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2 0 1 0 D O W N T O W N P L A N P R E PA R E D : A P R I L 2 0 0 2 FOR ENTIRE DOWNTOWN REDEVELOPMENT AREA D

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P L A N A D O P T I O N D AT E : APRIL 7, 2003

A LT E R N AT I V E P L A N F O R RIVERFRONT AREA B E T W E E N T H E B R I D G E S F R O M B AY STREET TO THE RIVER P R E PA R E D : A U G U S T 2 0 0 9 AC PA

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AD V I S O R S , BO O R N , PA R K E R / MU D G E T T / SM

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C H I T E C T S

P L A N A M E N D M E N T D AT E : APRIL 19, 2010

P H O T O B Y: J E R RY M I L L E R SEPTEMBER 9, 2009

FORT MYERS, FLORIDA

I T H


D O W N T O W N F T. M Y E R S , F L O R I D A

ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS

2003 DOWNTOWN FORT MYERS PLAN CITY OF FORT MYERS, FLORIDA

2009 FORT MYERS RIVERFRONT DEVELOPMENT PLAN CITY OF FORT MYERS, FLORIDA

J I M H U M P H R E Y, M A Y O R C I T Y C O U N C I L / C O M M U N I T Y R E D E V E L O P M E N T A G E N C Y: TA M M Y H A L L , WA R D O N E VERONICA S. SHOEMAKER, WARD TWO ANN MURPHY KNIGHT ED.D., WARD THREE MICHAEL FLANDERS, WARD FOUR R A N D A L L P. H E N D E R S O N J R . , W A R D F I V E

R A N D A L L P. H E N D E R S O N J R , M A Y O R C I T Y C O U N C I L / C O M M U N I T Y R E D E V E L O P M E N T A G E N C Y: T E R E S A WAT K I N S B R O W N , WA R D O N E JOHNNY STREETS, WARD TWO LEVON SIMMS, WARD THREE MICHAEL FLANDERS, WARD FOUR FORREST BANKS, WARD FIVE THOMAS LEONARDO, WARD SIX

D O W N T O W N R E D E V E L O P M E N T A G E N C Y A D V I S O RY B O A R D :

SPECIAL THANKS TO FORMER COUNCIL MEMBER WARREN WRIGHT AND F O R M E R M AY O R J I M H U M P H R E Y

DR. GERALD LABODA, CHAIRMAN KEN JONES, VICE CHAIRMAN

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F O R T M Y E R S R E D E V E L O P M E N T A G E N C Y A D V I S O RY B O A R D :

MARK FREEMAN, AIA

DR. GERALD LABODA, CHAIRMAN

DOMINIK GOERTZ

BUTCH MCGOVERN, VICE CHAIRMAN

LODOVIC KIMBALL

R O N W E AV E R

BETTY LANDRY

FRANKIE JENNINGS

BERNARD MCGOVERN

BRUCE GRADY

M A R C S U L L I VA N

ERMA BOYD

DOWNTOWN PLAN STEERING COMMITTEE:

R AY M O N D C A M P B E L L

DR. GERALD LABODA, CHAIRMAN

RIVERFRONT DEVELOPMENT PLAN STEERING COMMITTEE:

MARY BENSEL

DR. GERALD LABODA

MELISSA CREASY

MICHAEL FLANDERS, AIA

MICHAEL FLANDERS, AIA

STEPHEN BUCKLEY

MARK FREEMAN, AIA

TED COYMAN

DOMINIK GOERTZ

BOB GARDNER

TA M M Y H A L L

LEE GOLDEN

HARRISON KNIGHT GERALD MCHALE

D AV I D L O V E L A N D

MIKE ROEDER

LEIF LUSTIG

STEVE SHIMP

ROSE RUNDLE

M A R C S U L L I VA N

WILLIAM MITCHELL

DAISY UPSHAW-BENJAMIN

DOWNTOWN REDEVELOPMENT AG E NCY STAFF:

SAEED KAZEMI, CITY ENGINEER

D O N PA I G H T, E X E C U T I V E D I R E C T O R

DEREK C.S. BURR

PUBLIC WORKS STAFF:

FORT MYERS REDE VELOPMENT AG E NCY STAFF: L E I G H S C R A B I S , M I C H E L E H Y LT O N

S H AY E P R AT H E R

N ATA L I E D U N H A M

A T T O R N E Y: NANCY E. STROUD,

C H R I S T I N E H U R L E Y, D I R E C T O R

W EI S S S E R OTA H E L F M A N

M AUREEN LUND, A MY BAVIN,

P A S T O R I Z A & G U E D E S , P. A .

CI T Y M A N AG E R: W I L L I A M P. M I T C H E L L

D O N PA I G H T, E X E C U T I V E D I R E C T O R

J O A N L I G H T, D O N N A L I M E R I C K ,

NICOLE DEVAUGHN

SEPTEMBER 9, 2009

BILL LAWTON

ANDY MESSICK

COMMUNIT Y DEVELOPMENT D E PA R T M E N T S T A F F :

P H O T O B Y: J E R RY M I L L E R

SAEED KAZEMI

COMMUNIT Y DEVELOPMENT D E PA R T M E N T S T A F F : R O B E R T G A R D N E R , A I C P,

DIRECTOR

NICOLE DEVAUGHN, AICP

PUBLIC WORKS STAFF: S A E E D K A Z E M I P. E . , PUBLIC WORKS DIRECTOR E L I A N A H A Y E S , P. E . INTERIM CITY ENGINEER

AT T O R N E Y: G R A N T A L L E Y, C I T Y AT TO R N E Y

P H O T O B Y: N ATA L I E D U N H A M SEPTEMBER, 2009


D O W N T O W N F T. M Y E R S , F L O R I D A 2010 DOWNTOWN PLAN APRIL 19, 2010 COVER ........................................................................... ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS ...............................................

TA B L E O F C O N T E N T S 2003 DOWNTOWN FORT MYERS PLAN (TAB 1) APRIL 2003 DOWNTOWN REDEVELOPMENT AREA PLAN D

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TABLE OF CONTENTS .................................................. FOREWORD ..............................................................i-iii PUBLIC PROGRAM IMPLEMENTATION................. iv-v THE COMMUNITY REDEVELOPMENT ACT REQUIREMENTS........................................................ vi IDENTIFICATION OF ALTERNATIVES: APRIL 2003 DOWNTOWN REDEVELOPMENT AREA PLAN PREPARED BY DUANY PLATER-ZYBERK & COMPANY WITH NOVEMBER 2009 ALTERNATIVE PLAN FOR RIVERFRONT MASTER PLAN AREA BETWEEN THE BRIDGES, BAY STREET TO THE RIVER PREPARED BY ACQUEST REALTY AVISORY, BOORN PARTNERS, POPULOUS, PARKER MUDGETT SMITH ARCHITECTS ......... vii-viii PLAN ADOPTION RESOLUTION ............................ ix-x

I. EXECUTIVE SUMMARY .............................................. I.1 II. ANALYSIS REGIONAL CONTEXT ................................................... II.1 URBAN FABRIC ............................................................. II.2 LAND OWNERSHIP ....................................................... II.4 PARKING GARAGE RELOCATION.............. ................ .II.6 PEDESTRIAN SHEDS AND TRANSIT........ ................ ...II.7 THE COMMUNITY REDEVELOPMENT ACT REQUIREMENTS......................................................... ..II.8 III. GENERAL CONTROLS REGULATING PLAN ..................................................... III.1 REGULATING PLAN MAP....................... ................ ......III.2 THE TRANSECT ........................................................... III.3 A/B STREET FRONTAGE ASSIGNMENT .................... III.5 STREET RECONFIGURATIONS .................................. III.6 PROPOSED STREET CHANGES ................................ III.8 IV. SPECIFIC INTERVENTIONS OVERVIEW ................................................................... IV.1 THE HEART OF DOWNTOWN OVERVIEW ......................................................... IV.2 THE CENTER...................................................... IV.3 BASIN-FRONT .................................................... IV.7 HENDRY STREET MARKET .............................. IV.8 SYMPHONY AND PARKING ............................... IV.9 WEST BASIN / EAST BASIN ............................ IV.10 CULTURAL CAMPUS........................................ IV.11 EASTERN ENTRANCE/ANCHOR ... ................ IV.11 WESTERN ANCHOR ........................................ IV.12 THE WESTERN APPROACH HENLEY PLACE ............................................... IV.13 CENTENIAL PARK ............................................ IV.14 EDISON SQUARE AND WESTERN RIVERFRONT ....................... 1V.15 EDISON & FORD ESTATES ............................ 1V.18 THE EASTERN APPROACH EASTERN RIVERFRONT ................................. IV.19 EVANS NEIGHBORHOOD................................ IV.20 THE SOUTHERN APPROACH HENDRY ST. ENTRANCE AT MLK ................... IV.21

2009 FORT MYERS RIVERFRONT DEVELOPMENT PLAN (TAB 2) ---- CONTINUED

V. APPENDIX A. PRIOR STUDIES MEMO.................... ................ ......V.1 B. PLAN ADOPTION RESOLUTION....... ................ ......V.2

NOVEMBER 2009 ALTERNATE PLAN FOR RIVERFRONT MASTER PLAN AREA BETWEEN THE BRIDGES, & FROM BAY STREET TO THE RIVER AC PA

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PREPARED BY: A L T Y AD V I S O R S , BO O R N P U L O U S , P A R K E R / M U D G E T

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EXECUTIVE SUMMARY .............................................................I PROJECT SCOPE AND HISTORY ...................................... 1-1 CHARETTE 1:FRAMEWORK FOR DESIGN ....................... 1-2 CHARETTE 2:CONCEPT EXPLORATION .......................... 1-3 MASTER PLAN SUMMARY ................................................. 1-4 DEVELOPMENT GUIDELINES SUMMARY ........................ 1-6 DEVELOPMENT GUIDELINES - DISTRICT ....................... 1-7 HOTEL MARKET STUDY SUMMARY ................................. 1-8 RETAIL MARKET STUDY SUMMARY ................................. 1-9 INTRODUCTION ........................................................................2 PROJECT BACKGROUND .................................................. 2-1 PROJECT HISTORY ............................................................ 2-2 PROJECT AREA .................................................................. 2-3 PREVIOUS PLANNING EFFORTS ...................................... 2-4 CHARRETTE 1 SUMMARY ................................................. 2-5 HISTORIC DISTRICT ........................................................... 2-6 FEMA MAP ........................................................................... 3-8 FIGURE GROUND WITH DPZ PLAN .................................. 3-9 EXISTING LAND USE .......................................................... 2-9 DOWNTOWN PARKING .................................................... 2-10 EXISTING GREEN SPACE .................................................2-11 KEY PLANNING GOALS.................................................... 2-12 ANALYSIS SKETCH - ACCESS ......................................... 2-13 ANALYSIS SKETCH - DEVELOPMENT ............................ 2-14 ANALYSIS SKETCH - WATER ........................................... 2-15 ANALYSIS SKETCH OPEN SPACE ................................... 2-16 ANALYSIS SKETCH SUSTAINABILITY ............................. 2-17 CHARETTE 2 HISTORY .................................................... 2-18 CHARETTE 2 FINDINGS ................................................... 2-19 DAY 3 - OPTION AB ........................................................... 2-20 DAY 3 - OPTION C ............................................................. 2-21 SOUTH FLORIDA ARCHITECTURE.................................. 2-22 WATERFRONT ARCHITECTURE...................................... 2-23 MASTER PLAN ..........................................................................3 RENDERING ........................................................................ 3-1 ILLUSTRATIVE PLAN .......................................................... 3-2 MASTER REDEVELOPMENT PLAN ................................... 3-3 RENDERING ........................................................................ 3-4 VEHICULAR CIRCULATION ................................................ 3-6 EXISTING/NEW LAND AREA .............................................. 3-7 EXISTING/NEW STRUCTURES .......................................... 3-8 SUSTAINABLE FEATURES ................................................. 3-9 PEDESTRIAN CIRCULATION ........................................... 3-10 OPEN SPACE - ACTIVE/PASSIVE .....................................3-11


D O W N T O W N F T. M Y E R S , F L O R I D A

---- CONTINUED WATERFRONT PEDESTRIAN EDGE ............................... 3-12 WATERFRONT DEVELOPMENT....................................... 3-13 LAND USE/ZONING (NEW) ............................................... 3-14 SITE PLAN ......................................................................... 3-15 CURRENT/FUTURE LAND USE AND ZONING ................ 3-16 PARKING............................................................................ 3-19 SECTIONS AT STREET LEVEL ......................................... 3-20 RENDERINGS.................................................................... 3-24 DEVELOPMENT GUIDELINES..................................................4 DEVELOPMENT GUIDELINES............................................ 4-1 BLOCK A GUIDELINES........................................................ 4-2 BLOCK B GUIDELINES ....................................................... 4-4 BLOCK C GUIDELINES ....................................................... 4-6 BLOCK D GUIDELINES ....................................................... 4-8 BLOCK E GUIDELINES ..................................................... 4-10 BLOCK F GUIDELINES ..................................................... 4-12 BLOCK W1 GUIDELINES .................................................. 4-14 BLOCK W2 GUIDELINES .................................................. 4-16 BLOCK W6 GUIDELINES .................................................. 4-18 BLOCK P9W GUIDELINES .............................................. 4-22 BLOCK P9E GUIDELINES ................................................. 4-24 IMPLEMENTATION PLAN ..........................................................5 IMPLEMENTATION PLAN SUMMARY ................................ 5-1 SITE PLAN ........................................................................... 5-2 SITE PLAN PROGRAMMING .............................................. 5-3 PROJECT & COMPONENT COST MODEL......................... 5-6 SCHEDULE OF REGULATORY REQUIREMENTS ........... 5-24 PRELIMINARY PROJECT SCHEDULE & PHASING ........ 5-28 COMPONENT BLOCKS..................................................... 5-34 DISTRICT BRANDING PLAN / MARKETING AND MANAGEMENT PLAN ................................................. 5-40 PRELIMINARY PROJECT FINANCIAL FORECASTING MODELS ............................................ 5-42 FUNDING STRATEGY SOURCES AND USES ................. 5-52 REGULATORY REQUIREMENTS WATER TREATMENT/QUALITY-QUANTITY ................ 5-74 REGULATORY REQUIREMENTS MINIMUM FINISH FLOOR ELEVATION FEMA MAP .... 5-75 ELEVATION CHANGE CONCEPTS................................... 5-76 GRADE TRANSITION VIEWS ........................................... 5-77


D O W N T O W N F T. M Y E R S , F L O R I D A

FOREWORD

FOREWORD Fort Myers, like many small to mid sized cities, experienced the decline in its central business district over the years as a result of deteriorating infrastructure, the functional obsolescence of 100-year old buildings and the development of suburban malls and office parks. To reverse this decline the City embarked on an aggressive revitalization program for the downtown business district in 1984 when it created a downtown redevelopment district pursuant to Florida Statute Chapter 163. The City Council established itself as the Fort Myers Redevelopment Agency (FMRA) to oversee the redevelopment and approved the use of tax increment financing to help fund the revitalization of downtown.

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One of the first projects undertaken by the FMRA was the completion of the City’s first “modern day” redevelopment plan, which was completed in 1986 by BRW. The 1986 Plan resulted in several significant accomplishments, including: • • • • •

The retention and expansion of the City, County, State and Federal government offices to create a comprehensive government center. The construction of the 10-acre Centennial Park along the riverfront. Completion of a three-quarter mile long Riverwalk. Construction of two fishing piers and three commercial boat piers. Construction of the Harborside Event Center and parking garage.

By the start of the 21st Century it became evident that an updated master plan was needed for the downtown district. The internationally acclaimed architect and urban planner Andres Duany, and his firm Duany Plater-Zyberk and Co. (DPZ), was selected to work with the City Council and citizens of Fort Myers to formulate a new vision for downtown. The Downtown Fort Myers Plan was completed in 2002 and after extensive review it was formally adopted in April 2003. The 2003 Downtown Fort Myers Plan, which was based on the principles of “New Urbanism”, focused on pedestrian connectivity to the built environment, streetscape improvements, increased residential densities and restoration of the historic structures. Land use, street frontage improvements, street reconfigurations, and parking were controlled through a “Smart Code” which was adopted by the City as the overall land development regulations to guide renovations and new development in the downtown district. The 2003 Downtown Fort Myers Plan also established Specific Interventions for the four pedestrian sheds (Heart of Downtown, Western Approach, Eastern Approach and Southern Approach) that make up the downtown area. Specific Interventions are defined as “. . . pilot projects and other sometimes-flashy ideas that get most of the attention but these are most useful not as mandatory construction efforts but rather as illustrations of how new construction can occur along the lines of the General Controls.” City leaders immediately began implementing the plan and to date have met with great success. Major accomplishments include: • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

Adoption of the 2003 Downtown Fort Myers Plan, Streetscape Plan and Smart Code. Completion of over 1,200 new residential units. Completion of a 50-block utility replacement and streetscape improvement project. Reconfiguration of one-way streets to two-way throughout the core of downtown. The opening of a 40,000 sq. ft Publix grocery store. The approval of a new $20 million public library in the Cultural Campus. Completion of a new 10-story addition and 800 car parking facility to the Lee County Justice Center. Opening of the new Hotel Indigo. Rehabilitation of the former Post Office/Federal Courthouse for the Sidney and Berne Davis Arts Center. Leasing of the City Pier building to the Art of the Olympians. Completion of the Southern Approach gateway park. Renovations and upgrades to the City Yacht Basin. Designation by the State of Florida as a Waterfronts Florida Community. Historic restoration of over 20 downtown buildings. P H O T O B Y: J E R RY M I L L E R SEPTEMBER 9, 2009

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FOREWORD CONTINUED

One of the few areas lagging behind the successful redevelopment efforts was the publicly owned riverfront. The 2003 Downtown Fort Myers Plan had included recommendations for a new riverfront hotel constructed around the Exhibition Hall, a Symphony Hall connected to Harborside, parking facilities surrounded by retail and commercial liner buildings, an expanded Convention Center and an enlarged marina. Further study of the Symphony Hall proved that it was not financially feasible and Hurricane Charlie damaged the Exhibition Hall to the point that it had to be demolished. As proposed in the 2003 Downtown Fort Myers Plan, the City issued a Request for Proposals for development of the riverfront but negotiations with the selected developer ended after two years without an agreement. The crash of the real estate market in 2006 and 2007 further halted any attempts at developing the riverfront. The City Council later concluded that the hotel should be directly connected to Harborside and the riverfront should remain open for public access.

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In 2008, City leaders explored the idea of seeking a different sort of public/private partnership for the development of the riverfront. A Request for Qualifications was issued for a developer-led team of architects, planners, hotel consultants and retail specialists to master plan the riverfront from Bay Street to the river. The key to this approach was that the developer had to substantiate the financial and market feasibility of each aspect of the project and agree to be one of the developers of the project. The selected development team would be responsible for engaging the public in the planning process to create a plan that achieved the following criteria. • • • • • •

Activate the riverfront Create an exciting riverfront destination for local, regional and seasonal residents, and to attract tourists and convention visitors. Improve the connectivity between the historic downtown and the riverfront. Improve and enhance the existing public open spaces and create exciting new spaces. Maintain the scale and density of the riverfront that was proposed in the 2003 Plan. Improve and expand the Harborside Event Center and attract a convention quality hotel

The City selected Acquest Realty Advisors, who had teamed up with Boorn Partners, HOK/Populous and Parker Mudgett Smith Architects, to prepare the riverfront development plan. The notice to proceed was issued in December 2008 and in January, 2009 the first of several charrettes were held to gain public input. Throughout the planning process the team worked with property owners, citizens, business owners and civic leaders to explore and evaluate the desired uses for the riverfront. The Specific Interventions proposed in the 2003 Downtown Fort Myers Plan were also carefully evaluated against current financial and market conditions. The result was a riverfront plan and implementation strategy that was presented to the City on August 31, 2009 and adopted in principle by City Council on September 8, 2009. The 2009 Fort Myers Riverfront Development Plan will serve to update and amend many of the Specific Interventions for the riverfront portion of the Heart of Downtown contained in the 2003 Downtown Fort Myers Plan. Formal adoption is scheduled for March 2010 following review by the Planning Board, FMRA, Historical Preservation Commission, citizen and business groups and City Council. It should be noted that within the 2009 Fort Myers Riverfront Development Plan the page numbers are hyphenated. The hyphenation refers to the section number and the page number within each section (i.e. 1-1 is section 1-page 1). The significant elements of the 2009 Fort Myers Riverfront Development Plan include: • Creation of a signature water basin that would appear to bring the riverfront back to its historical shoreline along Bay Street. In reality the basin is a water retention area that helps to filter the surface water run-off from the downtown streets and buildings before it flows into the Caloosahatchee River. • The construction of a convention quality hotel over a parking structure attached to the east end of Harborside. • The addition of breakout rooms, lecture halls and office space in the existing Harborside Event Center. • The construction of an 80,000 +/- sq ft new exhibit hall for Harborside on the Post Office site. • Three signature restaurant sites, on publicly owned land, that could be leased to selected restaurants. • Improvements to Centennial Park including a boardwalk on the river side of the mangroves, a children’s interactive fountain, an amphitheater, and a permanent farmers market structure. • Expansion of the yacht basin. • A parking structure surrounded by liner retail/commercial buildings on the Smith Block. • Upgrades to Edwards Drive to create a more ceremonial, but still functional, vehicular drive. • Future improvements to the Royal Palm Tower site.

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FOREWORD CONTINUED

A major goal of the 2009 Fort Myers Riverfront Development Plan is to connect the historic district to the river rather than creating a stand-alone riverfront destination. The plan accomplishes this by bringing the water into Bay Street, connecting the historic downtown and keeping a majority of the riverfront as public open space. The plan also focuses on attracting unique local and regional retail shops and restaurants rather than strictly national chains. As a final note about the two plans, it should be understood that each plan has unique characteristics and merits, and in reality, elements of both plans may be incorporated into the final implementation strategy. It is worth noting that the 2003 Downtown Fort Myers Plan is a stand alone document that covers the entire downtown redevelopment area. The 2009 Fort Myers Riverfront Development Plan is a refinement of the ideas put forth in the 2003 Downtown Fort Myers Plan for the geographic area between the Caloosahatchee River Bridge and the Edison Bridge and from Bay Street to the river. To properly use this document it should be noted that there are three sections. Tab 1 enumerates the accomplishments that have been achieved since the adoption of the 2003 Downtown Fort Myers Plan and incorporates the changes and amendments proposed by the 2009 Fort Myers Riverfront Development Plan. Tab 1 is the 2003 Downtown Fort Myers Plan with updates and revisions noted in text boxes. Tab 2 is the 2009 Fort Myers Riverfront Development Plan for the area between the Caloosahatchee River Bridge and the Edison Bridge and from Bay Street to the river.

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P U B L I C P R O G R A M I M P L E M E N TAT I O N

P U B L I C P R O G R A M I M P L E M E N TAT I O N Increasingly, and especially in challenging economic times, downtown urban mixed-use development plans are dependent upon public incentives. Each project must be carefully evaluated, however, to determine if the project conforms to the plan and what incentives may be needed to achieve a reasonable financial return. Incentives may take the form of grants, loans, marketing and promotions programs, tax and impact fee credits and other tangible and intangible benefits.

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Financial Incentives/Programs New development and substantial rehabilitation of existing buildings in today’s economic climate is extremely difficult. Often time a gap exists between the cost of developing a project and the income the project can generate to cover debt service and operating expenses. As a result the following incentives may be required to attract new development. • • • • • •

Tax increment rebates Rent subsidies Loan or grant programs Tenant improvement subsidies Land assembly assistance and acquisition of easements Impact fee waivers or credits

The involvement of the public sector in private development results in what is commonly known as a public/private partnership. Such partnerships demand that the private developer understand the desires and goals of the public agency to encourage a particular redevelopment opportunity, to increase the local tax base or to enhance public services. Likewise the public sector must recognize the private sectors return on investment requirements. The partnership only works when both parties understand and accept each others goals. Business/Retail Retention and Recruitment Strategies Successful implementation of the Plan requires a healthy retail and business mix within the downtown district. To accomplish this goal it is critical that the city retains the existing businesses and helps to insure their vitality so that new businesses can be successfully recruited. The following initiatives are recommended to retain and attract new businesses. Retention – Business retention strategies involve a number of potential programs and they require open communication and a high level of coordination between the City, the FMRA and the businesses to insure that the programs are viable and effective. The FMRA business retention program could include the following elements: • • • • •

P H O T O B Y: J E R RY M I L L E R SEPTEMBER 9, 2009

The production and sponsorship of special events and promotions to attract people into downtown and the River District. Marketing and co-op advertising programs and materials. Branding and image making to create a unique identity for the downtown. Banners, gateway identification, wayfinding signage, websites, printed and E-newsletters and PowerPoint and video presentations. Assistance through rent subsidies/tenant improvements, grants and subsidy programs. Recruitment – The retail market analysis concluded that local and regional specialty businesses and restaurants that offer unique shopping and dining experiences should be recruited. Downtown should distinguish itself from the regional malls by offering an authentic, historic downtown setting with an attractive mix of one-of-a-kind shops and restaurants. The recruitment program could include the following elements:

• An up to date inventory of available commercial spaces. • Programs to encourage property owners to lease ground floor spaces to retail and restaurant tenants instead of offices. • Local, national and international marketing. P H O T O B Y: J E R RY M I L L E R SEPTEMBER 9, 2009

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P U B L I C P R O G R A M I M P L E M E N TAT I O N C O N T I N U E D

Maintenance and Security Proper maintenance and security of downtown are essential to the success of the revitalization program. Enhanced community policing efforts such as bicycle and walking patrols will result in improved safety for the area, and just as important, will improve the public’s perception that the area is safe. Likewise, enhanced maintenance, with seven day a week clean-up, is essential to the success of retail and dining destinations. Clean streets and sidewalks lead to less littering and other maintenance problems. A specialized street, sidewalk and parking lot sweeper should be considered for the downtown area to help maintain the brick streets, patios and sidewalks. The FMRA should continue to work with the Public Works and Parks Departments to determine the optimum number of workers and equipment needed to properly maintain the downtown district.

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D O W N T O W N F T. M Y E R S , F L O R I D A

THE COMMUNITY REDEVELOPMENT ACT REQUIREMENTS

THE COMMUNITY REDEVELOPMENT ACT REQUIREMENTS Chapter 163, Part III, Florida Statutes (the Community Redevelopment Act of 1969), as amended contains the requirements to be met by this Plan, included in the Downtown Fort Myers - April 2002 Redevelopment plan, adopted on April 7, 2003, as amended on March 15, 2010, to incorporate the 2009 Fort Myers Riverfront Development Plan, (as shown in Tab 2) for its use as the new community redevelopment plan for downtown Fort Myers.

2 0 1 0 D O W N T O W N P L A N

The Act requires that this Plan show by diagram and in general terms those specific plan requirements set forth in s. 163.362(2), Florida Statutes, including open space, street layout, building limitations (type, size, height, number, and use of buildings), as well as, dwelling units, and other public improvements. The General Controls section of the 2003 Downtown Fort Myers Plan, adopted on April 7, 2003, which follows, addresses each of these elements. As stated previously, Tab 2 includes the 2009 Fort Myers Riverfront Development Plan, of which the “Master Plan” Section of the Plan demonstrates an alternative redevelopment scenario (commonly referred to as the riverfront redevelopment area) for the area located between the Caloosahatchee River Bridge and the Edison Bridge north of Bay Street to the Caloosahatchee River. The open space, street layout, building limitations, as well as dwelling units and other public improvements for this alternative are located within the Master Plan section. Also required under the Act is the identification of publicly funded capital projects to be undertaken. Street reconfigurations are shown in the General Controls section of the 2003 Downtown Fort Myers Plan. Parking Garage relocation plans are outlined in the Analysis section, and additional desirable projects, while not mandatory, are depicted as Specific Interventions of the 2003 Downtown Fort Myers Plan. The accompanying Streetscape Plan identifies landscaping, lighting, and other streetscape treatments for downtown. The 2009 Fort Myers Riverfront Development Plan (Tab 2) demonstrates an alternate street reconfiguration, parking garage location, and additional desirable projects which could be funded as public projects within the redevelopment area. These alternative recommendations are found primarily within the Master Plan and Implementation Plan sections of the 2009 Fort Myers Riverfront Development Plan (Tab 2). The Act also requires that adequate safeguards exist that the work of redevelopment will be carried out pursuant to the Plan. This assurance can be made by noting that the City’s Comprehensive Plan and land development regulations for downtown were modified to conform to the recommendations set forth in the 2003 Downtown Fort Myers Plan and the alternative redevelopment scenario for the area located between the bridge north of Bay Street to the Caloosahatchee River necessitate additional comprehensive plan and land development code amendments. With regard to the projected costs of redevelopment, including the amount to be expended on publicly funded capital projects for the alternate riverfront redevelopment scenario, the implementation plan includes extensive project cost models, phasing, and additional opportunities for leveraging county, state, and federal funding to assist with redevelopment and funding. This cost/funding model does include the ability to utilize tax increment revenue to implement the design, permitting and construction of this alternate redevelopment scenario. No displacement of residents is anticipated as a result of the Plan, however, as a general policy, relocation shall conform to uniform relocation requirements, and replacement housing shall be assured, should any unanticipated temporary or permanent displacement occur as a result of specific action of the Fort Myers Community Redevelopment Agency or the City of Fort Myers.

P H O T O B Y: J E R RY M I L L E R SEPTEMBER 9, 2009

Finally, in addition to discussion of providing affordable housing in the Evans Neighborhood Square Specific Intervention, it is important to note that the City of Fort Myers has also created two redevelopment areas located immediately adjacent to the downtown redevelopment area, which have a primary focus on housing affordable to low and moderate income persons and the elderly. Consequently, the Downtown Fort Myers Plan is not intended to remedy a shortage of affordable housing in the City. As noted throughout the Specific Interventions section, the Plan provides for the retention of controls and establishment of restrictions on land sold or leased for private use. In addition, the Analysis section provides standards for municipal land leases or sale in the case of condominium development, as required by Chapter 163.

P H O T O B Y: J E R RY M I L L E R SEPTEMBER 9, 2009

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I D E N T I F I C AT I O N O F

A LT E R N AT I V E S

IDENTIFICATION OF ALTERNATIVES: 2003 DOWNTOWN FORT MYERS PLAN PREPARED BY DUANY PLATER-ZYBERK & COMPANY WITH ALTERNATIVE:

2009 FORT MYERS RIVERFRONT DEVELOPMENT PLAN BETWEEN THE BRIDGES FROM BAY STREET TO THE RIVER PREPARED BY ACQUEST REALTY AVISORY, BOORN PARTNERS, POPULOUS, PARKER MUDGETT SMITH ARCHITECTS

During the April 2003 planning process, the land along the river, primarily owned by the City of Fort Myers, became known as “the Gold Coast” and was considered the City’s biggest asset. With the 2009 plan, several key changes have been made and are highlighted in the following table. These proposed alternatives have been proposed to demonstrate opportunities that, with proper execution, should provide the impetus needed to bring people downtown to experience the true unique character and amenity of Fort Myers. It should be noted that within the 2009 Fort Myers Riverfront Development Plan the page numbers are hyphenated. The hyphenation refers to the section number and the page number within each section (i.e. 1-1 is section 1-page 1). 2003 Downtown Fort Myers Plan Page Number II.6

2009 Fort Myers Riverfront Development Plan Page Number

Difference

3-19

Parking Garage Relocations

Explanation

In the 2003 Downtown Fort Myers Plan, parking garage locations were proposed for the area between Bay Street and Edwards Drive. In the 2009 Fort Myers Riverfront Development Plan public parking structures are still proposed on the block between Bay/Edwards/Hendry and Jackson - but have been rearranged on the other two blocks. The land use map within the 2003 Downtown Fort Myers Plan on pg III.2 includes urban core, u r b a n c e n t e r, c i v i c , c i v i c r e c r e a t i o n , a n d p a r k i n g s t r u c t u r e o v e r l a y d i s t r i c t s . Page 3-14 of the 2009 Fort Myers Riverfront Development Plan demonstrates an alternate land use/zoning map for the area between the Caloosahatchee River Bridge, the Edison B r i d g e , B a y S t r e e t , a n d t h e C a l o o s a h a t c h e e R i v e r.

III.2

3-14 3-15 3-16 - 3-18

General Controls Land Use Regulating Plan Map

Land use and zoning map changes are necessary if the master plan on page 3-15 of the 2009 Fort Myers Riverfront Development Plan is implemented. The 2009 Fort Myers Riverfront Development Plan generally demonstrates phasing(see page 5-33) for the riverfront redevelopment and once the water basin (P3) is implemented, a small scale land use map amendment may be necessary to accomodate the planned 12 story hotel on the C1/C2 site of the master plan (see page 3-15). Based on direction by the city staff, land use and zoning changes may be processed for the C1 and C2 blocks. It should be noted that the existing land use map and zoning map with corresponding future land use policy and land development code need to be consistent and the 2003 Downtown Fort Myers Plan (pg III.2) may need to be amended to be consistent with the final land use controls that were processed and approved after the 2003 plan adoption.

III.5

3-16 - 3-18

Street Frontage/ Retail Use

In addition to blocks C1 and C2 changes, additional public space to be designated civic recreation may be processed as a small scale land use and zoning map amendment as well for block P2, P5, P7, and P8. The 2003 Downtown Fort Myers Plan recommended the designation of A/B type street frontage, as well as desired ground floor level retail. The 2009 Fort Myers Riverfront Development Plan includes additional targeted retail frontage a r e a s i n c l u d i n g : b l o c k s D 1 , D - 2 , E , F, a n d W . vii


D O W N T O W N F T. M Y E R S , F L O R I D A

I D E N T I F I C AT I O N O F

A LT E R N AT I V E S

IDENTIFICATION OF ALTERNATIVES (CONTINUED): 2003 DOWNTOWN FORT MYERS PLAN PREPARED BY DUANY PLATER-ZYBERK & COMPANY WITH ALTERNATIVE:

2009 FORT MYERS RIVERFRONT DEVELOPMENT PLAN BETWEEN THE BRIDGES FROM BAY STREET TO THE RIVER PREPARED BY ACQUEST REALTY AVISORY, BOORN PARTNERS, POPULOUS, PARKER MUDGETT SMITH ARCHITECTS

2003 Downtown Fort Myers Plan

2009 Fort Myers Riverfront Development Plan

Page Number

Page Number

III.6 III.7

I V. 1 THROUGH I V. 1 2

I V. 1 3 I V. 1 4

Difference

3-6

Street Reconfigurations

3-2 3-15 4-1 THROUGH 4-24 5-1 THROUGH 5-77

Specific Riverfront Interventions for the “Heart of Downtown” to the 2009 Fort Myers Riverfront Development Plan

3 - 11 3-15

Specific Interventions for the Western Approach to the 2009 Fort Myers Riverfront Development Plan

Explanation

T h e 2 0 0 3 D o w n t o w n F o r t M y e r s P l a n r e f e r e n c e s a s t r e e t p a t t e r n o n p a g e I I I . 6 a n d I I I . 7 . To implement the 2009 Fort Myers Riverfront Development Plan alternative, the street pattern or vehicular circulation shown on page 3-6 of the 2009 Fort Myers Riverfront Development Plan should be implemented. This exhibit demonstrates the rights of way that should be vacated to accomplish the development plan. The alternatives identified in the 2009 Fort Myers Riverfront Development Plan for this area are focused along the riverfront and recommend a reconfiguration of the planned development b e t w e e n t h e b r i d g e s , a n d f r o m B a y S t r e e t t o t h e R i v e r. W h e n t h e 2 0 0 9 F o r t M y e r s R i v e r f r o n t Development Plan is implemented various actions are needed to set the framework in place f o r t h e d e v e l o p m e n t t o b e c o m e a r e a l i t y, i n c l u d i n g c o m p r e h e n s i v e t e x t a m e n d m e n t s , l a n d development code amendments (to incorporate the specific guidelines into the downtown smart code). In addition, it is anticipated the city will enter into a development agreement to proceed with the implementation plan in sections 5-1 through 5-77 of the 2009 Fort Myers Riverfront Development Plan. The 2003 Downtown Fort Myers Plan identifies improvements to Centennial Park in a general term. While this area was not part of the riverfront redevelopment planning effort, the 2009 Fort Myers Riverfront Development Plan was developed to integrate Centennial Park with the connectivity of the Centennial Park eastern portion. Specific improvements including P7 and P 8 a r e r e c o m m e n d a t i o n s i n c o n c e p t o n l y.

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PLAN ADOPTION RESOLUTION

RESOLUTION NO. 2010-10

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PLAN ADOPTION RESOLUTION

x


D O W N T O W N F O R T M Y E R S APRIL 2002

PLAN ADOP T I O N D AT E : APRIL 7 , 2 0 0 3

FORT MYERS, FLORIDA D

U A N Y

P

L A T E R

A R C H I T E C T S

-Z

Y B E R K

A N D

T O W N

& C

O M P A N Y

P L A N N E R S


D O W N T O W N F T. M Y E R S , F L O R I D A

CITY OF FORT MYERS, FLORIDA J I M H U M P H R E Y, M A Y O R

D O W N T O W N F O R T M Y E R S

C I T Y C O U N C I L / C O M M U N I T Y R E D E V E L O P M E N T A G E N C Y: TA M M Y H A L L , WA R D O N E VERONICA S. SHOEMAKER, WARD TWO ANN MURPHY KNIGHT ED.D., WARD THREE MICHAEL FLANDERS, WARD FOUR R A N D A L L P. H E N D E R S O N J R . , W A R D F I V E DOWNTOWN REDEVELOPMENT AGEN C Y A D VISORY B OARD: DR. GERALD LABODA, CHAIRMAN KEN JONES, VICE CHAIRMAN MARK FREEMAN, AIA DOMINIK GOERTZ LODOVIC KIMBALL BETTY LANDRY BERNARD MCGOVERN M A R C S U L L I VA N

DOWNTOWN PLAN STEERING COMMITTEE:

DOWNTOWN REDE VELOPMENT AGENCY STAFF:

DR. GERALD LABODA, CHAIRMAN

D O N PA I G H T, E X E C U T I V E D I R E C T O R

MARY BENSEL

J O A N L I G H T, D O N N A L I M E R I C K , S H AY E P R AT H E R

MELISSA CREASY MICHAEL FLANDERS, AIA

C O M M U N I T Y D E V E L O P M E N T D E PA R T M E N T S T A F F :

MARK FREEMAN, AIA

C H R I S T I N E H U R L E Y, D I R E C T O R

DOMINIK GOERTZ

M AUREEN LUND, A MY BAVIN, NICOLE DE VAUGHN

C H A R R E T T E D AT E : N O V E M B E R 1 2 - 2 0 , 2 0 0 1 PLAN ADOPTED IN PRINCIPLE: APRIL 22, 2002 F I N A L P L A N A D O P T I O N D AT E : A P R I L 7 , 2 0 0 3

TA M M Y H A L L HARRISON KNIGHT

PUBLIC WORKS STAFF:

GERALD MCHALE

SAEED KAZEMI, CITY ENGINEER

ANDY MESSICK

DEREK C.S. BURR

MIKE ROEDER STEVE SHIMP

A T T O R N E Y:

M A R C S U L L I VA N

NANCY E. STROUD,

DAISY UPSHAW-BENJAMIN

W E I S S S E R O T A H E L F M A N P A S T O R I Z A & G U E D E S , P. A .

DESIGN TEAM: A N D R E S D U A N Y, J E F F S P E C K , D E B R A H E M P E L , E U S E B I O A Z C U E , M A R I N A K H O U R Y, S U Z Y L E E , M A R C E L A L E I VA , M A N U E L F E R N A N D E Z - N O VA L L , N ATA S H A Q U I N TA N I L L A , M A X I M O R U M I Z , G U S TAV O S A N C H E Z , G A L I N A TA H C H I E VA

C O N S U LTA N T S : C H U C K B O H L , J A I M E B R O W N , C AT H Y F O E R S T E R , BOB GIBBS, RICK HALL, JOE PETRICH, JAMES WASSELL


EXECUTIVE SUMMARY

D O W N T O W N F T. M Y E R S , F L O R I D A EXECUTIVE SUMMARY The 1990s witnessed a widespread rediscovery of American main streets and downtowns, a revival so powerful that it led to the construction of new town centers for the first time in over half a century. Revitalizing downtowns face more complex challenges, but they also benefit from their prime locations, extensive infrastructure, history, and architectural heritage. Not every city, however, was fortunate enough to survive the previous three decades with its downtown urban fabric intact. Although not immune from the ravages of this era of antiurban development, the City of Fort Myers did emerge with the “bones” of its historic downtown preserved: narrow streets, short blocks, historic buildings and a waterfront unspoiled by highways and high rises. “Success,” as Bobby Unser said, “is where preparation and opportunity meet,” and the downtowns that have succeeded are those that have taken steps to prepare themselves for redevelopment opportunities, the great majority of which must be initiated by the private sector. The City has now embarked on an effort to prepare itself to take advantage of the opportunities its historic assets present for the revitalization of its downtown. The current effort builds on the administrative foundation, plans and studies previously commissioned by the City and summarized in the Pre-Charrette Analysis completed by the Genesis Group (under separate cover) and a follow-up memo included as Appendix A of this report. In 1984, the City of Fort Myers created the Fort Myers Redevelopment Agency (FMRA) to formulate a plan and strategy for the revitalization of downtown Fort Myers. A master plan was completed in 1986 with a 10 to 15 year development horizon, now elapsed. The study area for the downtown also corresponds with a Tax Increment Finance District (TIF) created to help fund infrastructure improvements. After several false starts, a series of rehabilitation projects were initiated in the late 1990s focusing on the key downtown corridors of First Street and Hendry Street. These projects have begun to bear fruit in restoring the architecture and vitality of buildings along these key corridors, and bringing residents and street life back downtown.

Recognizing that the 1986 master plan had run its course and that development conditions were rapidly evolving, the City leadership decided that the downtown had arrived at a crucial point in its revitalization and initiated a new master plan process focused on the next steps. The effort commenced with an extensive pre-charrette analysis conducted by the Genesis Group, which reviewed all previous plans and studies for the downtown and identified issues and opportunities in advance of the charrette.

development, as well as general strategies for the downtown revitalization. Some are already well under way or will be executed over the coming months. Others will have to wait until conditions permit their implementation. One thing is certain: they will all change many times over the life of Downtown Fort Myers. The plan itself should continue to evolve as conditions change and projects are executed.

The charrette itself ran for nine days, from November 12 through November 20, 2001, during which over 1,500 residents, government leaders and major stakeholders of the City of Fort Myers attended public presentations, roundtable discussions and stakeholder meetings to contribute their knowledge and ideas for the future of downtown Fort Myers.

