Page 1


Forum of Private Business


Forum of Private Business Health and Safety Guide First edition published

1997 22nd edition, April 2019

Published by

Forum of Private Business Ruskin Chambers Drury Lane Knutsford Cheshire WA16 6HA Telephone Email Website

01565 626001 info@fpb.org www.fpb.org

Copyright

Š Forum of Private Business 2019

ISBN

978-1-871929-51-5

All rights reserved other than templates. No part of this publication may be reproduced in any material form, whether by photocopying, scanning, downloading onto computer or otherwise, without the written permission of the copyright owners, except in accordance with the provisions of the Copyright, Designs and Patents Act 1988. Subscribers to the Guide have paid for an update and information service, which is non-transferable. The document itself remains the property of the Forum of Private Business. Any unauthorised or restricted act in relation to this publication may result in civil proceedings and/or criminal prosecution.

Disclaimer Each business is responsible for ensuring its own compliance with UK health and safety regulations. Whilst the Forum has taken every possible care to ensure the information contained in this guide is accurate at the time of going to press, the publishers cannot accept any liability for errors or omissions, however caused.

Health and Safety Guide 2019

i


Contents Introduction

i

Contents

ii

Health and Safety Guide – twenty-second edition

v

Introduction

vi

Health and safety management

ix

About the guide

x

Abbreviations

xi

Section 1a - Health and safety management systems

1

1

Insurances

3

2

Responsibility

4

3a Directors’ duties

5

3b Directors’ competencies

6

4

Enforcing authority inspections

7

5

Health and safety policy

9

6

Risk assessment

10

7

Accident and emergency procedures

13

8

Accident and incident recording and reporting

15

9

Accident investigation

21

10 Incident analysis

24

11 Young people

25

12 New and expectant mothers

27

13 Safety representatives/representatives of employee safety

30

14 Health and safety poster/leaflet

31

15 Health and safety training

32

16 Working time

37

17 Homeworking

40

18 Safety signs and signals

41

19 Workplace inspections

43

20 Working at height

45

ii Forum of Private Business


Contents 21 Lone working

49

22 Personal protective equipment (PPE)

50

23 Safe systems of work (SSoW)

55

24 Violence, bullying and harassment

58

25 Traffic management

59

26 Vehicle safety

60

27 Adverse weather

64

28 Fire precautions and arrangements

65

29 Electrical safety

69

30 Display screen equipment (DSE)

73

31 Work equipment (WE)

76

Section 1b - Occupational health and safety systems

80

1

First aiders and appointed persons

83

2

First aid provisions

85

3

First aid - mental health

87

4

Welfare provisions

88

5

Stress

92

6

Manual handling

93

Section 2 - Health and safety requirements for specific hazards

97

1

Contractors

101

2

Working on others’ premises

103

3

Hazardous substances (COSHH)

104

4

Biological hazards

110

5

Dangerous substances

114

6

Respiratory protective equipment (RPE)

123

7

Health assessment monitoring

126

8

Asbestos-containing materials (ACMs)

131

9

Noise

135

10 Vibration

137

Health and Safety Guide 2019 iii


Contents 11 Lead

139

12 Radiation

141

13 Hot work

145

14 Lifting equipment (LE) and lifting operations

147

15 Pressurised equipment

149

16 Oil and gas equipment

151

17 Confined spaces

153

18 Equality and diversity

154

19 Waste management

156

Section 3 - Health and Safety requirements for specific industries

159

1

Small office

163

2

Small shop

164

3

Building, construction and installation

165

a) Construction (Design and Management) (CDM)

