging. I like a steady stream of new associates for me to nag. Wouldn’t want to get out of practise !!

Scott

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~~~~~~~~ Editorial ~~~~~~~~ Hello, Thank you to those of you that have contributed to this edition. Please keep the letters and articles coming. This is the 46th edition of this newsletter that I have produced and it is increasingly difficult to think of interesting articles to write, so I would appreciate any help that you can give me, even if it is ideas. Do you have a pet hate? Why not let off steam and let me know about it. Please check out page 15 for our group nights in 2014. There will be more information about them and any events that we are organising in the next edition. Many Thanks to Sue Sweetland for her patient and educated assistance in producing this Newsletter.

Terry Joyce

Please contact me by email at terry.joyce@iamchelmsford.org.uk Page 7

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Group contact information Our Group Enquiry number: - 07757 399897 Honorary Life Members

Mr Mike Corbett, Mr Glyn Jarrett, Mrs Ruth Jarrett, Mr Dave Travers, Mr Colin Snow.

Committee Chairman Associates Co-ordinator & Chief Observer

Scott Bannister

Secretary

Steve Wright

Treasurer

John Johnston

Membership Secretary

Ken Carrington

Website Editor

Jon Ward

Newsletter Editor

Terry Joyce

Events Organiser

Sally Langley

Publicity

John Stone

Group Contact

Susan Sweetland

External Events

Pat Clements

Committee Member

Dr Clifford Murira

Committee Member

John Ockmore

Committee Member

Anthony Marchant

Committee Member

Gary Silver

Committee Member

Ken Howard

Observer Examiner

Gaynor Manthorpe

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terry.joyce@iamchelmsford.org.uk

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Roadcraft The latest edition of Roadcraft has 13 Chapters, each divided into several Sections and has been prepared with the oversight of a Standing Advisory Board, which included representatives from major police and civilian driving organisations. ‘The system of car control’ is in Chapter 2 not 3 as in the previous edition. The chapter starts with a section titled ‘The need for a system of car control’, which hasn’t changed significantly. In the old version there are three bubbles with text in which have now become three rectangles. In the first, 'Strategic skills' has become 'human factors/the purpose of the journey'. The only change is that it asks “Are you aware of your own driving abilities and limitations?” In the second, 'Tactical skills' has become 'The traffic situation' and two questions are asked, “What are the prevailing weather and road conditions? and “How are other road users likely to behave?” In the third, 'Operational skills' has become 'Vehicle control'. The question asked is “Are you familiar with the capabilities of your vehicle?” I think it is now recognised that the weakness in the 'System' is the person using it! To emphasise this the book shows graphically the taking, giving and using of information. When moving on to IPSGA, under the heading ''Take information', there is a new paragraph, 'Obtain information through your other senses as well as your eyes. Sounds such as a horn or siren can warn you of other road users. Smells such as diesel or a bonfire can alert you to hazards such as spills or smoke.' In the acceleration phase, the authors have removed a couple of significant sentences, which are: Use the accelerator to maintain speed and stability through the hazard. Depress the accelerator sufficiently to offset any loss of speed due to cornering forces.' Why do you think they have removed them? There are three new pages, 37, 38 and 39. They cover 'Overlapping' and I'll cover these in the next article. Terry Joyce Roadcraft can be bought from most book or online stores, have a look at http://www.desktopdriving.co.uk/ and use police drivers handbook as the search. Page 9

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It's the wettest winter for years and goodness, don't you feel sorry for the residents of the Somerset Levels, some of whom have been cut off by the floods for weeks now? Heavy (or even light) rain seems to bring out the worst in some drivers - no reduction in their speed, far too close to the vehicle in front and above all, no lights! Even if they know where the switch is, it seems to be far too difficult actually to use it. Don't you just love it when there's a line of cars coming towards you and there's one without lights which has "disappeared"? This isn't just me on my soapbox again, it is a serious problem and in many cases it's also unlawful. And, oh yes, to add to the general fun of driving in wet weather, have you noticed that owners of black and darkcoloured vehicles are among the worst offenders? All present company is excepted of course as Advanced Drivers do it with headlights on. Sadly, we seem to be losing our traffic police because of budget cuts but with each KSI* collision costing in excess of a million pounds, I can't help thinking that somewhere along the line we have got our priorities wrong. Susan Sweetland *Killed or Seriously Injured