This plan document is to be used in conjunction with three documents provided under separate cover. These are:

Members of the DPZ team met with large groups of stakeholders to identify specific challenges and issues related to parking, traffic, retailing, real estate development, arts and culture, historic preservation, public works, and the waterfront. Dozens of individual meetings were also held to take a closer look at property ownership and the limitations and opportunities connected with specific sites throughout the downtown. Downtown Fort Myers is the product of that effort, and of the months of work analyzing the downtown both before and after the charrette. HOW TO USE THIS PLAN Downtown Fort Myers is not just a document. It is a new way of approaching urban planning and development, one that views the collaboration of public and private actions as a continuous and evolving process that began months before the charrette and will continue for years to come. Its aim is to identify general initiatives and specific projects that will maximize private investment while enhancing the public realm of the downtown. The text and graphics that follow provide a snapshot of this ongoing development process as of the end of 2001. The plan itself sets forth the actions that are necessary for Downtown Fort Myers to achieve its objectives. The document includes proposals for public action and proposals for private

SUPPLEMENTAL MATERIALS

- The SmartCode, which comprises a guide to implementation of this Plan. This document should be revised as necessary to qualify for legal status and then adopted by the city as an alternative to existing regulations including, but not limited to, the Comprehensive Plan and Smart Growth Management Code. The SmartCode can be implemented in one of two ways: either as a replacement to existing ordinances, or as an optional alternative. In an ideal world, we would recommend the former approach, but we have found that, in most places, eliminating existing codes in favor of a new one is often politically impossible. Instead, it is easier to allow the SmartCode to function in parallel with existing ordinances as a separate path to getting a permit. The key to achieving success in this latter case is to incentivize the SmartCode with quicker permitting, a pro-active process, and financial bonuses as possible. Many communities, such as Orlando, tie incentives like lower impact fees to the lower impacts associated with development that is permitted under smart growth regulations. When a smart growth code is implemented in this way, the benefits to developers are based on objective standards associated with the performance of development under the Smart Code versus development under the existing regulations. In effect, these represent performance standards rather than incentives. Of course, if the City has the political will to pass the SmartCode as its only zoning, land use, and subdivision ordinance for the downtown, we would support this effort. - Fort Myers Retail Analysis (November 2001), provided by Gibbs Planning. This report analyzes the Fort Myers trade area, demographic trends, downtown retail trends, and the

competitive position of the downtown vis-à-vis regional retail centers. The report identifies the types of retail that can be supported in the downtown in light of the market conditions for 2001, and those anticipated for a five-year outlook to the year 2006. Immediate opportunities for supportable retail include: market support for up to 90,000 square feet of junior department store retail, 55,000 square feet of grocery/ supermarkets, 40,000 square feet of movie theater with stadium seating, and a variety of entertainment/recreation, hardware, office supply, home furnishings and eating and drinking establishments. This represents a desirable mix of establishments to recruit for the proposed concentration of retail in the heart of downtown. The report emphasizes that “full implementation of the supportable retail square footage will require…implementation of the 2003 Downtown Fort Myers Plan recommendations, including additional parking decks, vehicular circulation enhancements and improved Streetscaping” (Gibbs, p. 3). This Plan incorporates elements of the retail analysis in the proposals for First Street and the location of specific types of retail and entertainment uses in the specific interventions presented below. - The Downtown Fort Myers Streetscape Plan provided by Genesis Group. This document addresses downtown aesthetics, focusing on the landscape, street furniture, lighting, signage, and other details recommended for the detailed improvement of downtown streetscapes. This DPZ Plan includes a more general analysis identifying the particular streets where the City should concentrate its resources, the phasing of improvements, and provides a more detailed consideration of the streetscape elements essential for enhancing First Street as the City’s premier pedestrian-oriented Main Street. THE COMPONENTS OF THE PLAN Downtown Fort Myers can be best understood as providing two different categories of product: General Controls on the one hand, and Specific Interventions on the other. The General Controls are the least glamorous part of the plan, but they are its heart and soul. They provide the fundamental systemic framework that will allow and encourage new growth to occur in a form that improves urban vitality rather than undermining it. Central to these is the SmartCode, an I.1


EXECUTIVE SUMMARY

D O W N T O W N F T. M Y E R S , F L O R I D A

alternative zoning ordinance described below, which shall be used as a guide to creation of new Growth Management Code regulations for the downtown area. The Specific Interventions, in contrast, are the pilot projects and other sometimes-flashy ideas that get most of the attention, but these are most useful not as mandatory construction efforts but rather as illustrations of how new construction can occur along the lines of the General Controls. While it would indeed please us to see all of these projects built as designed, their real value is to communicate the types of projects that the city should encourage in its efforts to improve the downtown. This too will be discussed below. The General Controls can be broken down into the following documents: ·

·

The A/B Frontage Assignment: One key to a successful downtown is to acknowledge that not every street must correspond to the highest pedestrian-friendly standards. Some streets will inevitably provide sites for muffler shops, fast-food drive-throughs, and other automotive-oriented businesses. Rather than dreaming that such places can be eliminated entirely, our plan will locate these streets in a way that they do not undermine the integrity of the downtown pedestrian network. A-Streets, serving pedestrians as well as cars, will be asked to correspond to the highest frontage standards of the SmartCode, while B-streets will be available for those businesses that focus primarily on automotive traffic. Both are profitable uses; the key is keeping them separate in order to create a continuous network of high-quality pedestrian frontage for the downtown. The Street Reconfigurations: As discussed in the Street Reconfigurations section of this report, most of the streets in downtown Fort Myers are currently configured to speed automotive traffic through the downtown -- or divert it entirely -- at the direct expense of pedestrian and commercial life. Over the years, the widening of travel lanes to higher-velocity standards, the removal of parallel parking, the implementation of one-way pairs, and the diversion

of traffic from First Street have all contributed to the downtown’s demise. Central to our plan is a reconfiguration of streets within the study area to a more pedestrian-friendly design. In many cases, such reconfiguration can be accomplished for the cost of paint alone (through re-striping), but other more significant changes can be implemented over time in conjunction with the planned replacement of under-capacity downtown infrastructure that will require major street excavations, and through regular public works maintenance required of the downtown streets, curbs, sidewalks and street trees. ·

·

The SmartCode: As mentioned above, the SmartCode (provided under separate cover) is a guide to recommended changes to the City’s zoning, Comprehensive Plan, and Growth Management Code that are currently in effect. Such an alternative is necessary because the existing ordinances include regulations that work against the realization of a revitalized, pedestrian-friendly downtown. The SmartCode, in contrast, focuses on the creation of mixed use, walkable neighborhoods. As part of the implementation of the Downtown Fort Myers plan, the SmartCode will be used by the City in evaluating plans prior to adoption of the final amendments to the City’s Comprehensive Plan and Growth Management Code. Following final adoption of the Comprehensive Plan and Growth Management Code amendments, the final regulating ordinance shall govern development in the downtown area. The Regulating Plan: The SmartCode is organized on the basis of the urban-to-rural Transect, a tool that is used to create internally-consistent environments of varying urban intensity. For example, an area in the Urban Center zone would have taller buildings that would be spaced closely adjacent to one another to form a pedestrian-friendly street wall, with wider sidewalks and more intensive downtown streetscaping, while an area in the Urban General zone would be composed of low rise, detached buildings and possess a more residential character. Clearly, an instrument is needed to distribute these

different Transect zones in an organized fashion throughout the downtown, and this instrument is the Regulating Plan. The Regulating Plan for Downtown Fort Myers is presented in the General Controls section of this Plan.

in the case of condominium development, sold to builders who are prepared to develop them along the pedestrianfriendly lines of the SmartCode. In the second case, a strong developer agreement would be an essential component of the ownership transfer. This is a strategy that cities such as West Palm Beach and Boca Raton have employed with great success in recent years, and has the benefit of catalyzing development without selling off the City’s prime assets. For each of these sites, the DPZ team proposed a Specific Intervention, such as a Hotel surrounding the Exhibition Hall. These proposals should be put forward by the city in the form of public Requests for Proposals, where the terms of the lease and the opportunities for public/private partnership would encourage developers to create projects similar to those proposed in the plan.

If they were implemented quickly, the four documents above would probably be enough to produce dramatic positive change within a few years. However, our time spent in Fort Myers allowed us to discover a large number of additional opportunities for improvement. Some of these improvements were already partially underway, others were suggested to us by citizens or business people, and many came from the design team. The most promising were developed into the Specific Interventions that make up a large part of the plan. The Specific Interventions include the following types of projects: ·

·

Private Development of Private Land: Many private properties within the study area are currently laying fallow because their owners are unable to find a profitable way to develop them according to existing zoning ordinances. For the largest of these properties, such as the Edison Ford Plaza, the sheer size of the site demands a scale of investment that could have a significant impact on the dynamics of the downtown. For this site and others, the plan recommends subdividing the area into smaller blocks and lots, so that smaller investors may immediately begin to build along the lines of the SmartCode. In other areas such as the East Riverfront, the scale of investment is already healthy, and a Specific Intervention is provided simply to illustrate the sort of development that the SmartCode would encourage. Private Development of Public Land: it has been mentioned many times how Fort Myers’ greatest material asset is the large amount of (non-park) riverfront land under city ownership, which became known as the “Gold Coast” during the charrette. Rather than laying empty, of no use to anyone, these properties should be leased on a long-term basis or,

·

Public Works on Public Land: No smart downtown revitalization plan relies on public funding to accomplish its goals – the money simply isn’t available. However, it is expected that the leasing of public land for private projects, and the tax revenue from those projects, will eventually generate a pool of funds large enough to support a wide range of public improvements. In addition to the street reconstruction already mentioned, this plan has proposed a number of Specific Interventions directed at public land, such as a reconfigured Centennial Park and Fishing Pier.

·

Public Works on Private Land: Finally, there are a number of locations within the downtown where private property can best be used to serve public functions. For example, the creation of a landscaped entry to downtown where Hendry Street meets Martin Luther King (MLK) Boulevard would require the city to work cooperatively with private landowners. In the same way that the city would jointventure with private developers on its own land, the city is also encouraged to collaborate with these individual parties to convert certain private lands to public through the outright purchase of property, a land swap, transfer of development rights, property tax breaks or development bonuses involving the mix and density of the project, so long as the bonuses are consistent with the master plan. I.2


EXECUTIVE SUMMARY

D O W N T O W N F T. M Y E R S , F L O R I D A ORGANIZATION OF THE PLAN DOCUMENT Analysis of Existing Conditions Downtown Fort Myers begins with an analysis of existing conditions for the downtown, looking at the Regional Context, Urban Fabric, the Existing Frontage Quality throughout the downtown, and Land Ownership. One major product of the charrette was the creation of an up-to-date figure-ground drawing of the Urban Fabric showing the building footprints, the street network and open space throughout the downtown study area. The Land Ownership diagram reveals that approximately 40% of downtown land is currently used for local, state, and federal government organizations and civic institutions (i.e., off the tax rolls). Of all these public lands, the City-owned land in the heart of downtown and along the waterfront basin represents the key opportunity for implementing this Plan through the types of public-private interventions described above. NOTE: In this Plan, the “heart of downtown” refers to the rectangular portion of the study area between the Edison Bridge and the US 41 bridge, from the waterfront to Second Street that is concentrated around the historic downtown of Fort Myers. General Controls Next the General Controls are presented through detailed diagrams and discussions applying the general strategies (introduced above) to the specific conditions present in downtown Fort Myers. The field surveys and analysis of existing conditions provided the basis for three key diagrams: the A/B Street Frontage Assignment, the Principal Pedestrian Sheds and Transit Loop, and the Proposed Parking Relocation strategy. The A/B Street Frontage Assignment (discussed above) indicates how the existing frontages should be woven together to create a continuous network of high-quality, pedestrian-oriented “A” Streets supported by “B” Streets. The Principal Pedestrian Sheds and Transit Loop diagram shows how the downtown can be organized into four overlapping pedestrian sections through the creation of high quality pedestrian frontages in the core and three neighborhood centers just to the east, west and south of the historic downtown. The Proposed Parking Relocation diagram shows how the relocation of planned parking garages

from the fringe to the core of the downtown can be used to fuel revitalization by establishing a steady flow of employee foot traffic past downtown businesses during workday hours, and by providing parking capacity in the core to serve evening and weekend visitors. A quick analysis of the Traffic Volume for downtown streets then leads into the section on Street Reconfigurations, which presents specific instructions for the re-striping, reversion to two-way, and eventual reconstruction of many streets within the study area. While the details of these reconfigurations will need to be redrawn by a qualified engineering firm, they have been approved by Rick Hall, the transportation engineer on the DPZ team. The General Controls section concludes with the presentation of the Regulating Plan (introduced above). Although significant portions of the downtown remain intact, the character of the area has been damaged by allowing urban and non-urban types of development to occur side-by-side. Based on the team’s field studies of neighborhoods throughout the downtown, the Regulating Plan specifies areas within the downtown appropriate for different types of development to create built environments that range from a vital downtown core to the more residential urban general zones. The plan also identifies districts where larger institutional uses and automobile-oriented activities can occur without intruding on the vitality of the core or the residential character of in-town neighborhoods.

connecting the satellite centers to the east, west and south of the core. The majority of study areas focus on the core itself, where the greatest opportunities exist for leveraging public and private sector resources and which represents the crucial starting point for carrying out the revitalization of the downtown. Many of the interventions described below imply a more fluid relationship between the public and private sectors, which is appropriate given the often-arbitrary lines that tend to exist between public and private property. These lines may provide temporary impediments, but to focus on such limitations is the exact opposite of what DPZ was asked to provide, which was “vision.” “Vision,” can be defined many ways, but it is perhaps best understood as “accounting for the factor of time.” In other words, when one considers the cumulative impact of repeated efforts towards a well-defined goal, it is possible to imagine overcoming even the largest obstacles over time. This Plan is intended to become that goal. In his final public presentation, Andres Duany noted that the current focus on the downtown, and the additional emphasis on the historic core, is something that all of the citizens and council members of Fort Myers can support as a common effort for all: “The downtown belongs to all of you; it is the identity of the entire city, and the reputation of Fort Myers rises and falls with the image of downtown.” It is only the downtown of the city that can claim this role, and therefore it is our responsibility to support the downtown in its efforts to represent us proudly and serve us well.

Specific Interventions 2009 Fort Myers Riverfront Development Plan The core of the report is devoted to a detailed presentation of Study Areas where the types of specific interventions discussed above are presented. As noted on page I.2, Specific Interventions differ from General Controls in that they are visions for pilot projects rather than mandatory requirements for development in the downtown. The study areas include critical areas along the waterfront, and key sites and corridors that will be instrumental in anchoring and

As described in the FOREWORD, the City commissioned a more refined riverfront development plan for the area between the bridges from Bay Street to the Caloosahatchee River. This plan is a representation of a market driven recommendation to connect the historic downtown district to the river and is found in Tab 2.

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DOWNTOWN FORT MYERS: The interconnected grid of comfortable streets and short blocks in historic downtown Fort Myers provide a healthy foundation on which to build a walkable downtown.

The Regional Context All strategies for revitalizing Downtown Fort Myers must take into account the regional context of Southwest Florida. The vast expanse of development that has spread out all along the Gulf Coast in between the original settlements of the region has provided a large population base that will factor into the future of the downtown, but it also reveals the wide range of choices available to people for living, working, dining, shopping, entertainment, recreational and cultural activities. Downtown Fort Myers is one place in a region of competing places, and it must identify and build on its inherent qualities to successfully compete in the regional marketplace. The general controls and specific interventions presented in Downtown Fort Myers are designed to leverage the downtown’s unique assets vis-à-vis neighboring communities

in the region. While Fort Myers does not possess the coastal beaches and upscale demographics of a Sanibel or Naples, the downtown does possess both a waterfront and a walkable “Main Street.” While other communities might possess one or the other, it is rare to find both of these amenities within easy walking distance of one another. Thus the riverfront and First Street represent the key features of the downtown’s location and built environment that will help drive its future revitalization. The regional setting also influences the merchandising strategy, which emphasizes activating the kind of existing variety of restaurants, merchants and venues rather than pursuing an “open air mall” strategy focused on the recruitment of national franchises.

Situated along the Caloosahatchee River off the Gulf Coast, Fort Myers can compete effectively with nearby communities by leveraging the qualities of its downtown core.

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The Existing Frontage Quality map indicates sections of blocks where there is currently Good, Fair, or Poor quality frontages in terms of the pedestrian experience. The analysis found that approximately 25% of the pedestrian experience downtown is first rate (“Good”), which is fairly typical of cities in the United States. The advantage present in Fort Myers is that so much good frontage is already contiguous, concentrated along First Street and some adjacent side streets and alleys. These existing conditions all influence the Transect-based Regulating Plan and A/B street assignment presented later.

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As noted earlier, the Urban Fabric drawing provides the City with an up-to-date drawing of the downtown that reveals the extent to which the construction and demolition of downtown buildings and aggregation of lots have altered the built environment of the city in recent decades. The Urban Fabric drawing reveals strengths, such as the considerable building coverage that remains in the historic core, and forms consistent streetwalls necessary for a high-quality pedestrian experience. It also shows weaknesses, such as the disintegration of these desirable conditions outside the core, including the blocks along the basin and waterfront. The relative continuity of the in-town neighborhoods located inland and to the west and east of the heart of downtown also becomes apparent, providing ample opportunities for

infill housing to solidify and strengthen these neighborhoods. Finally, and perhaps most significantly, the drawing shows the coarse grain of the large governmental and civic uses and their associated parking lots that have created an automobileoriented institutional district to the east and west of the Hendry Street corridor, particularly south of MLK Boulevard and north of the Boulevard bordering Cleveland Avenue.

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The Existing Urban Fabric and Frontage Quality Downtown Fort Myers and the more detailed drawings that follow also illustrate the quality of the downtown’s urban fabric, largely inherited from its historic past, that generally provides the network of narrow streets, alleyways and short blocks necessary for creating a walkable downtown.

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The Existing Frontage Quality drawing identifies areas where the quality of the frontage is Good, Fair, or Poor. Good quality frontages typically have buildings pulled up to the sidewalk, doors and windows facing the street, awnings and other features to create a positive pedestrian experience. Poor quality frontages typically involve buildings with deep setbacks, blank walls, garage openings, or surface parking lots facing the street.

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URBAN FABRIC: The existing urban fabric in the downtown presents favorable conditions for creating walkable downtown neighborhoods. While the past strategy of locating large institutional buildings and parking lots south of MLK Boulevard has made that area unattractive to pedestrians, it helped preserve key areas of the downtown. The historic core along First Street enjoys continuous streetwalls that make this an extremely comfortable “main street� for the City. To the east and west of the core, houses line the sidewalks with detached garages to the rear, providing a good basis for reconstructing in-town neighborhoods.

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The land ownership analysis leads directly to the first General Control of the plan. The City-owned land in the heart of downtown and along the waterfront basin – often referred to as “the Gold Coast” during the charrette – represents the great creative opportunity in Fort Myers, and holds the key for implementing this plan, bringing people downtown and funding future downtown improvements and amenities. Given its proximity to both the waterfront and First Street, the City-owned land is incredibly valuable.

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The study area for the downtown corresponds with a Tax Increment Finance District (TIF) created to help fund infrastructure improvements. The effectiveness of the TIF has been hampered by several factors that have limited its ability to raise funds. These include the lack of private investment in the downtown; the significant number of properties that currently benefit from a 10-year property tax assessment freeze as an incentive for the rehabilitation of historic buildings; and, most significantly, a decline in the amount of tax-paying private property in the 1980s and 1990s due to land acquisitions by city, county, state and federal governments and churches which now constitute approximately 40% of downtown land.

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2009 Fort Myers Riverfront Development Plan As described in the FOREWORD, the City commissioned a more detailed riverfront development plan in 2009 for the area between the bridges from Bay St. to the river. This plan is a representation of a market driven recommendation to connect the historic downtown district to the river and is found in Tab 2. Specifically, as it relates to land ownership, the riverfront land owned by the City of Fort Myers is intended to be developed with uses to encourage public access to the waterfront, as well as activation of the land area to encourage private development to improve the tax increment revenue within the district so that additional improvements can be made to benefit the public.

The downtown land ownership pattern resembles that of a state capital, with 40% of the downtown land owned by city, county, state and federal government agencies and civic institutions such as churches. The Plan calls for leveraging the City-owned land in the heart of downtown, particularly along the waterfront, to drive the downtown revitalization effort.

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D O W N T O W N F T. M Y E R S , F L O R I D A Municipal Ground Leases The Plan calls for this City-owned land to be developed through a long-term ground lease arrangement in which the City retains ownership of the land and leases it to developers, except in the case of condominium development, where ownership transfer and a strong developer agreement may be the more desirable approach. Lee S. Sobel, an Associate with the Investment Properties Group of CB Richard Ellis Inc. in Miami, provides additional background on municipal land leases: A municipal land lease typically works as follows: The city owns the land or has an option or some similar reversionary interest in which they can get the land in fee. They may put that parcel out to an RFP for development on a ground lease, or negotiate a direct ground lease with a developer, or buy land and flip a ground lease to a developer (there are a million variations). The lease may be for several pads on the parcel such as at Boca Raton’s Mizner Park, or they may lease the entire parcel, like at Miami’s Bayside, or a strip center or a free-standing building (especially fast food out-parcels). Ground leases are for periods of up to 99 years. This represents an ownership interest to the leaseholder that is long enough to be bought and sold from one leaseholder to the next. The theory behind any ground lease is that the lessee controls the improvements (the use of the land only) and pays rent to the lessor for the right to be on that land. The lessee does not buy the ground because it is cheaper to build a building and pay rent over the length of the depreciable life. When the amortization ends, the building has no value but rental revenue continues. They have excluded the cost of the land

into their calculations thereby getting to profits (hopefully) faster than if they bought the land. It works differently with a municipal landlord. In this case, the transfer of land in the form of a lease defines a sum certain value that is then capitalized to an amount equal to that which can then be raised in the form of a bond issue. In simpler terms, the execution of a lease instantly establishes a market value of the lease term to which credit (the bond) can be realized and justified when bargaining for the amount of the bond. The bond could be for many things but it can be made specific to the site or its immediate vicinity and applied to infrastructure improvements. By leasing the land, the City can retain some control over the development process through the issuance of RFPs. In addition, developers benefit from not having to carry the cost of the land, and the City retains the longterm ownership of the land for the benefit of future generations. Several of the specific interventions discussed below focus specifically on appropriate types of development options for City-owned land. 2009 Fort Myers Riverfront Development Plan As described in the FOREWORD, the City commissioned a more detailed riverfront development plan in 2009 for the area between the bridges from Bay St. to the river. This plan is a representation of a market driven recommendation to connect the historic downtown district to the river and is found in Tab 2. Specifically, as it relates to municipal ground leases, the riverfront land owned by the City of Fort Myers is intended to be developed with uses to encourage public access to the waterfront, as well as activation of the land area to encourage private development to improve the tax increment revenue within the district so that additional improvements can be made to benefit the public. Leasing vs. ownership should be examined in detail upon agreement during redevelopment efforts. II.5


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D O W N T O W N F T. M Y E R S , F L O R I D A Parking Garage Relocation Land acquisitions for government offices in the past were generally supported as a means for boosting the employment base in the downtown. Unfortunately the presence of some 9,000 employees in the downtown has not had the spillover effect that many hoped would bolster downtown shops, services, restaurants and entertainment venues. This failure can be blamed on the lack of an organizational strategy designed to increase pedestrian traffic in the commercial core. The need to effectively link the activities of the daily downtown employee and out-of-town visitors to the life of downtown through the built environment was a major conclusion of a report written more than three decades ago: Every effort should be made to improve the economic linkage between related downtown functions through strengthening of the physical linkages; the geographical proximity of related space users; the orientation, capacity and efficient use of streets, sidewalks and other facilities for accommodating pedestrian and vehicular access; the location of parking facilities and so forth. All of these are necessary and vital ingredients in the physical plan.

From a developer’s perspective, parking is sheer investment. Each parking space costs $15,000 to build and has a potential yearly rental value of approximately $500. Every parking space permits the building of approximately 330 square feet of retail and permits the building of approximately threefourths of an apartment or a condominium unit. To have thousands of county employee parking spaces sit vacant during evenings and weekends when the County offices are closed -- times when the parking could be shared with downtown residents and visitors -- would be an extraordinary waste of this valuable resource. The plan recommends locating a significant portion of these parking spaces to the north of First Street where they can reinforce investment in the heart of downtown. This location will create morning, lunchtime and afternoon foot traffic past downtown shops and merchants walking between the garages and their offices. It will also provide parking for people to visit the downtown during evenings and weekends for dining, shopping, entertainment and cultural events. Finally, it will act as a catalyst for new private sector investment in the downtown that can share this parking capacity.

Source: Economic Analysis of the Expansion of the CBD (1968), pg 31. Thus a major goal of Downtown Fort Myers will be to orchestrate streetscape improvements, traffic and pedestrian flow, parking garage placement, and the urban design of new development in the downtown in a way that unlocks these largely untapped markets for fueling the revitalization of the downtown. One key element of this strategy is to relocate in the city core some of the 3,000 parking garage spaces the County is planning to build within the next five years just south of MLK Boulevard. This map shows the proposed redirection of a large County parking garage into three smaller parking garages in the downtown. Downtown parking garages, lined with shops and residences, represent a major catalyst for attracting new downtown investment and will provide shared parking for office workers during the day, and residents and downtown visitors at night and on weekends.

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D O W N T O W N F T. M Y E R S , F L O R I D A Principal Pedestrian Sheds and Transit Pedestrian sheds are circular areas measured in terms of the walking distance that the average person is willing to walk from their home or parking space to their destinations. The pedestrian shed diagram identifies a potential neighborhood structure for the downtown based on historical development patterns, the existing frontage analysis, and the development potential of specific sites as commercial centers to anchor neighborhoods as the downtown is redeveloped. Pedestrian sheds recognize that in an area as large as the downtown there is not a single center, or a single neighborhood, but several that can be logically organized based on neighborhood centers and the discipline of the 5-minute walk. The plan identifies four pedestrian sheds that cover most of the downtown. Three of these are prototypical pedestrian sheds, that is, a 1/4-mile (5-minute) walk from center-toedge. One pedestrian shed is centered on Edison Square as a future neighborhood center; another is located where Evans Avenue turns into Park Avenue, where there is an existing corner store and some residual memory of commerce from earlier times; and another where MLK Boulevard and Hendry Street meet, which was identified during the charrette as an area of prime concern located outside of the historic heart of downtown. The centers for each of these pedestrian sheds occur where several major streets, avenues and boulevards come together, which is historically where centers of commerce have been located and which continue to represent some of the most viable site locations for retail. The fourth pedestrian shed is the heart of downtown, and it takes on a slightly different form given the concentration of good pedestrian frontages in this area. Instead of focusing on a single node, the center of the pedestrian shed in the core stretches out along an axis formed by the two principal pedestrian streets, First Street and Hendry Street. The result is a larger, elongated pedestrian shed in the heart of downtown that reflects the willingness of people to walk further when there is a continuous high quality pedestrian fabric.

These centers and their pedestrian catchments, in turn, form the basis of a downtown transit loop that can relieve the overreliance on automobiles when traveling within the downtown. People will not use transit if they have to get in the car and get out of the car to access transit. This situation involves changing from one mode of travel to another, and it is very hard to effect. If you capture riders as pedestrians, however, transit is viable. Each person who can walk from the edge to the center of a pedestrian shed is a potential transit user. 5 MINUTE WALK

Making transit work, however, requires careful phasing of the conditions that support transit use and the establishment of a regular, reliable schedule. First, the land-use must be in place in terms of establishing a mix of uses, walkability, and attractive waiting areas that are integrated with shops and activities rather than set up as isolated benches and booths attached to a street. With good walkability and destinations established (including key attractions such as the EdisonFord Estates and City of Palms Park), transit will become a legitimate alternative to driving. As the above conditions begin to be met, the City should introduce a small bus or group of busses along the loop shown. At its current size, this loop should allow a single bus to provide service every 12 minutes or less. In the best such systems, one never has to wait more than 5 minutes for a bus; therefore, to truly test the viability of transit, the city should provide – with much fanfare – two or three vehicles to loop in constant succession. These can begin as leased vans, to be purchased or replaced with larger vehicles as ridership grows. The ideal such vehicles are electric buses such as those that have been introduced with great success in Chattanooga, Miami Beach, and elsewhere. Initially at least, this transit should be provided for free, as the revenues generated from reasonable fares are insignificant compared to the benefit to downtown businesses that will result. Ideally, these vehicles would eventually be funded by tax revenue from those businesses that benefit.

15 MINUTE BUS LOOP

The Plan calls for building on the underlying neighborhood structure of the downtown to create walkable neighborhoods focused on three smaller neighborhood centers, and one larger center representing the heart of downtown. These centers will form the basis for a downtown transit loop that will provide an alternative to cars for moving around within the downtown.

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The Community Redevelopment Act Requirements Chapter 163, Part III, Florida Statutes (the Community Redevelopment Act of 1969), as amended contains the requirements to be met by this Plan for its use as the new community redevelopment plan for downtown Fort Myers. The Act requires that this Plan show by diagram and in general terms those specific plan requirements set forth in s. 163.362(2), Florida Statutes, including open space, street layout, building limitations, dwelling units, and other public improvements. The General Controls section of the Plan, which follows, addresses each of these elements. Also required under the Act is the identification of publicly funded capital projects to be undertaken. Street reconfigurations are shown in the General Controls section of the Plan, Parking Garage relocation plans are outlined in the Analysis section, and additional desirable projects, while not mandatory, are depicted as Specific Interventions. The accompanying Streetscape Plan identifies landscaping, lighting, and other streetscape treatments for downtown. The Act also requires that adequate safeguards exist that the work of redevelopment will be carried out pursuant to the Plan. This assurance can be made by noting that the City’s Comprehensive Plan and land development regulations for downtown are in the process of being modified to conform to the recommendations set forth in this document. No displacement of residents is anticipated as a result of the Plan, however, as a general policy, relocation shall conform to uniform relocation requirements, and replacement housing shall be assured, should any unanticipated temporary or permanent displacement occur as a result of specific action of the Fort Myers Community Redevelopment Agency or the City of Fort Myers. As noted throughout the Specific Interventions section, the Plan provides for the retention of controls and establishment of restrictions on land sold or leased for private use. In addition, the Analysis section provides standards for municipal land leases or sale in the case of condominium development, as required by Chapter 163.

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D O W N T O W N F T. M Y E R S , F L O R I D A The Regulating Plan The layers of complex land use regulations that have accumulated over many generations have resulted in the erosion of downtowns, as suburban elements like shopping malls, strip commercial areas, office complexes and garden apartment complexes are placed in neighborhoods that were historically urban. The introduction of rural-style landscaping and suburban types of development in cities destroys the pedestrian, mixed-use, urban atmosphere that makes cities viable, attractive, competitive places. Likewise, the introduction of high-rise buildings, attached housing, narrow streets and formal squares and plazas in rural and suburban communities contradicts the ambient qualities that attract people to those settings. In order to re-establish the urban character of downtown Fort Myers, the Regulating Plan simplifies the existing zoning into three categories of internally consistent environments. These categories are Urban General, Urban Center, and Urban Core. The Regulating Plan ensures that everything – the height of the building, the setback, the degree of complexity, the kind of lighting, the kind of landscaping – acts to reinforce the essential character that makes each of these zones a distinctive place. Two additional categories accommodate more specialized land uses and activities that either cannot or should not be coded: Civic and District. Civic properties are those that are publicly owned and publicly used and are expected to remain so in the future. They occupy considerable area within the downtown, some on smaller lots in the historic core, and others on very large sites along Monroe Street and south of MLK Boulevard. Although they are typically surrounded by another zone, they are not subject to the same rules. The greater regulatory flexibility allowed of civic uses recognizes their important roles in reinforcing community identity, and expressing democratic ideals and belief systems. Government facilities are not only included in the Civic category, they are also permitted in all other transectbased classifications in downtown, to allow for governmental flexibility in acquiring and developing private properties for future public uses. Civic properties which are publicly used for recreational purposes, either directly or indirectly, will be designated as Civic Recreation.

Other institutional uses which are not government-owed, such as non-profits, private schools, and religious institutions will also be allowed in all districts, but they are not included in the Civic category, to allow them flexibility in future sale of property. Within the transect-based categories of Urban Core and Urban General and along the riverfront, it is important to give high priority to water-dependent uses, such as marinas, yacht clubs, ferry terminals, or boat ramps, as well as mixed use projects containing these uses. Water enhanced uses such as resource-based recreational uses, residential, hotel, motel, as well as water-dependent uses will also be encouraged along the river. Also, in accordance with this Plan, uses which may possibly be enhanced by a waterfront location, such as restaurants, retail, bars, and mixtures of all water-enhanced uses will be allowed, if they are suitable for the neighborhood, and if the site plan takes full advantage of the location. Districts are set aside for very different reasons, to meet the more specialized needs of concentrations of office and industrial uses, and automobile-oriented uses where the mixed-use, pedestrian-oriented standards of the downtown are not required. Typical District properties in downtown include the Florida Power & Light Substation and the NewsPress complex. There are two reasons to support these standards for districts. First, the establishment of a pedestrian character is very difficult to maintain and is far less important for these types of uses (e.g., investment in landscaping, plazas and pedestrian walkways are often wasted in conjunction with car dealerships, drive-through fast food restaurants, and car washes). Second, by designating areas of the City where these types of uses can locate, the code protects the character of the three principal zones – Urban General, Urban Center, and Urban Core – from being destroyed by incompatible forms of development. The development standards for Districts allow the owner the option of developing under the underlying zoning category, i.e. B-2, or review under the City’s Planned Unit Development process.

2009 Fort Myers Riverfront Development Plan As described in the FOREWORD, the City commissioned a more detailed riverfront development plan in 2009 for the area between the bridges from Bay St. to the river. This plan is a representation of a market driven recommendation to connect the historic downtown district to the river and is found in Tab 2. Specifically, as it relates to the regulating plan for the Downtown area, an alternate land use and zoning recommendation has been made for portions of the riverfront geographic areas between the bridges from Bay Street to the Caloosahatchee River. Please refer to Tab 2 to review the alternate regulating plan recommendation.

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LEGEND: Urban Core: This zone contains the most dense construction and tallest buildings in downtown. It occurs primarily along the waterfront. The district imposes urban standards that respect the street. Density in the Urban Core is between 35 and 70 units per acre. Urban Center: This is a mixed-use district composed of buildings with retail at street level and commercial and residential uses above. The alignment of storefronts forms a continuous streetwall, and open space takes the form of regularly shaped streets, squares, greens, and plazas. This is the most common zone in the downtown and is applied to protect and establish the pedestrian-friendly fabric of the historic core. Density in the Urban Center is between 30 and 60 units per acre. Urban General: This is a primarily residential area, but more urban in character. Live/work areas and limited mixed uses are allowed in Urban General areas. Density in the Urban General area is between 6 and 12 units per acre. Civic: Only government owned, publicly used land that is intended to remain in public use and ownership. Civic Recreation: This area shall be set aside to reserve land use areas for parks, open space, and active and passive recreation purposes. RS-7: A single family residential district that meets the requirements of the City’s Growth Management Code. C-1: The Intensive Commercial allows general commercial uses. IL: A Light Industrial area. District Land Use - RS-7, C-1 and IL: The District land use category accommodates more specialized land uses that cannot or should not be coded based on the Smart Code, thus allowing greater regulatory flexibility to meet the more specialized needs of automobile-oriented uses. These uses are typically incompatible with the mixed used pedestrian character of the Urban Core, Urban Center, and Urban General uses found throughout most of downtown. Development in the District is regulated by either the Planned Unit Development review process or the underlying land use designation. Note: Map is not to scale. Along the waterfront on West First Street and First Street, the Urban Core land use designation shall begin thirty-five (35) feet from the property line, except for the area between Wilna and Carson Street, where the designation shall begin twelve (12) feet from the property line.

2009 Fort Myers Riverfront Development Plan As described in the FOREWORD, the City commissioned a more detailed riverfront development plan in 2009 for the area between the bridges from Bay St. to the river. This plan is a representation of a market driven recommendation to connect the historic downtown district to the river and is found in Tab 2.

This map is a representation of compiled public information. It is believed to be an accurate and true depiction for the stated purpose, but the City of Fort Myers and its employees make no guarantees implied or otherwise as to the accuracy or its completeness. We therefore do not accept any responsibilities to its use. This is not a survey or is it to be used for design. The CFMCDD maintains records regarding methods used to produce this map, and they can be furnished upon request. This map is for planning purposes only.

Specifically, as it relates to the regulating plan for the Downtown area, an alternate land use and zoning recommendation has been made for portions of the riverfront geographic areas between the bridges from Bay Street to the Caloosahatchee River. Please refer to Tab 2 to review the alternate regulating plan recommendation. III.2


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GENERAL CONTROLS

The Transect The Transect: a system of classification deploying the conceptual range rural -to- urban to arrange in useful order the typical elements of urbanism. The Transect is a natural ordering system, as every urban element easily finds a place within its continuum. For example, a street is more urban than a road, a curb more urban than a swale, a brick wall more urban than a wooden one, an allee of trees more urban than a cluster. This gradient when rationalized and subdivided, becomes the urban Transect, the basis of a common zoning system. The continuum of the Transect, when subdivided, forms the basis of the zoning categories: Rural, Sub-Urban, General Urban, Urban Center, and Urban Core. The Transect technique is derived from ecological analysis where it is applied to present the sequence of natural habitat from shore-dune-upland or wetland-woodland-prairie. Although the transect classification system contains both rural and sub-urban zones, there are no such zones in downtown Fort Myers. However, the historic 1920’s era Dean Park neighborhood at the eastern edge of the downtown does share some of the characteristics of a Sub-Urban zone and the Urban General area described on the following page. The majority of Dean Park residents have expressed their desire to limit higher density development in the neighborhood. Consequently, Dean Park will retain its existing land use designation as A-1 single family residential with some modifications which recognize the unique characteristics of the neighborhood (A-1DP).

The transect is a classification system ranging from the most rural to the most urban types of natural and built environments. It provides a method of land-use planning rooted in the overall character of the places to be preserved and built. Downtown Fort Myers is predominantly characterized by Urban General, Urban Center, and Urban Core places and conditions.

III.3


GENERAL CONTROLS

D O W N T O W N F T. M Y E R S , F L O R I D A

The Urban General area is primarily residential but more urban in character than a single family or Sub-Urban district. It is located closer to the town center. A mix of housing often shares a common setback and garden wall. A regular row of street trees gives the residential streets a special canopy. Urban General areas of the Regulating Plan encourage compatible infill primarily in the western portions of the downtown. These areas are closer to the urban center and urban core areas of the downtown, and present opportunities for introducing live/work units and limited mixed uses.

TRANSECT: URBAN GENERAL ZONE: Character of a block in the Urban General Zone

As described in the FOREWORD, the City commissioned a more detailed riverfront development plan in 2009 for the area between the bridges from Bay St. to the river. This plan is a representation of a market driven recommendation to connect the historic downtown district to the river and is found in Tab 2.

The mixed-use Urban Center is composed of two- to fivestory buildings with retail at street level and commercial and residential uses above. The alignment of storefronts forms a continuous streetwall, and open space takes the form of regularly shaped streets, squares, greens and plazas. This is the most common zone in the downtown and is applied to help protect and establish the pedestrian-friendly fabric of the historic core and the center of each surrounding neighborhood.

Specifically, as it relates to the regulating plan for the Downtown area, an alternate land use and zoning recommendation has been made for portions of the riverfront geographic areas between the bridges from Bay Street to the Caloosahatchee River. TRANSECT: URBAN CENTER ZONE: Character of a block in the Urban Center Zone

The Urban Core contains the most dense construction in the tallest buildings. This area often occurs along major thoroughfares but may also be located along waterfronts (as in the case of Fort Myers) or in other areas where property values are highest. The Urban Core is either thoroughly mixed-use or within walking distance of a mixed-use Urban Center. The designation of the eastern and western riverfronts as Urban Core acknowledges the expectations of property owners and people drawn to waterfront residences for their views and amenities. While accommodating the intensity of development implied by high property values, the Urban Core zone imposes urban standards that will make buildings in these areas respect the street, help frame the public realm, and provide public vistas to the water at the terminus of northsouth streets.

2009 Fort Myers Riverfront Development Plan

TRANSECT: URBAN CORE ZONE: Character of a block in the Urban Core Zone

NOTE: The maximum allowable building height within the Urban Center was changed from 2-5 stories to 2-7 stories after this plan was adopted.

III.4


GENERAL CONTROLS

D O W N T O W N F T. M Y E R S , F L O R I D A A/B Street Frontage Assignment

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The mapping of Existing Frontage Quality on page II.2 indicates how certain streets, due to their current characteristics, are more or less promising as future pedestrian routes. The A/B Street Frontage Assignment takes these conditions into account in proposing which streets should be directed towards pedestrian-oriented use and which should be allowed to maintain their primarily automotive-oriented quality.

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Streets that are allowed to maintain their automotive focus are designated “B-Streets.” These include most of the streets outside of the historic core that do not participate in the pedestrian network described above, as well as a few streets within the core that would require tremendous investment to achieve pedestrian-quality frontage.

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It is a goal of this plan to have portions of the A-Streets preserved for existing and future retail commercial uses. The adjacent map outlines in red the desired locations for ground floor retail in a concentrated area of two to three blocks in the core of downtown. If, for economic or other major reasons, owners cannot place retail uses in these ground floor locations, it is important to ensure that the exteriors present a retail appearance. This can be accomplished with larger windows and signage which follow the guidelines in this plan.

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Streets that will form a continuous, high quality pedestrian network are designated “A-Streets.” These include virtually all street frontage north of Main Street and west of Jackson Street through the heart of downtown to the waterfront. Within this core, First Street and Hendry Street form the main axes, with Hendry continuing as an A-Street to MLK Boulevard and beyond, to the multi-modal terminal and the City of Palms Park, while First Street continues as an A-Street to the east and west of downtown along the waterfront.

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The A/B Frontage Assignment, in addition to informing City redevelopment efforts, is referenced by the SmartCode to indicate the level of regulation that will apply along different streets within the Plan. As mentioned earlier, A-Streets are not necessarily any more profitable than B-Streets, but business owners abutting a B-Street may at their own discretion collectively elect to redesignate themselves as an A-Street, if they wish to follow A-Street requirements. The City should designate a policy for such a redesignation, for example by a majority vote.

2009 Fort Myers Riverfront Development Plan As described in the FOREWORD, the City commissioned a more detailed riverfront development plan in 2009 for the area between the bridges from Bay St. to the river. This plan is found in Tab 2. Specifically, as it relates to frontage assignments, the following streets have been changed to reflect the new plan or physical changes made during streetscape: Bay Street jog aligns to connect with Royal Palm; Portion of Edwards and Hendry St (retail); Dean Street (vacated); Bay Street (west end) primary frontage; River Drive (eliminated).

Given the good condition of existing downtown frontages in the core, almost everything north of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Boulevard is designated an A-Street, intended for high pedestrian quality frontages. South of MLK Boulevard, the goal is to create a pedestrian-friendly corridor that connects to the heart of downtown, running through the proposed Martin Luther King Square to the bus terminal and the City of Palms Park. THOROUGHFARE DESIGNATION PRIMARY STREET NETWORK (A FRONTAGE - PEDESTRIAN ORIENTED) SECONDARY STREET NETWORK (B FRONTAGE - AUTO ORIENTED) NEW PRIMARY STREET REMOVED STREET DESIRED GROUND FLOOR RETAIL

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GENERAL CONTROLS

D O W N T O W N F T. M Y E R S , F L O R I D A Street Reconfigurations The Traffic Volume diagram at right illustrates the amount of traffic along key corridors leading into and through the downtown. The surprise finding of Hall Planning and Engineering was that all of the principal downtown streets are currently well under capacity – most are near 50% capacity -- a situation that makes a wide range of traffic calming and street reconfigurations possible. Any further road widenings of downtown streets are unnecessary, and the fast moving one-way streets that crisscross the downtown can be reverted to pedestrian-friendly, two-way designs without impeding the existing volume of traffic. It is not so much the volume of downtown traffic – which is essential to support commerce – but the speed of vehicles moving through the downtown that residents and visitors abhor. Most of the streets in downtown Fort Myers are currently configured to speed automotive traffic through the city -- or divert it entirely -- at the direct expense of pedestrian and commercial life. A key element in the redevelopment of the downtown as a vital urban center will be the reconfiguration of streets to a more pedestrian-friendly design. Some of these reconfigurations require only restriping; while others require new signalization. The most extreme require replacement curbs; most of these should wait until infrastructure improvements are necessary. The street reconfigurations are presented street-by-street on pages III.9 - III.19. While the details vary greatly according to existing conditions, the basic strategies can be described as follows: 1. The reintroduction of parallel parking wherever possible. The addition of parallel parking increases the supply of convenient parking in front of downtown shops, helps slow down vehicles, and shields pedestrians on sidewalks from the flow of traffic. 2. Consistent application of 10-foot wide travel lanes and 7-foot wide parking lanes wherever possible, including on any new streets. The narrowing of travel lanes also helps to slow traffic and create more comfortable downtown streets. In Traffic-Engineering terminology, any travel lane wider than 10’ is deemed a “speed” lane and is therefore inappropriate to a pedestrian-friendly downtown.