166

b) Construction health, safety and welfare

170

c) Excavations

172

d) Confined spaces

173

4

Transport, haulage and distribution

174

5

Motor vehicle repair

180

6

Property and facilities management

184

7

Food industry

187

8

Warehousing

194

9

Care homes

197

10 Agriculture and rural businesses

204

11 Engineering

210

12 Contracting

214

13 License trade/brewers/distillers

216

14 Funeral directors

218

Templates

iv Forum of Private Business

221


Health and Safety Guide 22nd edition HSE’s ‘Helping Great Britain Work Well’ strategy states that: “Successful organisations understand that sensible and proportionate risk management is integral to delivering their business. This approach supports growth, enables innovation and protects an organisation’s most vital asset, its people. Positive outcomes can include reduced sickness absence, lower costs and a good reputation.”* Health and safety legislation applies to all businesses, no matter what size or sector you are in. Its importance cannot be overestimated as failing to comply can lead to prosecution with fines averaging £126,000** per case. As an employer, you are responsible for managing health and safety in your business and you need to ensure you are providing a safe working environment for employees, contractors, visitors and anyone else who might be affected by your operations. This new edition of the Forum’s Health and Safety Guide is a vital business resource to give you the peace of mind that you are fully up to speed when it comes to managing your legal health and safety duties. The simple guidance in checklist format will help you identify where you are already legally compliant and point to any action you need to take. This guide forms part of the Forum’s comprehensive support package to help members comply with legislation. We can also offer advice on all aspects of health and safety and offer audits, policies, assessments, procedures, inspections and training. Simply call our friendly helpline team on 01565 626001 to find out more.

*www.hse.gov.uk/strategy **statistics courtesy of HSE www.hse.gov.uk/statistics/enforcement.pdf?pdf=enforcement

Health and Safety Guide 2019 v


Introduction There are many reasons why companies should establish an effective health and safety management system. The first reason should always be to ensure that risks are sensibly and proportionately controlled so as to prevent accidents and injuries. Proportionate risk management essentially means that your effort to control an identified risk presented by your operations should be proportionate to the level of risk presented. If your operations are low risk then you need not devote an excessive volume of time, effort and resources to controlling those risks. However, you should not assume that a small business will present low risks. It is often assumed that the Health and Safety Executive (HSE) is responsible for all of the compliance pressures that businesses may feel themselves under. This is not always the case. The motivators for businesses to demonstrate that they are managing and developing their health and safety management systems beyond what is required by legislation and come from many sources including: •

Health and Safety Executive (HSE) – which is responsible for the enforcement of workplace health and safety legislation.

Insurance companies – keen to see companies manage health and safety so that their own financial risk is limited. This is reflected in the size of the premiums they require.

Solicitors – who may act on behalf of injured parties claiming that a company has been negligent with respect to civil law.

Fire authorities – which assess the suitability of and enforce fire safety measures.

Local authorities – which are, in general, the main enforcing authority for retail, wholesale distribution and warehousing, hotel and catering premises, offices and the consumer/leisure industries.

Equality and Human Rights Commission – which is the enforcing authority for the Equality Act 2006 with respect to equality and diversity.

Pre-Qualification Schemes – such as the Safety Scheme In Procurement (SSIP). This is an umbrella organisation that tries to facilitate mutual recognition between many competing procurement schemes in the UK, e.g. CHAS, SMAS, Constructionline, etc.

Environment Agency – which is the main enforcement body responsible for UK environmental legislation.

Police – who are responsible for investigating workplace fatalities (in conjunction with HSE) as well as other areas of law such as substance misuse in the workplace.

Commercial clients – who, as part of their own due diligence and contractor control procedures, wish to see evidence of effective health and safety management for their supply chains.

This is a long (but not exhaustive) list of motivators and, while it does not always have its roots in legal compliance, companies will nonetheless find themselves having to address their many requirements in order to operate their businesses successfully.