Our Observers Ron Adams

Graham Lowe

Scott Bannister

Gaynor Manthorpe

Pat Clements

Janet Miller

Philip Cooper

Dr Clifford Murira

Paul Crosby

John Ockmore

Jamie Drummond

Roger Spall

Max Ford

Lawrence Tattersall

Tony Hawes

John Tullett

Helen Jeffries

Mark Warbey

Terry Joyce

Brian Williams

Rob Laird

Rob Wise

George Locker

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Overtaking I was thinking of what to write about in this edition of Forward Vision and I thought 'overtaking would be a good subject because generally we don't get to do many overtakes these days. When talking about not many overtakes I mean on single carriageway roads. We obviously do overtake other vehicles, such as parked cars or when we're on a dual carriageway or motorway and although the technique of overtaking will be included in these the practical aspect is easier. Overtaking is a complex subject and for reference I have used Roadcraft, The Official Highway Code, the internet and my experience. Roadcraft has 26 pages on the subject, so I am not going to be able to cover everything in this article. The Highway Code has rules 135-138, 162-169, 214-215, 230, 267-269, 288 and 301 which I believe are applicable. Do you know of any others? My intention is to give you an overview of the subject, make you aware of the hazards but not put you off overtaking. Before moving on I must talk about your car or the vehicle which you are driving. With a lot of car manufactures trying to meet low emission targets, the performance of some of the cars produced suffers significantly so this needs to be taken into account when carrying out some manoeuvres like overtaking. Part of Advanced Driving is to know the capabilities of the car that you are driving. Overtaking is a complex and hazardous manoeuvre. Yes it is but don't let that put you off. Roadcraft states that the key safety points to consider before overtaking are: Do I need to? Is it necessary or appropriate in the circumstances? Is my vehicle capable of overtaking? I would like to add another, are you capable of overtaking? A well planned and well executed overtaking manoeuvre is no more dangerous than any other. The important thing to remember is that you should avoid impulsive, opportunist overtakes. Continued on Page 12 Page 11

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Overtaking continued

Before I move on, have a look at these statistics which researchers at Nottingham University determined when studying police records of overtaking collisions: 35% hit a vehicle turning right as the overtaking vehicle was attempting to pass 16% hit a vehicle travelling in the opposite direction 10% side swiped the vehicle being overtaken 8% lost control whilst overtaking or returning to the nearside lane 6% hit a vehicle which was turning or crossing at a junction 14% involved 'undertaking' (passing on the left) 5% resulted from evasive action taken by a driver when attempting to avoid someone else's risky overtaking manoeuvre. Here are some more statistics from RoSPA.