3. Reduction of curb radii to a more urban standard appropriate for town centers, preferably in the 5-10 foot range depending on the width of the sidewalk. The curb radius is a measure of the perimeter arc of the curb, and it is an important street design element for town centers. The longer the radius, the faster speed at which cars can make a turn, which is why curves are very long and gradual entering and exiting expressways. In town centers it is important to use shorter curb radii to create

sharper turns that will slow down automobiles (which are required to stop for stop signs, crosswalks or traffic lights anyway, and should not be speeding around corners without slowing down). The 25-foot curb radius commonly required for suburban streets needs to be reduced to a more urban standard for town centers, preferably in the 5-10 foot range. 4. Avoiding the use of bulb-outs, curb cuts and suburban engineering of streets. The street reconfiguration strategies will result in relatively narrow, urban streets with on-street parking that are ideal for pedestrians, and where bulb-outs are unnecessary. While bulb-outs may be necessary in suburban settings, where streets are wider and more challenging to cross, they end up cluttering the streetscape in downtowns with good urban streets. Bulb-outs are also more difficult to engineer and construct, especially for drainage, and will add to the cost of infrastructure. 5. The elimination of the traffic diverter at the eastern entrance of First Street and straightening of the winding, rural character of the street back to a more formal urban layout. The changes made to the historic character of First Street in the 1980s were intended to allow traffic to move more quickly through the downtown and around First Street, and imposed a meandering path which is incompatible with a traditional main street environment. The diverter at the eastern entrance of First Street actually steers traffic away from First Street shops and businesses. Straightening First Street and restoring on-street parking will restore its “Main Street” character and slow traffic. Removing the diverter will increase the opportunities for drivers slowly pass by and take notice of downtown shops and merchants. While this particular reconfiguration requires new infrastructure, it should be completed quickly due to the strong promise that it holds for downtown. Some of these changes can be accomplished immediately through restriping, some fairly quickly through restriping and the resignalizing of traffic lights, and some eventually through infrastructure replacement. These approaches are summarized as follows: 1. Restriping – Wherever possible, streets should be narrowed more economically by leaving existing infrastructure in place. Striping to designate new on-street parking spaces is a primary tool to achieve pedestrian-friendly traffic flow, allowing most curb lines to remain. Some speed reduction may be achieved for outlying streets as they approach the downtown by adding 4’-wide on-street bike lanes to the 35 mph streets.

NUMBER OF CARS IN THOUSANDS PER 24 HOURS 10 20 30 40 50

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TRAFFIC VOLUME: Downtown traffic is concentrated on a few major thoroughfares and the one-way streets crisscrossing the downtown. Most of these streets are currently over-engineered with as much as 50% excess capacity. Other than the major north-south bridge connections, the Plan calls for adopting more pedestrian-friendly configurations for streets throughout the downtown.

2009 Fort Myers Riverfront Development Plan 2. Reversion to Two-Way – This is an overlap with the reconstruction and restriping actions in many cases. Bay Street, First Street and Second Street should be returned to two-way operation at the earliest opportunity. Staging should begin from inside the historic downtown core and waterfront and proceed outward. It is essential that the reversion to two-way operation include the entire stretch of existing one-way streets, from Heitman Street (near US 41) on the west to the four-lane section of SR 80 on the east. The North/South one-way streets approaching Edison Bridge should remain. The Fowler and Park intersections with First Street and Second Street will take on a very efficient three-phase signal design to maintain capacity. 3. Reconstruction – Where necessary, “A” Streets should be reconstructed as economically as possible to achieve the design speeds of 25 or 30 mph that yield pedestrian comfort. This primarily means 9- or 10-foot lane widths and parallel parking on two-way streets. Detailed information on existing conditions and proposed changes for individual streets in the downtown appear on the following pages.

As described in the FOREWORD, the City commissioned a more detailed riverfront development plan in 2009 for the area between the bridges from Bay St. to the river. This plan is found in Tab 2. In addition, the City undertook, as the 2003 plan recommended, a 50 block utility replacement and streetscapes improvement project that implemented the recommendations primarily found in the General Controls portion of this plan. Specifically, as it relates to street reconfigurations, the plan was used as a guide for design and implementation. The result is an outstanding example of pedestrian friendly streets, with 8 foot wide parallel parking, 10 foot wide travel lanes to slow traffic, reduced curb radii to an urban standard, wtih other street reconfigurations to maintain safety for pedestrians. III.6


GENERAL CONTROLS

D O W N T O W N F T. M Y E R S , F L O R I D A

S T R E E T R E C O N F I G U R AT I O N S

Street Reconfigurations

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This diagram summarizes the current organization of the downtown street network, which is reconfigured in the pages that follow. As currently organized, the street network speeds traffic through the downtown on the one-way pair of Bay Street and Second Street.

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As described in the FOREWORD, the City commissioned a more detailed riverfront development plan in 2009 for the area between the bridges from Bay St. to the river. This plan is found in Tab 2.

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Specifically, as it relates to street reconfigurations, the pages following have been adjusted slightly to account for the recommendations of the 2009 plan.

STREET DIRECTION AND LANES

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III.7


GENERAL CONTROLS

D O W N T O W N F T. M Y E R S , F L O R I D A

S T R E E T R E C O N F I G U R AT I O N S

Proposed Street Changes

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This map summarizes the reconfigurations described in the pages ahead. The elimination of the Bay/Second oneway pair and the introduction of additional on-street parking contribute to a more walkable environment.

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Specifically, as it relates to street reconfigurations, it is recommended that: • Dean Street between Edwards Drive and Bay Street be removed (this functions currently as a driveway adjacent to Harborside with access to parking located east of Harborside) • The western portion of Edwards Drive between Monroe Street and Heitman be vacated • Heitman from Edwards Drive to Bay Street be vacated.

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As described in the FOREWORD, the City commissioned a more detailed riverfront development plan in 2009 for the area between the bridges from Bay St. to the river. This plan is found in Tab 2.

In addition, during the streetscape improvements, the City: • Maintained the eastern portion of Bay Street, instead of removing that portion as originally recommended. • Converted First Street and Second Street from one-way pair to two way traffic • Removed Heitman (from SR82 to Main Street)

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PROPOSED CHANGES REMOVED STREET REVERTED STREET TWO-WAY PARKING ADDED

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2009 Fort Myers Riverfront Development Plan The Street-by-Street Redesign pages contained on III.9 through III.18 were not included in this printing since they depicted DPZ’s proposed street reconfigurations for the Streetscape Project which has since been completed in November 2009.

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SPECIFIC INTERVENTIONS

D O W N T O W N F T. M Y E R S , F L O R I D A The Study Areas map identifies 17 Specific Interventions for Downtown Fort Myers. The study areas are focused on: the critical first stage areas for revitalization in the heart of downtown and along the waterfront; key sites for future neighborhood centers; and the principal corridors leading into the downtown.

OVERVIEW

EASTERN ENTRANCE

As mentioned earlier, the plan focuses on leveraging the key downtown amenities – a riverfront within walking distance of a walkable main street (First Street) – and taking advantage of the concentration of City-owned property in this area. Thus the area shown in The Heart of Downtown diagram contains the largest number of proposed interventions.

EAST BASIN SITE CULTURAL CAMPUS BASIN-FRONT SITE

2009 Fort Myers Riverfront Development Plan As described in the FOREWORD, the City commissioned a more detailed riverfront development plan in 2009 for the area between the bridges from Bay St. to the river. This plan was to translate the riverfront concepts presented in the 2003 Downtown Fort Myers Plan into an actual development plan that was based on current market and financial conditions. (The 2009 Fort Myers Riverfront Development Plan is located behind Tab 2.) The Specific Interventions contained in this section of the 2003 Downtown Fort Myers Plan are concepts of how new construction could occur in the Downtown Redevelopment Area. Since the final adoption of the 2003 Downtown Fort Myers Plan, these Interventions have been studied to determine whether they were financially and spatially feasible. Many of the items recommended in the 2003 Downtown Fort Myers Plan, such as the Harborside expansion, hotel, retail/mixed-use development, parking and public riverfront open space, have remained in the 2009 Fort Myers Riverfront Development Plan, however, some of them have been relocated within the riverfront area or revised. These include: • the relocation of the convention hotel from the former Exhibition Hall site to the Harborside Parking Lot site, • an increase in the amount of restaurant and retail space, • the relocation of the parking garage locations and the farmers’ market. Several items which were added in the 2009 Fort Myers Riverfront Development Plan include: • the creation of a water feature whose primary goal is to treat stormwater runoff, • a more substantial expansion of Harborside, • a curvilinear pier extending into the river, and • the creation of a riverwalk constructed on the riverside of the mangroves Two Specific Interventions which were not included in the 2009 Fort Myers Riverfront Development Plan include the Symphony Hall and riverfront roadway from Hendry St to Dean St.

EASTERN RIVERFRONT

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STUDY AREAS: The study areas include new neighborhood centers, eastern and western riverfront areas, and a host of sites in the historic core. IV.1


THE HEART OF DOWNTOWN SPECIFIC INTERVENTIONS

D O W N T O W N F T. M Y E R S , F L O R I D A

LARGER BLDG WITH ARCADE

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As described in the FOREWORD, the City commissioned a more detailed riverfront development

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plan in 2009 for the area between the bridges from Bay St. to the river. To review this alternative, please

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Improvements to the heart of downtown include the addition of infill buildings on empty lots and along the perimeter of blocks to mask parking areas, and the extension of the mid-block walkways to create an extensive system of passageways and courtyards lined with shops and restaurants. Many of these improvements are detailed in the pages ahead. IV.2


SPECIFIC INTERVENTIONS

D O W N T O W N F T. M Y E R S , F L O R I D A

THE HEART OF DOWNTOWN

The Center The Center study area is bounded by Edwards Drive to the north, Main Street to the south, Monroe Street to the west, and Lee Street to the east. This area represents, literally, “the center” of the downtown and includes the key “main street” section of First Street.

PHASE 1 PHASE 2

The first interventions planned for The Center study area concern the Street Improvement Phasing for downtown streets. Street improvements involve both the street reconfiguration strategies (discussed above) and streetscape improvements for the following corridors: 1. First Street between Royal Palm Avenue and Monroe Street; 2. Hendry Street from Main Street to the Yacht Basin, and; 3. The one-block section of Dean Street between First Street and Bay Street.

THE CENTER

2003 Downtown Fort Myers Plan Recommendation The City completed the streetscape improvements recommended by this specific intervention, primarily discussed on pages IV. 3- IV. 5 in December 2009. STREET IMPROVEMENT PHASING: This map identifies the first areas where the initial street improvements should be carried out. Subsequent phases will expand outward from this high-quality pedestrian core.

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D O W N T O W N F T. M Y E R S , F L O R I D A

DEAN STREET

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FIRST STREET - RECONFIGURATION: First Street represents the premier “Main Street” for all of downtown Fort Myers, and the block between Hendry and Broadway requires special attention, but these techniques should be applies to adjacent blocks as well. IV.4


SPECIFIC INTERVENTIONS

D O W N T O W N F T. M Y E R S , F L O R I D A Specific improvements proposed for First Street, between Broadway and Hendry Street, begin with the reversal of the damage done by earlier automobile-oriented alterations. Proposals include the street reconfiguration strategies already discussed: straightening the street path; reversion to two-way traffic; restoration of on-street parking on both sides of the street (7-foot parking lanes); narrowing the travel lanes from 12-foot down to 10-foot widths; and reducing large curb radii down to 5-10 foot range. Additional streetscape improvements include: 1. Removing brick planters, which impede the flow of pedestrian movement and are out of character; 2. Repositioning trash receptacles from their current locations so that there is one at each street corner; 3. Planting large palm trees (to match existing trees) at the party walls between buildings to avoid blocking window displays, signage and entrances to shops; 4. Removing “dining pens” (fenced in dining areas attached to restaurants on the sidewalks, that keep potential shoppers away from store windows) and building periodic extensions for dining; 5. Adding and enlarging awnings over entrances to shops and above display windows; 6. Extending the brick-paved mid-block walkways over the on-street parking lanes, to the edge of the travel lanes; 7. Adding streetlights along the length of the block at regular intervals at a consistent height of 10-12 feet. Lighting itself should be warm spectrum (eg., colorcorrected sodium vapor), and not too bright. Any light that is bright yellow (e.g., non color-corrected sodium) or Cobra-Head should be removed from the downtown; these can be relocated to the City’s highways where they are appropriate. The proposed streetscape improvements for First Street can be applied to A-Streets throughout the downtown. More detailed streetscape improvements are presented in the Genesis Report (under separate cover), but two items deserve additional attention here: canopies and signage.

Mandatory Canopies on Retail Streets While many buildings in the downtown have canopies to shelter pedestrians on sidewalks, there are significant gaps that discourage people from walking past storefronts on hot, sunny days or during rain. There should be a consistent coverage of canopies, arcades, and galleries to shelter people along the principle pedestrian streets and walks. Currently these encroachments are only encouraged by the downtown ordinance. The FMRA should require building owners and businesses to provide a canopy, arcade or gallery attached to the front of their buildings along the principle pedestrian A-Streets. Blade Signage For Canopies Main street retail requires excellent visibility to the passerby, who should be able to easily identify the names of shops and restaurants and the types of merchandise and food they sell from either side of the street. The FMRA should require building owners and businesses to attach blade signs on the bottom of canopies with the names of stores. Overhead signage shall be not less than 6 feet 8 inches (2 meters) nominal height above the sidewalk (per the City of Fort Myers Standard Fire Prevention Code, Section 7.1.5; A7.1.5).

THE HEART OF DOWNTOWN

TREE CANOPY ABOVE RETAIL SIGNS

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PARALLEL PARKING LANE

“WOOD” DINING PLATFORM IN PARKING LANE PLANTERS TO PROTECT DINERS

FIRST STREET - PROPOSED STREETSCAPE: This drawing summarizes the recommendations at left.

Additional Interventions in The Center Additional proposals for The Center study area include the completion of the streetwall through the addition of infill, the office expansion of the Wachovia block, and extensions and improvements to mid-block walkways to create a more comprehensive system. Infill buildings are proposed at the southern corners of Bay Street at the intersection with Hendry Street, and at the southeast corner of First Street and Jackson Street. The Wachovia property involves a crucial block that is currently dominated by a surface parking lot. The presence of the surface lot damages the pedestrian fabric of the downtown along two important A-Streets, Hendry and Main. The potential acquisition and expansion of this office building is shown, involving three separate buildings that will complete the street wall on the south side of Main Street and the west side of Hendry Street.

HENDRY STREET MARKET FROM MAIN STREET: This view down Hendry Street from Main Street shows the collective impact on the pedestrian quality of the downtown resulting from interventions proposed for several study areas, with the street walls completed all the way down to the proposed Hendry Street Market and beyond. IV.5


SPECIFIC INTERVENTIONS

D O W N T O W N F T. M Y E R S , F L O R I D A

THE HEART OF DOWNTOWN

FIRST STREET HENDRY STREET

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1’-0” to 1’-4” SIGN

SECOND STREET THE MID-BLOCK PEDESTRIAN NETWORK

Finally, the already established pattern of mid-block walkways (many former alleyways) is enhanced by extending the Collier Arcade south to Main Street, where it will open onto a view of the historic courthouse building. This new section of the arcade will incorporate along its interior a 5,000-6,000 square foot liner building accommodating a relocated post office (for post office boxes, stamps, and mail drop-off) to help maintain a steady flow of pedestrian traffic. The walkway system will continue out the existing arcade entrance, moving east across Broadway, where a new walkway extension is proposed. Continuing east, this extension will tie into the existing walkway system that runs north all the way through to Bay Street, south to Main Street (where it can connect to a First Union pathway), and east across Hendry Street. Here another walkway extension will be created by removing one slim building, leading to a “rear square” courtyard, and on through to Jackson Street. The walkway will then turn north, around

behind the planned infill building, and open into the existing plaza across the street from the historic courthouse building on First Street. Thin liner buildings will be added along the walkways and courtyards for shops and cafes that will add to the vitality, ambience, lighting, and sense of safety in the walkways.

CANOPY AND SIGN SECTION

CANOPY AND SIGN SECTION

In most cities, such mid-block pedestrian paths are not a wise development, because they take away rear alleys from their standard utilitarian use, forcing dumpsters out onto public sidewalks. The expansion of the mid-block network shown here is only recommended because the existing paths would benefit from a more integrated pedestrian flow, and because the City and its merchants have demonstrated a willingness to become more vigilant in the placement (and prompt removal) of trash receptacles on collection day. The merchants should formally agree to police themselves in this regard prior to undertaking any expansion.

CANOPY AND SIGN PERSPECTIVE: “Main Street” shops require signage oriented towards pedestrians. This sample blade sign is designed for use on the low canopies that are found on many buildings in the downtown.

IV.6


SPECIFIC INTERVENTIONS

D O W N T O W N F T. M Y E R S , F L O R I D A EAST BASIN SITE BASIN-FRONT SITE WEST BASIN SITE

BASIN STUDY AREAS: The study areas along Edwards Drive and around the Yacht Basin represent some of the most valuable opportunities for spurring new investment in the downtown.

THE HEART OF DOWNTOWN

2009 Fort Myers Riverfront Development Plan

MARINA EXPANSION

As described in the FOREWORD, the City commissioned a more detailed riverfront development plan in 2009 for the area between the bridges from Bay St. to the river. This plan was to translate the riverfront concepts presented in the 2003 Downtown Fort Myers Plan into an actual development plan that was based on current market and financial conditions. (The 2009 Fort Myers Riverfront Development Plan is located behind Tab 2.) The 2009 Fort Myers Riverfront Development Plan incorporates most of the recommended Specific Interventions from the 2003 Downtown Fort Myers Plan, such as expansion of Harborside, addition of a convention hotel, retail/mixed use development, parking and public open space, and in addition, incorporates a two block long water retention feature.

YACHT BASIN HOTEL MARKET STRUCTURE

Basin-Front Site The Basin-Front study area – half of which is owned by the City – illustrates several strategies for developing the downtown as a pedestrian-friendly, mixed-use urban center. Located one block north of First Street and adjacent to the Yacht Basin, the site is the proposed destination for one of the relocated parking garages from south of Martin Luther King Boulevard. The parking garage should be located in the center of this site and hidden from the street by buildings on three sides. The area surrounding the garage is platted as five individual properties, each of which would ideally hold a structure perhaps five stories tall. The platting of smaller properties allows smaller developers to take part in downtown development, and produces a larger

number of small-to-mid size projects that can be developed incrementally. This approach avoids the potential monotonous uniformity that a smaller number of large-scale projects can bring, such as the Ramada and the Justice Center compounds, that work against creating a diverse fabric of many different buildings that appeal to downtown visitors and enhance the downtown pedestrian experience. The thin parcel along Edwards Drive is shown occupied by a liner building that conceals the garage from the Yacht Basin and provides an attractive location for small shops and merchants on the ground floor, with residential on the upper floors all facing the riverfront. The other four parcels afford similar opportunities for 4-6 story mixed-use buildings, with retail opportunities on the ground floors (especially facing the Hendry Street Market) and residential or offices above. The waterfront view available from this location is probably best reserved for a variety of housing (apartments, senior housing, possibly a small hotel) over retail uses. Part of this intervention also involves the relocation of the Hall of Fifty States – which has previously been relocated – to reinforce the Cultural Campus site on page IV.10. The beautiful Banyan tree along Hendry must be preserved, however. The ground floors facing South and East need not contain retail uses.

LINER

PLATTED PROPERTIES

Edwards Drive and the Yacht Basin Just north of The Center are four key downtown blocks and waterfront property, including substantial City-owned land that will be crucial pieces of the downtown revitalization. Moving clockwise from in front of the Yacht Basin, these study areas include the Basin-Front, the (Hendry Street) Market Structure, the Symphony and Parking Site, the West Basin, the East Basin, and the Cultural Campus sites.

LARGER BLDG WITH ARCADE

ARCADE SURROUNDING BUILDING

NEW GARAGES

CULTURAL CAMPUS

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BASIN-FRONT SITE: Proposed strategies for this key site include the insertion of a parking garage to be masked by 5-story mixed-use buildings, including residences with small shops on the ground floor facing the Yacht Basin.

HARBOR FROM HENDRY STREET PIER: If properly developed, the Fort Myers Basin can look and function like the great European harbors of Marseille or Portofino, where buildings surround a port that feels like a town square with water as its floor. IV.7


SPECIFIC INTERVENTIONS

D O W N T O W N F T. M Y E R S , F L O R I D A

THE HEART OF DOWNTOWN

2009 Fort Myers Riverfront Development Plan HOTEL MARKET STRUCTURE

NEW GARAGES

HENDRY STREET MARKET: The Market Building has the potential to become a signature attraction for tourists and locals alike.

THE HENDRY-STREET MARKET

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As described in the FOREWORD, the City commissioned a more detailed riverfront development plan in 2009 for the area between the bridges from Bay St. to the river. This plan was to translate the riverfront concepts presented in the 2003 Downtown Fort Myers Plan into an actual development plan that was based on current market and financial conditions. (The 2009 Fort Myers Riverfront Development Plan is located behind Tab 2.)

400 ft

Hendry Street Market Directly adjacent to this block, the block of Hendry Street running between Bay Street and Edwards Drive is shown widened and shifted west by slightly shrinking the block west of Hendry (wholly owned by the City). The realignment and widening of Hendry along this block makes room for an inexpensive, open-air market linear pavilion to be located running down the center of Hendry Street, similar to the famous Market building in Charleston, South Carolina. This provides a classic, open-air setting for the existing Farmer’s Market that can help energize the downtown much more effectively from this location than from its current location below the US 41 overpass. This building is simply a long, inexpensive shed, but its southern end is capped with a small but monumental civic building to announce the market in the direction of First Street, drawing visitors toward the river.

The 2009 Fort Myers Riverfront Development Plan incorporates most of the recommended Specific Interventions from the 2003 Downtown Fort Myers Plan, such as expansion of Harborside, addition of a convention hotel, retail/mixed use development, parking and public open space, and in addition, incorporates a two block long water retention feature. While a farmers’ market is included in the 2009 Fort Myers Riverfront Development Plan, the recommended location was shifted east to the Harborside expansion and Centennial Park.

HENDRY STREET MARKET FROM MAIN STREET: View of the proposed Market Building looking north up Hendry Street towards the riverfront.

IV.8


SPECIFIC INTERVENTIONS

D O W N T O W N F T. M Y E R S , F L O R I D A

THE HEART OF DOWNTOWN

RIVER DRIVE SAILING CLUB

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HOTEL

EDWARDS DRIVE

NEW GARAGE

BAY STREET

LINERS

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Symphony and Parking Site The Symphony and Parking Site includes the two blocks just west of the proposed Hendry Street Market. A second relocated parking garage with residential liner buildings on all four sides will occupy the easternmost block (wholly owned by the City). Retail use is recommended for the ground floor on Hendry Street (facing the market) at the least. On the adjacent block, a new concert hall is proposed as an addition to the existing convention center. The concert hall proposal is driven by the ongoing search for a more permanent home for the 37-year old symphony in the downtown. The building itself is designed to the specifications of the symphony – acoustically perfect with a main level and second level balcony, with 1100 to 1500 seats in a sloped seating arrangement. As shown in the plan view, the hall can be embedded on the eastern side of the convention center site without moving the existing street. Creating the symphony hall as an addition to the existing building, rather than as its own separate structure, also allows the symphony hall to operate efficiently by sharing the existing staff and administrative apparatus of the convention center. The downtown benefits by having symphony-goers exit onto Dean Street, a short walk from both First Street and the riverfront.

As described in the FOREWORD, the City commissioned a more detailed riverfront development plan in 2009 for the area between the bridges from Bay St. to the river. This plan was to translate the riverfront concepts presented in the 2003 Downtown Fort Myers Plan into an actual development plan that was based on current market and financial conditions. (The 2009 Fort Myers Riverfront Development Plan is located behind Tab 2.) The 2009 Fort Myers Riverfront Development Plan incorporates most of the recommended Specific Interventions from the 2003 Downtown Fort Myers Plan, such as expansion of Harborside, addition of a convention hotel, retail/ mixed use development, parking and public open space, and in addition, incorporates a two block long water retention feature. Following the final adoption of the 2003 Downtown Fort Myers Plan, Council determined that locating a Symphony Hall within the riverfront area was not financially feasible.

HARBOR SIDE CONVENTION CENTER

2009 Fort Myers Riverfront Development Plan

NEW CONCERT HALL

SYMPHONY AND PARKING

TKTS

LOBBY

OPEN TO BELOW

STAGE

EXISTING SERVICES

MEZZANINE LEVEL BACKSTAGE

OFFICES

OFFICES

FIRST LEVEL: The new concert hall takes advantage of wasted space to the east of the convention center and, by making use of that building’s existing lobbies and services, provides a new stage at great economy.

IV.9


SPECIFIC INTERVENTIONS

D O W N T O W N F T. M Y E R S , F L O R I D A

THE HEART OF DOWNTOWN

West Basin Site Just north of the Symphony Hall is the West Basin Site, which is currently partially occupied by the Exhibition Hall. This riverfront site adjacent to the Yacht Basin represents an attractive site for a hotel. The proposal calls for the Exhibition Hall to be preserved and incorporated into the hotel as a lobby and restaurant area beneath the (re-exposed) vaulted ceiling. A small plaza in front of the Ferry terminal would provide a drop-off area for the Hotel. The Ferry Terminal itself is shown with a new wraparound porch. While the current suburban-mansion-style facade of the terminal is no great detriment to downtown, it would be easy to reconfigure through the replacement of the existing porch with something more appropriate. A wraparound porch would provide waterfront dining opportunities on the pier. A new River Drive has been created by running a road west from the bottom of Hendry Street to the boat ramp at the corner of Centennial Park, which then turns south to reconnect with Edwards Drive. River Drive provides another attractive street with a riverfront view, much like Ocean Drive in Miami Beach. This street could be closed off with bollards from time to time to keep vehicles away from the waterfront, but its low-speed geometrics would generally keep traffic from being a nuisance. The Sailing School is proposed as relocated next to the existing boat ramp, arranged in an L-shaped building to hold the boats. The free use of this ramp for big boats creates numerous problems for the downtown, including major parking issues, and is preventing the best use of this valuable waterfront property. In this proposal for the West Basin Site only the Sailing School retains access to the boat launch; all other users are to be redirected to boat ramps outside of the heart of downtown. In this way, the large turnaround can be eliminated to create a more walkable environment.

East Basin Site Across the Yacht Basin from this site, additional development is proposed on the East Basin Site that will complement the West Basin and complete the enclosure of the harbor. At the very end of Lee Street, on a site directly across from the Ferry Terminal, the existing single-story building is eventually be replaced by a larger building with a western arcade for sunset dining. This building should be the twin of the Ferry Terminal in terms of its mass. The site on the northeast corner of Edwards and Lee affords excellent views of the riverfront, and would be suitable for a large residential building or hotel. The building that is shown contains its own parking underneath, hidden from the street. The Plan also calls for additional boat slips to be added to the Yacht Basin, inviting more visitors to the downtown. These boat slips should be encouraged, as visiting yachters arrive with free time and disposable income to spend downtown. They also lack large kitchens, which benefits local restaurants. 2009 Fort Myers Riverfront Development Plan

RIVER DRIVE SAILING SCHOOL

EXHIBITION HALL (LOBBY)

LARGER BLDG WITH ARCADE

RESIDENTIAL OR HOTEL

HOTEL

EDWARDS DRIVE

YACHT BASIN

NEW CONCERT HALL

WEST BASIN SITE: Proposals for this site include the adaptive reuse of the Exhibition Hall as the lobby for a new hotel and restaurant, and the relocation of the Sailing School next to the existing boat ramp.

EAST BASIN SITE: The plan calls for a larger building with an arcade for sunset dining to be constructed directly across from the Ferry Terminal and help frame the harbor with buildings on all three sides of the Yacht Basin.

As described in the FOREWORD, the City commissioned a more detailed riverfront development plan in 2009 for the area between the bridges from Bay St. to the river. This plan was to translate the riverfront concepts presented in the 2003 Downtown Fort Myers Plan into an actual development plan that was based on current market and financial conditions. (The 2009 Fort Myers Riverfront Development Plan is located behind Tab 2.) The 2009 Fort Myers Riverfront Development Plan incorporates most of the recommended Specific Interventions from the 2003 Downtown Fort Myers Plan, such as expansion of Harborside, addition of a convention hotel, retail/mixed use development, parking and public open space, and in addition, incorporates a two block long water retention feature. Recommendations contained in the 2003 Downtown Fort Myers Plan with respect to the Exhibition Hall being used as a lobby for a hotel are no longer valid since damage to the Hall resulting from Hurricane Charlie forced the City to demolish the Hall. Also, Council later decided that they would prefer to have the convention hotel connected directly to Harborside, effectively moving it back one block from the river.

NEW HOTEL INCORPORATING EXHIBITION HALL: This renedering shows the Exhibition Hall incorporated into a new hotel and restaurant looking out over the riverfront.

IV.10


SPECIFIC INTERVENTIONS

D O W N T O W N F T. M Y E R S , F L O R I D A The Cultural Campus

Eastern Entrance & Eastern Anchor The eastern portion of the heart of downtown includes the Eastern Entrance and the Eastern Anchor study areas located between Fowler Street and Lee Street, from Second Street and Edwards Drive. The Eastern Entrance The Eastern Entrance study area runs from Fowler Street to Lee Street between First Street and Edwards Drive, but also includes the sites just east of Fowler on either side of First Street that represent a key gateway to the downtown. The northern parcel is occupied by the stately Burroughs Home, and the Plan calls for the Langford Kingston house – in danger of being torn down on its current site -- to be restored and relocated to the southern parcel. These two grand historic homes will then

Just south of the Eastern Entrance lies the Eastern Anchor study area, so-named because it is the site where the Plan envisions locating a retail/entertainment anchor for First Street. The Commercial Market Analysis, conducted by the Gibbs Planning Group, identified a market for a 40,000-square foot cinema with stadium seating that could be located in the downtown and help fuel the retail stores and restaurants along First Street. The Plan recommends positioning a midsized 6-to-8 screen theater at the southwest corner of First and Royal Palm Avenue, with a liner building for shops along First Street to mask the blank side wall of the cinema building. Sites for additional infill buildings are added along Lee Street, with two parking garages located on either side of Lee to serve moviegoers. The larger garage structure on the east side of Lee will also include a thin liner building for apartments facing an existing undervalued green.

THE HEART OF DOWNTOWN

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form the eastern gateway into downtown Fort Myers for traffic Completing the circle of study areas around the Yacht Basin is entering on First Street. a two-block sliver of land north of First Street between Lee and Jackson where the courthouse and the Chamber of Commerce The First Street corridor is the principal A-Street for downtown building are located. The Plan calls for transforming this block and the Plan calls for gaps in the street wall to be filled, into a “cultural campus” where a cluster of civic uses may be including the little-used basketball court area at the rear of the Ramada on the southwest corner of First and Fowler and, gathered. across the street, the current site of the Langford Kingston The elimination of the First Street diverter (discussed in greater house (targeted for a church parking lot). There is ample area detail under the Eastern Entrance study area below) will allow for church parking further south on the same block, and this key these two small block fragments to be woven together into a frontage at the corner of two high-volume streets is extremely single long block with an east-west walkway through the center. valuable for retail. The two buildings shown place retail at the The courthouse has been the focus of numerous proposals intersection, with parking hidden behind. from within the community for use as a photography museum, a library, and other civic and cultural activities. The existing The diversion of First Street that cuts through the Ramada building is generally too small for many of the proposed activities, property is removed, and a single infill building blocks long but the removal of the diverter will make it possible to build an views of the ugly parking lot while still allowing room for access. addition on the back of the courthouse that could accommodate A north-south alley divides the Ramada block, with the obsolete even the most demanding space needs of the library proposal. senior housing building removed and this site and portions The Plan is designed to accommodate whichever option the of the Ramada site re-platted to accommodate smaller infill buildings. These front a formal urban square that is created community ultimately decides to pursue. by inserting two narrow drives around the Palm Arboretum at The Plan shows the Hall of Fifty States relocated to the center Edwards Drive, giving the Arboretum a civic site worthy of its of this block, facing Lee, and surrounded by the pedestrian contents. Breaking down these larger properties into smaller walkway and a small plaza. The Hall and plaza are partially parcels will allow more individual developers to participate, enclosed by a new L-shaped building that fronts Jackson Street, using different architects, resulting in greater variety. The ready for whichever institution fails to secure the courthouse midblock alley is flanked by hidden parking lots serving the building. This proposal imagines the eventual removal of an new buildings surrounding the Arboretum. unsightly apartment building north of Bay Street, as that building Eastern Anchor undermines the pedestrian character of the neighborhood.

RELOCATED HALL OF 50 STATES

MOVED HISTORIC HOUSE

EASTERN ENTRANCE AND EASTERN ANCHOR: The Plan transforms the Eastern Entrance study area into a graceful gateway to the downtown, with historic homes flanking either side of First Street. A cinema is proposed as the Eastern CULTURAL CAMPUS: The elimination of the First Street diverter on the Anchor as a generator of commercial activity along First Street. site provides room to expand the existing courthouse and accommodate a plaza around the relocated Hall of Fifty States, accommodating a cluster of civic buildings.

2009 Fort Myers Riverfront Development Plan As described in the FOREWORD, the City commissioned a more detailed riverfront development plan in 2009 for the area between the bridges from Bay St. to the river. This plan was to translate the riverfront concepts presented in the 2003 Downtown Fort Myers Plan into an actual development plan that was based on current market and financial conditions. (The 2009 Fort Myers Riverfront Development Plan is located behind Tab 2.) The 2009 Fort Myers Riverfront Development Plan incorporates most of the recommended Specific Interventions from the 2003 Downtown Fort Myers Plan for the Cultural Campus and Eastern Anchor. Two significant changes include: keeping Bay Street open from Jackson Street to First Street and aligning it with Royal Palm Ave.; and replacing the proposed cinema with a public library. IV.11


SPECIFIC INTERVENTIONS

D O W N T O W N F T. M Y E R S , F L O R I D A Western Anchor

THE HEART OF DOWNTOWN

At the opposite end of First Street the Plan calls for a second anchor, in this case a grocery store. The Gibbs Commercial Market Analysis identified support for up to 55,000 square feet of grocery/markets, and recommended pursuing an operator that could be divided into more than one unit. Grocery store chains such as Ralph’s have been building urban-friendly versions of their markets with separate storefronts and entrances for their bakery operations, drug stores, video/film centers, and cafÊs rather than the typical superstore format in which all of these subunits are internalized and accessed through a single entrance. The grocery store is presented in one of two scenarios that might be pursued as part of an overall development strategy for the Western Anchor study area. Both scenarios include the following changes: Heitman Street (which currently acts as a service road) is removed and replaced with extended parking areas and a driveway; the postal facility is relocated; and the corner of First Street and Monroe Street is reserved for the grocery market. The corner location is considered essential to provide the grocery store with the highest visibility and traffic count possible.

Western Downtown

US 41 RESIDENTIAL OR HOTEL

EDWARDS DRIVE

2009 Fort Myers Riverfront Development Plan

EDWARDS DRIVE

LARGER RESIDENTIAL OR HOTEL

LARGER PARKING GARAGE

CONVENTION CENTER ANNEX

BAY STREET

BAY STREET BANK

RETAIL ANCHOR ANCHOR RETAIL

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FIRST STREET

The portion of the downtown west of US 41 is comprised of several diverse study areas, including Centennial Park, Henley Place, the McGregor Entrance, the Western Riverfront, and Edison Square. The Plan also addresses the pending changes to the Edison and Ford Estates, which lie just outside of the western edge of the downtown boundary, but which should be carefully tied into the downtown plan.

SAILING CLUB

WESTERN ANCHOR: This version of the Western Anchor is based upon the successful completion of a Convention Center expansion across Monroe Street.

FIRST STREET OE MONRET E R ST

Together, the market and cinema act as anchors at either end of First Street, much like department stores act as anchors at either end of a shopping mall, feeding the pedestrian foot traffic that flows in between. The Plan identifies the development of these two anchors as the highest priorities for the downtown in terms of any incentives that might be offered to developers to encourage investment.

US 41

In the first scenario, the drive-through bank building is also removed and the convention center is expanded to include a large annex that abuts US 41. The grocery store occupies the entire corner of First Street and Monroe Street. The northern portion of the block is occupied by a parking garage wrapped by a hotel or residential building that faces Centennial Park along the riverfront and Monroe Street to the east. In the second scenario, the convention center annex is not built and the drive-through bank building is retained. In this scenario a smaller grocery store is built on the corner of First and Monroe, with parking in the rear of the building. A larger parking garage is built in the center of the block masked by a mixed-use building along Monroe Street and the hotel or residential building facing Centennial Park and the northern section of Monroe.

SAILING CLUB

WESTERN ENTRANCE ALTERNATIVE SCENARIO: This second version of the Western Anchor is based upon the possibility that a Convention Center expansion is not deemed feasible. The result is a larger waterfront building and the preservation of the drive-through bank.

As described in the FOREWORD, the City commissioned a more detailed riverfront development plan in 2009 for the area between the bridges from Bay St. to the river. This plan was to translate the riverfront concepts presented in the 2003 Downtown Fort Myers Plan into an actual development plan that was based on current market and financial conditions. (The 2009 Fort Myers Riverfront Development Plan is located behind Tab 2.) The 2009 Fort Myers Riverfront Development Plan incorporates most of the recommended Specific Interventions from the 2003 Downtown Fort Myers Plan for the Western Anchor of the Heart of Downtown, such as expansion of the Harborside Event Center. However, following the final adoption of the 2003 Downtown Fort Myers Plan, the grocery store that was proposed as a retail anchor for the western edge of the Heart of Downtown, was built in the Edison Ford Square site within the Western Riverfront Shed. This site was determined to be more suitable to accommodating the parking, loading and traffic circulation needs of a large grocery store.

IV.12


SPECIFIC INTERVENTIONS

D O W N T O W N F T. M Y E R S , F L O R I D A

THE WESTERN APPROACH

Western Downtown The portion of the downtown west of US 41 is comprised of several diverse study areas, including Centennial Park, Henley Place, the McGregor Entrance, the Western Riverfront, and Edison Square. The Plan also addresses the pending changes to the Edison and Ford Estates, which lie just outside of the western edge of the downtown boundary, but which should be carefully tied into the downtown plan.

EXTENDED PARKING

Henley Place and the McGregor Entrance These three study areas, tightly clustered just west of the US 41 flyover, are presented as a group. While the distinctive oval park that defines Henley Place has survived, most of the large historic homes that once graced this little neighborhood are now gone. The Plan calls for replatting these large lots into smaller ones to accommodate rowhouses. These lots could also be recombined to create larger residential buildings. An alley is added on both sides of the park to accommodate offstreet parking in back of the homes.

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West First Street represents an office corridor of sorts. In keeping with this theme, three new office buildings are proposed just north of Henley Place, with parking accommodated in a new garage that backs up to US 41. The site for this garage is created by eliminating the unnecessary Carson Street. On the north side of First Street, mid-rise residential buildings are proposed to take advantage of the views of Centennial Park and the riverfront. The building shown fronting West First Street includes a 120-foot wide central lot where surface parking can be concealed from the street, with parking garages located beneath the rear of buildings. Just north of this structure, along the narrow “shrimp dock� parcel, a 60-foot wide mid-rise residential building is proposed that could include restaurants, shops and services for park users on the ground floor. If commerce is not considered viable and the ground floor is used for a parking garage, the wall of the parking garage facing the park should be broken up by requiring at least one small window per bay with detailing such as iron crossbars.

MID-RISE RESIDENTIAL

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HENLEY PLACE: Henley Place as a townhome neighborhood with parking behind the homes along alleyways and the oval park preserved. PLATTED PROPERTY FOR ROWHOUSES

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HENLEY PLACE AND CENTENNIAL PARK: The western approach to downtown is shown with lots replatted to accomodate rowhaouses in Henley Place, a greener Centennial Park, and a potential roundabout to rationalize traffic flows entering the downtown.

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2009 Fort Myers Riverfront Development Plan As described in the FOREWORD, the City commissioned a more detailed riverfront development plan in 2009 for the area between the bridges from Bay St. to the river. This plan did not address the Western Approach of the 2003 Downtown Fort Myers Plan and no significant changes have been made to the2003 Downtown Fort Myers Plan recommendations.

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IV.13


D O W N T O W N F T. M Y E R S , F L O R I D A

SPECIFIC INTERVENTIONS

Both of these projects imagine an “Urban Center” Transect designation on this site, resulting in mid-rise buildings. Several developers are now considering projects on these properties that would require a more intense “Urban Core” Transect designation to be accomplished. The regulating plan will need to be adjusted in the weeks ahead to reflect the City’s desires regarding the density of this site and others. Either solution is supportable from a planning perspective, as long as the street and park frontages are handled in a pedestrian-friendly manner.

THE WESTERN APPROACH

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PARTIALLY MODIFIED CENTENNIAL PARK: Here Centennial park is shown with a new bandstand facing the riverfront, some additional greenspace and a fountain. Parking is extended under the US 41 flyover, and a wrap-around loggia and trees are added to enhance the existing public restroom facilities.

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The McGregor Boulevard entrance addresses the problems associated with the US 41 flyover, which comes down off the bridge as it approaches the downtown, then rises again. The ramps and signage also make it difficult to enter the downtown from this important artery, with visitors often misdirected away from the downtown when they are trying to reach it. The shorter-term proposal is to create a traffic circle underneath the ramp to improve the local traffic flow. Pending further traffic studies, the long-term proposal is to remove the flyover and bring the highway down to the ground sooner, so that traffic can easily choose to enter the downtown through the rerouting made possible by the traffic circle. Both of these scenarios require further study prior to implementation, but they are recommended by Rick Hall, the team’s Transportation Engineer.

EXTENDED PARKING

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FULLY MODIFIED CENTENNIAL PARK: Here Centennial Park is shown with a linear green replacing much of the existing hardscape. The existing buildings are replaced and the “shrimp dock” has been aquired..

Centennial Park The Plan also includes two scenarios for improving Centennial Park, the downtown’s largest and most important green space. In the first scenario, a new bandstand is added to project the sound of performances toward the river rather than into nearby residential areas. The hardscape area is reduced to allow for more green space within the park, and a fountain is added. The existing pavilions in the park near the riverfront remain, but the bathroom building is enhanced with a wrap-around loggia and trees are planted to mask the service area behind the pavilion. Parking is extended further under the US 41 flyover and beyond, made possible by the removal of Heitman Street. (This parking serves both the park and the Western Anchor.) Additional pathways are added along the “desire lines” where people already regularly tread through the park.

In the second scenario for Centennial Park, the existing pavilions are removed and the hardscape is further reduced to create a greener park. A linear green is created running from the new bandstand (now set further back from the water, closer to West First Street) to the waterfront. The “shrimp dock” property has been obtained by the City in order to extend the park to its natural western waterfront, where it is provided with services, food, and drink in smaller pavilion buildings. The waterfront walk is continued beyond Centennial Park to the west and continues on past the Chart House per the existing plan.

2009 Fort Myers Riverfront Development Plan As described in the FOREWORD, the City commissioned a more detailed riverfront development plan in 2009 for the area between the bridges from Bay St. to the river. This plan was to translate the riverfront concepts presented in the 2003 Downtown Fort Myers Plan into an actual development plan that was based on current market and financial conditions. (The 2009 Fort Myers Riverfront Development Plan is located behind Tab 2.) Most of Centennial Park was outside of the 2009 Fort Myers Riverfront Development Plan study area but both the 2003 Downtown Fort Myers Plan and the 2009 Fort Myers Riverfront Development Plan recommended improvements to the park to generate more activity and use. In the future, it is recommended that a consultant be hired to prepare a Master Plan for the park. IV.14


SPECIFIC INTERVENTIONS

D O W N T O W N F T. M Y E R S , F L O R I D A

THE WESTERN APPROACH

MID- TO HIGH-RISE BUILDINGS ALONG WATER

PERIODIC WATERFRONT PLAZAS

PARKING AT MID-BLOCK

LINER APTS

PARKING STRUCTURE SERVING BUILDINGS TO SOUTH AND EAST CHART HOUSE RESTAURANT

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EUCLID AVENUE

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STREE

NEIGHBORHOOD INFILL AND REPLACEMENT

VIRGINIA AVENUE

NEW GREEN

FOUNTAIN ROUNDABOUT

MODERATE-DENSITY EDISON SQUARE PROPOSAL

EDISON LAB EDISON/FORD PARKING

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EDISON SQUARE AND WESTERN RIVERFRONT: In the western-most edge of the downtown, the Edison-Ford Shopping Center is transformed into smaller mixed-use urban blocks to allow for its reintegration into the surrounding urban fabric.