vi Forum of Private Business


The Forum of Private Business’s Health and Safety Guide is for you, the proprietor, partner or managing director, to help make sure you are aware of the many requirements for compliance with health and safety law, as well as all the other motivators that businesses need to take account of when allocating resources to health and safety management. The Guide has been produced to assist companies in addressing the many health and safety issues that they face. It is a guide only and does not replace your responsibility as an employer for the management of health and safety in your organisation. In following the Guide, you will need to provide additional documents to demonstrate that you can comply with the law. The Guide, and the information in it, does not constitute having access to competent health and safety advice, as is a strict legal requirement – the Forum of Private Business does not act directly as your health and safety advisors. It is to be used as a first step to establishing a successful health and safety management system. In addressing each of the subject areas within it, you may find that you need additional help and support. This can be obtained by calling the Forum of Private Business’s member helpline in the first instance on 01565 626001. The Management of Health and Safety at Work Regulations 1999 require that employers appoint one or more ‘competent persons’ to assist them in undertaking the measures needed to comply with legal requirements and prohibitions. The flowchart on page 34 will help you in appointing a competent person. Some of this assistance may come from competent individuals from inside a company. Note that this may be from more than one person. Many businesses develop in-house competence to manage their health and safety risks and do not need to use health and safety consultants. Developing in-house competence does not necessarily require formal health and safety qualifications; for low-risk businesses, following HSE guidance (such as Health and Safety Made Simple, www.hse.gov.uk/simple-health-safety) will normally be enough. Competency can be defined as: • Skills – having a specific range of skills or abilities to enable successful undertaking of the work • Knowledge – having a good working level of knowledge relevant to the proposed operation(s) • Experience – having experience of the same set of circumstances as presented by the task(s) at hand • Training – having a suitable level of training/qualifications to enable safe completion of the work. In terms of the skills mix, this may come from a single person or a team of people within an organisation, and could be supplemented by an external health and safety consultancy. However, any advice given by an external consultancy still has to be coordinated and implemented in-house. It is therefore important to address any shortcomings as far as in-house experience is concerned. This could mean a training programme so that you can start to have more ownership and hence more control over your own health and safety management. It must be noted that directors of a company (and sometimes individuals such as managers and supervisors) can be held personally liable for any health and safety failings or negligence, especially where there is a fatality.

Health and Safety Guide 2019 vii


The Management of Health and Safety at Work Regulations 1999 make it abundantly clear that, whoever you (the proprietor, partner or managing director) use as a ‘competent person’, whether employees or external consultants, it is YOU who is ultimately responsible for the management of health and safety within your business. You must understand that, while health and safety duties can be delegated as part of day-to-day operations, the ultimate responsibility can never be delegated. All of the information in this Health and Safety Guide can be used to develop safe systems of work (SSoW). These SSoW then need to be formally documented so that employees (and others) can be trained in them. In addressing these issues, you will help to ensure that your business can: • Be legally compliant

• Operate more efficiently

• Avoid criminal prosecution

• Operate more morally

• Avoid civil liability

• Reduce overheads

• Avoid high staff turnover rates

• Reduce insurance premiums

• Implement sensible risk control systems

• Demonstrate health and safety competence to clients

• Attract motivated and skilled staff • Operate more economically

viii Forum of Private Business

• Win more contracts.


Health and safety management D

AN

O

PL

Employers have a legal duty to put in place suitable arrangements to manage health and safety within their organisation. There are many different ways of managing your obligations, but the PDCA system is a fairly standard methodology.

D

AN

O

PL

PDCA

AN

D

• Identify the risk profile of the organisation.

EC

K

• Planning and coordination of the policy is essential for the management system to be effective.

• Coordinate the actions of those responsible for controlling the risks. K

EC

CH

AN

D O

PL

A

T

PDCA K

EC

CK

T

CH

D

AN

O

PL

CH E

A

C

A

T

EC

K

PDCA C

• An effective health and safety policy sets the strategic direction of the organisation.

CH

PDCA C

CH

T

O

PL

A

C

T

EC

A

C

K

PDCA

CH

• Implement a risk control system (RCS).

• Monitoring the effectiveness of the RCS is vital to measure performance. • Investigating accidents and incidents will help prevent recurrence and improve performance.

• Regular audit and review will enable confirmation that existing arrangements are still valid. • Incorporating results will allow lessons to be learnt for personnel and the organisation.