Table 1: Motorcyclist casualties in overtaking manoeuvres Severity of Injury

Casualties involved in overtaking manoeuvres

Total number of motorcyclist casualties

Percentage in overtaking manoeuvres

Killed

95

588

16%

Serious

867

6,149

14%

Slight

2,407

16,722

10%

All severities

3,369

23,459

14%

Table 2: Car occupant casualties in overtaking manoeuvres Severity of Injury

Casualties involved in overtaking manoeuvres

Total number of car occupant casualties

Percentage in overtaking manoeuvres

Killed

80

1,432

6%

Serious

484

11,535

4%

Slight

3,853

148,466

3%

All severities

4,417

161,433

3%

Continued on Page 13

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Overtaking continued

Depending on the circumstances preparing to overtake and overtaking will need you to process lots of information and keep processing new information as the manoeuvre develops. It takes good judgement, experience and practice to get it right. You need to consider the primary hazard (the car that you want to overtake) and any secondary hazards. Also we need to talk about speed differential. When overtaking you need approximately a fifteen mile an hour differential. What I mean by that is if the car you are considering overtaking is doing 45mph on a 60mph road, assuming you have enough road you should if there are no other hazards have a reasonable chance of overtaking it within the speed limit. Other numbers that might help you make your decision. At 30mph you will cover approximately 44 feet in one second, at 40mph: 58 feet, at 50mph: 73 feet and of course at 60mph: 88 feet. These figures can help you make other decisions in advanced driving. Firstly, 'Information'. Once you have checked all around your car, not just in front and behind and the car that you want to overtake, ask yourself, have I got enough road? Can I get back in safely? 'Position', once you are happy you are able to overtake, move into the following position. The following position is closer than you would normally allow. This position reduces the need to close up a lot of space immediately prior to overtaking and enables the manoeuvre to be completed quicker and over a shorter distance. You must, however, compensate for the lack of separation distance by increasing your scanning. You may need to adjust your road position to the right or left in order to maximise forward vision. This position should not be adopted indefinitely. Driving in this position places increased stress levels on the drivers of both the overtaking vehicle and the target vehicle. If an overtaking opportunity does not seem to be likely in the short term, resume your usual following distance. Your 'Speed' should be matching the car in front. At this point move across the white line without accelerating. Once in this position you will get more information, provided everything that you have already considered is still alright you can then select a 'Gear' if you need it and 'Accelerate'. As you reach the rear of the car that you are overtaking, confirm again that there is no reason why you shouldn't continue to overtake. Once you have safely passed them, move back in giving them as much room as possible. Overtaking is not a simple manoeuvre but it is one we should practice, even if we don't carry it out, so that when the opportunity arises it becomes much easier. There is far more than I have covered here, so please read Roadcraft to get the full picture. Why not ask an Observer if they can go over the overtaking manoeuvre with you. Terry Joyce

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Young Driver Scheme Do you know of anyone who is not 17 years of age, but wants to learn how to drive? Chelmsford IAM group supports this road safety scheme to give people the opportunity to learn basic car control skills in Driving School Dual Controlled cars on private land before they go on the public Highway. Lessons, lasting for one hour, are run on the third Sunday of most months at Earls Colne (near Coggeshall). There is an initial Registration Fee of ÂŁ30 which covers registration and the first one hour lesson. Subsequent lessons cost ÂŁ25. Lessons must be booked in advance. The scheme is intended primarily for 16 year-olds but, if vacancies permit, places may be offered to 15 year-olds or even to older people who are nervous about

getting behind the wheel (again, or for the first time). Full details of the scheme, a letter from Essex Police and a map may be viewed, and the application Form can be downloaded, from www.youngdriverscheme.org Alternatively, forms may be obtained from the YDS Organiser. Nicola Hyland, 67 Main Road, St Lawrence Bay, Southminster, CM0 7NA Dedicated Mobile number 07847 645632 or yds@iamchelmsford.org.uk

Notification of Events There has been a lot of positive feedback from events organised by the Group. If you would like to be kept informed of any up and coming events please make sure that l has your current email address.

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Group Nights & Events 2014 Please make a note in your diary Monday 10th March

Autoglym

Monday 7th April

Watch this space

Monday 12th May

Kelvedon Clocks will be giving us a talk on “One man’s horological (clock & watch) collection”. Chris will happily look at any watches or clocks that people might like to bring along on the evening, after we break for tea/coffee.

Monday 9th June

Manoeuvring in the car park

Monday 14th July

Watch this space

Monday 11th August

Watch this space

Monday 8th September

Watch this space

Monday 13th October

Watch this space

Monday 10th November

Watch this space

Monday 8th December

Xmas Quiz

Grant Widdowson

Chris Papworth

Grand Competition Our group will shortly be taking delivery of some locally produced wine and we need ideas for an appropriate label to stick on the front. These will be used as raffle prizes and gifts to speakers but if we have any spare we will sell at a huge mark-up – well, probably at cost price. Anyway, designs most welcome and the winner gets a free bottle of red or white with their prize-winning label on. I have many talents, but being artistic is not one of them so any input very welcome. Competition entries to scott.bannister@iamchelmsford.org.uk

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Your Group Needs You

Since numbers of new associates has picked up a bit from the depths of the recession, we are currently looking to train another 4 observers. Anybody interested, please contact Scott Bannister scott.bannister@iamchelmsford.org.uk

Group External Events Plans are already a foot, if not several feet, to arrange a session on the skid pan for the Autumn. Date not yet fixed. We are also looking to have two Driver Experience Days at Dunton. One in the Spring and the other in the Autumn – again no date fixed as we go to press. To register your interest in either/both, contact Scott Bannister scott.bannister@iamchelmsford.org.uk The skid pan session is not done in your own car (you’ll doubtless be pleased to hear) and is an excellent preparation for the Winter. Quite apart from the educational aspect, it’s really good fun. The Driver Experience Days at Ford’s test track at Dunton are a chance to push your own car just a little further than you normally do on public roads and you will end up with a much better understanding of what your car does and does not do at the end of it. Once again, it will put a smile on your face. As we go to press, I’m trying to organise an articulated lorry for us all to have a go at – nice to know what it’s like driving one of those beasts. As to cost – the skid pan will cost you £40 which is well under half what you would pay if you tried to go it alone, and Dunton will cost you £10 – which all goes to Essex Air Ambulance.