IV.15


SPECIFIC INTERVENTIONS

D O W N T O W N F T. M Y E R S , F L O R I D A

THE WESTERN APPROACH

Edison Square and The Western Riverfront

WEST FIRST STREET

APT VILLAS

MARKET APTS

Edison Square is a largely vacant shopping center bordered by McGregor Boulevard, Clifford Street, West First Street and Virginia Avenue. The current owners of the shopping center met with DPZ during the charrette and discussed several redevelopment options for the property. This Plan includes three alternative scenarios of varying degrees of intensity for the site: low density, moderate density, and high density. All three scenarios call for replatting the site by breaking up the large buildings and expansive parking lot into smaller pieces and creating a walkable fabric of narrow streets and short blocks. All scenarios also introduce a mix of uses, including a small grocery market at the head of the square, additional retail shops on the ground floor of buildings facing the square, and a mix of residential, office and live/work space. While the market will dictate the ultimate size of the grocery, out of the maximum market demand for 55,000 square feet of grocery store space identified in the Commercial Market Analysis, the Plan includes approximately 13,000-square feet located in Edison Square, with another 30,000-square feet located in the Western Anchor of the downtown core. The moderate density scenario (which approaches 30 dwelling units per acre) appears in the drawing above and is also shown in the context of the larger area of western downtown in the Edison Square and the Western Riverfront drawing. In this scenario the site is broken up into four blocks plus the Square, which is fronted by three-story buildings with retail on the ground floor and apartments above. A parking garage is located at the western edge of the site along McGregor and masked by a liner building that contains apartments over retail. A two-block east-west street lined with apartments, rowhouses and a narrow attached plaza runs through the middle of the site between Virginia Avenue and Euclid Avenue. The eastern third of the site contains

OFFICE OR RETAIL

ROWHOUSE OR LIVE/WORK SURFACE PARKING

CLIFFORD STREET

a parking court masked from the street by office buildings along McGregor, apartment villas along West First Street, row houses or live/work buildings along Clifford Street, and the retail facing the Square. The overall effect is to transform a single-use property dominated by a large parking lot into a wide range of housing, office and retail uses that can adapt to the market all focused on a well defined civic space.

EUCLID AVENUE

At the western-most edge of the downtown, the Plan proposes to transform the Edison-Ford Plaza (shopping center) into Edison Square, a pedestrian-oriented neighborhood center. Edison Square will serve as the center for a pedestrian shed that serves surrounding residential neighborhoods, new offices, hotels and residences along the western riverfront, and visitors to the nearby Edison and Ford Estates as well as drive-by traffic along McGregor Boulevard.

RETAIL PARKING GARAGE LINER APTS OVER RETAIL

SQUARE

McGREGOR BLVD

OFFICE

FOUNTAIN ROUNDABOUT

EDISON SQUARE, MODERATE DENSITY 0

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The moderate density proposal for Edison Square is shown here, with the market at the head of the plaza (in pink), other retail shops with awnings lining the square, and the square itself adapted to accommodate parking while maintaining a formal landscape.

IV.16


SPECIFIC INTERVENTIONS

D O W N T O W N F T. M Y E R S , F L O R I D A

Moving further west, the West First Street dogleg is reconfigured to add a new green with a liner building to close the vista and enclose the green. Moving south from the green on West First Street, the Plan also calls for neighborhood infill and replacement buildings to line the east side of the street. At the intersection of McGregor Boulevard and Virginia Avenue a small roundabout with a fountain lined with buildings on each corner is proposed to calm traffic and announce the entrance into the neighborhood from the west. The consistent frontage along McGregor, and particularly the retail on the north side of the boulevard, is designed to provide an attractive pedestrian route to Edison Square for visitors of the Edison and Ford Estates, discussed next.

WEST FIRST STREET

APT VILLAS

ROWHOUSE OR LIVE/WORK OFFICE OR RETAIL

APTS OVER RETAIL

PARKING APTS OVER RETAIL

SQUARE

Mc GREGOR BLVD

OFFICE

FOUNTAIN ROUNDABOUT

EDISON SQUARE, LOWER DENSITY: In the lower density proposal for Edison Square, the square itself is enlarged and accommodates parking for the retail shops around the square. A new through-street bisects the site from east-to-west.

WEST FIRST STREET

APARTMENTS

MARKET

LINER APTS.

The Plan for the remainder of the Western Riverfront proposes low-to-mid rise buildings (1-5 story) running along West First Street and side streets, with mid-to-high rise (2 to 18 story) buildings located along the waterfront. It is anticipated that a mix of office, hotels, condominiums and apartments will continue to be attracted to the West First Street corridor and riverfront, with offices concentrated south of the riverfront. To accommodate taller buildings along the waterfront without sacrificing the public view of the river, the Plan extends each of the north-south streets straight to the water’s edge where they terminate with a pleasant view of the river at the end of each street. Buildings line the perimeter of each waterfront block, with parking lots concealed in mid-block locations. One parking garage is proposed along the waterfront, just west of

CLIFFORD STREET

MARKET

EUCLID AVENUE

Just to the east of this garage, the Plan shows the riverfront walkway turning south and emerging on West First Street in an attractive plaza that announces the entrance to the walkway. This solution responds to the current intentions for the completion of the walkway in approximately this location. However, should additional support from developers be identified as the riverfront properties are redeveloped, the walkway could be extended all along the riverfront punctuated by periodic waterfront plazas. This is perhaps not the most popular solution, but it is the one that will result in the highest property values in the long run.

PARKING GARAGE OFFICE OR RETAIL

CLIFFORD STREET

The higher density proposal divides the site up into three blocks plus the square. Two of these blocks, east and west of the square, are larger and contain parking garages to support the higher density of development. These structures are completely lined by residential and mixed-use buildings. The east-west through street is eliminated but good connectivity is achieved with north-south streets on either side of the Square connecting West First Street and McGregor Boulevard. The smaller increments of individual rowhouses, live/work units and apartment villas are replaced in this scenario by threestory, six-unit (“six-pack”) apartment buildings with parking to the rear. The square is larger and more formal than in the moderate density proposal, and buildings range from fivestories around the parking decks to the 3-story apartment buildings.

THE WESTERN APPROACH

the boat slip, to serve sites to the east and south too small to accommodate adequate on-site parking.

EUCLID AVENUE

In the lower density proposal for Edison Square, the retail shops front onto a “parking square” fashioned after the Highland Park Shopping Village in Dallas, a successful model for balancing the needs of cars and pedestrians for over seventy years. At 150-foot face-to-face, the square is larger than the square in the moderate density proposal and is detailed to look and act as a formal square even when used for parking. The buildings are low-rise, although there are apartments above the retail shops around the square. A new street now runs all the way through the site between Virginia Avenue and Clifford Street. As compared with the moderate density proposal, this street accommodates a larger number of rowhouses or live/work units that face one another across the street to create a consistent character.

PARKING GARAGE LINER APTS OVER RETAIL

APTS OR OFFICE OVER RETAIL

OFFICE SQUARE

Mc GREGOR BLVD FOUNTAIN ROUNDABOUT

EDISON SQUARE, HIGHER DENSITY: The higher density proposal for Edison Square includes two parking garages on either side of the square anchoring two large blocks, with the market on the third block.

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IV.17


SPECIFIC INTERVENTIONS

D O W N T O W N F T. M Y E R S , F L O R I D A

THE WESTERN APPROACH

Edison and Ford Estates In the core interventions, the relocation of parking garages in the downtown was presented as a key strategy for activating the largely untapped market of downtown office workers. A second source of vitality for the downtown that has not been effectively leveraged is the Fort Myers tourism market. The pre-charrette analysis by The Genesis Group included a survey of ten key attractions in and around the downtown, including the Edison and Ford Estates, the Boston Red Sox spring training games at the City of Palms Park, and the Downtown Farmers Market. Taken together these attractions drew some 885,000 visitors to Fort Myers in the year 2000, and the Skatium is expected to add another 130,000 people, pushing the total number of visitors over the one-million mark. Unfortunately, the contribution that these visitors make to the downtown economy is only a small fraction of what might be anticipated given their numbers. The key attraction by far is the Edison and Ford Estates, which lie directly adjacent to the western edge of the downtown study area. The Estates existing plan is to create more parking and a new entrance just northeast of the existing site, and to restore portions of the historic gardens and botanical laboratory on the grounds. Downtown Fort Myers responds to this plan by creating a high-quality pedestrian frontage from Edison Square, down McGregor and Virginia Avenue to a pedestrian walkway that leads directly to the new entrance. The new parking is accommodated in a tree lined parking “field� of pervious surface (unpaved), blending more smoothly with the gardens of the estates. The famous palms along the Boulevard would also be extended further northeast along McGregor. The improvements will lead visitors along a short, attractive stroll to Edison Square where they could stop for lunch and some shopping.

The Plan also strongly recommends restoring trolley service between the Estates and the downtown core to bolster the economic impact of the Estates visitors on downtown shops, restaurants and attractions. The trolley itself should adopt a historic appearance and open-air design making the ride part of the visitor experience rather than an anonymous bustype transit connection. This trolley is ideally imagined as an interim solution until the proposed Transit Loop is established. The ideal long-term solution is perhaps is a slightly expanded transit loop that also serves the entrance to the Edison Ford Estates, so that redundancy is avoided.

GARDEN RESTORED TO ORIGINAL DESIGN

RESTORED EXPERIMENTAL LANDSCAPE NEW ENTRANCE BUILDING NEW PARKING

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The Edison and Ford Estates lie just west of the downtown study area, but are a key attraction that needs to be better connected to the Edison Square neighborhood and the downtown core. This drawing shows how this objective could be achieved while still accomplishing the expansion plans by carefully orienting the new visitor center and a pedestrian connection from the parking areas towards Edison Square. IV.18


SPECIFIC INTERVENTIONS

D O W N T O W N F T. M Y E R S , F L O R I D A

EDISON BRIDGE

BUSINESS US 41 (NORTHBOUND)

THE EASTERN APPROACH

FIRST STREET

MID- TO HIGH-RISE BLDGS ON WATER PARKING IN BETWEEN LOW- TO MID-RISE BLDGS AGAINST STREETS

PASSAGE TO WATER

STREET TO WATER

EASTERN RIVERFRONT: The Plan works to replace the riverfront pattern of residential towers surrounded by parking lots with a more urban settlement pattern that accommodates dense development while masking parking from First Street and preserving public views and connections to the riverfront.

Eastern Riverfront Like the Western Riverfront, the market and existing zoning for the Eastern Riverfront has created pressure and expectations for more dense, taller development in this area. The Plan works to curb the tendency to build isolated high-rise buildings surrounded by parking lots by requiring low-to-midrise buildings along First Street to mask parking areas. Midto-high rise buildings are allowed to seek out the riverfront views, but the building footprints drawn suggest scenarios where the 30-dwelling-per-acre limit can be accommodated in 5-story arrangements rather than high-rises. The former college/American Legion building is shown redeveloped with a park wrapping around the building and extending out into the river. The Plan also extends a street and a walkway to the riverfront, preserving some public views and passages to the water.

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IV.19


SPECIFIC INTERVENTIONS

D O W N T O W N F T. M Y E R S , F L O R I D A Evans Neighborhood Square

E

Boulevard low-to-mid rise office or retail buildings frame the perimeter of the southwest corner with parking concealed within a mid-block court. The parking court is masked from the interior of the block by a strip of infill housing that backs up to the parking lot. Parking for office buildings and the retail uses at the Square are also accommodated to the rear of buildings.

NU

WALTER’S STORE WITH EXTENSION

VE KA

LOW-RISE OFFICE OR RETAIL

R PA

D HIR

This neighborhood maintains an important pool of low-income and affordable housing, and the Plan encourages the City and nonprofit institutions to work closely together to ensure that affordable housing is maintained as redevelopment of the downtown moves forward. Throughout the interior blocks off Evans the Plan calls for compatible infill buildings to fill the gaps along streets, such that a mix of housing types and costs are maintained and enhanced to meet the demands for downtown living.

POSSIBLE RECONFIG. (PEDESTRIAN ALTERNATIVE)

T

ST

E RE

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PARKING PLAZA

EVANS AVENUE

The last two study areas represent sites targeted for neighborhood centers serving the pedestrian sheds of the downtown’s interior blocks. The Evans Neighborhood Square is focused on the intersection of Fourth Street with Evans Avenue and Park Avenue. The neighborhood center includes a parking plaza in front of the existing corner store (shown with a small expansion). Similar to in the low-density Edison Square proposal, this parking lot should be detailed as a pedestrian-friendly plaza. The long-term changes propose re-opening the intersection in front of the plaza and potentially reconnecting the neighborhood across Evans. While this may seem like wishful thinking today, the residents across Evans are well within easy walking distance of the center, so some traffic calming and the installation of a pedestrian crossing light could make the store an accessible destination for everyday shopping even if the traffic patterns are not altered.

THE EASTERN APPROACH

ET

RE

T HS

T UR

FO

Tall 1-story office buildings line Evans Avenue as it heads south, away from the Square, and help define the street edge and slow traffic. At the intersection of Evans and MLK

ET

INFILL HOUSING

ET

T HS

RE

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LOW-RISE OFFICE

STREET RECONFIGURATION

PUBLIC GREEN

INFILL HOUSING MIDBLOCK PARKING LOW TO MID-RISE OFFICE OR RETAIL

EVANS NEIGHBORHOOD SQUARE: This is a view of the proposed Evans Neighborhood Square looking east-northeast. The Square is framed by the L-shaped corner store and line of street trees, yet open in the center for parking. The retail and office buildings are one story tall, providing a smooth transition to the single-family homes in the surrounding neighborhood.

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MARTIN LUTHER KING BLVD

The Evans Neighborhood Square (at top) aims to leverage an existing corner store and the drive-by traffic along Evans and Park Avenues to establish a neighborhood center that can bridge two residential neighborhoods.

IV.20


SPECIFIC INTERVENTIONS

D O W N T O W N F T. M Y E R S , F L O R I D A

THE SOUTHERN APPROACH

Eastern Riverfront Like the Western Riverfront, the market and existing zoning for the Eastern Riverfront has created pressure and expectations for more dense, taller development in this area. The Plan works to curb the tendency to build isolated high-rise buildings surrounded by parking lots by requiring low-to-midrise buildings along First Street to mask parking areas. Midto-high rise buildings are allowed to seek out the riverfront views, but the building footprints drawn suggest scenarios where the 30-dwelling-per-acre limit can be accommodated in 5-story arrangements rather than high-rises. The former college/American Legion building is shown redeveloped with a park wrapping around the building and extending out into the river. The Plan also extends a street and a walkway to the riverfront, preserving some public views and passages to the water.

CITY HALL SURFACE PARKING AT REAR

MARTIN LUTHER KING BLVD

MLK SQUARE W/ PALM GROVE

SCREEN

JACKSON STREET

BROADWAY

MONROE STREET

The last two study areas represent sites targeted for neighborhood centers serving the pedestrian sheds of the downtown’s interior blocks. The Evans Neighborhood Square is focused on the intersection of Fourth Street with Evans Avenue and Park Avenue.

HENDRY STREET

CORNER PLAZA

MID-BLOCK SURFACE PARKING

CIVIC PLAZA

CENTRAL AVENUE

Evans Neighborhood Square

FIRE STATION

HISTORICAL MUSEUM

LINER BUILDING

PECK AVENUE LIBRARY EXPANSION

POLICE STATION INTERMODAL CENTER

LIBRARY

UNION STREET

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The proposed neighborhood center at Martin Luther King Boulevard is positioned to serve the residential area south of MLK Boulevard, take advantage of the drive-by traffic at one of the city’s busiest intersections, and tie in with the Hendry Street corridor. IV.21


D O W N T O W N F T. M Y E R S , F L O R I D A

SPECIFIC INTERVENTIONS

The neighborhood center includes a parking plaza in front of the existing corner store (shown with a small expansion). Similar to in the low-density Edison Square proposal, this parking lot should be detailed as a pedestrian-friendly plaza. The long-term changes propose re-opening the intersection in front of the plaza and potentially reconnecting the neighborhood across Evans. While this may seem like wishful thinking today, the residents across Evans are well within easy walking distance of the center, so some traffic calming and the installation of a pedestrian crossing light could make the store an accessible destination for everyday shopping even if the traffic patterns are not altered.

THE SOUTHERN APPROACH

Tall 1-story office buildings line Evans Avenue as it heads south, away from the Square, and help define the street edge and slow traffic. At the intersection of Evans and MLK Boulevard low-to-mid rise office or retail buildings frame the perimeter of the southwest corner with parking concealed within a mid-block court. The parking court is masked from the interior of the block by a strip of infill housing that backs up to the parking lot. Parking for office buildings and the retail uses at the Square are also accommodated to the rear of buildings. Current Proposal Since the charrette, a number of developments have led to the reconsideration of the site, and a new design. First, the Oasis Restaurant agreed to move to this key location from its current home in the defunct Edison-Ford Plaza Shopping Center. Second, the city moved to purchase the large green lawn on the north flank of the Historical Museum, which is well situated to be a public square. In response to these developments, this new proposal on the next page relocates the primary MLK Square one block east, where it provides excellent views of the Historical Museum while contributing to its campus. The civic plaza recommended at the museum entrance is kept, but a linear building is added to its north to screen the existing commercial building. This building, while unavailable in the short term, should eventually be removed to complete the square.

HENDRY STREET ENTRANCE AT MARTIN LUTHER KING SQUARE: The palm grove lends formality to the Martin Luther King Square, connects with the historic “City of Palms� theme introduced by Edison along the McGregor Boulevard approach to the downtown, and announces the arrival to visitors into the high quality, pedestrian-oriented A-Street fabric of the downtown core.

IV.22


D O W N T O W N F T. M Y E R S , F L O R I D A

SPECIFIC INTERVENTIONS

The new Oasis block has been reconfigured as detailed below. The existing building has been given three additions: a table area opening broadly onto a patio to its west, a frontispiece to the north providing additional floor space and better visibility, and an optional rear addition for when more space is needed. A small section of the originally-proposed square is kept at the corner, providing an amenity to the Oasis dining patio and giving an appropriate setting for this quasi-public institution.

THE SOUTHERN APPROACH

CITY HALL SURFACE PARKING AT REAR

JACKSON STREET

HENDRY STREET

BROADWAY

MONROE STREET

The redesigned Oasis Restaurant Site includes a parking lot lined by a low wall, a new smaller square, and several building additions designed to turn the existing structure into a suitable restaurant.

MLK SQUARE

W/ PALM GROVE

FIRE STATION

HISTORICAL MUSEUM

CIVIC PLAZA

This project concludes the Specific Interventions proposed as a part of this Plan. As already discussed, these are all design proposals that arose from the Charrette but that have not been fully tested and are expected to evolve over time. The Plan’s intention is not to have these all built by tomorrow, but rather to provide examples of the sort of construction that the City should encourage in general. That said, we are confident that more carefully-designed versions of these Specific Interventions would be a worthy addition to Fort Myers, and we are hopeful that the City will investigate each one on its own merits as a possible target project for future investment.

CENTRAL AVENUE

MARTIN LUTHER KING BLVD

CORNER PLAZA

PECK AVENUE LIBRARY EXPANSION

POLICE STATION INTERMODAL CENTER

LIBRARY

UNION STREET

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The recent redesign of this neighborhood moves MLK Square one block east, and redesigns the original block to accomodate the relocated Oasis Restaurant.

IV.23


D O W N T O W N F T. M Y E R S , F L O R I D A

SPECIFIC INTERVENTIONS

Accomplishing the Specific Interventions: The RFP Process. The Specific Interventions do not constitute regulations or required efforts. Some of them are intended to be accomplished by the City at its own expense when funding becomes available. But most Specific Interventions are designed to be undertaken by the private sector, and indeed it is the private sector that has been responsible for most of the development of American cities throughout history. As sponsors of this plan, however, the City must take measures to encourage the private sector to follow the plan, and central to this effort is the implementation of a public Request for Proposals process. For each of the Specific Interventions above intended for the private sector, the city should issue an RFP to the development community. These should be phased to reflect City priorities and timed to allow convenient response on the part of developers. Timing should also reflect which parcels are currently “in play,” and thus considered ripe for development by the business community. Each RFP should include the proposals included in this Plan, a copy of the SmartCode and the Regulating Plan for each parcel, and a list of further requirements for successful development bids. Each RFP should also list the specific incentives – financial, permitting, and otherwise -- that the City may provide, not to encourage a massive response as much as to avoid false expectations of government handouts. If the City sees opportunities to do so, it can wed some of the public projects imagined above to the private development process. For example, it can propose a single RFP for the Basin-Front Site and the Hendry Street Market, such that the developer of the private project would also be asked to complete the public one. These pairings must be organized carefully, to accomplish as much public improvement as possible without placing too large a burden on the developer. Particularly when coordination is needed between a variety of participants – such as the relocation of a County parking lot in a private building on City land – the City must take the lead in soliciting proposals from the largest possible range of developers.

IV.24


APPENDIX

D O W N T O W N F T. M Y E R S , F L O R I D A APPENDIX A MEMORANDUM

The Fort Myers Plan (1926)

TO:

Andres Duany, DPZ Jeff Speck, DPZ

FROM:

Cathy Foerster, Genesis Group

This study was very thorough for its time and resulted in the suggested implementation of a thoroughfare plan, street maintenance/planting plan, parks/parkways plan, school plan, railroad plan, improvements to the caloosahatchee river, and changes related to public building/housing/ zoning.

DATE:

Wednesday, November 7, 2001

RE:

Summary of Prior Reports Downtown Fort Myers

Several prior studies have been completed that provide historical perspective as well as recommendations for the downtown area. These studies/reports have been summarized below with the exception of the 1986 plan which was previously analyzed and incorporated into the precharrette analysis.

1. 2.

The Fort Myers Plan, 1926 Prepared by: Herbert Swan (New York) Economic Analysis of the Expansion of the Central Business District, June 1968 Prepared by: Adley Associates

3.

Downtown Master Plan, 1986 Prepared by: BRW, Inc.

4.

Urban Design Study, 1989 Prepared by: University of Florida Graduate Studio

5.

First Street Entertainment District Implementation Strategy, July 1994 Prepared by: Downtown Redevelopment Agency

6.

7.

Mayor’s Institute Design Team Workshop, September 1999 Participants: Grover Mouton, Mayor’s Institute of City Design at Tulane University Ralph Lerner, Dean of School of Architecture of Princeton University Mark Robbins, Director of Design for the National Endowment of the Arts Martin Luther King Boulevard Redevelopment Plan, March 2000 Prepared by: City of Fort Myers Economic Development Department

Interesting observations from 75 years ago include: § Lack of east/west and through streets. First Street should be extended to the west; Main Street should be continued to the west for 8 additional blocks. § Recommend that all downtown streets be 50 feet or more in width § Recommend that curb corners be no less than 12 feet, preferably 15 feet. § It is very important to set back street corners when erecting new buildings. § One-way movement is not advisable. § Decrease the number of left hand turning options. § Cars are permitted to park up to 12 feet from the house line. § 876 cars parked in the center of town at any given time. § The proposed river park and drive should be designed to allow generous parking; garages in the interior of blocks. Specific recommendations: Thoroughfare Plan § Establish building lines. § Create street openings through extension, widening and/or opening of specific streets. § Start the construction of Riverside Drive (Edwards Drive) ASAP. § Retain and ultimately widen the present bridge. § A new, wider bridge needed on the Fowler Street site. Street Planting/Maintenance § Minimum 8 ft wide open air planting strips; 12 ft preferred. § Implement street tree planting program. § Botanical garden should be the feature of at least one public park. § Widen streets in the central business area to build proper sidewalks. § Place wires underground ASAP. § Recommend uniform street signs. Parks/Parkways § 18-hole golf course should be made available ASAP. § Acquire and construct park along the waterfront, to include a yacht basin. § Recommend series of acquisitions for parks, connected by a series of boulevards. Public Building/Housing/Zoning § Establish minimum size of business lots. § A new city hall and municipal courthouse should be built on present

City Hall site south of First Street.

§

Economic Analysis of the Expansion of the CBD (1968)

§

This report was meant as a preliminary step in the development of a physical plan for downtown fort myers. “The most important and basic lesson downtown has to learn is the importance of overall planning according to a unified design concept…the plan for the cbd must recognize the various inextricable relationships and linkages which exist

§

between location and function of major downtown users (page 30).” The author’s conclusion in 1968 is still applicable in 2001: “Every effort should be made to improve the economic linkage between related downtown functions through strengthening of the physical linkages; the geographical proximity of related space users; the orientation, capacity and efficient uses of streets, sidewalks and other facilities for accommodating pedestrian and vehicular access; the location of parking facilities and so forth. All of these are necessary and vital ingredients in the physical plan (page 31).” Interesting observations (from 33 years ago): § Central Fort Myers stands on the threshold of becoming the trade and service center for a large and rapidly growing consumer market. § Downtown Fort Myers is virtually ringed on every side by blighting influences. § Reduction of sales within Downtown is due to construction of first rate shopping centers outside of the study area. § The Downtown has been in a state of decline for years. Increased population from 1940-1960, but minimal downtown building construction. § Natural areas have not been utilized. § Lack of continuity of retailing uses in Downtown. § Strong increasing demand for quality office space.

Develop voluntary design standards for existing buildings, new construction and streetscape design. Create a development handbook that incorporates design standards, permitting process and incentive programs. Request for Proposals for Security Services of the Downtown Area.

Anticipated budget for implementation of this strategy: $220,000 Incentive Programs $104,400 Advertising and Promotions $622,500 Capital Improvements (streetscape, signage, lighting) $146,700 Operating Expenses (includes enhanced maintenance and security) $1,093,600 Mayor’s Institute Design Team Workshop (1999) This initiative was focused on the expansion of the Harborside Convention Center and hotel development. The design team recommended the promotion of development through defined zones; placement of the hotel on top of the ballroom/meeting space; connecting the waterfront to activities on First Street (Entertainment District) through waterways; and, creating an open air shelter out of the Old Exhibition Hall by preserving the roof and tearing down the walls. Martin Luther King Boulevard Redevelopment Plan (2000) The study limits for this corridor redevelopment plan abut the eastern boundary of the Central Business District, and has an indirect influence on planning / redevelopment efforts within the Downtown. This study was prepared in coordination with FDOT’s expansion of the roadway. In conjunction with the widening, the City committed $3 million in infrastructure improvements – storm sewers, landscaping, irrigation, new utilities and enhanced lighting.

University of Florida Urban Design Study (1989) This study, prepared by UF Graduate Students, is focused on design concepts related to circulation, facades and street edges, streetscape, block types and waterfront considerations in the Downtown area. It is worth a review by DPZ. First Street Entertainment District Implementation Strategy (1994) The Downtown Redevelopment Agency, through a series of subcommittees, prepared this implementation plan based on the districts delineated in the 1986 Master Plan. This strategy references 17 requested actions including: § §

Amend the Downtown Plan to change the Retail/Mixed District to Entertainment District. Amend the Growth Management Code to permit open air market / farmers market. V.1


APPENDIX

D O W N T O W N F T. M Y E R S , F L O R I D A APPENDIX B RESOLUTION NO. 2003-20 A RESOLUTION OF THE CITY COUNCIL OF THE CITY OF FORT MYERS, FLORIDA, AMENDING REDEVELOPMENT PLAN FOR DOWNTOWN DATED JULY 21, 1986, BY ADOPTING A REVISED PLAN ENTITLED “DOWNTOWN FORT MYERS - APRIL 2002”, APPROVING THE STREETSCAPE PLAN AND THE SMART CODE IN PRINCIPLE, EXTENDING THE TIME CERTAIN FOR COMPLETING ALL REDEVELOPMENT FINANCED BY INCREMENT REVENUES UNTIL NOVEMBER 18, 2032, AND PROVIDING FOR AN EFFECTIVE DATE. WHEREAS: Pursuant to Part III, Chapter 163, Florida Statutes, the Community Redevelopment Act of 1969, as amended, the City of Fort Myers has previously created the Community Redevelopment Agency to undertake redevelopment within the corporate limits of the City pursuant to the Redevelopment Act; and WHEREAS: The City Council created the Downtown Redevelopment District on September 4, 1984; and WHEREAS: Based on evidence presented to the City Council at public meetings and incorporated into the minutes of Council meetings, the area in the City of Fort Myers more fully described in Section 2 below meets the criteria of a blighted area as defined in Section 163.340(8)(a), Florida Statutes; and WHEREAS: The City Council adopted the Fort Myers Downtown Plan on July 21, 1986, to guide the redevelopment of the district; and WHEREAS: The Community Redevelopment Agency and the City Council in 2001, determined that there was a need for an amended downtown plan, and as a result, hired the firm of Duany Plater-Zyberk and Company to prepare an amended plan; and WHEREAS: The amended Downtown Plan, Streetscape Plan, and SmartCode were presented to the City Council on April 22, 2002, whereby they were adopted in principle; and WHEREAS: The City of Fort Myers Planning Board reviewed said Plan, Streetscape Plan, and SmartCode on October 9, 2002 and January 15, 2003, and recommended approval; and WHEREAS: The redevelopment of the aforesaid area is necessary in the interest of the public health, safety and welfare of the residents of the City of Fort Myers and in the interest of implementing the intent of the Florida Legislature as expressed in the Act by revitalizing the area economically and socially, thereby improving the tax base, promoting sound growth, and providing economic development.

NOW, THEREFORE, BE IT RESOLVED BY THE CITY COUNCIL OF THE CITY OF FORT MYERS, FLORIDA, that: 1. The Community Redevelopment Plan entitled “Downtown Fort Myers – April 2002” and the accompanying appendices, hereafter referred to as the “Plan”, is hereby adopted as the amended redevelopment plan for the area described below. Said Plan and accompanying appendices are on file in the City Clerk’s Office. 2. The Streetscape Plan and Smart Code are hereby approved in principle. 3. The “Plan” redevelopment area boundaries shall remain the same as those established on July 21, 1986, and are described as follows: Beginning at the intersection of the centerline of the thread of Billy’s Creek and the east line of Section 13, Township 44 South, Range 24 East, City of Fort Myers, Lee County, Florida run southeasterly and southerly along said centerline of said Creek for 340 feet more or less to an intersection with the northerly prolongation of the east line of Lot 8, Block C, Dean’s Subdivision (Plat Book 4, page 24, Lee County Records); thence run southerly along said prolongation, said east line and a southerly prolongation thereof for 950 feet more or less to an intersection with the southerly line of Michigan Avenue; thence run westerly along said southerly line for 1,465 feet more or less to an intersection with the east line of Evans Avenue; thence run southerly along said easterly line for 2,610 feet more or less to an intersection with the south line of said Section 13 in Anderson Avenue; thence run easterly along said south line for 5 feet to an intersection with the northerly prolongation of the easterly line of Evans Avenue as shown on the plat of Evans Second Addition (Plate Book 2, page 1A, Lee County Records); thence run southerly along said prolongation and said easterly line for 1,480 feet more or less to an intersection with the easterly prolongation of the southerly line of Market Street as shown on the plat of Anderson Heights (Plat Book 3, page 59, Lee County Records); thence run westerly along said prolongation, said southerly line and a westerly prolongation thereof for 1,410 feet more or less to an intersection with the west line of Central Avenue; thence run northerly along said westerly line of Central Avenue for 160 feet more or less to an intersection with the south line of Victoria Avenue; thence run westerly along said southerly line and a westerly prolongation thereof for 3,900 feet more or less to an intersection with the west line of Euclid Avenue; thence run northwesterly along the southwesterly line of Altamont Avenue for 57 feet more or less to an intersection with the southeasterly line of McGregor

Boulevard; thence run southwesterly along said southeasterly line for 1,185 feet more or less to an intersection with the northeasterly line of the Edison Estate; thence run northwesterly for 1,200 feet more or less to the Point of Beginning of the former City of Fort Myers bulkhead line as established by City Ordinance No. 545; thence continue northwesterly for 5530 feet more or less to a point of intersection in the northwest Corporate Limit of the City of Fort Myers; thence run northeasterly along said Limit 5,464.19 feet to an intersection with a line parallel with and 300 feet (as measured on a perpendicular) southwesterly from the centerline of State Road No. 45; thence run northeasterly along said Limit, perpendicular to and passing through a point on said centerline at 300 feet, for 600.0 feet; thence run northeasterly along said Limit for 1,934.95 feet to an intersection with a line 200 feet southwesterly (as measured on a perpendicular) from the centerline of Business 41 (State Road No. 45A); thence run northeasterly along said Limit (perpendicular to said centerline) for 500 feet; thence run northeasterly along said Limit for 1,600 feet more or less to an intersection with the northeast limit of City ownership of submerged lands as established by Chapter 6962, Laws of Florida, 1915; thence run southeasterly along said northeasterly limit for 6,200 feet more or less to said centerline of Billy’s Creek; thence run southeasterly along said centerline for 530 feet more or less to the Point of Beginning.

housing shall be assured, should any unanticipated temporary or permanent displacement occur as a result of specific action of the Community Redevelopment Agency or the City of Fort Myers. (e) The “Plan” provides for the retention of controls and establishment of restrictions on land sold or leased for private use. (f) The City of Fort Myers has a commitment to the provision of affordable housing, including the creation of two redevelopment areas with a primary focus on housing affordable to low and moderate income persons and the elderly. Said areas are located immediately adjacent to the “Plan” area; consequently, the “Plan” is not intended to remedy a shortage of affordable housing in the City. 6. The Community Redevelopment Agency is hereby directed to carry out the “Plan” in accordance with its terms. 7. This resolution shall become effective immediately upon adoption.

4. The City Council of the City of Fort Myers, Florida hereby finds that it is in the best interest of the City of Fort Myers to extend the time certain set forth for completing all redevelopment financed by increment revenues within the area described in Section 2 above. Said date shall be extended to November 18, 2032, which is thirty (30) years from the date of adoption of this amended plan, as permitted by s. 163.362(10), Florida Statutes. 5. The City Council of the City of Fort Myers, Florida hereby finds that the “Plan” meets the requirements of Chapter 163, Part III, Florida Statutes, as amended, and specifically finds that: (a) The “Plan” shows by diagram and in general terms those specific plan requirements set forth in s. 163.362(2), Florida Statutes, including open space, street layout, building limitations, dwelling units, and other public improvements. (b) The “Plan” identifies publicly funded capital projects to be undertaken. (c) Adequate safeguards exist that the work of redevelopment will be carried out pursuant to the “Plan”. (d) No displacement of residents is anticipated as a result of the “Plan”, however, as a general policy, relocation shall conform to uniform relocation requirements, and replacement

V.2


Fort Myers Riverfront Development Plan ACQUEST REALTY ADVISORS BOORN PARTNERS POPULOUS PARKER/MUDGETT/SMITH ARCHITECTS


ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS

RIVERFRONT DEVELOPMENT TEAM: Acquest Realty Advisors, Inc. Acquest Development, Inc. Boorn Partners Populous (formerly HOK Venue) Parker Mudgett Smith Architects, Inc.

David Ong, Joan Cleland, Doug Smith, John Lowry, Karen Shamaly John Boorn, Mary Lynne Boorn John Shreve, David Greusel, Mike Rodriquez, Kevin Fast, Brett Payton, Kata Borszeki, David Archer, Wyatt Beard, Daniel Wood, Matthew Keys William Mudgett, Patrick Hartig, Michelle Gouley

CONSULTING TEAM: HOK JJR Johnson Engineering David Plummer Associates HVS Downtown Works S. Hamilton Group, LLC

J. Foard Meriwether, Ismael Torres Bernie Fekete, Chad Brintnall Kevin Winter, David Willems, Christine Hurley, Tina Mayfield Mark Gillis, Suresh Karre Hans Detlefson Scott Schuler Sandra Hamilton

CITY OF FORT MYERS

Riverfront Steering Committee:

Mayor: Hon. Jim Humphrey

Don Paight Stephen Buckley Ted Coyman

City Council Members: Michael Flanders Randall Henderson, Jr. Thomas Leonardo

Michael Flanders Bob Gardner Lee Golden

Levon Simms

Saeed Kazemi

Johnny Streets

Gerry Laboda

Warren Wright

Bill Lawton David Loveland Leif Lustig Rose Rundle William Mitchell

Acknowledgements

ii


TABLE OF CONTENTS

INTRODUCTION

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY

MASTER PLAN

DEVELOPMENT GUIDELINES

IMPLEMENTATION PLAN

1-1

Project Scope and History

2-1

Project Background

3-1

Rendering

4-1

Development Guidelines

5-1

Implementation Plan Summary

1-2

Charrette 1: Framework for Design

2-2

Project History

3-2

Illustrative Plan

4-2

Block A Guidelines

5-2

Site Plan

1-3

Charrette 2: Concept Exploration

2-3

Project Area

3-3

Master Redevelopment Plan

4-4

Block B Guidelines

5-3

Site Plan Programming

1-4

Master Plan Summary

2-4

Previous Planning Efforts

3-4

Rendering

4-6

Block C Guidelines

5-6

Project & Component Cost Model

1-5

Master Plan

2-5

Charrette 1 Summary

3-6

Vehiclular Circulation

4-8

Block D Guidelines

5-24 Schedule of Regulatory Requirements

1-6

Development Guidelines Summary

2-6

Historic District

3-7

Existing/New Land Area

4-10 Block E Guidelines

5-28 Preliminary Project Schedule & Phasing

1-7

Development Guidelines-District

2-7

FEMA Map

3-8

Existing/New Structures

4-12 Block F Guidelines

5-34 Component Blocks

1-8

Hotel Market Study Summary

2-8

Figure Ground with DPZ Plan

3-9

Sustainable Features

4-14 Block W1 Guidelines

5-40 District Branding Plan |

1-9

Retail Market Study Summary

2-9

Existing Land Use

3-10 Pedestrian Circulation

4-16 Block W2 Guidelines

2-10 Downtown Parking

3-11 Open Space -Active/Passive

4-18 Block W4 Guidelines

2-11 Existing Green Space

3-12 Waterfront Pedestrian Edge

4-20 Block W6 Guidelines

2-12 Key Planning Goals

3-13 Waterfront Development

4-22 Block P9W Guidelines

5-52 Funding Strategy Sources and Uses

2-13 Analysis Sketch - Access

3-14 Land Use/Zoning (New)

4-24 Block P9E Guidelines

5-74 Regulatory Requirements -

2-14 Analysis Sketch - Development

3-15 Site Plan

2-15 Analysis Sketch - Water

3-16 Current/Future Land Use and Zoning

2-16 Analysis Sketch - Open Space

3-19 Parking

Minimum Finish Floor Elevation

2-17 Analysis Sketch - Sustainability

3-20 Sections at Street Level

FEMA Map

2-18 Charrette 2 History

3-24 Renderings

2-19 Charrette 2 Findings

Marketing and Management Plan 5-42 Preliminary Project Financial Forecasting Models

Water Treatment | Quality/Quantity 5-75 Regulatory Requirements -

5-76 Elevation Change Concepts 5-77 Grade Transition Views

2-20 Day 3 - Option AB 2-21 Day 3 - Option C 2-22 South Florida Architecture 2-23 Waterfront Architecture

Table of Contents

iii


EXECUTIVE SUMMARY 1


PROJECT SCOPE AND HISTORY

SCOPE

The Acquest/Boorn/Populous team (Redevelopment Team) was selected by the Fort Myers Redevelopment Commission in October of 2008 to lead the City through the process of planning and designing a revitalized riverfront in historic Downtown Fort Myers. On November 10, the City entered into an Agreement with the Redevelopment Team to begin the master planning of Fort Myers’ downtown riverfront.

The project scope for the planning phase consists in three main tasks, with many associated subtasks. The first task, Project Evaluation, took place in the first quarter of 2009. This task consisted of learning about existing conditions within the study area, and conducting meetings with stakeholders in the community to learn what the community’s desires for the downtown riverfront were. The primary goal-setting activity was conducted in the form of a charrette (an intense, three day workshop) in Fort Myers in January 2009. Results of the first phase were documented in a booklet called the “Framework for Design,” portions of which are excerpted in this Executive Summary.

The team began work in earnest in early 2009. The team’s mission was first, to develop a master plan for the riverfront study area, and, on gaining approval for the master plan, to implement the projects identified therein. This report documents the first of these two primary tasks.

The second major phase, Conceptual Development Plan and Testing, took place in the late spring and early summer of 2009. This phase involved engaging the planning team to develop a series of alternative approaches to the development of the downtown riverfront which could be tested by community stakeholders and the marketplace. The central focus of this phase was another charrette, which took place in March 2009 at City Pier, a building on the waterfront with excellent views of the redevelopment area. The results of the second charrette were documented in a second booklet entitled “Concept Exploration,” portions of which are included in this Executive Summary and in Section 2: Introduction. Following the second charrette, a series of market studies were conducted by the team to test the feasibility and practicality of the concept that emerged from the charrette as the preferred approach to redevelopment. The third major phase of work, Development Strategy Recommendations, is documented in this publication. The Redevelopment Team’s master plan

recommendation is based on market testing of the redevelopment plan. This important step helped the Redevelopment Team to verify that the physical improvements anticipated by the master plan do in fact address real or potential market needs and are organized in a way that makes sense to the commercial real estate marketplace. The master plan was adjusted during this phase to better reflect the realities of the real estate market in downtown Fort Myers. An overall project budget and financing plan outline have been developed and are included in Section 5: Implementation Plan. It should be said, in this regard, that while the Redevelopment Team recognizes that the real estate market is, at this moment (third quarter 2009), in one of the worst down cycles since the Great Depression, our team’s findings are based on the assumed return, in the not too distant future, of a more normal real estate and commercial development market. The time required to entitle and design the proposed improvements should, we believe, allow the development to coincide with that anticipated return to more normal conditions, putting the City in position to be one of the first major new developments to emerge on the other side of the current economic downturn. The completion and adoption of this Master Plan for Redevelopment by the City of Fort Myers will constitute the conclusion of the planning phase of the project, and the initiation of, with the City’s approval, the implementation phase. This will entail a series of entitlement tasks, to ensure that the regulatory hurdles facing the reconfiguration of the riverfront are all properly addressed, as well as the putting together of funding from the various public and private sources anticipated in the first phase of implementation. See the Phasing and Implementation Strategy in Section 5: Implementation Plan for more information.

Photo courtesy of Jerry Miller

Fort Myers Riverfront Development Plan

Project Scope and History

1-1


Charrette 1: Framework for Design

The following list of goals represents a consensus of the planning team’s takeaways from Charrette 1 in Fort Myers, after having received input from a large number of stakeholder individuals and groups. The first charrette was held January 19-21, 2009.

CONNECTIONS: Facilitate connections to venues. Vehicular and pedestrian interaction between Edwards Drive and 1st Street. Reconnect the waterfront to the historic downtown. Link residential towers to downtown. Connect the marina to the historic downtown.Pedestrian friendly vehicular flows. Appeal to a wide spectrum of the population. NEW DEVELOPMENT: Organic and evolved, not forced. Treat the redevelopment as an ongoing organic entity. Create different pods of interest. Meet community needs in a sustainable sequence. Phased project with early phase accomplishments. UNIQUE DESTINATION: A unique destination in Florida for people of different ages and incomes to enjoy. A destination for visitors and residents. Change the perception of the downtown and the city. Establish unifying components. Regularly scheduled arts/events programming about the arts and culture of Southwest Florida. The arts are a huge part of downtown. “Pleasure Pier” would be a fabulous “big idea.” Create a reason to visit and/or stay. Unique identifying element. Possible themes include: art, historic, lights.