Health and Safety Guide 2019 ix


About the Guide The purpose of this Health and Safety Guide is to allow you to identify health and safety issues that are relevant to your business. Identifying which topics are relevant to your operations will help you to feel confident that your business complies with health and safety law and other business requirements. The Health and Safety at Work etc. Act 1974 places responsibility on business owners. Put simply, you have a duty of care to your employees and others who may be affected by what you do. You have duties to: • Yourself and your employees, including trainees, wherever they are working • Contractors and visitors to your business • Those affected by your work, for example neighbours or the general public • People who use the products you supply • Users of your services. The Forum of Private Business’s Health and Safety Guide 2019 is divided into three sections. Section 1 covers general health and safety topics – ALL businesses must complete this section. Section 2 identifies health and safety requirements relating to specific hazards – you should review this section to determine if any areas are applicable to your operations. Section 3 identifies further health and safety requirements for specific industries – you will only need to complete the topics that are relevant to your business (it may be that none of the topics are relevant). Each topic has a series of questions with tick boxes, designed to help ensure that you have considered the essential points. As you read through the topic, tick the boxes to show you have taken the point into consideration. The Guide will enable you to identify those areas where you need additional help in controlling the risks from your activities. If you discover serious issues while working through the Guide, they should be corrected immediately. After considering all the appropriate sections of the Guide, you are likely to have a list of areas needing further work. You should assess what you need to do and prioritise the actions. Developing your action plan and implementing it can depend on a number of factors including time, cost and resources. Your action plan should clearly identify realistic timescales for completion by named individuals. It is important that those involved can clearly see what is expected of them. Regular meetings during implementation of the plan will give individuals the chance to discuss their progress and any issues they may have. The action plan will also serve to keep everyone focused in achieving their goals. Note: Possession of this guide does not make you automatically compliant with the law or satisfy the many other motivators; it is purely a tool to aid you in the steps required to achieve a proportionate health and safety management system for your business. If you need further help, contact the Forum of Private Business’s member helpline on 01565 626001 or email info@fpb.org

x Forum of Private Business


Abbreviations ACoP

Approved code of practice

EAV

Exposure action value

ACM

Asbestos-containing material

EEA

European Economic Area

ADS

Approved Dosimetry Service

EICR

Electrical installation condition report

ATV

All-terrain vehicle

EL

Employers’ liability

BSiF

British Safety Industry Federation

ELV

Exposure limit value

CAT

Cable-avoidance tool

EFAW

Emergency first aid at work

CCTV

Closed-circuit television

EMAS

Employment Medical Advisory Service

CDM

Construction (Design and Management)