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Highway Code Changes in the New Highway Code (2007) Š Crown copyright 2007

The other bits Annexes Motor vehicle documentation and learner driver requirements Insurance. To use a motor vehicle on the road, you MUST have a valid insurance policy. This MUST at least cover you for injury or damage to a third party while using that motor vehicle. Before driving any motor vehicle, make sure that it has this cover for your use or that your own insurance provides adequate cover. You MUST NOT drive a motor vehicle without insurance. Also, be aware that even if a road traffic incident is not your fault, you may still be held liable by insurance companies. Law RTA 1988 sect 143

Uninsured drivers can now be automatically detected by roadside cameras. Further to the penalties for uninsured driving listed on page 126, an offender’s vehicle can now be seized by the Police, taken away and crushed. Law RTA 1988, sects 165a & 165b

The types of cover available are indicated below: Third-Party insurance - this is often the cheapest form of insurance, and is the minimum cover required by law. It covers anyone you might injure or whose property you might damage. It does not cover damage to your own motor vehicle or injury to yourself. Third-Party, Fire and Theft insurance - similar to third-party, but also covers you against your motor vehicle being stolen, or damaged by fire. Comprehensive insurance - this is the most expensive but the best insurance. Apart from covering other persons and property against injury or damage, it also covers damage to your own motor vehicle, up to the market value of that vehicle, and personal injury to yourself. Third-Party, Fire and Theft insurance - similar to third-party, but also covers you against your motor vehicle being stolen, or damaged by fire. Comprehensive insurance - this is the most expensive but the best insurance. Apart from covering other persons and property against injury or damage, it also covers damage to your own motor vehicle, up to the market value of that vehicle, and personal injury to yourself.

This annexe covering insurance has been modified and extended to include uninsured drivers and types of insurance cover. Page 17

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One in five drivers is over 65 There are now more than seven million drivers over the age of 65 on the UK’s roads, according to road safety charity, the Institute of Advanced Motorists (IAM). The number of drivers over 65 reached 7,191,192 in November 2013. This makes up 19 per cent of all drivers with full driving licences. The figures come from driving licence data published by the DVLA in December 2013. They also show that: ♦

There are 4,068,498 drivers over the age of 70

There are 1,101,779 drivers over the age of 80

195 drivers are over 100 years old

Of the drivers over 65, 367,711 or five per cent have points on their licence. For drivers over seventy the figure is 195, 773 or five per cent with points and 35,498, three per cent of drivers over 80 have points. This compares favourably with middle-aged drivers. The age group most likely to have points on their licence is 42 year-olds. Of the 816,915 licence holders in that group, 82,929 or 10 per cent have points. For younger drivers the figures are 3, 339, 826 licence holders, 270,817 with points, or 8 per cent. This supports research by the IAM that shows that older drivers are in fact safer than many other drivers. Where older drivers have slower reaction times, they use their experience on the road to compensate by driving at slower speeds on all occasions and allowing more space between them and other road users. IAM chief executive Simon Best said: “In twenty year’s time, one in ten people will be over 80 years old. Responding to an older population is a significant policy issue for government, health and transport agencies – a greater number of people will require help with their mobility and acting now can ensure the right support networks are in place as numbers increase. Easy access to driving assessments, better advice from the medical profession and car and road designs that mitigate the effects of ageing should all be top in 2014. The overarching policy aim should be to keep people independent and driving safer for as long as possible http://data.gov.uk/dataset/driving-licence-data. http://www.iam.org.uk/media-and-research/research/reports/20276-holding-back-the-gears-the-ageing-process-and-driver-safety