1-2

Charrette 1: Framework for Design

THE WATERFRONT: Activate the river edge. Bring the waterfront to life. Interact with the water—go out into it, don’t block it visually. Activate the waterfront walk with activities throughout the day. Need programming and consistent use 365/24/7. Utilized by every segment of the community to create an active waterfront. A year round environment for activity. Look for activities that drive pedestrian and boating activity. OPEN SPACE: The waterfront is the most significant public space. Access to the water must be preserved. Edwards Drive can be a significant boulevard. Multiple public plazas, parks and green spaces. SUSTAINABILITY: Leverage Fort Myer’s unique natural setting to emphasize an outdoor-oriented and healthy lifestyle as over arching qualities that define future characteristics of downtown. This would apply to environmental practices, energy consciousness, and material utilization for new construction. This redevelopment plan would also foster social sustainability, attracting a wider economic/demographic audience, both locally and regionally.

August 19, 2009


Charrette 2 Concept Exploration

CHARRETTE 2 : CONCEPT EXPLORATION The second Fort Myers charrette was concerned with building a series of alternative plan approaches to the redevelopment based on the goals and information developed during the first charrette. This charrette took place over three days from March 24 – March 26, 2009. The charrette’s first day saw the development of several planning approaches. One of the main differences in approach was the attitude taken toward the water’s edge. Recognizing that the reconfiguration of river shoreline is both technically challenging and presents significant regulatory issues, the team took a series of more and less conservative approaches to treating the water’s edge. Generally, these approaches varied from the most conservative (Option A1) to the least conservative (Option C). As the charrette continued, both sets of options (conservative and non-conservative) were developed in order to provide the City with both safe and potentially challenging approaches to consider. A public review meeting ended the day with a healthy turnout of both citizens and stakeholders. The second day included a more careful look at the options generated on Day 1. Each option was developed, and in some instances, options were combined, with variations in treatment of public space also developed. At the conclusion of the second day, a public review meeting gave the Redevelopment Team and stakeholders an opportunity to review and comment on the work completed. The third day saw continued refinement of the two options which received the most favorable reception at the end of Day 2. Option AB, a compilation of desirable features from Options A and B, represents the conservative approach with respect to shoreline modifications. Option C is characterized by a new basin (which may in fact be a stormwater basin rather than a river basin) which creates a dramatic new waterfront profile in the redevelopment area. In the review with the City Council on the third day, a clear preference emerged for Option C. This is the option which was carried forward into development of the proposed redevelopment master plan illustrated in Section 3 of this document.

Fort Myers Riverfront Development Plan

Option AB Site Plan

Option C Site Plan

Option AB is intended to be minimally invasive with respect to the river edge. Centennial Park is expanded to the east, while the boat ramp is relocated to the west edge of Centennial Park or off site. An expanded City Pier is the focus of waterfront activity, with additional restaurant and pavilion structures as well as “pleasure pier” activities which might include rides or other attractions on a boardwalk pier extension.

This is the final version of Option C as presented at the wrap-up meeting of the second charrette. Although not yet a master plan, this plan depicts the most current thinking of the team with respect to Option C. Major features of the plan include an expanded Centennial Park, a major water feature reaching deep into the development as a way to bring First Street closer to the river, and an expanded City Pier that includes restaurants, pavilions, and family attractions on a boardwalk extension. An iconic structure (like a lighthouse) is shown on an artificial island extending north from City Pier. While constructing the island may be problematic, the idea of an iconic structure at the end of an extended pier should not be.

Charrette 2: Concept Exploration

1-3


RECOMMENDED MASTER PLAN The recommended master plan for Fort Myers’ downtown riverfront redevelopment is the outgrowth of a process that has unfolded over ten months and uncounted conversations, workshops, meetings and public discussions. It represents the best thinking not only of the Redevelopment Team, but of the many stakeholders who have taken part in its creation. The recommended Master Plan is a response to the strong desire of this community to leverage its unique riverfront location and historic, pedestrian oriented city center to create a vibrant downtown that attracts residents, visitors, businesses and investors.

creates a focus for the redevelopment area. Additionally, the expanded use of water creates valuable waterfront locations for the proposed hotel and mixed used developments bringing important commercial activity to downtown Fort Myers’ River District.

WATERFRONT Public access to the waterfront is at the forefront of the redevelopment master plan. Beginning with a redeveloped waterfront in Centennial Park, a boardwalk helps extend river access past the environmentally sensitive mangroves. The The core idea of the master plan is a two-directional armature of public space new basin is of course lined with a promenade, and City Pier engages more that ties the entire riverfront together in an east-west direction (assuming that actively with the river because of this basin and the addition of new dining the river is north), and, perpendicular to this, ties the riverfront to the rest of and amusement facilities planned for the pier. An expanded marina provides downtown along the key connection at Hendry Street. To this armature all additional slips for leased and transient boating, and the redevelopment of the proposed development, redevelopment and public improvements are Edwards Drive will create a stronger pedestrian promenade along the south edge connected, creating important synergies among the various commercial, cultural of the yacht basin. The redesigned and expanded waterfront serves as a central and civic anchors. Highlights of the master plan are briefly outlined as follows. civic amenity that has broad appeal for a diverse community and allows people to experience this unique location whether they are cruising the Caloosahatchee, PUBLIC REALM just strolling through the district, visiting a particular business or attending an As mentioned above, the cruciform armature of Edwards Drive and Hendry Street event. is the primary public space in the redeveloped River District. This armature is reinforced by special paving patterns and streetscaping that is a level above CONNECTIVITY the already excellent landscaping achieved by the downtown utility and street Throughout the planning process, emphasis has been placed on making better improvement project. The intent is to redefine these streets as major pedestrian connections: between river and downtown, between attractions, and between thoroughfares, inviting citizens and visitors to explore the riverfront and the rest of downtown and the larger metropolitan area. The recommended master plan Fort Myers’ historic downtown as an understandable, cohesive experience. responds by reinforcing the city grid, dispersing parking resources around and A redeveloped Centennial Park is shown as part of the enhanced public realm. Better access to the riverfront, more active and passive areas for recreation and entertainment, and planned utilization of open space for Harborside related events, as well as fairs, festivals and open markets will allow Centennial Park to serve as a vital civic anchor that draws residents and visitors alike to this central destination. Another significant component of the redesigned public realm is the addition of a water basin that more effectively ties downtown Fort Myers to the river. This basin, which has the added benefit of serving to treat stormwater runoff in the vicinity, creates a strong visual link between the river and Bay Street, and is visible from First Street. The basin helps to identify City Pier as a peninsula, and

1-4

Master Plan Summary

at the edges of the redevelopment area to encourage pedestrian activity, and making explicit links to planned transit developments along First Street. The integration of a trolley system for more local use as well as the inclusion of biking and walking paths will only enhance this connectivity and expand the districts appeal as a regional destination for residents and visitors alike. HARBORSIDE EVENT CENTER The master plan anticipates the expansion of Harborside Event Center in two ways. On site expansion will include new meeting space and dedicated ballroom space to help the Center compete more effectively for regional and national events. A major expansion to the west, across Monroe Street, will provide needed exhibition space, and will also serve as a spectator venue for entertainment events, drawing more people to Fort Myers’ riverfront. The

expanded Center serves as an important economic catalyst for the downtown by bringing visitors to the area who will drive demand for downtown Fort Myers’ goods and services, allow for the development of the proposed hotel and waterfront restaurants, and increase business opportunities locally. MIXED USE DEVELOPMENT A significant block (‘D’ in the plan) is shown developed as a mixed-use project with ground-floor retail and restaurants, structured parking, and upper floors containing offices or other appropriate uses. This development will add much needed activity and population to the River District, making it more active by day and more attractive in the evening. With vital frontage along Hendry Street, the D Block development will create a critical commercial link to the existing historic downtown business district to drive demand for future ground floor retail and restaurant users. Similar mixed use development is planned to occur, over time, in the blocks east of Jackson as the redevelopment area matures. PHASING AND IMPLEMENTATION The general flow of redevelopment will be from west to east. The blocks labeled E and F in the master plan will likely be the last to be redeveloped. The future of the former Ambassador hotel is unclear at this time, and resolution of the challenges surrounding this property may be some years away. Fortunately, the plan is conceived in such a way that given the proper balance of public and private investment, the development area will appear “complete” at the end of any phase and allow each phase of development to succeed on that basis. Details of the phasing and implementation plan can be found behind the 5th section of this document, labeled “Implementation Plan”. The purpose of this section is to provide detail regarding the uses proposed within the redevelopment including their physical, financial and market feasibility, conceptual programming as well as prospective phasing. Pursuant to the implementation plan, the Riverfront Redevelopment Team identifies the critical initial public and private development necessary to provide vitality to the above described armature and assure the natural succession of the redevelopment plan in full through its final phase.

August 19, 2009


Riverfront Development Plan

P5 P7

DETENTION BASIN

EDWARDS DRIVE

W4

EXISTING HARBORSIDE EVENT CENTER

B1

P7

P10

E1

F2

D2

P14

EXISTING PARK OF PALMS

F1 PROPOSED SURFACE PARKING

EXISTING CITY PARKING GARAGE

FIRST STREET

FUTURE LIBRARY SITE

N

Fort Myers Riverfront Development Plan

D1 Retail/Residential/Office D2 Parking/Retail/Residential E1 Mixed Use F1 Retail/Residential/Office F2 Retail/Residential/Office W1 Future Art of Olympians W2 Retail/Restaurant

EXISTING MULTI-LEVEL PARKING GARAGE

BAY STREET

FIRST STREET

A1 Exhibit Hall B1 Lecture Hall B2 Event Center B3 Event Center Admin. B4 Event Center Meeting Rms. C1 Rooms Tower C2 Parking

AMBASSADOR HOTEL

DEAN STREET

STREET

DETENTION BASIN

C2 B2

HEITMAN

P3

P12

D1

B3 BAY STREET

P7

C1

W7

EXISTING

W3 Retail/Restaurant W4 Retail/Restaurant W5 Retail/Restaurant W6 Commercial W7 Commercial P1 Seawall P2 Curved Pier

P3 Storm Detention P4 Edwards Culvert/Bridge P5 Pier P6 Boardwalk P7 Park Pavillion P8 Boat Ramp P9 Centennial Park

P10 Monroe - Bay to Edwards P11 Edwards - Monroe to Hendry P12 Edwards - Hendry to Lee P13 Edwards - Lee to Bridge P14 Hendry - Bay to Edwards P15 Hendry - Edwards to City Pier P16 Lee - Edwards to Yacht Basin

ROYAL PALM AVENUE

P10

S

P7

P9 CENTENNIAL PARK

A1

AIN NT

P8

U FO

LOADING/PARKING

B4

P7

W6

W3

P4

EDWARDS DRIVE

SURFACE PARKING

LEE STREET

P18

P16 P15

P3

REET

P11

W1

W2

INS

CENTENNIAL PARK

FOUNTA

EMERGENCY ACCESS

P9

DETENTION POND

P1

P8

P17

JACKSON ST

P7

EX. CITY PIER BUILDING

HENDRY STREET

P6

P7

EXISTING FORT MYERS YACHT BASIN

W5

STAGE

EDISON BRIDGE

P19

FOWLER STREET

P2

PROPOSED SURFACE PARKING

US 41 (CLEVELAND AVENUE)

YACHT BASIN EXPANSION

P17 Marina Expansion P18 Trolley System

0

100

200

Master Plan

400

1-5


Guidelines Summary

Development Guidelines As part of the recommended master plan, the Redevelopment Team has created these Development Guidelines. The purpose of these guidelines is not to dictate a particular building mass, form, or expression, but to put in place some basic planning principles that should be observed as each block is redeveloped. In general, these principles are compatible with the guidelines contained in the 2002 DPZ master plan for downtown Fort Myers. They are, however, more specific with respect to the blocks in the redevelopment study area, and correspond directly to the recommendations of the redevelopment master plan (preceding section). The Development Guidelines are intended to convey the general shape and character of the proposed redevelopment without being overly prescriptive with respect to architecture. This is intended to provide latitude to individual owners, whether public or private, as to the appropriate architectural expression of a particular parcel, while still maintaining a coherent overall appearance within the River District. Moreover, these guidelines are intended to encourage new development to be designed compatibly with adjacent existing downtown buildings, particularly those in the historic district. With the exception of the Hall of 50 States, the contributing structures of the historic district are located south of the study area (south of Bay Street). While a variety of architectural styles exist in the district, three over arching characteristics are evident among the historic buildings: boundary/edges, massing, and articulation. As described below, these three urban design qualities form the basis of the Development Guidelines as illustrated on a block-by-block basis:

1-6

Development Guidelines Summary

Boundary/Edges: Common alignment of building facades along streets or parks contribute to the sense of a cohesive district and definition of public space, evident with the distinctive “streetwall” of First Street between Monroe and Lee Streets. The Development Guidelines identify important edges of individual parcels, which should be architecturally resolved by “build-to” lines: these are similar to traditional “set-back” criteria, but stipulate that building edges be built along identified property lines to achieve a similar streetwall effect. Massing: Except for the massive Ambassador Hotel and residential towers and near the bridges, the general scale of downtown buildings varies between two and four levels (a few one-story and six- or seven-story buildings also exist). These guidelines suggest how new development can vary with height, mass, modulation, and setbacks so that it fits appropriately with the urban scale of the historic downtown core. Articulation: Some of the most notable features of Fort Myers architecture include the first-level canopies along First Street, the Arcade Theater marquis, and the neo-classical First National Bank entry pediment – among others. The variety and richness of the downtown core contains lessons for future development on how individual building articulation can create uniqueness, but can also relate to adjacent buildings on a district and civic scale. These guidelines suggest specific design opportunities of individual blocks that can embrace adjacent amenities, entries, roof shapes, circulation elements, etc. It is important to point out that the Development Guidelines are indeed “guidelines”, and not intended to be “prescriptive”. For example, the building massing represented in the guidelines reflects the massing portrayed in the

master plan, but should not be construed by the City or by future developers as a strict building envelope. The building envelope for each parcel is ultimately governed by the underlying zoning, not by the development guidelines. This is to ensure that there is enough flexibility within the master plan to accommodate changes in market demand that will naturally occur over time. Another reason for avoiding prescriptive design details at this level is to avoid excessive uniformity of expression, which is characteristic of suburban shopping and “lifestyle” centers, but which should not characterize Fort Myer’s redeveloped historic riverfront. The plan anticipates and has room for more than one architectural form or expression within its overall framework. This is illustrated in the master plan by the discussion of appropriate South Florida architecture. While steering away from the faux Mediterranean look which has characterized many recent developments in South Florida, the master plan commends two distinct styles as particularly appropriate to the region: the South Florida Cracker style, which evolved organically from early settlements, and the Mid-Century Modern style, a rethinking of traditional forms that, while bringing a new vocabulary to the region, still respected the climate, scale and building traditions of South Florida. Further, it is not the intention of this master plan to prescribe that all buildings must be designed in either of these two styles. Rather, it is the intention of the plan to suggest that new development be informed by the insights of these two historic styles while taking advantage of present-day building technology and materials. Just as it would be wrong, in our view, to create a faux Mediterranean village on the riverfront, it would be just as wrong to create a faux Cracker-style village in the early decades of the 21st Century.

August 19, 2009


Development Guidelines - District

Fort Myers Riverfront Development Plan

Development Guidelines - District

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Hotel Market Study Summary

Hotel Study (HVS, June 2009) and Harborside Expansion Study (KPMG, late 2006): As part of the Redevelopment Plan initiative, Acquest hired HVS to complete a hotel study which presumed the expansion of Harborside as contemplated by KPMG. The highlights and recommendations of the KPMG study are as follows: New free standing Exhibit Center adjacent to existing Harborside Event Center and improvements to the existing Harborside Event Center - Proposed Program: Exhibit Hall 50,000 SF – 60,000 SF Ballroom 15,000 SF – 18,000 SF Meeting Space 10,000 SF – 12,000 SF KPMG RATIONALE: “HEC does not compare favorably with other State convention facilities in terms of its size, type and configuration of space placing it at a competitive disadvantage for attracting convention and meetings business. In addition, projected future changes in the State competitive market will likely further negatively impact HEC’s ability to penetrate convention and meetings business if the facility is not renovated and expanded.” ”….. research suggests that a moderate expansion and reconfiguration of existing space at HEC in tandem with the development of additional hotels adjacent to and/or within walking distance would place the facility in a better position to meet the long-term needs of the community and increase its penetration in various market segments such as State association business and sports tournaments that generate more out of-town attendees, hotel room nights and incremental new economic impact.” POTENTIAL ECONOMIC IMPACT: •350,000 attendee days •$58 - 67 million in direct/indirect spending •800 direct/indirect jobs are supportable based upon this spending •Over $2 million in hotel, sales and use taxes generated for State and County

HOTEL PROGRAMMING RECOMMENDATION: •200-room, full-service hotel - Marriott, Hilton, Sheraton •Restaurant serving breakfast, lunch & dinner and separate lounge •6,140 SF of on-site meeting space •Outdoor pool & whirlpool •Exercise center, Business center, Gift shop, Guest laundry HOTEL ASSUMPTIONS: •Modernization / expansion of existing Harborside Center •Contiguous headquarters hotel •Separate event center •Other local amenities HOTEL MARKET FINDINGS AND FORECAST OF PERFORMANCE: •Market peaked in late 90’s at 72% occupancy rate •Declined to 55% in 2002 •Fluctuated from 60% to 69% 2003-2008 •Off 5% YTD 2009 •Average daily rates (“ADR’s”) increased from $129 in 2002 to $163 in 2008 •ADR off 11% YTD 2009 •Subject projected to open in 2012 @ 63% occupancy $135 ADR •Increasing in 2015 @ 69% occupancy $155 ADR •Forecast occupancy consists of: 23% Commercial 57% Group 20% Leisure •Concludes market value AT opening •Estimated “all-in”cost •Economic Gap (Difference)

$27 million $35.5 million $8.5 million

The findings and recommendations of the HVS study, the purpose of which was to determine the feasibility of a hotel integrated into the Harborside Event Center, are as follows:

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Hotel Market Study Summary

August 19, 2009


Retail Market Study Summary

Retail Market Study The development team commissioned the firm Downtown Works to study the proposed retail based, mixed use development within the proposed redeveloped River District. Downtown Works’ study encompasses new development only, but addresses broader market conditions impacting Historic Downtown District. The proposed program (to be completed in multiple phases) includes street level retail of roughly 100,000 square feet and residential/office use on several levels above ranging from 100,000 to 150,000 square feet.

Retail/Mixed Use Findings: Retail Market Study While the recent national economic challenges have had a negative impact on the current market conditions, the study highlights the importance of the long term growth trajectories of the region which have consistently placed Southwest Florida’s population among the fastest growing in the United States over the past 20 years. The study states that currently Cape Coral-Ft. Myers his ranked 8th in the nation with Lee County’s growth projected to increase 35% in the next 8 years. In addition to the longer term growth characteristics of the region, the study also highlights the importance of this unique location to draw tenants and their respective customers based on the lack of competition for this type of project given its waterfront orientation and integration with the historic, pedestrian oriented downtown. The Downtown Works’ study findings project the market will be able to support up to 271,300 SF by 2013. This is based on a 1% capture share of downtown workers’ daytime expenditures, a 1% capture of the seasonal visitor market share, a 1% capture of trade area expenditures (Lee County excluding Bonita

Fort Myers Riverfront Development Plan

Springs and south) and a 1% capture of seasonal resident expenditures. The study recommends merchandising the project to focus on a core district of waterfront oriented restaurants consisting of 5-7 properties at varying price points and food types. The development should orient tenant mix towards one-of-akind, innovative and diverse vendors with a local and/or regional presence. This retail will depend greatly on the success of the surrounding improvements (hotel, upgraded waterfront, restaurants and cultural attractions) as well as the vibrancy of the established downtown core. The study recognizes the importance of Hendry Street to connect the downtown historic districts to create a regional draw and destination over the long term. Mixed Use Market Indicators The district calls for an authentic urban, multi-layered, mixed use environment consisting of retail at grade with several stories of additional uses above. It is clear that the current and forecasted residential market conditions will not allow for additional development of rental/for-sale units in the reasonable future. Therefore, the development team is considering office and other commercial uses for the upper floors of the project. Given the logistic and physical realities of the construction process, the phasing of these multi storied buildings is not recommended (i.e. do not build 1st floor retail and add upper levels in the future) for this project. Rather the mixed use blocks must consider realities of current market in the selection of recommended uses and develop the buildings over time based on the market demand and financing realities. The development team will continue to explore development alternatives for the mixed-use blocks to incorporated potential solutions and balance market factors.

Retail Market Study Summary

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INTRODUCTION 2


PROJECT BACKGROUND The City of Fort Myers is located along south bank of the Caloosahatchee River a short distance from the Gulf of Mexico. Historically a working city of shipping and industry, Fort Myers is today the business and governmental hub of Lee County and a region known as Southwest Florida, which includes Lee, Hendry, Glades, Collier and Charlotte counties. The population of Lee County, Florida is approximately 600,000 (2008 Census Bureau estimate). Until the recent economic downturn, Southwest Florida had experienced rapid growth in population (over 30% growth between 2000 and 2008), and that growth is expected to continue once the economy stabilizes.

headquarters hotel was available in close proximity (by the time of this study, the Ambassador Hotel, which had originally opened as a Sheraton four blocks east of Harborside, was no longer operating as a convention-quality hotel, a situation which led to the eventual closing of the hotel in 2008). The study also suggested that new exhibition space of approximately 50,000 square feet be usable for spectator events by means of telescoping seating, which would enhance the flexibility of the building and provide additional events, revenue and foot traffic in the downtown. The KPMG study also recommended adding meeting space to Harborside to make the facility more competitive.

Harborside Event Center was opened in 1985 as a public facility for conventions, events, local performances, and public functions. Although the building has been well-maintained and upgraded in certain cosmetic aspects, it retains the basic functional aspects of its original 1985 configuration. As the availability of hotel rooms in downtown Fort Meyers has declined since Harborside opened, the number of conventions involving out of town delegates held in the building has dwindled to a negligible number.

Following the KPMG study, the City undertook a process to select a development team to plan and redevelop the downtown riverfront. This process is described in a subsequent section, Project History.

conditions vary and are more or less hospitable to pedestrian traffic. The City of Fort Myers’ downtown is characterized by the generally smallscale (2-3 story) historic buildings which line most of First Street between the US Highway 41 bridge and the Edison Bridge. Much of this area is included in a Historic District designated a US Historic District in 1990. Most of the redevelopment study area is within this Historic District. Over the years, redevelopment projects have reduced the building inventory north of Bay Street to the point that much of this land is now vacant, underdeveloped, or surface parking.

The land in most of the study area is fill that was accumulated along the river bank during the city’s industrial past. For this reason, soils are generally of poor quality and deep foundations are required for buildings of all but the smallest size. The site, with the exception of Centennial Park and a very small park (Palms SITE CHARACTERISTICS Park) south of Edwards Drive, has been fully developed in the past and is mostly The redevelopment area is defined by the portion of downtown Fort Myers between the US Highway 41 bridge on the west, the Edison Bridge on the east, covered with buildings or paving. and north of Bay Street to the river. The river edge within the redevelopment area Most of the site is in a storm surge floodplain as defined by the Federal In 2004, The City of Fort Myers engaged KPMG in a study of the market demand features a number of conditions, including a concrete promenade in Centennial Emergency Management Agency (FEMA). An illustration of the extent of this for expanded convention space at Harborside Event Center, a large public Park, a dense mangrove, commercial piers, and a City-owned yacht basin. While floodplain is included elsewhere in this section. A discussion of our team’s building at Monroe Street and Edwards Drive in the historic district. The study the water’s edge is more or less accessible to the public within the study area, strategy is included in section 5. determined that there was market demand for expanded space at Harborside if a

Fort Myers Riverfront Development Plan

Project Background

2-1


PROJECT HISTORY In August 2007, the City of Fort Myers issued a request for qualifications for architectural firms to assist with the planned first phase of expansion of Harborside Event Center. However, before qualifications were received, the City withdrew the RFQ in anticipation of a developer-led redevelopment project to encompass the entire riverfront, not just the expansion of Harborside. This developer-led process was issued as a request for qualifications in February, 2008; qualifications were received in April, 2008. Proposals were then requested from three teams, leading to the eventual selection of the Acquest/Boorn/ Populous team in October of 2008. Once an agreement was negotiated, the team began background work on the project in November and December of 2008. In January of 2009, the Redevelopment Team convened in Fort Myers for the first charrette, an intense, three day workshop involving the team and a large group of stakeholders interested in the outcome of the project. Stakeholders were invited from each of the following groups: • • • • • • •

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Project History

Steering Committee Hospitality industry Downtown property owners Retail industry County planning and development staff City department representatives City Council

In addition to the above groups, a public forum was held so that members of the general public would have the opportunity to provide input to the process. The goal of each of these meetings was for the redevelopment team to gain an understanding of the community’s goals and objectives for the riverfront redevelopment. After the first charrette, the redevelopment team assembled and issued a document called the Framework for Design, which captured the key findings from the charrette, along with documenting existing conditions on and around the project site. In March of 2009, the Redevelopment Team convened a second charrette in Fort Myers. This charrette was to explore a series of conceptual design ideas for the redevelopment project, and to test those ideas with stakeholders in the community. This charrette resulted in a great deal of interest from stakeholders as well as the general public, and three public sessions were held to review progress and to summarize findings. The most successful concept to emerge from the second charrette became the basis of the master plan. After the conclusion of the Alternative Development Concept Exploration phase, the team went about verifying the market demand for new space anticipated by the preferred concept. This market analysis resulted in some adjustments to the plan, but not to the overall redevelopment concept. The modified plan is the

August 19, 2009


Project Area

The area is bounded by the Caloosahatchee River to the north, Bay street to the south, US Highway 41 (Cleveland Avenue) to the west and Fowler street to the east. Though not included in the redevelopment area, making connections to historic First Street will be a critical success factor. Additionally, the portion of Centennial Park located west of the Caloosahatchee Bridge was included in the planning efforts due to it’s proximity to the redevelopment area and it’s function as a civic space. The concepts shown hereafter, as they relate to Centennial Park, are only design suggestions. Development of the area should be refined by a consultant team and the solution should relate to adjacencies as part of the master plan.

Project Area

Fort Myers Riverfront Development Plan

Project Area

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PREVIOUS PLANNING EFFORTS The Fort Myers riverfront redevelopment is part of a larger downtown redevelopment area which itself is part of Fort Myers proper. These areas have been subject to a number of planning efforts in the recent past. The most significant of these planning efforts are briefly summarized below. DOWNTOWN MASTER PLAN (“THE DUANY PLAN”) APRIL, 2003 This plan, prepared by Duany Plater-Zyberk & Company but popularly referred to as The Duany Plan, was the result of a major public participation process which took place in the early 2000s. The result was a comprehensive master plan which has served as the basis for much of Fort Myers subsequent planning, zoning and land use decisionmaking. The Duany Plan touches on several areas of the central city, but includes a fairly detailed plan for the redevelopment of the riverfront (see graphic this section). This plan has been referred to often by the Governing Body when evaluating development proposals for downtown Fort Myers, and is still considered to be a guiding document for development of the city’s urban core. HARBORSIDE EXPANSION STUDY 2006 KPMG and HOK Venue provided this study of the potential expansion of Harborside Event Center in 2006. The study found that there was market support for expansion of the facility on the condition that an adequate number of hotel rooms be developed in close proximity to Harborside. The study recommended adding approximately 12,000 square feet of new meeting space to Harborside, in

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Previous Planning Efforts

Duany Sketch

Duany Sketch

addition to approximately 55,000 square feet of multi-purpose exhibition space that could be used for a variety of functions, including spectator events. The likely location for the exhibition space was across Monroe Street from Harborside Event Center. Meeting space could be added on site. A study was also undertaken of the potential for locating a performing arts venue immediately to the east of Harborside adjacent to Dean Street, as suggested in the Duany Plan. It was determined that a performing arts venue of the desired size would not fit on the existing land east of Harborside, and that the function space afforded by such a venue would be of marginal value to Harborside in attracting events. There was no clear method for financing the construction or operation of the performance venue. FUTURE LAND USE PLAN MARCH, 2008 The Future Land Use component of the Comprehensive Plan touches on the redevelopment of downtown. The Downtown Redevelopment Area is identified in Exhibit C-1 of the Future Land Use Plan, encompassing the present study area as well as most of downtown Fort Myers. Duany Plan

August 19, 2009


Charrette 1 History

CHARRETTE 1 SUMMARY Acquest Realty Advisors, Acquest Development, Boorn Partners, HOK Venue and Parker Mudgett Smith Architects were selected by the City of Fort Myers in late 2008 to plan and develop the downtown riverfront in Fort Myers. This document is the record of the first planning charette for the Fort Myers Riverfront Redevelopment project as well as investigations and research conducted prior to the second charrette. It is intended to represent a framework for the design ideas which will be advanced in the second charrette.

Charrette 2

In the first charrette, input was solicited from a number of stakeholder groups in addition to the City Council and the Council-appointed Steering Committee for the project. Stakeholders included individuals and representatives of the following groups: • • • • • •

Charrette 2

Fort Myers Riverfront Development Plan

Local land owners Retailers Hospitality industry (hotels and motels) City staff County staff General public

Also included in the framework were a series of background diagrams which represent a level of understanding of the physical and legal opportunities and constraints within the study area. These diagrams are important because they establish the parameters within which the planning team will operate. Following the baseline diagrams, a series of pages documented block-by-block the existing conditions within the study area, including an inventory of existing parcels, buildings, and ground floor uses. This documentation assisted the design team by establishing known conditions for each block under investigation. Finally, a series of case studies were presented for reference. These case studies depicted similar development projects which were mentioned or alluded to during the first charrette. They were helpful for comparison to the current case, and, for the most part, as examples of successful mixed use developments elsewhere in Florida and North America. The purpose of this document was not to anticipate the outcome of the second charrette, but to create a realistic and relevant framework within which the planning team can generate ideas which address the most significant goals of the project.

The results of those meetings was captured and recorded, and from those results, the team has developed a series of guiding principles which can be found in the following pages. These principles represent a distillation of the general sense and consensus of the various stakeholder groups. While not all stakeholder remarks were exactly congruent, there was sufficient repetition and overlap for the team to be able to develop the guidelines which follow.

Charrette 1 Summary

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Historic District

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Historic District

The Fort Myers Downtown Commercial District is a US historic district (designated as such on January 26, 1990) located in Fort Myers, Florida. The district is bounded by Monroe Street to the west, Lee Street to the east and Second st. to the south. It extends north to the Caloosahatchee River. It contains 69 historic buildings.

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FEMA Map

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The entire redevelopment zone is within the 100 year flood hazard area as defined by FEMA. See section 5 Implementation Plan for a discussion of how the redevelopment proposes to treat ground floor elevations in light of FEMA and SFWMD requirements.

Fort Myers Riverfront Development Plan

FEMA Map Enhanced

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Figure Ground with Duany Plan

Figure ground diagram comparing the existing building inventory to the proposed inventory from the DPZ master plan. The existing inventory is depicted by solid black shapes, and the proposed inventory is depicted with transparent gray shapes.

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Figure Ground with DPZ Plan

August 19, 2009


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Map for reference only and is not a Survey. The City of Fort Myers makes no claims or guarantees about the accuracy or currency of the information contained on this map, and expressly disclaims liability for errors and omissions. Source: City of Fort Myers Community Development GIS

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City of Fort Myers Official Zoning Map

NEW

3260

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RS-5 - SINGLE FAMILY - 5 RS-6 - SINGLE FAMILY - 6 RS-7 - SINGLE FAMILY - 7

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Parking Structure Overlay District Overlay RS-E - SINGLE FAMILY ESTATE

WORK

250 500

Downtown Redevelopment Area

CORTINA

0

Downtown Redevelopment Inset

CI

D

DANIELS PKWY

City of Fort Myers Official Zoning Map.mxd - 09/18/2008 @ 1:45:21 PM

City of Fort Myers official zoning map.

Existing zoning taken from the City of Fort Myers official zoning map. Zoning categories are derived from the DPZ downtown master plan. See page 3-14 for proposed land use diagram.

Urban Center Civic Civic Recreation Urban Core

Fort Myers Riverfront Development Plan

Existing Land Use

2-9


Downtown Parking Capacity

A Downtown Parking Needs Capacity Study was performed by Walker Parking Consultants for the City of Fort Myers in the fall of 2006. This study reviewed the existing parking and future needs for an area bounded by the Caloosahatchee River to the north, Fowler Street to the east , Edison Avenue to the south, and US HWY 41 (Cleveland Avenue) to the west. In the report, Walker identifies 5,653 parking spaces in the north sub-area, which is defined as the 38 block area north of Martin Luther King Jr. Blvd. This includes on-street public spaces, on-street private spaces, off-street public spaces, off-street public-restricted spaces and off-street private spaces.

2-10

Downtown Parking

August 19, 2009


Existing Green Space

Centennial Park

Centennial Park

Centennial Park

Existing Greenspace Existing Riverwalk

Fort Myers Riverfront Development Plan

Existing Green Space

2-11


KEY PLANNING GOALS The following list of goals represents a consensus of the planning team’s takeaways from Charrette 1 in Fort Myers, after having received input from a large number of stakeholder individuals and groups. The first charrette was held January 19-21, 2009. CONNECTIONS: Facilitate connections to venues. Vehicular and pedestrian interaction between Edwards Drive and 1st Street. Reconnect the waterfront to the historic downtown. Link residential towers to downtown. Connect the marina to the historic downtown. Pedestrian friendly vehicular flows. Appeal to a wide spectrum of the population. NEW DEVELOPMENT: Organic and evolved, not forced. Treat the redevelopment as an ongoing organic entity. Create different pods of interest. Meet community needs in a sustainable sequence. Phased project with early phase accomplishments. UNIQUE DESTINATION: A unique destination in Florida for people of different ages and incomes to enjoy. A destination for visitors and residents. Change the perception of the downtown and the city. Establish unifying components. Regularly scheduled arts/events programming about the arts and culture of Southwest Florida. The arts are a huge part of downtown. “Pleasure Pier” would be a fabulous “big idea.” Create a reason to visit and/or stay. Unique identifying element. Possible themes include: art, historic, lights.

OPEN SPACE: The waterfront is the most significant public space. Access to the water must be preserved. Edwards Drive can be a significant boulevard. Multiple public plazas, parks and green spaces. SUSTAINABILITY: Leverage Fort Myer’s unique natural setting to emphasize an outdoor-oriented and healthy lifestyle as over arching qualities that define future characteristics of downtown. This would apply to environmental practices, energy consciousness, and material utilization for new construction. This redevelopment plan would also foster social sustainability by attracting a wider economic/demographic audience, both locally and regionally.

THE WATERFRONT: Activate the river edge. Bring the waterfront to life. Interact with the water—go out into it, don’t block it visually. Activate the waterfront walk with activities throughout the day. Need programming and consistent use 365/24/7. Utilized by every segment of the community to create an active waterfront. A year round environment for activity. Look for activities that drive pedestrian and boating activity.

2-12

Key Planning Goals

August 19, 2009


Analysis Sketch - Access

Fort Myers Riverfront Development Plan

Access

2-13


Analysis Sketch - Development

2-14

Development

August 19, 2009


Analysis Sketch - Water

Fort Myers Riverfront Development Plan

Water

2-15


Analysis Sketch - Open Space

2-16

Open Space

August 19, 2009


Analysis Sketch - Sustainability

Fort Myers Riverfront Development Plan

Sustainability

2-17


Charrette 2 History

Diagram delineating a proposed hybrid-powered transit line that would connect the riverfront with other regional attractions.

Vital to the success of a redeveloped riverfront is connectivity and access to other sites in and adjacent to downtown Fort Myers, as well as sufficient parking capacity for the expected increase in visitors. As part of the charrette, the team analyzed downtown and developed a series of diagrams that begin to think of downtown in terms of a series of loosely bounded districts. As an overlay to this, existing parking was studied. The districts began to inform the team as to where new parking resources should be proposed in relation to redevelopment of the riverfront. Connecting people with the various sites and amenities is critical. A hybridpowered transit line that links the downtown with the Edison-Ford Estates, City of Palms Park and sites to the north is proposed. This line would terminate at the Reilly Brothers depot. The transit line would also allow the city to utilize parking facilities at various sites, that otherwise may not be accessible, for larger events on the river. Sketch delineating the various districts in downtown Fort Myers, and how potential parking and public transit begin to connect these districts.

2-18

Charrette 2 History

August 19, 2009


Charrette 2 Findings

OPTION A2 SITE PLAN

OPTION B SITE PLAN

OPTION C SITE PLAN

Option A2 as developed is very similar to Option A1, with the significant differences being the

Option B was developed on the premise of creating two intersecting grand avenues, which form

Option C has several characteristics that are similar to the other options, yet provides the boldest

location of the Harborside expansion and hotel, as well as the redesign of Centennial Park. In

the spine that everything else works toward. The two streets that are developed as avenues are

move as far as the shoreline is concerned. A channel is cut into the site, returning a small piece

this option, the hotel is located across Dean Street from the existing Harborside facility. The

Edwards Drive and Hendry Street from Edwards Drive to Bay Street. The improved Hendry would

of the Caloosahatchee shoreline back to its original location, which is roughly at Bay Street. This

Harborside expansion is located to the west, on the block that is currently occupied by the US

take on a slightly altered alignment to bring it more in line with the pier that leads out to the existing

allows for views to the water from the retail and hotel development that is shown along the channel.

Post Office. In Centennial Park, a large basin is carved out of the shoreline, with a jetty extending

City Pier building. The primary retail zone would span both sides of Hendry, with specialty retail

Centennial Park is also reconfigured to allow for a beach along the waterfront. This effort is

out into the harbor to help to form an enclosed area of passive water that is approachable from

and waterfront restaurants focused on and adjacent to the City Pier. The Harborside expansion

intended to begin to provide opportunities for locals and visitors alike who want to interact with the

the shore. This space is framed by a building to house the Art of the Olympians on the city pier,

is shown on the block currently occupied by the US Postal Service. A hotel and parking garage

water, while bringing an explicit connection to the riverfront as close as possible to the First Street

which could take on the characteristics of a “pleasure pier”. Adjacent to the northeast edge of

are added to the east side of the existing Harborside facility, the result being the closure of Dean

pedestrian corridor.

the development area, a cultural oriented development is encouraged, with the a component

Street between Edwards and Bay. Along the waterfront, Centennial Park receives a significant

being new downtown classroom facilities for Florida Gulf Coast University. Facilities of this type

makeover, with primary focus given to creating a formal lawn / open space that can be used for

begin to set up a gateway into the heart of downtown Fort Myers.

passive recreation as well as large functions (i.e. Boat and RV shows, concerts, etc…). The shoreline is reworked, so that water is “pulled” inland to the edge of Edwards Drive, thus creating an opportunity for people to get close to the water and better experience everything the riverfront offers (boat rentals, kayaking, etc.). The final major component of this plan is to introduce a farmers market at the southwestern terminus of Edwards Drive (Edwards and Monroe), which will extend to the west and connect the park on the southwest side of US 41 with everything that is proposed on the east side of the bridge.

Fort Myers Riverfront Development Plan

Charrette 2 Findings

2-19


Option AB Comparative Scale:

3-D model of Option AB

A

D

EDWARDS DRIVE

D

E

D

D

B

C F

D D

F

D

Option AB is intended to be minimally invasive with respect to the river edge. Centennial Park is expanded to the east, while the boat ramp is relocated to the west edge of Centennial Park or off site. An expanded City Pier is the focus of waterfront activity, with additional restaurant and pavilion structures as well as “pleasure pier” activities which might include rides or other

LEE STREET

JACKSON ST

HENDRY ST

F

DEAN STREET

MONROE STREET

BAY STREET

attractions on a boardwalk pier extension. The main focus of Option AB is the redevelopment of Hendry Street as a two-sided retail corridor leading visitors from the waterfront to First Street and vice versa. The new hotel is shown

FIRST STREET

adjoining Harborside Event Center on the east, with a drop-off courtyard in relocated Dean Street. The expansion of Harborside incorporates new meeting rooms and lecture halls adjoining the Scale: 1” = 300’ (*scale is approximate)

OPTION AB SITE PLAN

existing structure as well as expanded exhibit space west of Monroe Street. A new parking structure is shown at the southeast corner of the main retail/mixed use block;

0

150

300

600

A

Centennial Park

B

Harborside Expansion

C

Hotel

D

Retail / Mixed Use

E

Potential Public/Civic Building Site

F

Parking

2-20

Day 3 - Option AB

this garage is intended to support the retail users as well as residents or offices above. Primary parking for the development would be at anchor garages (not shown in this drawing) proximate to City of Palms Garage and the Ambassador Hotel.

August 19, 2009


Option C

3-D model of Option C

D

A

EDWARDS DRIVE

D E C

B

iconic structure (like a lighthouse) is shown on an artificial island extending north from City Pier.

F

LEE STREET

City Pier that includes restaurants, pavilions, and family attractions on a boardwalk extension. An

D

JACKSON ST

deep into the development as a way to bring First Street closer to the river, and an expanded

HENDRY ST

Major features of the plan include an expanded Centennial Park, a major water feature reaching

F

BAY STREET DEAN STREET

MONROE STREET

This is the final version of Option C as presented at the wrap-up meeting of the second charrette.

D

FIRST STREET

While constructing the island may be problematic, the idea of an iconic structure at the end of an extended pier should not be. The new hotel and its related ground floor space wrap the west edge of the water feature south of Edwards Drive. Harborside Event Center is expanded as described elsewhere in this report. The primary retail/mixed use block is east of Hendry and south of Edwards Drive. Other, less

OPTION C SITE PLAN

Scale: 1� = 300’ (*scale is approximate)

intense development fills in the edges of Palms Park. A parking structure, similar in footprint to City of Palms Garage, provides required parking for riverfront retail, restaurants and mixed use

0

150

development. Centennial Park is developed as a major public open space, with potential for large gatherings. Edwards Drive is redeveloped as the primary east-west circulation through the development, while Hendry is the primary north-south connection.

Fort Myers Riverfront Development Plan

300

A

Centennial Park

B

Harborside Expansion

C

Hotel

D

Retail / Mixed Use

E

Potential Public/Civic Building Site

F

Parking

Day 3 - Option C

600

2-21


South Florida Architecture The Steering Committee, the City Council, and the various stakeholders involved in the redevelopment planning process have been clear about their architectural expectations: The redevelopment should feature architecture that is appropriate to Southwest Florida. This requirement has resulted in the team spending some time exploring what sort of architecture is most appropriate to its location within a registered Historic District in downtown Fort Myers. The team has been assisted by local architects, planners and urban designers who have thought deeply about this topic well before the present planning effort. This section of the Introduction will briefly capture some of the thinking that has influenced, and continues to influence, the Redevelopment Team.

Example of Florida Cracker architectural style.

Mid-century modernism.

Example of Florida Cracker architectural style .

Mid-century modernism.

were devised that allowed natural ventilation to cool the buildings. Sadly, most of those lessons were forgotten as architecture moved on and became more and more dependent on air conditioning. Air conditioned buildings no longer required (so it was thought) deep overhangs, thoughtful plans for cross-ventilation, or sun protection. Eventually, architects came to believe that any kind of building could work in South Florida with enough air conditioning. Only the relatively recent interest in sustainability has led architects to reconsider the lessons of both the Cracker Style and the Mid-Century modernists.

the need for mechanical refrigeration and taking into account the high humidity that requires careful attention to the choice of building materials. It is not the intent of the Redevelopment Team to require either Cracker Style or MidCentury Modern Buildings in the redevelopment area. The intent of this exploration is to demonstrate that in at least two cases, an appropriate architecture can be derived from the locale, the climate, and the materials and technologies available to the builder. Roof overhangs, shading, cross ventilation, protected openings and other features are common to both historical styles, and might inform the design of new buildings in the redevelopment area. Most important, in our view, is that the design of the new buildings be informed by the wisdom of both indigenous builders and the pioneers of Mid-Century Modernism. That wisdom consists in paying attention to the conditions of the site, the climate and the context to develop design solutions that are as appropriate to the unique Southwest Florida setting as they are to the time.