FAW

First aid at work

CNC

Computer numerically controlled

FFE

Firefighting equipment

COSHH

Control of substances hazardous to health

FFI

Fees for intervention

CQC

Care Quality Commission

FLT

Fork lift truck

DBS

Disclosure and Barring Service

FRA

Fire risk assessment

DGSA

Dangerous goods safety adviser

FRI lease

Full repairing and insuring lease

DQC

Driver qualification card

FSA

Food Standards Agency

Driver CPC

Driver certificate of professional competence

GDPR

General Data Protection Regulations

DSE

Display screen equipment

HACCP

Hazard analysis and critical control point

DVSA

Driver and Vehicle Standards Agency

HAVS

Hand-arm vibration syndrome

EAP

Emergency assembly point

HFL

Highly flammable liquid

Health and Safety Guide 2019 xi


Abbreviations HGV

Heavy goods vehicle

PCV

Passenger carrying vehicle

HPWJ

High pressure water jetting

PDCA

Plan Do Check Act

IN

Improvement notice

PEEP

Personal emergency evacuation plan

IPAF

International Powered Access Federation

PN

Prohibition notice

IR

Infrared

PPE

Personal protective equipment

LA

Local authority

PSV

Public service vehicle

LE

Lifting equipment

PTO

Power take-off

LEA

Local education authority

PTW

Permit to work

LEV

Local exhaust ventilation

RCD

Residual current device

LGV

Large goods vehicle

RCS

Risk control system

LPG

Liquified petroleum gas

REACH

Registration, evaluation, authorisation and restriction of chemicals

MEWP

Mobile elevated work platform

RIDDOR

Reporting of Incidences, Diseases and Dangerous Occurrences Regulations

MSDS

Material safety data sheets

RF

Radio frequency

MSLA

Minimum school-leaving age

ROPS

Rollover protective structure

OHPL

Overhead power lines

RPA

Radiation protection adviser

PASMA

Prefabricated Access Suppliers’ and Manufacturers’ Association

RPE

Respiratory protective equipment

PAT

Portable appliance tests

SSiP

Safety Schemes in Procurement

xii Forum of Private Business


Abbreviations SSoW

Safe systems of work

VDU

Visual display unit

STEL

Short-term exposure limit

VWF

Vibration white finger

TMH

Telescopic materials handlers

WBV

Whole body vibration

TMP

Traffic management plan

WE

Work equipment

UV

Ultraviolet

WEL

Workplace exposure limits

VAAW

Vehicle as a weapon

WTN

Waste transfer note

Health and Safety Guide 2019 xiii


Notes

xiv Forum of Private Business


Section 1a Health and safety management systems This section covers general health and safety topics and is relevant to all businesses. Most of the topics covered in this section will be applicable to your business. As you work your way through the Guide, any ‘no’ answers should help you to identify areas that may need improvement. When you have completed all the relevant parts of Section 1a, move on to Section 1b and check whether any further topics are relevant to your business. After considering all the appropriate sections of the Guide you will have created a list of areas needing further work. You should then develop an action plan in which actions are clearly identified and assigned to named individuals, with realistic timescales set for completion. Template 33 – Health and safety guide action plan


Notes

Note: 1.4 million workers are suffering from a new or long-standing work-related illness. HSE 2018

2 Forum of Private Business


Section 1a

1. Insurances Employers’ Liability (Compulsory Insurance) Act 1969 Employers’ Liability (Compulsory Insurance) Regulations 1998 Most companies should have a certificate of employers’ liability (EL) insurance in place to a value of not less than £5 million.

Have you implemented procedures to ensure that:

You are aware of whether you qualify for an exemption? Refer to the Employers’ Liability (Compulsory Insurance) Act 1969: A Guide for Employers (HSE40) for further details. EL insurance is obtained (to a value of not less than £5 million)? A copy of your current certificate of EL insurance is displayed at each site or premises? Your employees must have access to it but it can be made available electronically if required, e.g. on an intranet site. You retain copies of certificates that have expired? Claims for diseases may be made up to 40 years after they have been identified. Your company may also require other insurances, such as: • Public liability • Building and contents • Professional indemnity/liability • Business interruption • Key person • Vehicles and equipment • Contractors’ all risk. Usually, insurance companies include these as part of a package of insurance policies for businesses. Forum insurance Comprehensive legal expenses and tax investigation insurance is included as standard in Forum membership. This includes cover for costs incurred in defending a health and safety criminal prosecution and access to an expert health and safety helpline. For more information on our business insurance, call us now on 01565 626001.

References HSE Employers’ Liability (Compulsory Insurance) Act 1969: A Guide for Employers (HSE40) www.hse.gov.uk/pubns/hse40.pdf HSE insurance website www.hse.gov.uk/simple-health-safety/get.htm

Health and Safety Guide 2019 3


2. Responsibility Health and Safety at Work etc. Act 1974 You must identify who is ultimately responsible for health and safety in your business. The proprietor, partner, managing director/board/trustees or other similar person is ultimately responsible for health and safety across all aspects of the business. Sometimes this responsibility may be shared jointly by directors or board members for example. Duties for health and safety may be delegated to a person in the organisation who is competent to perform them, but the responsibility will still remain with the formally identified person, i.e. the proprietor, partner or managing director. It is necessary that the formally identified person is identified as having ultimate responsibility for health and safety. This person must ensure that the business has access to competent health and safety advice, so that health and safety responsibilities can be suitably discharged. Where it is not economically viable to employ someone directly, then the assistance of an external consultancy can be sought. You may find that a combination of in-house and external expertise is preferable. Obtaining this advice, however, in no way reduces the responsibility of the formally identified person. Enter the details of the person who is ultimately responsible for health and safety in your workplace.