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CHELMSFORD ADVANCED MOTORISTS LIBRARY LIST DVDs Drive Smarter, Essential know-how for your driving career (2 copies) By Gem Motoring Assist Roadcraft, The Police Driver’s Course on Advanced Driving By The Police Foundation

PC CD-ROMs The Interactive Highway Code HMSO/ Interactive Driving Systems Hazard Perception Test

HMSO/Oasis

BOOKS Roadcraft Human Aspects of Police Driving The Tyre Digest (2 copies)

TSO Scottish Police College Michelin

Driving Abroad

Robert Davies

The Official Highway Code Rev. 2007 Edition

HMSO

The Official Guide to Accompanying L-Drivers

DSA

Sideways to Victory

Roger Clark

The Myway Code

Ian Vince/Dan Kieran

Paul Ripley’s Expert Driving

Daily Telegraph

The Inner Game of Tennis

W Timothy Gallwey

Mind Driving

Stephen Haley

Older Drivers – Safe or Unsafe? Traffic– Why we drive the way we do Boreham, A History of the Racing Circuit

IAM Tom Vanderbilt Bryan Jones & John Frankland

CDs Awake, Driver Reviver

THINK

Advanced Road Craft

Bespoke Driving Training

The Driving Test – Your Licence to Drive

IAM/Safety on the Move

If you have any books etc from the Library can you please contact Scott Bannister Page 19

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Letters & emails On all matters relating to motoring and the Chelmsford Group, this newsletter or your experiences in preparing for or taking your test are most welcome. Why did I do the IAM course – well a member of my family passed their IAM test and I felt the gauntlet had been thrown down! It seemed to take a long time as either I, or my observer Dr Clifford kept spending time abroad working for various charities. I must admit that Clifford taught me many new aspects of safe driving techniques and I would like to express my sincere thanks to him and Scott for their time and encouragement. During my test I was driving through a hamlet near my home which has a 30 mph limit but after passing the village green and through into non residential country lane I started to accelerate only to see the national speed limit sign round the next bend! I kept quiet but at the end of the test the examiner asked if I had anything to say – I came clean but feel I should have acknowledged it at the time. This summer I drove a Ford Transit full of Humanitarian Aid, with UK Aid which is based in Felsted, out to Chernihiv in Ukraine (40 miles due East of Chernobyl) where the motorways had signs for “U” turns. Luckily they were not busy, but you had to watch out for the odd horse and cart. It was a round journey of 3400 miles and I am sure my training helped keep me safe. I know they are always looking for drivers so if any of you are interested, have a look at their website for further details. http:// www.uk-aid.org/ Would I recommend the course – certainly. Graham Whicker ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ Preparing for and taking the IAM Test Last summer, my son Simon took my 16 year old grandson to Earls Colne, and enrolled him in the IAM Young Driver Scheme. The instructor there told them about the IAM Skills for Life Programme, and Simon suggested that he and I should join. Our idea was that improving our driving skills would be useful, not just for ourselves; but that it may in some way also help our grandsons. Having driven cars for well over 50 years, I had always regarded my self, as we all do I suppose , as a “good” driver, with no need to change any of my driving habits. My first drive did not, however, impress Scott. Continued on page 21

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Letters & emails

continued

My driving was somewhat systematic, but the wrong system, that went back to the age of “brake fade,” when you were encouraged to use the gearbox before brakes. So the shock of having to change to IPSGA was tempered by the objectives of understanding, and meeting, the other principles of the Roadcraft Manual, and the Highway Code. My Observer -Scott - made the whole experience a pleasure. His knowledge of Essex roads, and the routes he chose, covered a wide variety of highways and their associated hazards, and were great fun to drive. His understanding of the system, and insistence on attention to detail, soon made me realize that focus, compliance and concentration, were not an option. I passed the test in the South Essex area in early December 2013 and I have become obsessive in making every drive as fault free as I can. I offer my many thanks to Scott for his time, knowledge, and perseverance; and to Pat Clements for her input on my mock test. As Scott says “Now you just have to live up to it” Bert Tolaini ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ Dear Terry, I read your recent winter tyres update with interest. However I had a little nagging feeling that maybe insurers may have something to say about them. My worry was that they could use it as an excuse for not paying out if “non-standard” tyres were fitted. Even if it were a no fault collision they would love any reason not to pay out. I did a little digging and found some interesting information. The AA states that all four tyres must be changed or it could affect the stability and balance of the car. I imagine this is because they have different characteristics under breaking. See http://www.theaa.com/motoring_advice/safety/winter-tyres-in-the-uk.html Some insurers require you to inform them if you fit winter tyres. (Association of British Insurers) https://www.abi.org.uk/Insurance-and-savings/Products/Motor-insurance/Winter-tyres Note the link to a list of insurers. The information is unclear and the only way is to check with your insurer. Another thought occurred to me. What if they are left on during the summer, are you covered then? I guess you could equally say ‘am I covered if I don’t fit them in the winter?’ The devil is in the detail. Having Summer/Regular tyres on in the winter is OK because they are a “Standard” fit recommended by the car manufacturer. Having winter tyres on in the summer is “Non Standard” and not a manufacturer recommendation. I am sure the debate will run on, but food for thought. Regards Andy Henderson Page 21