Cracker Style Generally, the term “Cracker Style” refers to indigenous buildings in South Florida built in the late 19th and early 20th centuries. This unselfconscious style is a direct response, using technologies available at the time, to the particularities of climate in the region. The Florida Solar Energy Center says of Cracker Style: Before the advent of air conditioning, Florida settlers counted on nature for cool comfort. They surrounded their homes with wide verandas that shaded walls and windows. They built in lots of windows that were open to cooling breezes but protected from summer sun and seasonal rains. And they topped off their houses with clever cupolas and clerestories to vent interior heat. These common-sense design elements are the roots of Florida’s original architectural statement – the Cracker style. Why “Cracker?” The story goes that many of these early settlers were ranchers who used the “crack” of a whip to round up their cattle – a distinctive sound that became a trademark. Native Floridians came to be called Crackers, and their homes defined what today is known as the Cracker style. Cracker style buildings are characterized by sloping roofs, often with monitors of some type, wide roof overhangs, surrounding porches, and a ventilated crawl space to discourage wood rot. Mid-Century Modern When Modern architecture became popular in the United States, generally after World War II, a few Florida practitioners began to explore its implications and usefulness for the demands of Florida’s climate. Interestingly enough, although they employed a design vocabulary very different from the Cracker Style discussed above, they reached many of the same conclusions. Mid-Century Modern buildings in Florida were often designed with deep roof overhangs to provide shade and keep occupants dry during heavy rains. Brise-soleils were designed to protect the buildings from harsh sunlight. And open plans 2-22

South Florida Architecture

Implications The common element to both Cracker and Mid-Century Modern styles is a logical sensitivity to and a logical response to the unique demands of South Florida’s sub-tropical climate. Although very different in their expression, both Cracker Style and Mid-Century Modern buildings can respond effectively to Southwest Florida’s unique climate, minimizing

August 19, 2009


Historic photograph of City Recreation Pier in downtown Fort Myers.

Waterfront Architecture One finding of the team, after reviewing historical documentation available to them, was that there is a particular type of building that was common on the Fort Myers waterfront in years past but is no longer seen there. As the redevelopment plan took shape, there came to be increasing interest among team members in understanding the particular waterfront architecture of Fort Myers’ riverfront, and in seeing what applicability it might have for future redevelopment.

AERIAL PHOTOGRAPH OF FORT MYERS, late 1940’s

Pier Buildings The term “pier buildings” refers to the industrial and warehouse buildings that used to line Bay Street prior to more recent redevelopments. Though architecturally very simple, these buildings created a particular rhythm along the waterfront. Their long dimension was, like a pier, always perpendicular to the river’s edge. Their roofs were invariably pitched across the short dimension of the building, creating a distinctive building type along the river. The collection of pier buildings that used to line the riverfront was a distinctive characteristic of the downtown riverfront, one that has unfortunately disappeared as the downtown evolved from shipping to commercial to government and recreational uses. Our team believes that the massing characteristic of the earlier pier building is an appropriate architectural response to the buildings in the redevelopment plan which are north of Edwards Drive. In particular, the potential building sites shown on blocks labeled “W,” except where very small pavilions are indicated, should take on the character of pier buildings. As with the discussion of South Florida architecture, it is important to point out that the intention of the Redevelopment Planning Team is not to replicate historic structures along the riverfront. Our desire is that new waterfront buildings be informed by the linear massing, sloped roofs and simple shapes of the historic pier buildings, not that they be recreated.

Fort Myers Riverfront Development Plan

Waterfront Architecture

2-23


MASTER PLAN 3


Rendering 1

Aerial view from the north

Fort Myers Riverfront Development Plan

Rendering

3-1


Illustrative Plan

FORT MYERS RIVERFRONT DEVELOPMENT PLAN

P5 P7

DETENTION BASIN

W1

EDWARDS DRIVE

W4

P14

EXISTING PARK OF PALMS

F2

F1 PROPOSED SURFACE PARKING

EXISTING CITY PARKING GARAGE

FIRST STREET

FUTURE LIBRARY SITE

N

3-2

Illustrative Plan

D1 Retail/Residential/Office D2 Parking/Retail/Residential E1 Mixed Use F1 Retail/Residential/Office F2 Retail/Residential/Office W1 Future Art of Olympians W2 Retail/Restaurant

EXISTING MULTI-LEVEL PARKING GARAGE

BAY STREET

FIRST STREET

A1 Exhibit Hall B1 Lecture Hall B2 Event Center B3 Event Center Admin. B4 Event Center Meeting Rms. C1 Rooms Tower C2 Parking

AMBASSADOR HOTEL

DEAN STREET

P10

E1

D2

C2 B2

HEITMAN

P3

DETENTION BASIN

EXISTING

W3 Retail/Restaurant W4 Retail/Restaurant W5 Retail/Restaurant W6 Commercial W7 Commercial P1 Seawall P2 Curved Pier

P3 Storm Detention P4 Edwards Culvert/Bridge P5 Pier P6 Boardwalk P7 Park Pavillion P8 Boat Ramp P9 Centennial Park

P10 Monroe - Bay to Edwards P11 Edwards - Monroe to Hendry P12 Edwards - Hendry to Lee P13 Edwards - Lee to Bridge P14 Hendry - Bay to Edwards P15 Hendry - Edwards to City Pier P16 Lee - Edwards to Yacht Basin

ROYAL PALM AVENUE

LOADING/PARKING

P7

W7

P12

D1

B3 BAY STREET

P7

C1

B1

STREET

P7

P9 CENTENNIAL PARK

EXISTING HARBORSIDE EVENT CENTER

P10

INS TA UN FO

P8

A1

W6

P4

EDWARDS DRIVE

SURFACE PARKING

W3

B4

P7

P16 P15

P3

LEE STREET

P18

W2

REET

P11

INS FOUNTA

EMERGENCY ACCESS

CENTENNIAL PARK

DETENTION POND

P1

P8

P17

JACKSON ST

P7

EX. CITY PIER BUILDING

HENDRY STREET

STAGE

P9

P7

EXISTING FORT MYERS YACHT BASIN

W5

P6

EDISON BRIDGE

P19

FOWLER STREET

P2

PROPOSED SURFACE PARKING

US 41 (CLEVELAND AVENUE)

YACHT BASIN EXPANSION

P17 Marina Expansion P18 Trolley System 0

100

200

400

August 19, 2009


Master Redevelopment Plan This section describes the Master Redevelopment Plan for the Riverfront Redevelopment study area. The culmination of almost a year of work, the master plan is the result of an interactive, participatory process that involved a large number of citizens, stakeholders, elected officials and government staff in addition to the Redevelopment Planning Team. As such, it represents the best efforts of all involved to make a statement about the desired future state of the downtown riverfront in Fort Myers. This section consists of several plates which illustrate various aspects of the master plan. The Illustrative Plan, shown on this page and elsewhere, is a single view that attempts to envelop all the various aspects of the plan in a comprehensible format. The additional plates serve to make some of the particular aspects of the plan more readily apparent to the interested reader. Major Themes The “big ideas” embedded in the master plan are the same ones that came out of the first charrette and are recorded in the Framework for Design document produced earlier in this process. They are as follows: Access and Connections: Facilitate connections to venues within the study area. Promote healthy vehicular and pedestrian interaction between Edwards Drive and First Street. Reconnect the waterfront to the historic downtown. Link residential towers to the downtown. Connect the marina to the historic downtown. New Development: New development should be organic and evolved, not forced. Treat the redevelopment as an ongoing organic entity. Create different pods of interest. Meet community needs in a sustainable sequence. Develop a phased project with early phase accomplishments. Unique Destination A unique destination in Florida for people of different ages and incomes to enjoy. A destination for visitors and residents. Change the perception of the downtown and the

Fort Myers Riverfront Development Plan

city. Establish unifying components, like regularly scheduled arts/events programming about the arts and culture of Southwest Florida. The arts are a huge part of downtown. “Pleasure Pier” would be a fabulous “big idea.” Create a reason to visit and/or stay. Create a unique identifying element. Possible themes include art, history, lights. The Waterfront: Activate the river edge. Bring the waterfront to life. Interact with the water—go out into it, don’t block it visually. Activate the waterfront walk with activities throughout the day. Need programming and consistent use 365/24/7. The waterfront should be utilized by every segment of the community to create an active waterfront. A year round environment for activity. Look for activities that drive pedestrian and boating activity. Open/Public Space: The waterfront is acknowledged as the most significant public space. Access to the water must be preserved, continuously at the water’s edge and from as many inland points as possible. Edwards Drive can become a significant public boulevard, as can the crucial Hendry Street connection between First Street and the riverfront. Multiple public plazas, parks and green spaces should be provided in order to create a variety of nodes of interest throughout the development. Sustainability: The redevelopment should leverage Fort Myers’ unique natural setting to emphasize an outdoor-oriented and healthy lifestyle as overarching qualities that define future characteristics of downtown. This would apply to transportation strategy, environmental practices, energy consciousness, and material utilization for new construction. The redevelopment plan would also foster social sustainability by attracting a wider economic/demographic audience both locally and regionally. There are two distinct aspects to the term “sustainability” that need to be understood. On the one hand, sustainable development follows best practices for environmental stewardship. This means that future development should improve the characteristics of the site with respect to storm water runoff, minimize construction waste, follow best practices for minimization of energy use, use locally available and/or recycled construction materials, and provide a healthful and regenerative indoor environment, all while taking the realities of the marketplace into account. The U.S. Green Building

Council’s (USGBC) LEED® Rating System is a widely accepted measurement tool for gauging the sustainability of any given construction project relative to the current state of the art. New development in downtown Fort Myers, especially where public funding is involved, should pursue LEED® Certification as a development goal. Because LEED is administered by USGBC, it is important to characterize LEED certification as a goal, not as a requirement, since the decision whether to certify a project is not in the owner’s domain. The other aspect of sustainability, of equal importance to environmental stewardship, is the sustainability of the redevelopment as a whole. Each recession serves to remind us of the vulnerability of commercial real estate, especially of retail, to the vagaries of the economy and the whims of consumers. It is vitally important that the riverfront redevelopment be sustainable not just environmentally, but also as a viable, ongoing operation. This kind of sustainability, like its counterpart, requires careful planning and even more careful execution. Projects must be identified with acknowledgement of the realities of the marketplace (such as the need for parking), not on the wishful thinking of the planning team. And the implementation plan must be sufficiently flexible to allow for change over time as marketplace realities shift. Even an acclaimed master plan will be of little service if it does not allow for growth and change over time. Living Plan Like any plan, the redevelopment master plan represents a snapshot, not of existing conditions but of a desired future state. This recognizes that snapshots are in essence frozen moments of time, while the development of Fort Myers’ riverfront is a dynamic condition. While it would be desirable to imagine the master plan being implemented all at once in a single massive construction project, the reality will be far more complex, and will unfold over a period of several years. Along the way, it is likely that particular elements of the plan will change in response to changing market realities, changing ownership of land, and changing priorities of the community. The best that can be said of the current plan is that it represents the best thinking of all those involved about what Fort Myers’ riverfront should look like some years hence. What it actually will look like depends on the commitment of city leaders and the citizens of the region to follow through with the plan.

Master Redevelopment Plan

3-3


Rendering 2

Aerial view looking west

3-4

Rendering

August 19, 2009


Rendering 3

Nighttime aerial view looking north

Fort Myers Riverfront Development Plan

Rendering

3-5


EDISON BRIDGE

Vehicular Circulation

Vehicle Circulation Eliminated Roadway

3-6

Vehicular Circulation

August 19, 2009


Existing / New Land Area 0

100

200

400

Current Land Area Proposed Land Area

N

Fort Myers Riverfront Development Plan

Existing / New Land Area

3-7


Existing / New Structures

New Structures Existing Structures Potential Development (outside the study area)

3-8

Existing / New Structures

FUTURE LIBRARY SITE

August 19, 2009


Sustainable Features 0

100

200

400

Pretreatment of storm water

Native and Adapted Planting

Preserve Mangrove

Potential Permeable Paving

Permeable Paving

Preserve Park

Permeable Lawn

Potential Roof Garden Opportunities Maintain River Flow

N

Fort Myers Riverfront Development Plan

Sustainable Features

3-9


Pedestrian Circulation

To Edison-Ford Estates

Pedestrian Circulation

Building Entry

3-10

Pedestrian Circulation

ROYAL PALM AVENUE

Structures

FIRST STREET FIRST STREET

August 19, 2009


Open Space 0

100

200

400

FIRST STREET

Open Space - Passive/Active Open Space - Passive Open Space - Active

N

Fort Myers Riverfront Development Plan

Open Space - Active

3-11


Waterfront Pedestrian Edge

Waterfront Pedestrian Edge

3-12

Waterfront Pedestrian Edge

August 19, 2009


Waterfront Development 0

100

200

400

New Structures New Open space New Water Surface

N

Fort Myers Riverfront Development Plan

Waterfront Development

3-13


Land Use / Zoning (New)

Urban Center Civic Civic Recreation Urban Core

* see page 2-9 for existing landuse diagram

3-14

Land Use / Zoning (New)

August 19, 2009


Development Key Plan

FORT MYERS RIVERFRONT REDEVELOPMENT MASTERPLAN

Fort Myers Riverfront Development Plan

Site Plan

3-15


Current/Future Proposed Land Use and Zoning Designations

Fort Myers Riverfront Development Plan

Current/Future Proposed Land Use and Zoning Designations with maximum development potential compared to Riverfront Development Plan Block

SF

2.5

108,730

Civic Rec (ROW)/Urban Center

5

543,650

7

17859.6 91040.4

Civic Rec (ROW) Urban Center

NA 5

NA 455,202

NA 7

A A1 A1

CURRENT LAND USE AND ZONING REGULATIONS Land Use/Zoning F.A.R Max. Bldg. (SF) Max. Height Use (Habitable Floors)

Land Acreage

0.41 2.09

B

2.41

104,966

Civic* 5 524,830 * Using Urban Center Development Parameters

7

B1 B1 B2 B3 B4 C C1 C1 C2

D

1.54 0.43 0.4 0.71

2.83

Levels

Building (gsf)

Event/Exhibit Center

82,800

1

82,800

Exhibit Hall

82,800

Harborside Expansion (Area to be added)

28,485

2

28,485

Lecture Hall (level 1) Lecture Hall (level 2) Event Center Retail Event Center Admin. Event Center Meeting Rms

10,600 2,500 2,160 7,600 5,625

2

13,100

1 (1st floor) 1 (2nd floor) 1 (2nd floor)

2,160 7,600 5,625

39,000

12

378,370

67,202

Civic/Urban Center

5

336,010

7

Hotel

18730.8 17424 30927.6

Civic Urban Center Urban Center

5 5 5

93,654 87,120 154,638

7 7 7

Rooms Tower

5-12

283,770

Parking

1-4

94,600

123,251

Urban Center

5

616,255

7

Mixed Use

42,235

4

333,935

Retail/Residential/Office

42,235

4

143,335

Level 1: Retail/Restaurant Level 2: Residential/Office Level 3: Residential/Office Level 4: Residential/Office

42,235 33,700 33,700 33,700

Parking/Retail/Residential/Office

38,130

7

190,600

Level 1: Garage Level 1: Retail Level 2: Garage Level 3: Garage Level 4: Garage Level 5: Garage Level 6: Office Level 7: Office

32,050 6,060 38,110 38,110 38,110 38,110 25,000* 25,000*

D1

D2

3-16

Foot-print (gsf)

Current/Future Proposed Land Use and Zoning Designations

PROPOSED LAND USE AND ZONING REGULATIONS Land Use/Zoning F.A.R Max. Bldg. Max. Height (SF) (Habitable Floors)

Urban Center

5

543,650

7

Urban Center 5 89298 7 Urban Center 5 Request Civic Use not be required to go through Planned Unit Development (PUD) process Civic* 5 524,830 7 *Using Urban Center Development Parameters Request Civic Land Use Category not be required to go through Planned Unit Development (PUD) process

Urban Center 12 806,424 with Hotel/Convention Center Overlay (HCO) Urban Center - HCO 12 224,770 Urban Center - HCO 12 209,088 Urban Center - HCO 12 371,131 C block updated to reflect HCO, 01/10/10

Urban Center

5

616,255

12 12 12 12

7

August 19, 2009


Current/Future Proposed Land Use and Zoning Designations

Fort Myers Riverfront Development Plan

Current/Future Proposed Land Use and Zoning Designations with maximum development potential compared to Riverfront Development Plan Block

0.59

25,673

PROPOSED LAND USE AND ZONING REGULATIONS Land Use/Zoning F.A.R Max. Bldg. Max. Height (SF) (Habitable Floors)

Levels

Building (gsf)

Mixed Use

12,200

4

43,460

Urban Center

5

128,365

7

Level 1: Retail/Restaurant Level 2: Residential/Commercial Level 3: Residential/Commercial Level 4: Residential/Commercial

12,200 10,420 10,420 10,420

Mixed Use

38,525

104,100

Urban Center

5

560,730

7

Retail/Residential/Office

13,525

Level 1: Retail Level 2: Residential/Commercial Level 3: Residential/Commercial Level 4: Residential/Commercial

13,525 13,525 13,525 13,525

F2

Retail/Residential/Office

25,000 25,000 25,000

W

3.13

136,557

Urban Center

5

682,785

7

Level 1: Retail Level 2: Resdiential/Commercial Level 3: Potential additional levels as Residential or Commercial Level 3 & 4: Potential additional levels as Residential or Commercial Waterfront Mixed Use

Urban Center

5

682,785

7

W1 W2 W3 W4 W5 W6 W7

0.75 0.34 0.38 0.29 0.25 0.49 0.64

32,654 14,641 16,370 12,810 10,892 21,253 27,937

Urban Center Urban Center Urban Center Urban Center Urban Center Urban Center Urban Center

5 5 5 5 5 5 5

163,270 73,205 81,850 64,050 54,460 106,265 139,685

7 7 7 7 7 7 7

Future Art of Olympians or potential future private/public building expansion Retail/Restaurant Retail/Restaurant Retail/Restaurant Retail/Restaurant Commercial Commercial

Urban Center Urban Center Urban Center Urban Center Urban Center Urban Center Urban Center

5 5 5 5 5 5 5

163,270 73,205 81,850 64,050 54,460 106,265 139,685

7 7 7 7 7 7 7

Civic Rec/NONE

NA

NA

NA

Civic Rec

NA

NA

NA

Urban Center/NONE NONE Urban Center Urban Center NONE NONE

NA NONE 5 ROW NONE NONE

NA NONE 319,375 ROW NONE NONE

NA NONE 7 ROW NONE NONE

Urban Center/NONE Civic Rec NONE Urban Center Civic Rec NONE

NA NA NONE ROW NA NONE

NA NA NONE ROW NA NONE

NA NA NONE ROW NA NONE

F

SF

CURRENT LAND USE AND ZONING REGULATIONS Land Use/Zoning F.A.R Max. Bldg. (SF) Max. Height Use (Habitable Floors)

Foot-print (gsf)

E

Land Acreage

2.57

Urban Center

112,146

Urban Center

5

5

128,365

560,730

7

7

F1

P

Public Infrastructure Improvements

4

54,100

107 2

100,000

1

63,200

25,000 25,000 63,200

16,130 8,000 8,000 5,200 6,300 10,750 8,820

Waterfront Inlet and Feature P1 P2 P3 P4 P5 P19

1.47 63875

Fort Myers Riverfront Development Plan

Seawall Curved Pier Storm Detention Edwards Culvert/Bridge Pier (adjacent to City Pier Bldg.) Docks/Slips

Current/Future Proposed Land Use and Zoning Designations

3-17


Current/Future Proposed Land Use and Zoning Designations

Fort Myers Riverfront Development Plan

Current/Future Proposed Land Use and Zoning Designations with maximum development potential compared to Riverfront Development Plan Block

Land Acreage

SF

CURRENT LAND USE AND ZONING REGULATIONS Land Use/Zoning F.A.R Max. Bldg. (SF) Max. Height Use (Habitable Floors)

Foot-print (gsf)

Levels

Building (gsf)

PROPOSED LAND USE AND ZONING REGULATIONS Land Use/Zoning F.A.R Max. Bldg. Max. Height (SF) (Habitable Floors)

Park Improvements and Amenities P6 P7 P8 P9

0.88 38285

Civic Rec Civic Rec

NA NA

NA NA

NA NA

Civic Rec Civic Rec

NA NA

NA NA

NA NA

7 NA

Boardwalk Park Pavillion(s), restrooms and stages Boat ramp relocation or potential future private/public building expansion Park Infrastructure and Landscape

Urban Center Civic Rec

5 NA

191,425 NA

Urban Center Civic Rec

5 NA

191425 NA

7 NA

NA NA NA NA NA NA Urban Center

NA NA NA NA NA NA 5

NA NA NA NA NA NA NA ROW

NA NA NA NA NA NA 7

Monroe - Bay to Edwards Edwards - Monroe to Hendry Edwards - Hendry to Lee Edwards - Lee to Bridge Hendry - Bay to Edwards Hendry - Edwards to City Pier Building Lee - Edwards to Yacht Basin

NA NA NA NA NA NA Urban Center

NA NA NA NA NA NA 5

NA NA NA NA NA NA NA ROW

NA NA NA NA NA NA 7

NA

NA

NA

NA

Marina expansion

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

Trolley system

NA

NA

NA

NA

Streetscape P10 P11 P12 P13 P14 P15 P16 Marina P17 Trolley P18

3-18

Current/Future Proposed Land Use and Zoning Designations

August 19, 2009


Section through Monroe

Proposed Building (A1)

3-20

Sections at Street Level

Terrace (12’ width)

Walkway (12’ width)

Angled Parking (22’ width)

Monroe Street Two-lane (22’ width)

Median with Water Feature (21’ width)

Monroe Street Two-lane (22’ width)

Walkway (15’ width)

Proposed Building (B1)

August 19, 2009


Section through Edwards at Centennial Park

Centennial Park

Fort Myers Riverfront Development Plan

Walkway On-street (12’ width) Parking (8’ width)

Edwards Drive Two-lane (22’ width)

On-street Walkway Parking (10’ width) (8’ width)

Proposed Building (B4)

Sections at Street Level

3-21


Section through Edwards dr at Basin

North Basin

3-22

Sections at Street Level

Walkway Green Walk(8’ width) Zone way (7’) (5’)

Edwards Drive Two-lane (22’ width)

Walk- Green Walkway way Zone (8’ width) (5’) (7’)

South Basin

August 19, 2009


Section through Hendry

South Basin

Fort Myers Riverfront Development Plan

Walkway On-street (12’ width) Parking (8’ width)

Hendry St. One-lane (12’ width)

Median (28’ width)

Hendry St. On-street Walkway One-lane Parking (10’ width) (12’ width) (8’ width)

Terrace (14’ width)

Proposed Building (D1)

Sections at Street Level

3-23


Renderings Lofton’s Island:

The programming for the Marina and or reconfigured City Pier area is flexible and should take into consideration the opportunity to provide connectivity to Lofton’s Island.

Redeveloped Edwards Drive

Aerial view of Hendry Street and City Pier

3-24

Renderings

Aerial view of City Pier and Marina

August 19, 2009


Renderings

Expanded Harborside Event Center

Expanded Yacht Basin

Fort Myers Riverfront Development Plan

New Basin and Hotel at City Pier Renderings

3-25


DEVELOPMENT GUIDELINES 4


Development Guidelines As part of the recommended master plan, the Redevelopment Team has created these Development Guidelines. The purpose of these guidelines is not to dictate a particular building mass, form, or expression, but to put in place some basic planning principles that should be observed as each block is redeveloped. In general, these principles are compatible with the guidelines contained in the 2002 DPZ master plan for downtown Fort Myers. They are, however, more specific with respect to the blocks in the redevelopment study area, and correspond directly to the recommendations of the redevelopment master plan (preceding section). The Development Guidelines are intended to convey the general shape and character of the proposed redevelopment without being overly prescriptive with respect to architecture. This is intended to provide latitude to individual owners, whether public or private, as to the appropriate architectural expression of a particular parcel, while still maintaining a coherent overall appearance within the River District. Moreover, these guidelines are intended to encourage new development to be designed compatibly with adjacent existing downtown buildings, particularly those in the historic district. With the exception of the Hall of 50 States, the contributing structures of the historic district are located south of the study area (south of Bay Street). While a variety of architectural styles exist in the district, three over arching characteristics are evident among the historic buildings: boundary/edges, massing, and articulation. As described below, these three urban design qualities form the basis of the Development Guidelines as illustrated on a block-by-block basis:

Boundary/Edges: Common alignment of building facades along streets or parks contribute to the sense of a cohesive district and definition of public space, evident with the distinctive “streetwall” of First Street between Monroe and Lee Streets. The Development Guidelines identify important edges of individual parcels, which should be architecturally resolved by “build-to” lines: these are similar to traditional “set-back” criteria, but stipulate that building edges be built along identified property lines to achieve a similar streetwall effect. Massing: Except for the massive Ambassador Hotel and residential towers and near the bridges, the general scale of downtown buildings varies between two and four levels (a few one-story and six- or seven-story buildings also exist). These guidelines suggest how new development can vary with height, mass, modulation, and setbacks so that it fits appropriately with the urban scale of the historic downtown core. Articulation: Some of the most notable features of Fort Myers architecture include the first-level canopies along First Street, the Arcade Theater marquis, and the neo-classical First National Bank entry pediment – among others. The variety and richness of the downtown core contains lessons for future development on how individual building articulation can create uniqueness, but can also relate to adjacent buildings on a district and civic scale. These guidelines suggest specific design opportunities of individual blocks that can embrace adjacent amenities, entries, roof shapes, circulation elements, etc. It is important to point out that the Development Guidelines are indeed “guidelines”, and not intended to be “prescriptive”. For example, the building massing represented in the guidelines reflects the massing portrayed in the

master plan, but should not be construed by the City or by future developers as a strict building envelope. The building envelope for each parcel is ultimately governed by the underlying zoning, not by the development guidelines. This is to ensure that there is enough flexibility within the master plan to accommodate changes in market demand that will naturally occur over time. Another reason for avoiding prescriptive design details at this level is to avoid excessive uniformity of expression, which is characteristic of suburban shopping and “lifestyle” centers, but which should not characterize Fort Myer’s redeveloped historic riverfront. The plan anticipates and has room for more than one architectural form or expression within its overall framework. This is illustrated in the master plan by the discussion of appropriate South Florida architecture. While steering away from the faux Mediterranean look which has characterized many recent developments in South Florida, the master plan commends two distinct styles as particularly appropriate to the region: the South Florida Cracker style, which evolved organically from early settlements, and the Mid-Century Modern style, a rethinking of traditional forms that, while bringing a new vocabulary to the region, still respected the climate, scale and building traditions of South Florida. Further, it is not the intention of this master plan to prescribe that all buildings must be designed in either of these two styles. Rather, it is the intention of the plan to suggest that new development be informed by the insights of these two historic styles while taking advantage of present-day building technology and materials. Just as it would be wrong, in our view, to create a faux Mediterranean village on the riverfront, it would be just as wrong to create a faux Cracker-style village in the early decades of the 21st Century.

Boundary and Edges

Massing

Articulation

*Photo curtesy of Jerry Miller

Fort Myers Riverfront Development Plan

Development Guidelines

4-1


Block A Guidelines

EXISTING GROUND FLOOR TENANT

ADDRESS

EXISTING GROUND FLOOR USE

A1

US Post Office

1330/50 Monroe Street

Retail / Distribution (post office)

40,338

A2

Parking Lot

2050 Edwards Drive

Parking

21,244

A3

Parking Lot

Heitman Street

Parking

8,030

LAND UNIT TOTALS (sf)

4

* Cross reference 3-19 for full development use 7

4

3

OE

NR

MO

3

6

5

ET

RE

ST

1

2 IVE

R SD

D

R WA ED

Boundary and Edges 1 EXISTING PROPERTY LINE 2 PROPOSED PROPERTY LINE 3 PROPOSED HWY 41 ROW 4 SET BACK LINE 5 CENTENNIAL PARK BUILD TO LINE 6 MONROE ST BUILD TO LINE 7 BAY ST BUILD TO LINE W6 F W1 W2 P9E

W4 C

E D

B A P9W

Diagram Legend

4-2

Development Guidelines - Block A

August 19, 2009


Block A Guidelines

5 7 4

NR

3

OE

OE

NR

MO

1

1

MO

2

2 6

3

ET

RE

ET

ST

RE

ST

4

IVE

D DS

RD

WA

ED

E

RIV

R SD

R WA

ED

Massing

Articulation

1 ICONIC MASS WITH OPEN VIEWS TO THE RIVER

1 ICONIC ROOF AT CENTENNIAL PARK

2 PREFUNCTION ZONE. MOSTLY TRANSPARENT WITH OPEN VIEWS

2 PEDESTRIAN SCALE CANOPY

3 UNDERSIDE OF US41 - ALLOWS LOADING AND SERVICES ON BACKSIDE OF EXHIBIT HALL

3 RAISED TERRACE (FEMA FLOOD ELEVATION)

4 FOCAL POINT FOR END AXIS OF EDWARDS DRIVE

4 LOBBY WITH TRANSPARENCY AND LIGHTING FEATURES 5 SECONDARY ENTRY 6 COVERED WALKWAY TO HARBORSIDE 7 US41 BRIDGE

East View

Fort Myers Riverfront Development Plan

North View

South View

West View

Development Guidelines - Block A

4-3


Block B Guidelines

EXISTING GROUND FLOOR TENANT

ADDRESS

B1 Harborside Event Center 2150 Edwards Drive * Cross reference 3-19 for full development use

EXISTING GROUND FLOOR USE Convention Center

LAND UNIT TOTALS (sf) 101,254.4 5

4 ED

O

E

3

NR

IVE

O

DR

1

M

DS

ST

RE

W AR

ET

6

2

Boundary and Edges 1 EXISTING PROPERTY LINE 2 PROPOSED PROPERTY LINE 3 EXISTING HARBORSIDE EVENT CENTER 4 MONROE STREET BUILD TO LINE 5 BAY STREET BUILD TO LINE 6 EDWARDS DRIVE BUILD TO LINE

W6 F W1 W2 P9E

W4 C

E D

B A P9W

Diagram Legend

4-4

Development Guidelines - Block B

August 19, 2009


Block B Guidelines

8 7 1

6

1 3

4 ED

ET RE ST

DR

Massing

M

M

O

NR

IVE

NR

IVE

2

E

ST

DS

E

DR

O

DS

3

W AR

RE

W AR

O

ET

ED

5

O

2

Articulation

1 PREFUNCTION CORRIDOR LINKING NEW BALLROOM WITH MEETING ROOMS

1 NEW BALLROOM INSIDE EXISTING HARBORSIDE

2 UPPER LEVEL MEETING ROOMS WITH VIEWS TO THE RIVER

2 EXISTING RAISED PATIO BECOMES COVERED OUTDOOR SPACE

3 MASS OF PLENARY HALLS SHOULD FIT SCALE OF EXISTING BUILDING

3 NEW SECOND LEVEL MEETING ROOMS 4 NEW PREFUNCTION WITH CLERESTORY WINDOWS ALLOWING NATURAL LIGHT 5 NEW PLENARY HALL 1 - TIERED SEATING 6 NEW PLENARY HALL 2 - TIERED SEATING 7 OUTDOOR COURTYARD 8 SECOND LEVEL ADMINISTRATIVE OFFICE

East View

Fort Myers Riverfront Development Plan

North View

South View

West View

Development Guidelines - Block B

4-5


Block C Guidelines

EXISTING GROUND FLOOR TENANT

ADDRESS

EXISTING GROUND FLOOR USE

Parking Lot

1320 Hendry Street

Parking

67,430

C2 Parking Lot 1375 Hendry Street * Cross reference 3-19 for full development use

Parking

18,398.59

6

3

5

BAY

4

DRY

2

7

STR

HEN

C1

LAND UNIT TOTALS (sf)

EET

1

Boundary and Edges 1 EXISTING PROPERTY LINE 2 PROPOSED PROPERTY LINE 3 PROPOSED PARKING GARAGE 4 BAY STREET BUILD TO LINE 5 BUILD TO LINE 6 BUILD TO LINE 7 EDWARDS DRIVE BUILD TO LINE W6 F W1 W2 P9E

W W4 C

E D

B A P9W

Diagram Legend

4-6

Development Guidelines - Block C

August 19, 2009


Block C Guidelines

1 5

2 6

1

8 2

EET

STR

BAY

DRY

STR

STR

Massing

EET

3

DRY

STR

7

HEN

BAY

EET

4

HEN

3

EET

4

Articulation

1 MAIN HOTEL MASS

1 EMPHASIZE TOWER ROOF AT RIVER SIDE

2 FORM RESPONDS TO CURVED BASIN

2 FEATURE TOWER SIDE WITH TRANSPARENCY AND VIEWS TO RIVER

3 DRIVES FOR PARKING GARAGE ACCESS AND SERVICES

3 RAISED TERRACE (FEMA FLOOD ELEVATION)

4 PARKING GARAGE

4 ROOFTOP TERRACE - POSSIBLE GREEN ROOF, EVENT SPACE, OVERLOOKS 5 ROOF LEVEL STEPS DOWN TOWARDS BAY STREET TO RESPECT URBAN SCALE 6 BREAK UP FACADE OF TOWER 7 MODULATE BAY STREET FACADE 8 ICONIC FACADE TO TERMINATE DEAN STREET

East View

Fort Myers Riverfront Development Plan

North View

South View

West View

Development Guidelines - Block C

4-7


Block D Guidelines

EXISTING GROUND FLOOR TENANT

ADDRESS

EXISTING GROUND FLOOR USE

D1

Vacant Site

Corner Lot

Undeveloped

13,011

D2

Vacant Historic Bldg.*

2254 Edwards Drive

Undeveloped*

7,070

D3

Vacant Site

Corner Lot

Undeveloped

29,947

D4

Parking Lot

2269/75 Bay Street

Parking

60,225

LAND UNIT TOTALS (sf)

* Cross reference 3-19 for full development use

6

**The existing Hall of 50 states (D2) will be relocated to one of two locations: adjacent to Palms Park

6 5

6

on land adjacent to the Amtel property, Historical Museum.

5

1 1

RE

ET

* Cross reference 3-19 for full development use

ED

IVE

3 4

ND

DR

1

HE

DS

RY

ST

WA R

2

Boundary and Edges 1 EXISTING PROPERTY LINE 2 PROPOSED PROPERTY LINE 3 EDWARDS DRIVE BUILD TO LINE 4 HENDRY STREET BUILD TO LINE 5 BAY STREET BUILD TO LINE 6 JACKSON STREET BUILD TO LINE

W6 F W1 W2 P9E

W4 C

E D

B A P9W

Diagram Legend

4-8

Development Guidelines - Block D

August 19, 2009


Block D Guidelines

8 7

8 2

1 6

1

3

RIVE

Massing

RIVE

ET RE ST RY ND

ST RY

SD

HE

SD

1 5

EDW ARD

ND

EDW ARD

4

2

4

RE

1

5 4

HE

ET

1

Articulation

1 MULTI-STORY DEVELOPMENT WITH LOWER LEVEL STOREFRONTS

1 FEATURE CORNER ELEMENTS

2 UPPER LEVEL DEVELOPMENT WITH VIEWS TO THE RIVER

2 EDWARDS DRIVE FACADE - MODULATED FACADE WITH OPENINGS THAT SHOULD TAKE ADVANTAGE OF RIVER VIEW 3 HENDRY STREET FACADE - MODULATED FACADE WITH RESPECT TO 1ST STREET 4 PEDESTRIAN SCALE CANOPY 5 RAISED TERRACE (FEMA FLOOD ELEVATION) 6 FACADE WITH TRANSPARENCY TAKING ADVANTAGE OF RIVER VIEWS 7 PARKING GARAGE 8 GARAGE ENTRY TOWERS

East View

Fort Myers Riverfront Development Plan

North View

South View

West View

Development Guidelines - Block D

4-9


Block E Guidelines

EXISTING GROUND FLOOR TENANT

ADDRESS

EXISTING GROUND FLOOR USE

E1

Fort Myers Chamber of Comm.

2310 Edwards Drive

Retail / Office

21,545

E2

Parking under office building

1375 Jackson Street

Parking

24,650

LAND UNIT TOTALS (sf)

* Cross reference 3-20 for full development use 5 5

5

4

5

JAC

KS

1

ON

ST

RE

ET

LEE EET

STR 3 2

DS

AR DW

E

Boundary and Edges 1 EXISTING PROPERTY LINE 2 PROPOSED PROPERTY LINE 3 EDWARDS DRIVE BUILD TO LINE 4 LEE STREET BUILD TO LINE 5 SET BACK LINE

W6 F W1 W2 P9E

W4 C

E D

B A P9W

Diagram Legend

4-10

Development Guidelines - Block E

August 19, 2009


Block E Guidelines

1

2

JAC

KS

ON

JAC

KS

ST

RE

4

ET

1

LEE

LEE

STR

E

RE

ET

DS

AR DW

E

EET

EET

STR

DS

ST

3

2 AR DW

2

ON

Massing

Articulation

1 EXISTING UTILITY WITH SETBACKS TO DESIGN AROUND

1 FACADE MODULATION ALONG EDWARDS DRIVE

2 MAJORITY OF MASS ADDRESSING EDWARDS DRIVE

2 PEDESTRIAN SCALE CANOPY 3 RAISED TERRACE (FEMA FLOOD ELEVATION) 4 MODULATED LEE STREET FACADE

East View

Fort Myers Riverfront Development Plan

North View

South View

West View

Development Guidelines - Block E

4-11


Block F Guidelines

EXISTING GROUND FLOOR TENANT

ADDRESS

EXISTING GROUND FLOOR USE

F1

Fort Myers Palm Park

2414 Edwards Drive

Park

F2

Parking Lot

2401 Bay Street

Parking

F3

Lobby / Reception

2424 Edwards Drive Apartment

Lobby

F4

Driveway

2425 Bay Street

Parking / Driveway

F5

Amtel Hotel

2500 Edwards Drive

Hotel

LAND UNIT TOTALS (sf) 19,500 19,122.84 86,515 4,543

6

192,076

6

6

5

* Cross reference 3-20 for full development use

5

4

ED

DS

LEE

STR

3 WA R

EET

4

2 ST

RE

ET

1

Boundary and Edges 1 EXISTING PROPERTY LINE 2 PROPOSED PROPERTY LINE 3 EDWARDS DRIVE BUILID TO LINE 4 BUILD TO LINE 5 LEE STREET BUILD TO LINE 6 BAY STREET BUILD TO LINE 7 SET BACK LINE W6 F W1 W2 P9E

W4 C

E D

B A P9W

Diagram Legend

4-12

Development Guidelines - Block F

August 19, 2009


Block F Guidelines

1 2

3

2 2

4

DS

1 ST

WA R

DS

RE

ET

Massing

EET 5

ED

ST

STR

EET STR

4

LEE

WA R

3

3

1

ED

1

LEE

2

2

RE

ET

Articulation

1 FORT MYERS PALM PARK

1 PROMINENT CORNER ELEMENTS

2 MAIN FACADES WITH VIEWS AND ACCESS TO THE PARK

2 MODULATED FACADE PLAYING OFF THE CHARACTER OF THE HISTORIC 1ST STREET 3 PEDESTRIAN LEVEL CANOPIES 4 RAISED TERRACE (FEMA FLOOD ELEVATION) 5 FORT MYERS PALM PARK

East View

Fort Myers Riverfront Development Plan

North View

South View

West View

Development Guidelines - Block F

4-13


Block W1 Guidelines

2 1

3

4 2

Boundary and Edges 1 EXISTING SHORELINE 2 PROPOSED SHORELINE 3 EDWARDS DRIVE BUILD TO LINE

W1

4 SET BUILD LINE

W6 F W1 W W2 P9E

W4 C

E D

B A P9W

Diagram Legend

4-14

Development Guidelines - Block W1

August 19, 2009


Block W1 Guidelines

4

7 6 4

3 2 11

1 3

3

10

1

8

2

5

9

EDW ARDS

EDW ARDS

DRIV

E

Massing

DRIV

E

Articulation

1 SHED ROOF FORM TO MIMIC THE HISTORIC PIER BUILDINGS

1 NORTH BASIN

7 ICONIC TOWER

2 BUILDING SHOULD PREDOMINANTELY RUN ALONG THE NORTH-SOUTH AXIS

2 PEDESTRIAN BRIDGE

8 COVERED PROMENADE

3 SIMPLE SHAPES TO BUILDING

3 DANCING WATER FEATURE

9 FEMA TERRACE

4 VERTICAL ELEMENT SERVES AS A FOCAL POINT OR GATEWAY TO DOWNTOWN

4 RIVER

10 HISTORIC PIER LINEAR ROOF LINE

5 BOARDWALK OVERLOOK

11 ICONIC GRAPHIC

6 BOARDWALK TRELLIS

East View

Fort Myers Riverfront Development Plan

North View

South View

West View

Development Guidelines - Block W1

4-15


Block W2 Guidelines

2 6

ST

RE

ET

5

EDW ARD

5

2

3

HE

4

ND

RY

6

1

S DR

IVE

Boundary and Edges

W2

1 EXISTING PROPERTY LINE 2 PROPOSED PROPERTY LINE 3 EXISTING SHORELINE 4 EDWARDS DRIVE BUILD TO LINE 5 HENDRY STREET BUILD TO LINE 6 BUILD TO LINE

W6 F W1 W2 P9E

W4 C

E D

B A P9W

Diagram Legend

4-16

Development Guidelines - Block W2

August 19, 2009


Block W2 Guidelines

1 3

6

1

5

2 6

ET ST

EDW ARD

S DR

HE

4

HE

EDW ARD

2

ND

RY

3

ND

2

RE

5

RE

2

7

ST

1

5

ET

3

3

RY

3

S DR

IVE

Massing

IVE

Articulation

1 LINEAR BUILDINGS RUNNING IN THE NORTH/SOUTH AXIS

1 EXISTING CITY PIER BUILDING

2 OPENINGS AND ACCESS FROM ALL SIDES OF THE BUILDING

2 BOARDWALK

3 STRONG UNOBSTRUCTED VIEWS TO THE RIVER

3 COVERED PROMENADE 4 RAISED TERRACE (FEMA FLOOD ELEVATION) 5 LINEAR ROOF LINES PLAYING OFF OF THE HISTORIC PIER BUILDINGS 6 ICONIC GRAPHIC 7 OPEN LINK BETWEEN BUILDINGS

East View

Fort Myers Riverfront Development Plan

North View

South View

West View

Development Guidelines - Block W2

4-17


Block W4 Guidelines

6

5 HENDRY STREET

5

5

5

1

4 3

2

W4

S RD

IVE

DR

WA

ED

Boundary and Edges 1 EXISTING PROPERTY LINE 2 PROPOSED PROPERTY LINE 3 EDWARDS DRIVE BUILD TO LINE 4 HENDRY STREET BUILD TO LINE 5 BUILD TO LINE 6 PROPOSED HOTEL

W6 F W1 W2 P9E

W4 C

E D

B A P9W

Diagram Legend

4-18

Development Guidelines - Block W4

August 19, 2009


Block W4 Guidelines

7

6 5 4 1

RY ST

HEND

2

REET

REET

RY ST

HEND

3

2

1

2 3

E

RIV

D DS

E

RIV

D DS

R WA

R WA

ED

ED

Massing

Articulation

1 SOUTH BASIN

1 FEATURE CORNER

2 BUILDING ACCESS OFF OF EDWARDS DRIVE AND HENDRY STREET

2 COVERED TERRACE

3 TRANSPARENT FACADE WITH VIEWS OF THE BASIN

3 RAISED TERRACE (FEMA FLOOD ELEVATION) 4 OVERLOOK TRELLIS 5 SOUTH BASIN 6 DANCING WATER FEATURE 7 PUBLIC FOUNTAIN PLAZA

East View

Fort Myers Riverfront Development Plan

North View

South View

West View

Development Guidelines - Block W4

4-19


Block W6 Guidelines

2 3

4 LEE

5

EET

STR

1

S RD

IVE

DR

WA

ED

W6 Boundary and Edges 1 EXISTING PROPERTY LINE 2 PROPOSED PROPERTY LINE 3 EXISTING SHORELINE 4 EDWARDS DRIVE BUILD TO LINE 5 LEE STREET BUILD TO LINE

W6 F W1 W2 P9E

W4 C

E D

B A P9W

Diagram Legend

4-20

Development Guidelines - Block W6

August 19, 2009


Block W6 Guidelines

2

1 2 1

3 4 2

3

4 LEE

LEE

3 S RD

STR

STR

E

IV DR

Massing

3 2 3

EET

EET

WA

ED

1

S RD

IVE

DR

WA

ED

Articulation

1 FORT MYERS YACHT BASIN

1 BUILDING WITH STRONG NORTH/SOUTH LINEAR AXIS

2 PROMINENT BUILDING ENDING LEE STREET AXIS

2 COVERED PORCHES

3 LINEAR BUILDINGS PLAYING OFF THE HISTORIC PIER BUILDINGS

3 RAISED TERRACE (FEMA FLOOD ELEVATION) 4 ICONIC GRAPHIC

East View

Fort Myers Riverfront Development Plan

North View

South View

West View

Development Guidelines - Block W6

4-21


Block P9W Guidelines Existing Conditions:

Proposed Conditions:

The area of Centennial Park west of the Bridge accommodates both passive and active recreational uses, and acts as an important

Replacement restroom facilities and a new Farmers Market pavilion are

gateway into the city from both the north and south. A waterfront sidewalk provides attractive views of the Caloosahatchee River, and

proposed along the east and west edges of the park, along with a new

extends eastward toward City Pier. A variety of tree species are found in the park, but the majority of the park is open grassy area where

open-air stage at the north end. These new structures, and supporting

concerts and other events take place. The existing restroom facilities are reportedly in need of upgrade or replacement, and contribute

sidewalks and landscaping, will create a centralized oval where future

little to the creation of a central space or water promenade. The Farmers Market currently takes place under the bridge, using the existing

concerts, festivals and other public events can take place in a more

paving for parking and temporary stall installation.

efficient layout. The stage location is set back from the water’s edge so that it can support smaller, more intimate audiences and events which could gather at a prime location to enjoy sunset views over the Caloosahatchee. A small pier is also proposed for small craft such as kayaks, to complement the adjacent Edison Sailing Club use directly to the west of the park. Additionally, a two-bay surface parking lot and drop-off is indicated on the western edge of the park to provide convenient access for visitors; if desired, this could also be redesigned to accommodate a future boat ramp if desired. All concepts shown, as they relate to Centennial Park, are only design suggestions. Development of the area should be refined by a consultant team and the solution should relate to adjacencies as part of the master plan.