Company Company address

Postcode Telephone Email Person responsible for health and safety Position

4 Forum of Private Business

Mobile


Section 1a

3a. Directors’ duties Health and Safety at Work etc. Act 1974 Corporate Manslaughter and Corporate Homicide Act 2007 Company Directors Disqualification Act 1986 Companies and directors (and those ultimately responsible for health and safety – the ‘controlling minds’) can be prosecuted for failing to comply with health and safety legislation. This can lead to large fines and penalties and also imprisonment in serious cases. Disqualification orders relating to health and safety failures in the management of companies may also be raised. These are legal sanctions against directors convicted of health and safety offences. The maximum period of disqualification is 15 years, except where the order is made by a court of summary jurisdiction, in which case the maximum period is 5 years. Where offences and liabilities are deemed to be corporate then penalties can include unlimited fines, remedial orders and publicity orders. A remedial order will require a company or organisation to take steps to remedy any management failure that led to a death. The court can also impose a publicity order requiring the company or organisation to publicise that it has been convicted of the offence.

Are you confident that suitable arrangements are in place to:

Plan, deliver, monitor and review a comprehensive health and safety management system? Ensure the company board, directors, partners, proprietors, etc. lead by example and show a strong commitment to health and safety? Ensure all those involved in the management of health and safety are suitably aware of their duties and responsibilities and that they are competent? This includes the director and other key decision-makers. Ensure you have access to competent health and safety advice? Ensure all staff are sufficiently trained and competent in their health and safety responsibilities? Ensure your workforce is consulted properly on health and safety matters, and that their concerns are reaching the appropriate level within your organisation? Undertake suitable and sufficient risk assessments at all levels in your organisation? Ensure that monitoring of what is happening on a day-to-day basis is undertaken? Ensure you have at least an annual board meeting where health and safety is discussed and appropriate targets and budgets are set to help manage and improve health and safety?

References HSE Leading Health and Safety at Work microsite www.hse.gov.uk/leadership HSE Corporate Manslaughter microsite www.hse.gov.uk/corpmanslaughter

Health and Safety Guide 2019 5


3b. Directors’ competencies Health and Safety at Work etc. Act 1974 Corporate Manslaughter and Corporate Homicide Act 2007 Company Directors Disqualification Act 1986 Directors (and boards and trustees) make decisions at the top level of a company that can affect health and safety outcomes for all employees and others who may be affected by the company’s undertakings. It is therefore important that directors and those responsible for setting a company’s agenda fully understand the impact of the decision-making process that occurs behind closed doors. This understanding and competency may need to be demonstrated if things go wrong. A formal training course can help to demonstrate this compliance and will also send out a message to staff that health and safety is being taken seriously at the highest level.

If you are a director, board member or trustee, can you demonstrate that you are aware of:

The human costs of decisions made in the boardroom? The economic implications of allowing unsafe systems of work? The importance of allocating suitable resources and budgets to ensure safe systems of work? Your personal and the company’s legal responsibilities with regards to health and safety? The importance of incorporating the risk assessment process at the core of company decision-making? The need to have access to competent health and safety assistance and, where someone is appointed, that they are given suitable resources to assist you? This may include appointing an internal coordinator to coordinate and implement the advice given. The importance of incorporating a proactive health and safety culture within the organisation? The importance of developing a health and safety strategy? The need to identify training requirements at every level within the company? The importance of monitoring and reviewing health and safety performance?

References HSE Leading Health and Safety at Work - Actions for directors, board members, business owners and organisations of all sizes www.hse.gov.uk/pubns/indg417.pdf

6 Forum of Private Business


Section 1a

4. Enforcing authority inspections Health and Safety at Work etc. Act 1974 Health and Safety (Fees for Intervention) Regulations 2012 If an enforcing authority inspector calls, you must ensure you co-operate with his or her requests. An enforcing authority can include the HSE, the fire and rescue service, the police or your local authority (LA).