Chelmsford Advanced Motorists

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A Winter’s Tale I bought four Kumho "KW23" tyres for my Mazda MX-5, these are 185/60R14 82T which is a "high speed" winter tyre rated to 118mph. The wheels are genuine Mazda ones, which were £20 for the set of four (!) plus the cost of a day trip to Dereham to collect them. Storing the alloy wheels and tyres is easy enough (see picture on page 23) and the cost of swapping in the spring and autumn is nil, just a half hour with the jack and a wheel brace. All I need is a nice bit of plate glass for the top. The other two can go in the garden shed. Well this is my solution! The original tyres for this car are 195/50R15 82V, i.e. a larger wheel with a wider and lower profile tyre. The outside diameter of the new tyres is the same, which keeps the speedometer and mileage readings correct, and the offset of the new wheels keeps the rims in the same lateral position relative to the hubs which is apparently very important to retain the handling of an MX-5. Both tyre sizes are given on the car itself, on a metal plate on the driver's door, but Mazda specify a V-rated tyre for this car. A change to a winter tyre represents a modification to the vehicle, which my insurance company require to record. They also want to be told when I put the original wheels and tyres back in the Spring, which seems a bit excessive given 15-minute call centre waiting, but at least they don't charge for this. They reserve the right to invalidate your insurance if you don't tell them about modifications. I noticed the new tyres as soon as I reached 30 mph after I left the tyre depot. The car drove as though it was a dry day in June instead of a damp December; the MX-5 is a communicative thing to drive but this seems incredible pottering out of town and then driving ten miles gently home to start scrubbing the surface off the rubber. We might imagine the narrower tyre section will have a lower rolling resistance and I will use less petrol; I am sure the taller section will give a more compliant ride and I'm hopeful the concrete parts of the A12 will be revealing here. We are told to renew tyres when they are six years old. If you swap tyres every six months you will need to cover more than 10,000 miles a year to get good value for money, and avoid scrapping part-worn tyres. We know that winter tyres perform better throughout the year than the car manufacturer's original fitments ... and so I wonder how soon the manufacturers will be rebranding their winter tyres as "all year" tyres for the UK market. They make the car feel like it has a better poise on the road with lighter and tighter handling and less tyre noise, but this seems a bit over the top for ten miles. I need to drive them more and harder and in bad weather before I write more about their performance. I will try to measure the tread depth over the next four months too. I saw a "designer" coffee table made out of a worn-out Formula 1 tyre, which gave me the idea for the photo. It does need a top if I keep it. Richard Gawler

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Chelmsford Advanced Motorists

Issue 104


Neat Winter Tyre storage solution

Regent Street Motor Show Saturday 1st November The annual Motor Show is a unique free London motor show in one of the capital city's most famous streets. In 2013 the event attracted 400,000 visitors with displays of more than 300 cars spanning 125 years of motoring from the earliest 19th Century veterans to the very latest supercars stretching from Piccadilly Circus in the south to Oxford Circus in the north. See more in Extra 1

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Chelmsford Advanced Motorists

Issue 104


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Chelmsford Advanced Motorists

Issue 104


Extra bits With this the electronic version of Forward Vision I am not limited by the amount of pages that there are in the paper one, so I am taking this opportunity to add an extra section. On this page are is a snippet from the motoring world.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ More from Page 23