P9W

W6 F W1 W2 P9E

W4 C

E D

B A P9W

Diagram Legend

4-22

Development Guidelines - Block P9W

August 19, 2009


Block P9W Guidelines

1

4 3

2

5

Park Elements

1 LINEAR BUILDINGS OPEN ON ALL SIDES 2 SMALL AMPHITHEATER STAGE WITH COVER. DESIGNED SO THAT PERFORMANCES CAN OCCUR ON NORTH OR SOUTH LAWN 3 SOUTH LAWN - OPEN PARK SPACE FOR LARGE GATHERINGS 4 PARKING 5 I-40 BRIDGE

East View

Fort Myers Riverfront Development Plan

North View

South View

West View

Development Guidelines - Block P9W

4-23


Block P9E Guidelines Existing Conditions:

Proposed Conditions:

The area of Centennial Park west of the US 41 Bridge is a large area with several elements – sidewalks, parking, trees, boat ramp –

With the improvements to Edwards Drive as the last piece of the

but falls short of its potential to be the signature park of downtown Fort Myers. From the downtown, it acts as the threshold to the

downtown streetscape plan to be executed, the new street will

Caloosahatchee River; yet it has little direct relationship to the water. From the Edison Bridge and from the river, it acts as the “front yard”

be transformed into a premier waterfront promenade extending

for the downtown buildings; yet its most direct connection to the buildings is achieved by its role as a surface parking lot. While the

between the two downtown bridges. In the future, Edwards Drive

sidewalk connects along the northern edge of the park to City Pier, the thick mangroves block any view of the water for nearly its entire

may become known as the “Promenade of Palms” or similar, implying

length. The existing boat ramp has been identified as a community asset, but needs to be relocated to a different location along the river.

its new connection as an important public space that is now an

The ramp will be relocated out of the downtown and three possible options are being considered: Epler site across the River, Boatland

integral element of Centennial Park. Edwards Drive now becomes

site across the River and immediately adjacent to the Riverside Community Park.

the pedestrian-oriented space that unites the park with the adjacent buildings, and the spine that accommodates large events such as Art Fest, boat festivals and other activities that could be planned with Harborside (and possibly the Art of the Olympians). Taking this partnership one step further, the park space between Monroe Street and the W1 parcel is envisioned as a flexible open space with modulated banding and infrastructure to handle festivals, concerts, or simply passive recreation uses. Whereas the park space east of Monroe Street may be characterized by large, flexible open area, the park space between Monroe and

P9E

the bridge has the ability to take on a different scale and character: one more directly connected to the Harborside Expansion and programmed to act as a sort of outdoor lobby or reception area. If properly funded and designed, it could become the Fort Myers Public Gardens – the place where public art, monuments, native plants and landscaping and lighting all come together and symbolize the marriage of the city and the river. A variation on the waterfront walkway proposes that a new boardwalk W6

be constructed on the waterside of the existing mangroves. This

F

would be an elevated walkway that could now place visitors directly

W1 W2

next to the water, emphasizing the environment (mangroves, manatee,

P9E

and the larger river ecosystem) in an educational and recreational

W4 C

E D

B

manner. To further promote a visual connection with the river, the A

mangroves could also be “limbed up” under a managed plan, to allow pedestrians to see the water through the branches.

P9W

Diagram Legend

4-24

Development Guidelines - Block P9E

August 19, 2009


Block P9E Guidelines

4

6

3 4

5 2

1

4

1

Park Elements 1 TEMPORARY FESTIVAL TENTS ALONG EDWARDS DRIVE 2 HARDSCAPE BANDS WITH POWER CONNECTIONS EVERY 30 FEET TO ALLOW FOR PARK EVENTS AND EXHIBITIONS 3 COVERED BAND SHELTER WITH STAGE FACING BOTH THE PARK AND THE RIVER 4 RIVERWALK PROMENADE 5 FEATURE TURN ABOUT AT WEST END OF EDWARDS DRIVE AND NORTH END OF MONROE STREET 6 PASSIVE PARK WITH PONDS AND SMALL PERFORMANCE STAGES

East View

Fort Myers Riverfront Development Plan

North View

South View

West View

Development Guidelines - Block P9E

4-25


IMPLEMENTATION PLAN 5


Implementation Plan Summary Implementation Plan: Summary of Purpose and Objective The purpose of this section is to provide detail regarding the uses proposed within the redevelopment including their physical, financial and market feasibility, conceptual programming as well as prospective phasing. Please note below, a statement regarding the physical challenges we face in the implementation of the plan related to the Southwest Florida Water Management District minimum floor elevations. We presume, as discussed on numerous occasions with City staff, that we will be successful in mitigating the impact of this obstacle. Phase 1A, as depicted in the Preliminary Project Schedule and Phasing Plan section, is recommended as the initial public and private development which will provide critical impetus behind the redevelopment district plan and cause the natural succession of the redevelopment plan in full through its final phase. Assuming support for the plan, the final section, Funding Strategy – Sources and Uses, provides a tool to guide the Team in aligning the significant resources necessary for implementation. The opportunities available from public sources conveyed within this section, like those available within the private sector for a well conceived market driven real estate investment, are numerous, but will require significant political advocacy and intergovernmental cooperation to realize. In concert with the newly hired federal lobbyist and local, county and state proponents of economic development, this document, supplemented by economic impact statistics, provides a guide for the funding of the redevelopment plan. Below is an overview of the sub-sections within the Implementation Plan section which follows: Site Plan and Site Plan Programming Each proposed use within the redevelopment plan is identified by an alpha numeric designation (i.e. A1 or P18) referred to as a block number on the site plan provided in 5.2. The site plan provides an aerial perspective of the redevelopment plan and the physical location of each component block in relation to the plan and other component blocks. The proposed programming for each component block is identified in further detail with section 5.3. The programming for a block includes a brief description and details as applicable, like square footage, number of stories, number of parking spaces, number of rooms or units for the built environment including proposed infrastructure. Project and Component Cost Model The Project and Component Cost Model provides preliminary cost estimates for each of the component blocks in accordance with its applicable programming. These estimates are “rough order of magnitude” (ROM), meaning they have been derived from very preliminary architectural and engineering design detail and reasonable assumption based upon our Team’s experience. The estimates include soft costs and contingency. The purpose of this section is to convey the prospective costs of the proposed improvements in order to better understand their financial feasibility and subsequently plan for their implementation. Additionally, the model identifies the critical Phase 1A improvements and their estimated costs separately. Schedule of Regulatory Requirements The Schedule of Regulatory Requirements provides a roadmap for the entitlements required for the adoption of the redevelopment plan at which point the plan will become actionable from an implementation perspective including beginning detailed design work.

Fort Myers Riverfront Development Plan

Preliminary Project Schedule and Phasing The Preliminary Project Schedule and Phasing plan provides an overview of the proposed sequential physical development of the redevelopment plan for each component block. The Plan is intended to guide implementation by suggesting the mix of public improvements needed to support the private improvements. The critical initial public and private development necessary to provide the vitality to the redevelopment district and assure the natural succession of the redevelopment plan in full through its final phase is identified as Phase 1A. Component Blocks Detail The Component Blocks – Detail section provides a block by block narrative of each use or proposed improvement within the redevelopment plan. Provided within each section is the alpha numeric block number, a rendering of the block, an indication of its proposed phase within the overall redevelopment plan, as well as a discussion regarding the physical and financial feasibility of the use and its interdependence with other proposed uses. A summary of the proposed uses of funds (estimate of the costs) for the development of the block and prospective sources of funds to implement development is also provided. Details related to the identified sources can be found beneath the Funding Strategy – Sources and Uses section. v

Physical Feasibility - a note regarding minimum finish floor elevations: The City of Fort Myers Riverfront redevelopment area is located within the Caloosahatchee FEMA flood zone AE. FEMA has established a base flood elevation (BFE) of 7 to 9 ft, NAVD within the project area. The BFE is the peak stage for a 100-year storm event. Per 44 CRF Ch 1 Section 60.3(c)(3), FEMA requires all non-flood proofed non-residential building finished floor elevations be constructed at or above this elevation. FEMA does allow commercial buildings to be built below the BFE, as long as those buildings are flood proofed. However, SFWMD has stated all finished floor elevations (commercial or residential) must be constructed above the BFE. SFWMD would require a variance to construct a building finished floor elevation (other than an accessory structure) below the BFE. SFWMD staff stated that to their knowledge no variances to this requirement have been issued by SFWMD. The Team for this riverfront master plan has indicated the need for retail and service oriented businesses to be connected to the street frontage without the steps, ramps and terraces that would be required with the higher finished floor elevations. It is important to maintain pedestrian connectivity to the proposed uses within the riverfront redevelopment area.

District Branding Plan/Marketing and Management Recommendation The District Branding Plan/Marketing and Management Recommendation section is intended to provide a framework for the ongoing interaction between the stakeholders within the district and to leverage their respective marketing efforts to more effectively reach prospective visitors and businesses that will build Downtown Fort Myer’s economic strength and recognition as a regional destination.

Saeed Kazemi, P.E., Public Works Director has indicated the City of Fort Myers will assist in obtaining a variance from SFWMD, per Chapter 40E-0.113. If successful, the need to elevate the buildings to the extent required by SFWMD could be reduced and provide the pedestrian connectivity being sought by the design team. The proposed building finished floor elevations could remain close to the existing elevations and be flood proofed above the BFE.

Preliminary Project Financial Forecasting Models The Preliminary Project Financial Forecasting Models are provided as a tool for the ongoing assessment of the potential financial feasibility of each block. The models are designed to measure market rates of return for the blocks as presented and for the permutations that are likely to arise as a result of a redevelopment plan which will evolve to adapt to market and financial conditions. The models allow for the adjusting of public and private sources of funds in order to determine an appropriate mix based upon the availability of public and private resources.

A majority of the existing structures within the Downtown redevelopment area do not meet this minimum finished floor elevation required by SFWMD. Incorporating new higher finished floor elevations with the existing lower elevations would require ramps, steps and terraces. The City would like to eliminate the need for these additional design requirements and the development Team strongly recommends this be pursued immediately and with diligence in order reach an understanding of the requirements so we can market the district successfully.

Funding Strategy – Sources and Uses The Funding Strategy – Sources and Uses section is a highly detailed description of the potential pool of funding sources, and critical milestones relating to their procurement, that can be brought to bear upon each component blocks within the redevelopment plan. This section identifies local, state and federal programs and initiatives that, if pursued, can facilitate the appropriate financial architecture to make implementation feasible. The opportunities available from public sources conveyed within this section, like those available within the private sector for a well conceived market driven real estate investment, are numerous, but will require significant political advocacy and intergovernmental cooperation to realize. In concert with the newly hired federal lobbyist and local, county and state proponents of economic development, this document supplemented by economic impact statistics provides a basis for the funding of the redevelopment plan.

IMPLEMENTATION PLAN : SUMMARY

5-1


Development Key Plan

FORT MYERS RIVERFRONT DEVELOPMENT PLAN

5-2

DEVELOPMENT KEY PLAN

August 19, 2009


Site Plan Programming part 1 of 3

Fort Myers Riverfront Development Plan Project Programming by Block Phase

Block

1A

A

Land Acreage

SF

2.5

108,730

A1 1A

B

2.41

104,966

B1 B1 B2 B3 B4 1A

C

1.54

67,202

C1 C2

1B

D D1

D2

Fort Myers Riverfront Development Plan

Use

Footprint (gsf)

Levels

Building (gsf)

Event/Exhibit Center

82,800

1

82,800

Exhibit Hall

82,800

Harborside Expansion

28,485

2

28,485

Lecture Hall (level 1) Lecture Hall (level 2) Event Center Retail Event Center Admin. Event Center Meeting Rms

10,600 2,500 2,160 7,600 5,625

2

13,100

1 (1st floor) 1 (2nd floor) 1 (2nd floor)

2,160 7,600 5,625

Hotel

39,000

12

378,370

5-12 1-4

283,770 94,600

Rooms Tower Parking

2.83

123,297

Mixed Use

42,235

4

333,935

Retail/Residential/Office

42,235

4

143,335

Level 1: Retail/Restaurant Level 2: Residential/Office Level 3: Residential/Office Level 4: Residential/Office

42,235 33,700 33,700 33,700

Parking/Retail/Residential/Office

38,130

Level 1: Garage Level 1: Retail Level 2: Garage Level 3: Garage Level 4: Garage Level 5: Garage Level 6: Office Level 7: Office

32,050 6,060 38,110 38 110 38,110 38,110 38,110 25,000 25,000

Parking Spaces/Rooms/ Res. Units

200-227 rooms 224 spaces

111 res.units

37 units 37 units 37 units 7

190,600

411 spaces

Acquest SITE PLAN PROGRAMMING

5-3


Site Plan Programming part 2 of 3

Fort Myers Riverfront Development Plan Project Programming by Block Phase

Block

3

E

3

F

Land Acreage

SF

0.59

25,673

2.57

112,146

F1

F2

2 1B 1B 1B 1B 3 3

5-4

Acquest SITE PLAN PROGRAMMING

Use

Footprint (gsf)

Levels

Building (gsf)

Mixed Use

12,200

4

43,460

Level 1: Retail/Restaurant Level 2: Residential/Commercial Level 3: Residential/Commercial Level 4: Residential/Commercial

12,200 10,420 10,420 10,420

Mixed Use

38,525

Retail/Residential/Office

13,525

Level 1: Retail/Restaurant Level 2: Residential/Commercial Level 3: Potential Residential/Office Level 4: Potential Residential/Office

13,525 13,525 13,525 13,525

Retail/Residential/Office

25,000

Level 1: Retail/Restaurant Level 2: Residential/Commercial Level 3: Potential Residential/Office Level 4: Potential Residential/Office

25,000 25,000 25,000 25,000

W

3.13

136,557

Waterfront Mixed Use

63,200

W1 W2 W3 W4 W5 W6 W7

0.75 0.34 0.38 0.29 0.25 0.49 0.64

32,654 14,641 16,370 12,810 10,892 21,253 27,937

Future Art of Olympians/Other Private/Park Pavillion Retail/Restaurant Retail/Restaurant Retail/Restaurant Retail/Restaurant Commercial Commercial

16,130 8,000 8,000 5,200 6,300 10,750 8,820

Parking Spaces/Rooms/ Res. Units

tbd tbd tbd 104,100 to 154,100 4

54,100

tbd tbd tbd 2-4

50,000 to 100,000

tbd tbd 1

63,200

August 19, 2009


Site Plan Programming part 3 of 3

Fort Myers Riverfront Development Plan Project Programming by Block Phase

Block

Land Acreage

P

SF

Use

Footprint (gsf)

Levels

Building (gsf)

Parking Spaces/Rooms/ Res. Units

Public Infrastructure Improvements

Waterfront Inlet and Feature 1A 2 1A 1A 1A 2

P1 P2 P3 P4 P5 P19

Seawall Curved Pier Storm Detention Edwards Culvert/Bridge Pier (adjacent to City Pier Bldg.) Docks/Slips

Park Improvements and Amenities 2 2 2 2

P6 P7 P8 P9

Boardwalk Park Pavillion(s), restrooms and stages Boat ramp relocation Park Infrastructure and Landscape

Streetscape 1A 1A 2 3 2 2 2 1A

P10 P11 P12 P13 P14 P15 P16 P18

Monroe - Bay to Edwards Edwards - Monroe to Hendry Edwards - Hendry to Lee Edwards - Lee to Bridge Hendry - Bay to Edwards Hendry - Edwards to City Pier Building Lee - Edwards to Yacht Basin Roundabout - Monroe and Edwards

Marina 3

P17

Marina expansion

Trolley 3

P18

Fort Myers Riverfront Development Plan

Trolley system

Acquest SITE PLAN PROGRAMMING

5-5


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5-7


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All concepts shown, as they relate to Centennial Park, are only design suggestions. Development of the area should be refined by a consultant team and the solution should relate to adjacencies as part of the master plan.

5-8

PROJECT AND COMPONENT COST MODEL

August 19, 2009


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Fort Myers Riverfront Development Plan

  

PROJECT AND COMPONENT COST MODEL

5-9


Project and Component Cost Model part 5 of 18 City of Fort Myers Riverfront Redevelopment Plan Estimating Assumptions General: Please make sure your estimate includes the following (these need not be broken out separately, just accounted for in your overall estimate for each component) -

Construction costs including pile foundations and sitework (i.e. utilities, sidewalks, curbs, hardscape and landscape); General conditions and fee; Design contingency Use today’s construction costs but indicate in a footnote your recommendation for a construction cost escalation (%) assuming a 3rd Q 2010 construction start.

A1: New Exhibit Hall Parking below is eliminated; Demo Heitman St. (Bay to Edwards St.) Demo Edwards Dr., (Monroe to Heitman) Loading/Delivery area on vacated Heitman; 3 well truck loading dock; Exterior – masonry or pre-cast w/stucco; Column free space; Operable partitions; Carpeted floor w/ power grid 25-30’ on center; Open grid ceiling; Acoustical soundboard; Prefunction and concession areas; Prep kitchen and equipment Covered pedestrian crosswalk (across Monroe) B1-B4: -

Expansion and Renovation of Existing Harborside Event Center Renovation of existing space-finishes only (floor covering, paint, VWC, ceiling, lighting); Finish of new meeting rooms should be of same quality as existing; Assume pile foundations under expanded areas

C1-C2: Hotel and Parking Garage Include demo of Dean St. Assume some costs for integrating existing Harborside with new hotel; Assume full service hotel brand (Marriott or Sheraton) Break out cost of garage separately and assume foundations entire building split 50-50 between hotel and garage. Include full kitchen and laundry with equipment; D1-D2: Mixed Use (Smith Block) Include removal/relocation of Hall of 50 States Retail space assumptions – core and shell- plumbing stubbed, no plumbing fixtures, storefront, no ceilings, undistributed HVAC; Residential space assumptions – paint, flooring, appliances, cabinets Office space assumptions – core and shell; exclude TI

W1 – W7: Waterfront Mixed Use WI – assume enclosed, stand alone, single purpose building – art gallery and some small offices. Retail/Restaurant – assume buildings visible from all sides, attractive roof and storefront, core and shell interior; assume masonry or steel construction. W5 – existing City Pier retrofit to retail below and restaurant above W6 & W7 – commercial – assume some sort of marina oriented business (i.e. yacht broker, marina store) P1 – P19: Public Infrastructure Improvements -

-

-

-

-

Basin PI – Seawall extends around curved basin from pedestrian bridge (north end) to Bay St., then from Bay St. along east edge of basin to pedestrian bridge. P3 – Storm detention. Include all costs for dredging and constructing basin; assume earth bottom, 12’ depth. Include cost of hauling off and de-watering. P4 – Include cost of constructing Edwards Dr. over basin from edge to edge and box culvert. Also include in this section cost of pedestrian bridge/weir construction at north end of basin. New Piers/Docks P2 – P5 - include cost of construction of curved pier that extends from pedestrian bridge into river and the cost of the construction of the pier to be added directly to the west of the City Pier building; assume piers are constructed with concrete piers and decking. P19 – include costs of new commercial slips and docks as depicted on plan surrounding new pier and City Pier building. See attached email with attachments for dock and pier revisions and construction details. Centennial Park Improvements P6,P7,P9 – See Centennial Park Improvement Plan (sent to you previously) for detail on improvements. P7 structures are a combination of open air pavilions, open stages, and enclosed restroom/service buildings; include costs for demolition of existing park improvements and all hardscape, detention pond and landscaping. P8 – include cost of demolishing existing boat ramp and relocating it to western edge of park; include cost of surface parking for boaters in this component. See attached email for latest revisions to boardwalk and elimination of filled area at river Streetscape P10 – P18 – Please estimate the cost of each street segment: include traffic circle at end of Edwards in estimate for P11; streetscape estimate should assume same design and materials as utilized in City’s newly constructed First St. (brick pavers). Note that Edwards Dr. is intended to be wider than typical city streets downtown as it is anticipated to be utilized as an Esplanade for outdoor events (art festivals, etc). Include demolition, surveying, maintenance of traffic for roadways & public access allowance, and allowance for unchartered underground piping and for adjacent site restoration; include landscaping (note Edwards is intended to be lined with palm trees its entire length), irrigation and any hardscape depicted. exclude any ROW utilities with the exception of an allowance for some storm sewer modification; exclude cost of sidewalks and curbs (these should be included in each building component estimate as part of sitework); Exclude signalization, and site furnishings, signage, pavement markings.

Marina Expansion & Trolley – Exclude from estimate

5-10

PROJECT AND COMPONENT COST MODEL

August 19, 2009


Project and Component Cost Model part 6 of 18

OAK Estimates Fort Myers Riverfront Development Plan Estimated Costs Phase

Block

1A

A

Land Use/Zoning

Acres

Land Area (SF)

2.71

118,050

A1 1A

B

2.42

105,415

F.A.R

Max. Bldg. (SF) Use

Footprint (gsf)

Levels

Building (gsf)

Event/Exhibit Center

82,800

1

82,800

$

Exhibit Hall

82,800

Harborside Expansion

28,485

2

28,485

$

Lecture Hall (level 1) Lecture Hall (level 2) Event Center Retail Event Center Admin. Event Center Meeting Rms

10,600 2 500 2,500 2,160 7,600 5,625

2

13,100

1 (1st floor) 1 (2nd floor) 1 (2nd floor)

2,160 7,600 5,625

Hotel

39,000

12

378,370

Parking Spaces

Total Const Cost

Assumptions:

23,601,401 Exhibit hall itself is based on $275/s.f including pile foundations.

5,302,988 Piling for new bldgs. Included; sitework included. Remodel of existing harborside included.

B1 B1 B2 B3 B4 1A

C

2.56

111,515

C1 C2

1B

D

Rooms Tower Parking

2.79

D1

D2

Fort Myers Riverfront Development Plan

121,530

$145/s.f. excl piles $135/s f $135/s.f.

5-12 1-4

$125/s.f. excl. piles; shell only. $145/s.f. $130/s.f.

252

Pile foundation and sitework are split 50/50 between hotel & parking

200-227 252

$ $ $

51,527,700 Hotel/room/retail themselves = 286,270 s.f.= $173.30/s.f. exl site/piles 5,995,000 Parking itself = 94,600 s.f. = $43.92/s.f. excl site & piles 57,522,700 Grand Total

$

35,675,190 Includes retail terrace & relocation of Hall of 50 States.

Mixed Use

42,270

4

385,180

522

Retail/Residential/Office

45,500

4

169,080

111

Level 1: Retail/Restaurant Level 2: Residential Level 3: Residential Level 4: Residential

45,000 33 700 33,700 33,700 33,700

Parking/Retail/Office

38,130

Level 1: Garage Level 1: Retail Level 2: Garage Level 3: Garage Level 4: Garage Level 5: Garage Level 6: Office Level 7: Office

32,070 6,060 38,130 38,130 38,130 38,130 12,725 12,725

37 37 37 7

216,100

411

PROJECT AND COMPONENT COST MODEL

5-11


Project and Component Cost Model part 7 of 18

Fort Myers Riverfront Development Plan Estimated Costs Acres

Land Area (SF)

0.59

25,700

Building (gsf)

Mixed Use

12,200

4

43,460

Level 1: Retail/Restaurant Level 2: Residential Level 3: Residential Level 4: Residential

12,200 10,420 10,420 10,420

Mixed Use

25 000 25,000

104 100 104,100

Retail/Residential/Office

13,525

37

Level 1: Retail Level 2: Residential Level 3: Residential Level 4: Residential

13,525 13,525 13,525 13,525

Civic

25,000

Level 1: Public Level 2: Public

25,000 25,000

2

W1-W7

Waterfront Mixed Use

51,760

1

W1 W2 W3 W4 W5 W6 W7

Future Art of Olympians/Park Pavillion Retail/Restaurant Retail/Restaurant Retail/Restaurant Retail/Restaurant Commercial Commercial

16,130 8,000 6,300 5,200 5,380 10,750 8,020

P1-P19

Public Infrastructure Improvements

3

E

F

2 57 2.57

F1

F2

2 1B 2 1B 1B 3 3

Max. Bldg. (SF) Use

Levels

Block

3

Land Use/Zoning

Footprint (gsf)

Phase

112 070 112,070

F.A.R

Parking Spaces

Total Const Cost $

Assumptions:

6,723,765 Includes pile foundations, sitework & demo of existing bldgs. $120/s.f. excluding piles, sitework and demolition. $130/s/f. excluding piles, sitework and demolition. $130/s/f. excluding piles, sitework and demolition. $130/s/f. excluding piles, sitework and demolition.

$

16 594 700 16,594,700

4

$150/s.f. excl piles and sitework; shell space only. $130/s.f. excl piles and sitework $130/s.f. excl piles and sitework $130/s.f. excl piles and sitework

107 $150/s.f. excl piles and sitework. $150/s.f. excl piles and sitework.

66,370

$

11,950,050 $190/s.f. excl sitework. $180/s.f. excl sitework. $180/s.f. excl sitework. $180/s.f. excl sitework.

22 18

Two levels - 5,380 s.f. x2 = 10,760 s.f. total; $200/s/f. @10,760 s.f. $155/s.f. excl sitework $155/s.f. excl sitework

Waterfront Inlet and Feature

5-12

1A 1A 1A

P1 P3 P4

Seawall Storm Detention Edwards Culvert/Bridge

$ $ $

1A 1A 1A

P2 P5 P19

Curved Pier Pier (adjacent to City Pier Bldg.) Docks/Slips

$ $ $

PROJECT AND COMPONENT COST MODEL

288,900 480,000 100,000

3,810,625 21,775 s.f. x $175/s.f. 3,150,000 18,000 s.f. x $175/s.f. 2,280,720 15,205 s.f. x $150/s.f.

August 19, 2009


Project and Component Cost Model part 8 of 18

Fort Myers Riverfront Development Plan Estimated Costs Phase

Block

Land Use/Zoning

Acres

Land Area (SF)

F.A.R

Max. Bldg. (SF) Use

Footprint (gsf)

Levels

Building (gsf)

Parking Spaces

Total Const Cost

Assumptions:

Park Improvements and Amenities 2 2 1A 2

P6 P7 P8 P9

Boardwalk Park Pavillion (s), restrooms and stages Boat ramp relocation Park Infrastructure, hardscape and landscape

$ $ $ $

Monroe - Bay to Edwards Edwards - Monroe to Hendry Edwards - Hendry to Lee Edwards - Lee to Bridge Hendry - Bay to Edwards Hendry - Edwards to City Pier Building Lee - Edwards to Yacht Basin

$ $ $ $ $ $ $

1,176,000 16,800 s.f. x $70/s.f. 1,311,610 187,000 1,711,994

Streetscape 1A 1A 1A 2 2

P10 P11 P12 P13 P14 P15 P16

314,000 Based on $785/l.f. (typical) 557,350 549,500 549,500 251,200 227,650 204,100

Marina 2

P17

Marina expansion

Trolley 1B

P18

Trolley system

All concepts shown, as they relate to Centennial Park, are only design suggestions. Development of the area should be refined by a consultant team and the solution should relate to adjacencies as part of the master plan.

Fort Myers Riverfront Development Plan

PROJECT AND COMPONENT COST MODEL

5-13


Project and Component Cost Model part 9 of 18

Dear Ms. Cleland: Thank you for the opportunity to provide the attached Conceptual Construction Budget Update for the Fort Myers Riverfront Redevelopment. We appreciate the opportunity to participate in this most exciting project for the City of Fort Myers. We reviewed the site plan dated July 9,2009 along with the related Information included with your email dated July 13th• We discussed the conceptual designs and architectural character and Intent of this project with Mr. Bill Mudgett of Parker Mudgett Smith Architects on July 14th and generally agreed the scope for this update. We updated all of the Marine & Site Elements based on the JJR revised Site Plan dated July 10th, along with the memo and other related Info from JJR. Recognizing the most significant revisions to the concept design since our initial submission in early June are related to various scope revisions to the site and marine work, we secured budget pricing Information from Kelly Brothers, who we have worked with In the past and who have undertaken most of this type of work in the Ft. Myers area in the past. We have also based our Conceptual Construction Budget Update on the Downtown Fort Myers Preliminary Development Yields chart (program of building areas) provided with your email and as modified in the attached file and the conceptual plans of the Convention Hotel component dated May 22, 2009 that were provided previously. We also based our costing on the current market conditions and pricing levels In the summer of 2009, as you are no doubt aware, the local construction market had experienced significant de-escalation over the last few years reflecting the current state of the national, regional and local economies. It is difficult to predict when the local construction market will recover given all of the variables, we currently anticipate a somewhat slow recovery subject to the economy and the eventual recovery of the local real estate market upon which the local construction Industry is so dependant. We understand that you anticipate commencing some of the construction in 2010. We would suggest that an escalation contingency be considered to protect the Fort Myers Riverfront Redevelopment budget albeit this contingency should be somewhat modest at least thru the next three years thru 2012, we would recommend a 10% escalation contingency be carried at this time for any work not commencing over the next couple of years, note this escalation contingency Is not reflected In the attached or below. We developed our Conceptual Construction Budget using both our historical and current pricing database and reflected a range of pricing to address the very preliminary conceptual nature of the concept design at this time and also Included a design and construction contingency of 5% as attached and as follows: Building Components Range· $138,000,000 to $152,000,000 Site & Marine Work Components Range -$28,000,000 to $35,000,000 Design & Construction Contingency Range -$8,000,000 to $9,500,000 (5%) Total Conceptual Construction Budget Range· $174,000,000 to $196,500,000

Kraft Construction has also worked with the City of Fort Myers and we are under construction currently on the Downtown Streetscape project which will upon completion redevelop some 55 blocks of downtown Fort Myers, including milling, repaving the asphalt roads, extensive redeveloped underground utilities, brick pavers and sidewalks, street lighting and signalization and landscaping/irrigation; that experience will certainly pertain to the Fort Myers Riverfront Redevelopment project. Kraft Construction also has significant prior experience with all of the various components planned In your program, e.g., we completed the High Point Place residential development in downtown Fort Myers In 2007. Kraft has also played a significant role in the redevelopment of both downtown Naples and Sarasota given dozens of Commercial, Retail, Hotel and Residential buildings both along 5th Avenue (downtown) Naples and in Sarasota over the last 10 years. We would be very Interested In partnering with Acquest and your selected design team as your Construction Manager, we believe we have all of the necessary experience and credentials and the financial strength to undertake a development of this magnitude. We would be very happy to meet with you and your team at your convenience to present the attached Conceptual Construction Budget, brief your team on the various assumptions and the basis upon which we provided the attached cost Information. Thank you again for this opportunity, please do not hesitate to call If you require any clarification or have any questions.

Yours Sincerely,

Travis A. Coulter Senior Vice President Chief Preconstruction Officer Kraft Construction Co. Inc. CC: Bill Mudgett, Parker Mudgett Smith Architects Bob Koenig, Kraft Construction

As you may be aware, Kraft Construction Is currently working with your designers Including Parker Mudgett Smith Architects and Populous with Kraft having been selected by Lee County to act as the Construction Manager for the new Boston Red Sox Spring Training Facility, the project team has commenced preconstruction services with the anticipated start of construction over the next year. Kraftsmanship We build more than buildings. We build partnerships.

5-14

PROJECT AND COMPONENT COST MODEL

August 19, 2009


Project and Component Cost Model part 10 of 18

All concepts shown, as they relate to Centennial Park, are only design suggestions. Development of the area should be refined by a consultant team and the solution should relate to adjacencies as part of the master plan.

Fort Myers Riverfront Development Plan

PROJECT AND COMPONENT COST MODEL

5-15


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Fort Myers Riverfront Development Plan

All concepts shown, as they relate to Centennial Park, are only design suggestions. Development of the area should be refined by a consultant team and the solution should relate to adjacencies as part of the master plan.



PROJECT AND COMPONENT COST MODEL

5-17


Project and Component Cost Model part 13 of 18 Level 7

Ft Myers Hotel Program Summary - Option C2

Date:

Hotel

5/22/2009

Future Expansion

17,000

Guest/Modules

36

14,246

Circulation

14,000 28

12,299

2,754

1,701

Building Gross 35% Dept Gross 15% Net Area

Description

Gross Area

Ground Floor

Subtotal

Gross Area

35,700

Lobby/Circulation

5,750

6,613

Front Office

3,276

3,767

Subtotal 9,000

Level 8

17,000

Guest/Modules

36

14,246

Circulation

36

Service & Engineering

6,566

7,551

Main Kitchen Storage & Food Handling

5,904

6,790

All Purpose Restaurant

5,406

6,217

CafĂŠ

2,878

3,310

Other

Level 2 Administration

1,163

1,337

4,007

4,608

36

1,701

14,246

Circulation

14,000 28

12,299

2,754

Level 11

1,701

17,000

Guest/Modules

19,900

12,299

17,000

Guest/Modules

1,453

14,000 28

2,754

Level 10

9,000

1,701

14,246

Circulation

Baggage/Valet Services

12,299

17,000

Guest/Modules

Offices & Front Desk

28

2,754

Level 9

Guest Services

14,000

36

14,246

Circulation

14,000 28

12,299

2,754

1,701

Business Center Housekeeping & Laundry Engineering & Service

4,933

5,673

Employees Facilities

4,066

4,676

Other

Total Modules

252

196

Total Keys

227

176

Total Area

191,800

121,000

3,606

Level 3

8,500

Administration/Bookkeeping

3,137

3,608

Engineering & Service

4,366

5,021

Other

(129)

FT Myers Hotel Program Summary - Option C2

Date:

Parking

Future

Description Level 4

8,700

Pool Support

2,323

14,000

Spaces

Net Area

Ground Floor

2,672

Gross Area

24,000

Ramp

Towels

Spaces

27,800

Service Parking (on grade)

Lockers

Gross Area

5/22/2009

3,800

Offices

Second Floor

Grille

2,047

2,354

Fitness

1,859

2,138

1,150

Other

1,536

4,012

Pool Deck

6,500

7,688

Parking

68

20,500

46

14,000

87

25,800

46

14,000

68

20,500

46

14,000

Children's Area Children's Area

0

Third Floor Parking

Level 5 Guest/Modules Concierge

17,000 32

12,788

4

1,458

Circulation

Circulation

28

12,299

Fourth Floor

2,754

Level 6 Guest/Modules

14,000

1,701 17,000

36

14,246 2,754

Parking

14,000 28

12,299 1,701

Total Spaces Total Area

5-18

PROJECT AND COMPONENT COST MODEL

224

139 94,600

42,000

August 19, 2009


Project and Component Cost Model part 14 of 18

Joan, the breakdown for the D2 Bldg is as follows: • Retail 6,060 sf @ $95/sfto $105/sf Low Range $576,000; Mid Range $606,000; High Range $636,000 • Parking Garage 184,590 sf 522 spaces @ $52/sf to $57/sf Low Range $9,640,000; Mid Range $10,081,000; High Range $10,521,000 • Office/Commercial 25,450 sf @ $142/sfto $156/sf Low Range $3,614,000; Mid Range $3,792,000; High Range $3,970,000 • Total D2 Bldg 216,100 sf @ $64/sfto $70/sf Low Range $13,830,000; Mid Range $14,479,000; High Range $15,127,000 The split between D1 & D2 in the Development Yield Spreadsheet is D1 $20,162,000 & D2 $14,479,000; we used the Mid Range numbers per the Conceptual Construction Budget breakdown we provided in the Development Yield Spreadsheet. These numbers exclude the associated 5% Design & Construction Contingency. Please note there can be a wide variance on pricing parking garages particularly if the proposed bldg includes mixed use elements such as Retail/Commercial or Residential Use, the level of architectural detail on the perimeter elevations and also dependant on the efficiency of the garage design, layout, ramps, etc. Surprisingly, we have seen price ranges considerably larger than the Low to High Range I expressed above on other garage structures we have priced and built previously. Trust this is sufficient, please let me know if you have any other questions. Regards, Travis From: Joan Cleland [mailto:JCleland@acquestrealty.com] Sent: Monday, July 27, 2009 9:42 AM To: Travis Coulter Subject: Ft. Myers Riverftont Development Plan -estimate Travis: I need a little bit more information on the D block. You’ve estimated the entire Mixed Use block with parking in one number (D1 & D2). I need to see the break out of the parking garage costs (D2) that you included. Can you provide me with that today? Thanks, Joan

Fort Myers Riverfront Development Plan

Joan, the breakdown between the Hotel & associated Parking Garage is as follows: • Parking Garage 94,600 sf 224 spaces @ $57/sf to $63/sf Low Range $5,392,200; Mid Range $5,676,000; High Range $5,959,800 • Hotel (Front/Back of House & Guestrooms) 191,800 sf 227 keys, 252 modules @ $208/sf to $229/sf Low Range $39,858,800; Mid Range $41,867,000; High Range $43,874,200 Note, this breakout based on the conceptual $/sf would include the associated foundation costs of each functional facility; if for budget purposes the foundation costs are to be split 50/50 between the Parking Garage & Hotel, I would suggest another approx. $200,000 be shifted from the Hotel to the Garage as follows: • Parking Garage say Mid Range $5,876,000 • Hotel say Mid Range $41,667,000 These numbers exclude the associated 5% Design & Construction Contingency. Trust this is sufficient, please let me know if you have any other questions. Regards, Travis From: Joan Cleland [mailto:JCleland@acquestrealty.com] Sent: Friday, July 24, 2009 11:54 AM To: Travis Coulter Cc: Karen Shamaly Subject: Hotel Parking garage Travis: I have one question on the estimate that you submitted. Can you break out the cost of the hotel parking garage, (C2), separate from the hotel? As mentioned in the Estimating Assumptions document I sent you, we need you to divide the foundation costs between the hotel and parking garage 50-50. Please cc Karen Shamaly with your response since she is preparing our cost schedules. Thanks for your help. Joan Cleland

PROJECT AND COMPONENT COST MODEL

5-19


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PROJECT AND COMPONENT COST MODEL

August 19, 2009


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August 19, 2009


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Fort Myers Riverfront Development Plan

5-23


Schedule of Regulatory Requirements part 1 of 4

5-24

Acquest SCHEDULE OF REGULATORY REQUIREMENTS

August 19, 2009


Schedule of Regulatory Requirements part 2 of 4

August, 2010

Fort Myers Riverfront Development Plan

Acquest SCHEDULE OF REGULATORY REQUIREMENTS

5-25


Schedule of Regulatory Requirements part 3 of 4 Downtown Fort Myers Riverfront Master Plan - Development Approval Processes Schedule of Regulatory Requirements and Timetable for Adoption AUGUST, 2009

NOTE: This development approval process assumes that certain requirements will be removed during the amendment to the Comprehensive Plan and Land Development Code (e.g. Parking Structure Overlay; Civic Uses being a mandatory Planned Unit Development [PUD]). If certain anticipated changes are not completed, then alternate or other development approval process may be needed.

CC

29-Jun-09

SEPTEMBER, 2009

ACQUEST

HPC/PLN BD

SPEC CC

SUBMITTAL

Special

Workshop

19-Aug

27-Aug

31-Aug

OCTOBER, 2009

CC

DT POA

CRA ADV

CRA

HPC

PLN BD

7-Sep

10-Sep

10-Sep

23-Sep

24-Sep

7-Oct

CRA

ADV

19-Oct

26-Oct

Special 19-Oct

NOVEMBER, 2009

CC

CC

CC

2-Nov

16-Nov

2009 DEC

2010 JAN

FEB MAR

APR

MAY JUN JUL AUG SEP OCT

to run

COMMUNITY REDEVELOPMENT AGENCY ACTION ITEMS

1 Master Plan Adoption - Amendment to Redevelopment Plan - NOVEMBER 2, 2009 FINAL ADOPTION 2 Fort Myers Riverfront Master Plan Interim Review (invite Planning Board, Historic Preservation Commission, CRA Advisory Board) 3 Fort Myers Riverfront Master Plan Publication and submittal by Acquest, Populous, Boorne CRA Staff to circulate plan to Council, CRA, CRA Advisory Board, Historic Preservation Commission, and Planning Board by 4 memorandum 5 Regular Historic Preservation Commission and Special Planning Board Meeting 6 Staff to Incorporate Riverfront Master Plan into Downtown Redevelopment Plan and produce final redevelopment plan document City Council Conceptual Approval BY RESOLUTION of Riverfront Master Plan by Populous (invite Planning Board/Historic 7 Preservation Commission/Board of Adjustments/Downtown Advisory Council) Advisory Review (not statutory) of Riverfront Master Plan incorporation into Downtown Redevelopment Plan by Downtown Property 8 Owners Association Advisory Review (not statutory) of Riverfront Master Plan incorporation into Downtown Redevelopment Plan by Fort Myers 9 Redevelopment Advisory Board

16 days to incorporate plan and produce amendment

10 Advisory Review (not statutory) of Riverfront Master Plan by Community Redevelopment Agency Board Advisory Review (not statutory review of Riverfront Master Plan incorporation into Downtown Redevelopment Plan by Historic 11 Preservation Commission 12 Review of Riverfront Master Plan incorporation into Downtown Redevelopment Plan by Planning Board 13 Sixty (60) day response time for Planning Board to send written comments (endorsement) to City Council (only time for 16 days) Statory Review of Riverfront Master Plan incorporation into Downtown Redevelopment Plan by Community Redevelopment Agency 14 Board and send to City Council for review

Approx - 12 days to publish written endorsement

15 Permission to advertise Downtown Redevelopment Plan amendment - City Council 16 Advertisement to run in FM News Press 17 One Required Public Hearing of Downtown Redevelopment Plan amendment - City Council 18 19 Master Development Agreement - Acquest Realty Advisors Inc. 20 Preparation of Development Agreement 21 City staff and Developer negotiate Master Development Agreement (anticipated to include phases of development) 22 Planning Board review (optional) 23 Permission to Advertise Master Development Agreement 24 1st Public Hearing - Master Development Agreement 25 2nd Public Hearing - Master Development Agreement 26 NOTE: Contingent on Comprehensive Plan Amendment and Land Development Code Amendments 27 Phase 1 Development Agreement - Acquest Realty Advisors Inc. 28 Preparation of Development Agreement - Phase 1 29 City staff and Developer negotiate Phase 1 Development Agreement (anticipated to include phases of development) 30 Planning Board review (optional?) 31 Permission to Advertise Phase 1 - Development Agreement 32 1st Public Hearing - Phase I - Development Agreement 33 2nd Public Hearing - Phase I - Development Agreement

5-26

Acquest SCHEDULE OF REGULATORY REQUIREMENTS

August 19, 2009


Schedule of Regulatory Requirements part 4 of 4 NOTE: This development approval process assumes that certain requirements will be removed during the amendment to the Comprehensive Plan and Land Development Code (e.g. Parking Structure Overlay; Civic Uses being a mandatory Planned Unit Development [PUD]). If certain anticipated changes are not completed, then alternate or other development approval process may be needed.