Are you aware that:

Enforcement inspectors can enter your workplace at any time without giving notice, though notice may be given where the inspector thinks it is appropriate? Normal inspection includes assessing the workplace, work activities, health and safety management systems and documents to ensure you are complying with health and safety, food and fire legislation? During a normal inspection, an inspector will check that you have arrangements in place for consulting and informing employees? Enforcement action may result in a letter informing you of your requirements for compliance? Enforcement action may result in an improvement notice (IN) informing you of what has to be done, why and by when? The IN will inform you when the remedial action has to be undertaken by. After this period, a re-inspection may be undertaken to determine your compliance. If you fail to comply with the requirements of the improvement notice, you may be prosecuted? Enforcement action may result in a prohibition notice (PN) instructing you to cease the activity until appropriate remedial action has been taken? The prohibition notice will inform you of when the remedial action has to be undertaken by. After this period, a re-inspection may be undertaken to determine your compliance. If you fail to comply with the requirements of the prohibition notice, you may be prosecuted?

Health and Safety Guide 2019 7


Fees For Intervention Are you aware that:

The new HSE cost recovery scheme is called Fees For Intervention (FFI)? If you are in material breach of health and safety legislation the HSE may recover its costs from you by charging a fee for the time and effort it spends on helping you to put the matter right, investigating and taking enforcement action? The recovery of costs for formal intervention is currently levied at £124 per hour, with a monthly invoicing schedule? You can avoid intervention fees by ensuring legal compliance?

References HSE What to Expect when a Health and Safety Inspector Calls (HSC14) www.hse.gov.uk/pubns/hsc14.htm HSE Health and Safety Regulation – A Short Guide (HSC13) www.hse.gov.uk/pubns/hsc13.pdf HSE Fee for Intervention – What you need to know www.hse.gov.uk/pubns/hse48.pdf HSE How HSE Regulates www.hse.gov.uk/enforce/ HSE Fee for Intervention (FFI) microsite www.hse.gov.uk/fee-for-intervention/index.htm

8 Forum of Private Business


Section 1a

5. Health and safety policy Health and Safety at Work etc. Act 1974 By law, businesses employing five or more employees, including proprietors or partners, must have a written health and safety policy that is reviewed on at least an annual basis. It is helpful, in terms of defence against litigation, if a business has a written policy even if it employs fewer than five employees. For example, the company may employ fewer than five employees directly, but may also employ casual or agency staff or contractors. For the purposes of health and safety, casual or agency staff or contractors should be classed as employees as you still have a duty of care towards them. If you employ five or more people, you need to have a formal, documented health and safety policy.

Are you aware that: You will need to formulate a health and safety policy document if you employ five or more people Template 32 – Health and safety policy Having a health and safety policy in place will assist in: • Complying with the law • Documenting the management systems that you already have in place • Ensuring employees (and others working at your premises, such as contractors) are informed of the health and safety arrangements for the business • Securing contracts with clients • Demonstrating compliance to insurance companies • Demonstrating a professional image to clients and suppliers. You will need to work through the rest of the Guide and formulate or update your policy statement accordingly. The level of detail in your policy statement will depend on how complex your business is. You may need to significantly expand on the template provided to ensure that your arrangements are covered. The health and safety policy should be broken down into three sections: 1. Statement of intent (the policy statement) 2. Organisation/duties and responsibilities 3. Arrangements.

References HSE website: Write a health and safety policy for your business www.hse.gov.uk/simple-health-safety/write.htm

Health and Safety Guide 2019 9


Profile for Forum of Private Business

Health and Safety Guide 2019 Preview  

22nd Edition of the Forum of Private Business Health and Safety Guide 2019. Health and Safety legislation applies to all businesses, no mat...

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22nd Edition of the Forum of Private Business Health and Safety Guide 2019. Health and Safety legislation applies to all businesses, no mat...