Regent Street Motor Show Saturday 1st November The annual Regent Street Motor Show is a unique free-to-view London motor show in one of the capital city's most famous streets. In 2013 the event attracted 400,000 visitors with displays of more than 300 cars spanning 125 years of motoring from the earliest 19th Century veterans to the very latest supercars. Stretching from Piccadilly Circus in the south to Oxford Circus in the north. The event also previews the Bonhams London to Brighton Veteran Car Run and includes the EFG Concours d’Elegance featuring many of the extraordinary pre-1905 vehicles that will be driving from Hyde Park to the Sussex seaside resort on the following day. With its unique atmosphere and camaraderie, the Bonhams London to Brighton Veteran Car Run (staged specifically as a non-profit making veneration) commemorates the Emancipation Run of 14th November 1896, which celebrated the Locomotives on the Highway Act. The Act raised the speed limit for ‘light locomotives’ from 4 to 14mph, and abolished the need for these vehicles to be preceded by a man on foot waving a red flag. The Emancipation Run was first re-enacted in 1927 and has taken place every November since, with the exception of the war years and 1947 when petrol was rationed. The Royal Automobile Club has managed the Run with the support of the Veteran Car Club since 1930. For more information visit: www.veterancarrun.com. Terry Joyce Extra

Chelmsford Advanced Motorists

Issue 104


Wanted - toy cars Best known for its collection of iconic cars, the National Motor Museum at Beaulieu is putting out an appeal for cars of a different kind. As part of a Guinness World Record attempt for the Longest Line of Toy Cars, Beaulieu is asking for donations of toy cars, in order to smash the current record of 9,795, set in Guatemala last December. The attempt will be held in the grounds of the Beaulieu attraction with a continuous line, one kilometre long, of at least 10,000 cars placed end to end, starting and finishing inside the National Motor Museum. After the record attempt, the toys will be sold and the proceeds donated to Naomi House & Jacksplace hospices for children and young adults. Sainsbury’s is supporting the appeal, with collection boxes in 21 stores in the South coast region from Monday 10th February, to enable their customers to donate toy cars. Local schools are also joining in the appeal and there will be boxes in Naomi House charity shops. Sainsbury’s spokesman, Phil Bridgwater, said:” This is an ideal event for our customers to get involved in, supporting a charity everyone can relate to. Sainsbury’s customers never fail to rise to a challenge and I have no doubt they will speed their way to the number of cars required.” To qualify, donated cars can be of any type designed to be played with by hand including cars, lorries, tractors and quad bikes, but not large enough for children to sit on. Toy cars can also be donated by visitors to the Beaulieu attraction and children who bring two or more toy cars during February half-term and on the day of the record attempt, can enter for half price. The attempt will take place on Bank Holiday Monday, 5th May. Katie Hamilton for Naomi House said: We would like to thank Beaulieu, Sainsbury’s and other sponsors of this Guinness World Record attempt. We are sure everyone will want to be part of it and are delighted that Naomi House will benefit.” Waste management company, Biffa has provided all the collection boxes and Chandler’s Ford based Quayline Digital has printed 22,000 advertising leaflets free of charge. For more information and listing of collection points visit:

www.beaulieu.co.uk/recordattempt Extra 1

Chelmsford Advanced Motorists

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The links below are to websites that you may have an interest in. Please let me know if any of them are not working. Email me if you think of any websites that may be of interest.

IAM DrivingAdvice & Tips http://www.iam.org.uk/media-and-research/media-centre/driving-and-riding-tips

Online Highway Code http://www.direct.gov.uk/en/TravelAndTransport/Highwaycode/index.htm

Know your traffic signs http://www.direct.gov.uk/prod_consum_dg/groups/dg_digitalassets/@dg/@en/@motor/documents/digitalasset/dg_191955.pdf

Tyresafe http://www.tyresafe.org

Drive Alive http://www.drive-alive.co.uk

Heritage Motor Centre http://www.heritage-motor-centre.co.uk/

London Cyclist http://www.londoncyclist.co.uk/

Colchester: Some of the A12 can be seen on the left

www.iamchelmsford.org.uk

Forward Vision 104 February14  

Newsletter of Chelmsford Advanced Motorists

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