CC

29-Jun-09

35

ACQUEST

HPC/PLN BD

SPEC CC

SUBMITTAL

Special

Workshop

19-Aug

27-Aug

31-Aug

CC

DT POA

CRA ADV

CRA

HPC

PLN BD

7-Sep

10-Sep

10-Sep

23-Sep

24-Sep

7-Oct

CRA

CC

ADV

19-Oct

26-Oct

Special 19-Oct

CC

CC

2-Nov

16-Nov

DEC

JAN

FEB MAR

APR

MAY JUN JUL AUG SEP OCT

to run

COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT DEPARTMENT ACTION ITEMS

36 Land Disposition in a Community Redevelopment Area 37 City of Fort Myers advertises land disposition within a Community Redevelopment Area 38 Developer submits for purchase 39 Permission to advertise land disposition 40 Public Hearing on Land Disposition 41 42 Master Plan Adoption/Amended Redevelopment Plan into Comprehensive Plan (Map and Text) 43 Preparation of Comprehensive Plan Map and Text Amendments needed for plan adoption into Comprehensive Plan 44 Submit analysis of Comprehensive Plan Text and Map amendments needed to accommodate Master Plan 45 Staff review of changes needed to Comprehensive Plan City of Fort Myers to amend Comprehensive Plan Future Land Use Element Text to incorporate newly adopted plan and any 46 necessary development density/intensity 47 Draft Text Amendment in underline strikethrough of Text amendment with New Redevelopment Plan date 48 City of Fort Myers Planning Board to review and recommend transmittal of Comprehensive Plan Text Amendment 49 Permission to advertise Comprehensive Plan Text Amendment transmittal to DCA 50 Public Hearing Comprehensive Plan Text Amendment transmittal to DCA 51 Transmit to DCA 52 Department of Community Affairs Objections Recommendations and Comments (ORC) Report Period (publication) 53 Permission to advertise Comprehensive Plan Text Amendment ADOPTION for DCA 54 1st Public Hearing Comprehensive Plan Text Amendment ADOPTION for DCA 55 2nd Public Hearing Comprehensive Plan Text Amendment ADOPTION for DCA 56 57 Land Development Code/Zoning Map Amendment 58 Preparation of Land Development Code (Smart Code) amendments needed for adoption into Code 59 Submit analysis of Land Development Code amendments needed to accommodate Master Plan 60 Staff review of changes needed to Smart Code City of Fort Myers to amend Land Development Code to incorporate newly adopted plan (and any necessary development maximums 61 needed) Draft Land Development Code Text Amendment in underline strikethrough of Text amendment with New Redevelopment Plan 62 development parameters 63 City of Fort Myers Planning Board to review and recommend approval to Land Development Code Amendments 64 Permission to advertise Land Development Code/Zoning Map Amendments 65 Public Hearings to adopt Land Development Code/Zoning Map amendments 66 67 Certificate of Review from Historic Preservation Commission for Downtown Master Plan 68 Preparation of Certificate of Review Application/Plan for submittal 69 Staff review of plan 70 Revision (if needed) of Certificate of Review Application/Plans 71 Staff Report of Certificate of Review 72 Historic Preservation Commission (HPC) Public Hearing

Fort Myers Riverfront Development Plan

Acquest SCHEDULE OF REGULATORY REQUIREMENTS

5-27


Preliminary Project Schedule and Phasing Part 1 of 6

Development Implementation Schedule: Phase 1A (Applies to all projects within Phase 1A that require zoning amendments. Individual public infrastructure components of Phase 1A can be commenced immediately and should have an earlier delivery schedule subject to funding availability) Pre-Development Activities: (12 months) - Conduct physical feasibility testing (soil, environmental, engineering, traffic studies); - Secure hotel franchise commitment; - Qualify and competitively select project team (A&E, CM, hotel operator); - Conduct cost feasibility (design development to reflect franchise requirements; pre-construction estimating) - Complete zoning/land use feasibility (Comp Plan and Land Use Plan amendments, SFWMD floodzone variance); - Create overall project Cost Summary and Master Schedule; - Negotiate terms of all land acquisition and land lease agreements; - Negotiate terms of all project agreements (management, construction, A&E, franchise) - Negotiate terms of Development Agreement - Negotiate and structure terms of City and County contributions - Financial feasibility- acquire funding commitments from all public and private funding/financing sources - Finalize all project agreements and close on all required financing/funding Pre-Construction Activities: ( 12 to 18 months) - Design Phase 6-9 mos. - Permitting Phase 6-9 mos. Site Improvements and Building Construction:

5-28

PRELIMINARY PROJECT SCHEDULE AND PHASING

(24 months)

August 19, 2009


Preliminary Project Schedule and Phasing Part 2 of 6

Phasing 1A Phase 1A consists of (from west to east) Harborside Expansion, Edwards Drive, basin and pier, new hotel, and Hendry Street improvements.

Fort Myers Riverfront Development Plan

PRELIMINARY PROJECT SCHEDULE AND PHASING

5-29


Preliminary Project Schedule and Phasing Part 3 of 6

Phasing 1B Phase 1B development includes (from west to east) new restaurants at pier and basin, and Block D mixed-use development and parking.

5-30

PRELIMINARY PROJECT SCHEDULE AND PHASING

August 19, 2009


Preliminary Project Schedule and Phasing Part 4 of 6 All concepts shown, as they relate to Centennial Park, are only design suggestions. Development of the area should be refined by a consultant team and the solution should relate to adjacencies as part of the master plan.

Phasing 2 Phase 2 developments include (from west to east) Centennial Park, City Pier, and east portion of Edwards Drive.

Fort Myers Riverfront Development Plan

PRELIMINARY PROJECT SCHEDULE AND PHASING

5-31


Preliminary Project Schedule and Phasing Part 5 of 6

Phasing 3 Phase 3 development includes (from west to east) Block E and Block F mixed use developments, Yacht Basin expansion, and new marina buildings.

5-32

PRELIMINARY PROJECT SCHEDULE AND PHASING

August 19, 2009


Preliminary Project Schedule and Phasing Part 6 of 6

Combined Phasing Phase 1A

Fort Myers Riverfront Development Plan

Phase 1B

Phase 2

Phase 3

PRELIMINARY PROJECT SCHEDULE AND PHASING

5-33


Component Block A1 and B1-B4 Part 1 of 6 Block Number (s):

A1 and B1-B4

Phase:

1A

Project Description:

The estimated economic impact, also developed within the aforementioned KPMG study, brought forth the following highlights which we believe remain reasonable:

A1 The Harborside expansion includes an approximately 80,000 SF event and exhibit center (new construction) on a single level. The expansion will be connected to the existing Harborside Event Center via a covered pedestrian crosswalk that will traverse Monroe St.

1. 2. 3. 4.

350,000 attendee days $58 - 67 million in direct/indirect spending 800 direct/indirect jobs are supportable based upon this spending Over $2 million in hotel, sales and use taxes generated for State and County

Sources and Uses: B1- B4 The Harborside renovation includes upgrades to the existing interior finishes, conversion of existing space into divisible ballroom space, the addition of a 2 story lecture hall, several new meeting rooms, administrative space and limited retail space. As part of the renovation, Harborside and the new full service hotel will be fully integrated on the east side of the existing Harborside Event Center building, to provide for seamless operation and access between the hotel and the Event Center. Acquisition Plan: To facilitate the Harborside expansion (A1), the City will need to control the post office site through fee simple ownership or a long term lease (this cost is not reflected below). Both options as well as others should be scrutinized while taking into consideration the priorities and financial needs of each component of the plan.

Block

Estimated Costs/Uses*

A1

$28.7 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; $35.1 million

B1-B4

$6.6 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; $8.1 million

Potential Sources (both blocks) Tourist Development Tax State Sales Tax TIF (Super TIF) Discretionary County Sales Tax FMRA Ad Valorem TIF Federal Grants/Appropriations Corporate Naming Federal EB-5 Program (debt) BAB and RZED Bonds (debt)

Assuming the uses are partially funded through bonded indebtedness (30 year amortization at 6.5% with 1.2x DSC), the revenue stream necessary to support them is between $3,000,000 and $ 4,000,000 per year.

Feasibility and Economic Impact: The feasibility of blocks A1 and B1-B4 are well documented in the KPMG study dated December of 2006. As designed, the new Harborside will be well positioned to capture its fair share of regional and national business. The success of the new Harborside is dependent upon the development of a full service nationally branded headquarter hotel, the ongoing revitalization of the downtown and the addition of supporting entertainment, retail and dining destinations.

5-34

COMPONENT BLOCK A1 AND B1-B4

August 19, 2009


Component Block E1 and F1-F2 part 2 of 6 Block Number (s):

C1 and C2

Phase:

1A KPMG study for the combined hotel and Harborside improvements, forecasted the following highlights which we believe remain reasonable:

Project Description: C1 A full service nationally branded hotel with 200-227 rooms and the following amenities: 3 meal restaurant Café Lobby lounge Gift shop

Fitness center Outdoor pool & whirlpool Business center Guest laundry

C2

1. 2. 3. 4.

350,000 attendee days $58 - 67 million in direct/indirect spending 800 direct/indirect jobs are supportable based upon this spending Over $2 million in hotel, sales and use taxes generated for State and County

Notwithstanding the positive results forecasted within the KPMG and HVS studies, the costs of the hotel as designed exceed its economic market value as estimated through an analysis of future cash flows. As a result, in addition to providing parking, favorable land terms, and the sharing of public spaces within Harborside, additional tools, which are enumerated beneath the sources and uses header below for C1, will be utilized to create the returns necessary to attract private capital for development.

A 224 space, 4 level, public parking deck to service the hotel and Harborside. Sources and Uses: Acquisition Plan: W6 F W1 W2 P9E

W4 C

E D

B A P9W

Fort Myers Riverfront Development Plan

To facilitate the development of the hotel, we recommend the City negotiate an economically reasonable long term lease for air rights above the parking with the hotel owner, suitable to facilitate financing for the hotel. We do not believe, given the initial economics of the hotel, that this will be a significant source of cash for the City. We do, however, expect that the hotel and/or its guests will pay market based parking fees for the public parking structure integral to the hotel.

Block

Estimated Costs/Uses*

Potential Sources

C1

$36 – $44.9 million

Private equity and traditional debt Federal New Market Tax Credits State New Market Tax Credits FMRA Ad Valorem TIF Enterprise Zone tax credits Brownfield tax credits Impact Fee Waivers Federal EB-5 Program (debt) HUD Section 108 Loans (debt)

C2

$5.92 – $7.24 million

FMRA Ad Valorem TIF Federal Grants/Appropriations BAB and RZED Bonds (debt)

Feasibility and Economic Impact: The feasibility of the hotel and parking were examined by HVS and the study has been provided under separate cover. As designed, the new hotel will be well positioned to capture its fair share of regional and national group business. The success of the new hotel is dependent upon the renovation and expansion of Harborside and other public improvements including the streetscape along Edwards, Monroe and Hendry and the construction of the storm detention inlet and related improvements which are anticipated to create additional entertainment destinations with close proximity. We have had preliminary discussions with several national hotel brands who have expressed significant interest in the project given its unique position in the market. The estimated economic impact, developed within the previously mentioned

*Assuming the parking deck (C2) is partially funded through bonded indebtedness (30 year amortization at 6.5% with 1.2x DSC), the revenue stream necessary to support it is between $ 500,000 and $ 700,000 per year.

COMPONENT BLOCK C1 AND C2

5-35


Component Block D1 and D2 Part 3 of 6 Block Number (s):

D1 and D2

Phase:

1B

Project Description: The Block D program forms the basis of a principal retail destination in downtown Fort Myers. The program was specifically designed to maximize waterfront viewing and interaction among all of the leasable areas to maximize demand in the marketplace. D1 The current plan includes a mixed use building totaling 143,335 sq. ft. which consists of 42,235 sq. ft. of ground level retail and restaurant space with three levels of residential/office above at 33,700 sq. ft. each. D2 The D2 block represents a 411 car structured parking facility on levels 1-5 with a 6,000 sq. ft retail location on the ground floor and an additional 50,000 sq. ft. of potential office space on two 25,000 sq. ft. levels at 6 and 7. Acquisition Plan: The 2.83 acres that make up the D Block is privately owned by the Smith family and will need to be controlled by the City and/or Developer in order to implement the proposed program. This cost is not included in current cost estimates. Land control may take multiple forms including an outright land purchase to develop the commercial uses and the garage or some form of joint venture or development agreement which would allow the land owner to participate and/or maintain some form of ownership as the project is developed. These options will be assessed as the development is further refined and the owners continue to assess the opportunity.

The development team recognizes the fluidity of the market and is evaluating several development alternatives in response to market conditions. These alternatives include considering the benefits and challenges of creating a largely residential component above the first floor retail/restaurant platform versus developing a more marketable office oriented product. The development team is considering options which may include little or no residential, but include more efficient office above a reconfigured parking structure. Given the project’s location within the FEMA flood zone, the finished floor heights will need to be raised 7-9 feet above the base flood elevation in order to meet SFWMD requirements. This level could be as high as 5 feet above the existing grade which will have a significant negative impact on the pedestrian access and connection to the surrounding streets, public spaces and existing historic, commercial district. The City and project team are working together to obtain a variance which will lower the requirement for this finished floor height, making the buildings more attractive to potential tenants and decreasing costs associated with meeting these conditions. It is important to note that in considering development alternatives within this block, the overall development square footage yields, parking amounts (400-500 spaces), and height characteristics (seven levels) are comparable in all of these various cases. The product mix and subsequent design will be finalized based on market demand response and pre-leasing activity. Sources and Uses: Block

Estimated Costs/Uses*

Potential Sources

D1

$25.1 – $30.7 million**

Private equity and traditional debt Federal New Market Tax Credits State New Market Tax Credits FMRA Ad Valorem TIF County QTI/employment benefits Enterprise Zone tax credits Brownfield tax credits Impact Fee Waiver Federal EB-5 Program (debt)

D2 Parking Garage

$8.8 – $10.8 million

FMRA Ad Valorem TIF Federal Grants/Appropriations BAB and RZED Bonds (debt)

D2 Potential Office

$8.5 – $10.3 million

Private equity and traditional debt Federal New Market Tax Credits State New Market Tax Credits FMRA Ad Valorem TIF County QTI/employment benefits Enterprise Zone tax credits Brownfield tax credits Impact Fee Waiver

Feasibility and Economic Impact: Given the current economic conditions, the near term development prospects for this component are challenging. However, the long term growth characteristics that have consistently placed Fort Myers and Southwest Florida markets among the fastest growing in the United States are expected to continue driving economic growth in the area. The first floor retail and dining environment will play a critical role in establishing a core, retail oriented, pedestrian friendly destination in Fort Myers. With a new building to meet the design criteria of key destination tenants, D1 has the ability to add a new dimension to the merchandising available downtown. In addition, the surrounding walkway/terrace will offer customers much desired outdoor dining and views of the water The leasing strategy will focus efforts towards high quality, destination oriented tenants with a local/regional appeal. The development team recommends continuing to work with Florida based S. Hamilton Group to seek these tenants and gain leasing commitments, assuming the future site control (described above). The overall merchandising strategy includes gaining a total of 5-7 noteworthy restaurants of varying price points and themes located along the water (in the W blocks) as well as the key corners of the D1 building. 5-36

COMPONENT BLOCK D1 AND D2

*Assuming the parking deck (D2) is funded through bonded indebtedness (30 year amortization at 6.5% with 1.2x DSC), the revenue stream necessary to support it is between $ 790,000 and $ 970,000 per year. This amount could be offset substantially through the use of TIF financing mechanisms and grant funds to lower the borrowing amount as well as potential parking revenue to support debt payments. **tenant allowance not included in projected cost – amount will be a function of use and market conditions

August 19, 2009


Component Block E1 and F1-F2 part 4 of 6 Block Number (s):

E1 and F1-F2

Phase:

3 Feasibility:

Project Description: The E and F Blocks are designed to take advantage of their park frontage and proximity to the waterfront. These buildings are envisioned to have an orientation towards the water and park for retail, residential and other commercial uses. The ultimate use of these sites will be determined by two critical factors. First, the development plans will need to consider the existing uses (i.e. Chamber of Commerce Facility on E Block and the Section 8 housing provided on the F Block). In addition to requiring the relocation of these vital uses, the redevelopment plans will be greatly impacted by the existing Amtel Hotel and parking facility which currently dominates the eastern edge of the redevelopment area.

The development team recommends a redevelopment plan which evolves and is flexible in nature given the expense of and need to relocate the current uses and the uncertainty of the Amtel’s future use. The distance of these locations from the Hendry Street corridor logically allows the redevelopment of these sites to be finalized based on market demand in a later Phase 3 development. Sources and Uses: Block

Estimated Costs/Uses

Potential Sources (both blocks)

E1

$7.2 – $9.8 million

Private equity and traditional debt Federal New Market Tax Credits State New Market Tax Credits FMRA Ad Valorem TIF

F1-F2

$17.8 – $24.1 million

Private equity and traditional debt Federal New Market Tax Credits State New Market Tax Credits FMRA Ad Valorem TIF City CIB Private donations for Civic Uses

E1 The current plan includes a mixed use building totaling 43,460 sq. ft. on four levels. F1-F2 The development plan contemplates a total of 104,100 sq. ft. on blocks F1 and F2 of up to four levels with a mix of retail, residential, commercial and civic uses. Acquisition Plan: While these sites are publicly owned, future development will be largely determined less by the land control issues and more by the relocation of existing uses as well as the future redevelopment of the Amtel hotel and garage site.

W6 F W1 W2 P9E

W4 C

E D

B A P9W

Fort Myers Riverfront Development Plan

COMPONENT BLOCK E1 AND F1-F2

5-37


Component Block P1 through P19 part 5 of 6 Block Number (s):

P1-P19

Phase:

1A, 2 and 3

The improvements are lumped together in related groups below for simplicity. The estimate for phase 1A improvements, considered critical to attract and instigate redevelopment, is between $10.5 and $12.5 million*.

Project Description: Block/Phase/Description The P Blocks represent public improvements integral to the plan. These improvements range from seawall to boardwalks, multi purpose pavilion buildings to an expansion of the existing Marina and streetscape improvements. Below is a listing of the proposed improvements:

Acquisition Plan: Implementation of the above is not expected to require the acquisition of property with the exception of the boat ramp relocation. To facilitate the development of the improvements as depicted on the plan, we recommend the City investigate the relocation of the ramp to another nearby location in advance of phase 2, when the plan necessitates relocation. While the activity created by the ramp is desirable within the downtown, the significant amount of property it requires is better utilized as proposed in supporting core uses critical to the framework of the redevelopment. Several options are available including two properties across the River and another adjacent to the Riverside Community Park.

5-38

Additionally, it is worth noting that with the development of P2, P5 and P17 there will be numerous opportunities to creatively plan for interaction between Lofton’s Island and the City. Ideally, these improvements will provide the impetus for further development of the island as a unique destination and integral part of the experience within the Riverfront District. COMPONENT BLOCK P

Phase

Block Number

Description

1A 2 1A 1A 1A 2 2

P1 P2 P3 P4 P5 P6 P7

2 2

P8 P9

1A 1A 2 3 2 2

P10 P11 P12 P13 P14 P15

2 3 1A Edwards 3 2

P16 P17 P18

Seawall Curved Pier Storm Detention Edwards Culvert/Bridge Pier (adjacent to City Pier Bldg.) Boardwalk Park Pavilion(s), Farmer’s Market, Restrooms, Stages Boat ramp relocation Centennial Park Infrastructure and Landscape Streetscape: Monroe - Bay to Edwards Streetscape: Edwards - Monroe to Hendry Streetscape: Edwards - Hendry to Lee Streetscape: Edwards - Lee to Bridge Streetscape: Hendry - Bay to Edwards Streetscape: Hendry - Edwards to City Pier Building Streetscape: Lee - Edwards to Yacht Basin Marina expansion Streetscape roundabout: Monroe and

P18 P19

Trolley system stop Docks/Slips

Waterfront Inlet and Feature 1A 2 1A 1A 1A 2

P1 P2 P3 P4 P5 P19

2 2 2 2

P6 P7 P8 P9

Estimated Costs/Uses

Streetscape P10 P11 P12 P13 P14 P15 P16 P18

$6 – 7.5 million

Monroe - Bay to Edwards Edwards - Monroe to Hendry Edwards - Hendry to Lee Edwards - Lee to Bridge Hendry - Bay to Edwards Hendry - Edwards to City Pier Building Lee - Edwards to Yacht Basin Roundabout - Monroe and Edwards

Marina** 3

P17

$7 – $9 million

Boardwalk Park Pavillion(s), restrooms and stages Boat ramp relocation Park Infrastructure and Landscape

Block/Phase/Description

1A 1A 2 3 2 2 2 1A

$20 – 25 million

Seawall Curved Pier Storm Detention Edwards Culvert/Bridge Pier (adjacent to City Pier Bldg.) Docks/Slips

Park Improvements and Amenities

Sources and Uses: The proposed sources for the P block improvements are provided in detail within the sub-section “Funding Strategy – Sources and Uses”. Significant grants and low cost loans are available in addition to traditional sources including the downtown TIF. The costs represented below, it must be emphasized, are rough order of magnitude as a result of the minimal level of engineering and architectural detail completed to date. Estimates for these improvements range widely as demonstrated within the detailed Project and Component Cost Model section, and in each case we are displaying a range based upon the highest estimate below. Further planning and value engineering outside the scope of this master plan will result in a narrowing of the range.

Estimated Costs/Uses

$5 – 6 million Marina expansion

Trolley 3

P18

Trolley system

TBD

* Assuming the P block improvements for 1A are fully funded through bonded indebtedness (30 year amortization at 6.5% with 1.2x DSC), the revenue stream necessary to support them between $ 950,000 and $ 1.1 million per year. **the marina improvements are expected to generate additional revenue for the marina operations and are a source of repayment for the indebtedness incurred in undertaking them. All concepts shown, as they relate to Centennial Park, are only design suggestions. Development of the area should be refined by a consultant team and the solution should relate to adjacencies as part of the master plan.

August 19, 2009


Component Block W1, W2-W5 & W6-W7 part 6 of 6 Block Number (s):

W1, W2-W5 & W6-W74

Phase:

W1–W5 Phase 2 and W6-W7 Phase 3

Project Description: The W2, W3, W4 and W5 Block buildings represent a collection of waterfront oriented restaurants built around the expanded inlet which capitalizes on the expanded waterfront and responds to the significant unmet demand for waterfront dining opportunities. All of these buildings, with the exception of the City Pier W5 building, will be newly constructed to meet the specifications of the tenants with strong design guidelines to ensure a high quality construction worthy of these flagship locations. Currently, W5 is home to the Art of the Olympians with the long term objective that this organization will grow into a stand alone, uniquely designed feature on the park, making available W5 for an additional premiere waterfront destination. The W1 building is located on the park side of the inlet and is highlighted as a potential location for the new Art of the Olympians venue. As the planning for this facility is in its early stages, the final build out will depend on the group’s success, however, this block is certainly well located and could support many other uses such as, other civic uses, a marine life education, additional park pavilions, and even later phased restaurants or mixed uses. The W6 & W7 buildings are located within the expanded and renovated marina and represent future uses to support the marina facility and add to the strength of the marina operations and support additional patron usage. W1 Building W2 W3 W4 W5 W6 W7 Total

Given the strength of these locations for their proposed uses, the development team recommends continuing with its engagement of S. Hamilton Group to pursue leasing the restaurant locations W2, W3 and W4 during the implementation process of the public components, i.e. the park and waterfront improvements, which are necessary to create these physical locations. Critical to the success of these restaurants are the waterfront locations created by the new inlet as well as the additional demand generated by the new hotel and expanded convention facilities. Given the project’s location within the FEMA flood zone, the finished floor heights will need to be raised 7-9 feet above the base flood elevation in order to meet the SWFMD requirements. This level could be as high as 5-7 feet above the existing grade which will have a significant impact on the pedestrian access and connection to the surrounding streets, public spaces and existing commercial district. The City and project team are working together to obtain a variance which will lower the requirement for this finished floor height, making the buildings more attractive to potential tenants and decreasing costs associated with meeting these conditions. This first phase requires that Block D is controlled by the City/Developer in such a manner that parking is secured for these locations until the full development of Block D is implemented. It is anticipated that these building will be funded through traditional equity and debt sources and will not require public subsidy outside of providing flexible terms for the use of the public land. In the cases of W1, and W6-W7, these buildings will be developed in later phases, Phase 2 and 3 respectively, based on market demand and the progress of the potential users in implementing their own growth strategies.

16,130 sq. ft.

Future Art of the Olympians/Future Private/Public

Sources and Uses:

8,000 sq. ft. 8,000 sq. ft. 5,200 sq. ft. 6,300 sq. ft. 10,750 sq. ft. 8,820 sq. ft. 63,200 sq. ft.

Retail/Restaurant Retail/Restaurant Retail/Restaurant Retail/Restaurant Commercial Commercial

Block

Estimated Costs/Uses

Potential Sources

W1, W6 & W7

$7.1 - $8.7 million

Private equity/donations State and Federal grants City- flexible terms for land Marina CIB Marina revenues City CIB

W2-W5

$7.1 - $8.7 million*

Private equity and traditional debt City- flexible terms for land

Acquisition Plan:

W6 F W1 W2 P9E

W4 C

E D

All of the land necessary for the development of these buildings is currently owned by the City and will either be purchased as these sites are developed or controlled under a long term lease as the buildings are developed. Feasibility and Economic Impact:

*tenant allowance not included in projected cost – amount will be a function of use and market conditions

B A P9W

Fort Myers Riverfront Development Plan

COMPONENT BLOCK W

5-39


District Branding Plan Marketing and Management Plan Part 1 of 2

Branding the District Creating a strong brand for the River District will play an important role in the overall implementation of the Riverfront Redevelopment Plan. Once established, the brand identity serves as a powerful marketing tool that allows for clear, consistent messaging across a variety of customer groups including residents, business owners, public officials and visitors. As people know and understand the brand and see its value, the District’s brand identity can serve as a rallying call and an important launch pad for those working within the district to market their unique businesses and organizations. In addition, the District’s branding strategy will need to embrace the redesigned public spaces in the Riverfront Redevelopment Plan, leveraging their uses to further the goals of creating a vital downtown that serves its community, attracts visitors and brings new businesses to the downtown. Under the direction of the Fort Myers Redevelopment Agency and the Harborside Event Center management team, the creation of a River District brand and marketing strategy is in process and focuses on the River District’s history, arts and events. One of the first initiatives is the creation of a River District website to achieve a broader audience and create a more consistent message. The development team recommends leveraging the efforts underway rather than creating a new, separate strategy for the proposed Riverfront Redevelopment Plan and subsequent projects. Critical success factors for the River District brand include: (1) Riverfront location - Celebrating the unique aspects of Fort Myers’ riverfront, including its visual and physical access to the Caloosahatchee River which creates a clear competitive advantage to this location relative to other regional commercial and retail oriented districts. (2) Historic downtown - Ensuring that the River District brand includes a strong reference to and alliance with the Historic Downtown District another distinct and defining aspect to attract visitors, residents and businesses to the area. (3) Proactive, consistent communications - Creating a cohesive district-wide communications strategy that targets residents, employers (both current and potential), visitors and business owners. (4) History of place - Connecting the district brand to the historic features which bookend the district to the west and east including the Edison Ford Winter Estates as well as the Burroughs Home and Gardens and the Langford Kingston Home. (5) Arts & culture – Building upon the success of the monthly Art Walk and the popular Florida Rep/Arcade Theatre to support the District as the regional hub for the arts. (6) Art of the Olympians – Integrating this internationally unique Olympic designation into both the arts component as well as the regional attractions aspect of the brand and subsequent marketing strategy. (7) Programming public spaces - Coordinating existing downtown Fort Myers’ events to improve the visitor experience and the expansion of public programming for a diverse audience over the annual calendar. (8) Connections among places – Fostering enhanced connections within the district through the use of a new trolley system, an informative signage program and well located, accessible parking. A strong brand identity will help organize and leverage the marketing strategies of the component parts while allowing their customers to better understand all the District has to offer.

Ongoing Management Ongoing management of the Riverfront District will play an important role to maximize the benefits of the public and private investments required to bring the Riverfront Redevelopment Plan to fruition. The most fundamental role will be to enhance the image, awareness and usage of downtown as a vibrant regional hub of activity for business, art, entertainment and water activities. This effort will require a focused staff that has the expertise necessary to accomplish a range of vital managerial tasks and serve as a clearinghouse for the many initiatives and events already in place. It is the development team’s recommendation that, if financially feasible, a Downtown Coordinator be engaged who would have dedicated responsibility for the ongoing management of the district.

5-40

DISTRICT BRANDING PLAN

Key components of the District’s management will include: (1) Brand Management - Implementing the branding strategy for the Riverfront District to integrate the brand identity across multiple channels. (2) Marketing Implementation - Creating and implementing the specific marketing plans associated with the broader district brand strategy including website management, advertising initiatives, district signage and way finding as well as stakeholder and public communications. (3) Stakeholder Coordination - Integrate efforts among the various Riverfront District groups and initiatives such as Harborside Event Center, annual events and festivals, business owners and landlords, Chamber of Commerce, Visitor and Convention Bureau, public departments, and resident groups. (4) Event Management - Programming public spaces to provide a robust calendar of year round activity that draws residents and visitors to Fort Myers River District on a consistent basis and allows the key civic spaces to act as anchors to the District. (5) Fundraising and Promotions – Sourcing revenue opportunities and event sponsors will be a vital component of supporting the enhanced programming and marketing within the District (6) Cultural Anchors - Continue to build upon the arts attractions in the district by supporting the growth and development of existing organizations and growing institutions such as Art of the Olympians and the Sidney & Berne Davis Center as well as the inclusion of public art in the redesigned public spaces. (7) Waterfront Activity – Seek water oriented activities and businesses to capitalize on the expanded waterfront access of the redevelopment plan. (8) Retail, Restaurant and New Business Attraction - Engage historic downtown landlords in retail marketing and leasing strategies that leverage the Riverfront District anchors and serve as a conduit that proactively works with brokers, retailers and restaurateurs to find optimal locations. The development team recognizes the strength of many current City staff members and recommends leveraging this talent to focus on a more unified approach that will bring together numerous marketing, event management and business attraction efforts underway. Secondly, with the newly redeveloped waterfront and the addition of a full service hotel and expanded convention facility, Fort Myers’ strength as a regional player will grow tremendously. To capitalize on this momentum, requires a singularly focused agency or organization that will ensure a high quality experience for downtown’s visitors, residents and stakeholders. This type of organization may be created from scratch or by integrating existing resources. Regardless of its formation, the most important element for future success is that the group has a clarity of mission to accomplish the above tasks, the necessary funding and the responsibility to report results. One important pitfall to avoid is the assigning of this extensive effort to an existing group without increasing funding and staffing to successfully accomplish it. Funding sources may come from a reallocation of current sources and/or creating a Building Improvement District or a Special Improvement District (BID or SID) to support initiatives. The most frequently used improvement or assessment district is the BID, where property or business owners in a commercial district pay a supplemental property tax to improve an area’s maintenance, security, parking and transportation management, streetscape enhancements, vending programs, special events and marketing. Assessments may be based on either square footage or frontage footage. Clearly, in challenging economic times this is an approach that may not be feasible and may not gain widespread support in the near term, therefore, leveraging existing personnel and funding may be the optimal course in the near term as the Redevelopment Plan is executed and projects brought to fruition. The creation of such a group is a critical next step in the project implementation phase of the Riverfront Redevelopment Plan.

August 19, 2009


District Branding Plan Marketing and Management Plan Part 1 of 2

Project Marketing and Leasing The finalized River District brand will also play an important role in helping to establish the identity of the Riverfront Redevelopment Plan projects. The marketing plans for these projects should tie into and gain leverage from the strength of the broader District plan adding their own unique play on the naming, logos, signage that fit the particular use while creating a cohesive destination understood by the broader audience of visitors, stakeholders, business owners, potential conventioneers and residents alike. (By way of example: “The River District’s Caloosa Walk, Caloosa Way at the River District or Caloosa Harbor” ). In the near term, the development team will be focusing its respective marketing efforts at the project level to build public advocacy and to facilitate project implementation particularly in the areas of: • • • • •

Gaining support of necessary public officials and agency staff members to serve as advocates for the funding sources and tenant attraction. Obtaining financing from commercial, private equity and public sources. Securing a commitment for a national, full service hotel franchise. Securing private equity and debt financing commitments for a full service hotel. Attracting potential tenants to verify project feasibility and achieve preleasing hurdle requirements for financing.

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dŽƚĂůŚĂŶŐĞ ϮϬϬϬͲϮϬϬϴ

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ϵϴ͘ϯй

ϱϲ͘ϭй

džƉĞŶĚŝƚƵƌĞWŽƚĞŶƚŝĂů

ΨϮ͕ϯϳϲ͕ϴϴϳ

Ψϰ͕ϳϭϰ͕ϱϮϲ

Θϳ͕ϯϱϵ͕ϮϬϯ

ϵϴ͘ϯй

ϱϲ͘ϭй

   

 





The ultimate goal is to join this waterfront dining and retail destination with the critical First Street corridor by using the strength of the D Block frontage along Hendry as a key connector both visually and physically. Boorn Partners strongly recommends coordinating leasing efforts and merchandising strategies across the downtown and working closely with landlords to maximize benefits throughout the district. Partnering with the City’s Redevelopment Agency and the proposed Downtown Coordinator, Boorn Partners and S. Hamilton Group would create a master merchandising strategy that leverages the Riverfront investment to benefit the historic downtown district.

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WƌŽũĞĐƚ,ŝŐŚůŝŐŚƚƐ͗



The leasing program of the key W and D blocks focuses on anchoring the pedestrian, waterfront destination with a select group of 5 – 7 restaurants having a variety of offerings and the ability to create a regional draw. The remaining 20,000 sq. ft. of retail will consist of unique tenants (i.e. jewelry, gifts, home décor, books, apparel, galleries etc…) and other food uses (such as ice cream, coffee, and gourmet). Boorn Partners and S. Hamilton Group are targeting Florida’s wealth of local and regional retailers and restaurateurs looking for opportunities to expand a regional presence rather than traditional national brands.

Ϯϳ͘ϲй

dŚĞZŝǀĞƌŝƐƚƌŝĐƚ



In the case of the mixed use project (Block D) and restaurant pads (W’s), Boorn Partners will work directly with business owners as well as leverage brokerage relationships to find, attract and secure tenants. Additionally, we will represent the project nationally through the International Council of Shopping Centers’ (ICSC) regional and national sponsored events to attract the broadest range of retailers and restaurateurs to the project. Initial efforts include contracting with the Florida based leasing brokerage firm of S. Hamilton Group, LLC to market the project to prospective restaurateurs and retailers. In addition, the firm will introduce the project to prospective tenants at the August Florida ICSC in Orlando.

dŽƚĂůŚĂŶŐĞ ϮϬϬϴͲϮϬϭϯ

ZĞĚĞƐŝŐŶĞĚĂŶĚĞdžƉĂŶĚĞĚĞŶƚĞŶŶŝĂůWĂƌŬǁŝƚŚ ĨĂŵŝůLJĂƚƚƌĂĐƚŝŽŶƐ͕ŶĞǁƉƵďůŝĐĂƌƚǁĂůŬĂŶĚƉĞĚĞƐͲ ƚƌŝĂŶŚĂƌďŽƌĨƌŽŶƚǁĂůŬǁĂLJ͘ ŶĞǁ͕ĨŽƵƌƐƚĂƌ͕ϮϬϬƌŽŽŵŚŽƚĞůĂŶĚĞdžƉĂŶĚĞĚ ĐŽŶǀĞŶƚŝŽŶĨĂĐŝůŝƚLJƚŽƚĂůŝŶŐŽǀĞƌϭϱϬ͕ϬϬϬƐƋƵĂƌĞĨĞĞƚ ŽĨĞdžŚŝďŝƚ͕ďĂůůƌŽŽŵĂŶĚŵĞĞƚŝŶŐƐƉĂĐĞ͘ EĞǁůLJĞdžƉĂŶĚĞĚĂŶĚƌĞĨƵƌďŝƐŚĞĚŚĂƌďŽƌŝŶůĞƚĨĞĂƚƵƌͲ ŝŶŐƐĞǀĞƌĂůǁĂƚĞƌĨƌŽŶƚĚŝŶŝŶŐůŽĐĂƚŝŽŶƐǁŝƚŚŽƵƚĚŽŽƌ ƚĞƌƌĂĐĞŽƉƉŽƌƚƵŶŝƚŝĞƐ͕ŵĂŐŶŝĨŝĐĞŶƚǀŝĞǁƐŽĨƚŚĞƌŝǀĞƌ ĂŶĚŶĞǁůŝŐŚƚŚŽƵƐĞĨĞĂƚƵƌĞĂŶĚĐĞŶƚƌĂůůLJůŽĐĂƚĞĚ ǀĂůĞƚƉĂƌŬŝŶŐ͘ EĞǁ͕ƌĞƚĂŝůĂŶĚĚŝŶŝŶŐŽƌŝĞŶƚĞĚŵŝdžĞĚƵƐĞĚĞǀĞůŽƉͲ ŵĞŶƚǁŝƚŚϰϬ͕ϬϬϬƐƋ͘Ĩƚ͘ƐƚƌĂƚĞŐŝĐĂůůLJůŽĐĂƚĞĚĂƚƚŚĞ ŝŶƚĞƌƐĞĐƚŝŽŶŽĨĚǁĂƌĚƐĂŶĚ,ĞŶĚƌLJ^ƚƌĞĞƚƐǁŝƚŚŝŶ ŽŶĞďůŽĐŬŽĨƚŚĞŚĞĂƌƚŽĨŚŝƐƚŽƌŝĐĚŽǁŶƚŽǁŶ&Žƌƚ DLJĞƌƐĂŶĚƚŚĞŶĞǁŚŽƚĞůĂŶĚĐŽŶǀĞŶƚŝŽŶĨĂĐŝůŝƚLJĂŶĚ ƚŚĞŶĞǁůLJĞdžƉĂŶĚĞĚŵĂƌŝŶĂ͘

ƌƚŽĨƚŚĞ KůLJŵƉŝĂŶƐ

ZĞƚĂŝůͬ ZĞƐƚĂƵƌĂŶƚ

EĞǁ͕ϱϬϬĐĂƌƉĂƌŬŝŶŐĨĂĐŝůŝƚLJŝŶĐůƵĚĞĚŝŶƚŚĞŶĞǁ ŵŝdžĞĚƵƐĞĚĞǀĞůŽƉŵĞŶƚ͘

zĂĐŚƚĂƐŝŶ

ZĞƚĂŝůͬDŝdžĞĚhƐĞ ,ĂƌďŽƌƐŝĚĞ džŚŝďŝƚ ĞŶƚĞƌ

,ĂƌďŽƌƐŝĚĞ

WĂƌŬŝŶŐ 'ĂƌĂŐĞ

,ŽƚĞů

WĂƌŬŝŶŐ 'ĂƌĂŐĞ ZĞƚĂŝů

Overall, the results from these critical project level marketing efforts will play an important role in measuring market demand for the proposed commercial uses, better understanding potential rental revenue and clarifying project capital sources in today’s challenging markets.

Z / s  Z   / ^d Z /  d  ͬ  Z / s  Z & ZK E d  Fort Myers Riverfront Development Plan

DISTRICT BRANDING PLAN

5-41


Preliminary Project Financial Forecasting Models Part 1 of 10

Hotel Project Platform Stabilized Cash Flow Forecast

REVENUES: % Revenue Hotel Room Revenue 65.0% Food 26.8% Beverage 5.1% Telephone 0.5% Other Income 2.6% Subtotal 100.0% Total Base Revenue

POR $150.83 $62.09 $11.94 $1.07 $5.97 $231.90

Occupancy 69.00% 69.00% 69.00% 69.00% 69.00%

$231.90

% of Revenue 22.00% 60.00% 130.00% 50.00% 35.35%

$7,551,642 26.90%

$3,142,136

Gross Operating Profit

37.75%

$4,409,506

3.00% 3.30% 3.10% 4.00%

$350,424 $385,466 $362,105 $467,232 $1,565,228

Total Operating Expenses

75.65%

$8,836,525

Net Operating Income

24.35%

$2,844,278

Preliminary Project Financial Forecasting Models

200 69.00% $150.83 $104.07 365

Total $1,671,408 $2,237,335 $70,065 $150,354 $4,129,161

Non-Departmental Operating Expenses

Mangement Fee Real Estate Taxes Insurance Replacement Reserve Fixed Expenses

Number Rooms Occupancy Average Rate Rev PAR Days Open

$0 $11,680,803

Departmental Income

5-42

$7,597,307 $3,127,473 $601,418 $53,896 $300,709 $11,680,803

Room Revenue Assumptions

$11,680,803

Other Income Gross Potential Income

EXPENSES: Departmental Expenses Rooms Food & Beverage Telephone Other Income Total Departmental Expenses

Revenue

August 19, 2009


Preliminary Project Financial Forecasting Models Part 2 of 10

Hotel Project CASH FLOW FORECAST PLATFORM

Initial Capitalization: Construction Cost (Retail)

Project $36,000,000

Total Construction Cost Initial Equity Contributions New Market Tax Contribution Tax Credit Proceeds Construction Loan Amount % of Total Cstrn C

100%

Leverage:

50%

Total Required Equity

Proceeds at Stabilization: Value at Stabilization based on Cap Rate Permanent Loan Amount based on Stabilized Value Permanent Loan Proceeds After Repayment of Cstrn Loan Repayment of Other Debt Permanent Loan Proceeds after repay of Debt & Other Debt

10.00% 70%

Outstanding Equity After Repayment of Constr. & Priority Loans

$36,000,000 $12,107,896 $4,068,937 $1,823,167 $18,000,000

$180,000 Cost per room 200 Total Rooms

$12,107,896

$0

$12,107,896

$12,107,896

$0

$28,442,780 $19,909,946 $1,909,946 $0 $1,909,946

$0 $1,909,946

$0

$10,197,950

$10,197,950

$0

Number of Rooms Occupancy Rate Average Rate Rev PAR Days Open

Assumption Summary: 69.00% Average occupancy during first operating year is 85%. $150.83 Average Daily Rate $104.07 Rev PAR 365 Day Open 4.00% Structural Reserves (inc. in Fixed Expenses) 3.00% Average rental increases across all rental revenue beginning with stabilization 3.00% Expense growth 10.00% Reversion Cap Rate 2.00% Closing Costs (inc. commissions) 200 Total Rooms

Year 1

Year 2

Stabilized Year 3

Year 4

Year 5

Year 6

Year 7

Year 8

Year 9

Year 10

200 63% $136.12 $85.76 365

200 67% $143.29 $96.00 365

200 69% $150.83 $104.07 365

200 69% $155.35 $107.19 365

200 69% $160.02 $110.41 365

200 69% $164.82 $113.72 365

200 69% $169.76 $117.13 365

200 69% $174.85 $120.65 365

200 69% $180.10 $124.27 365

200 69% $185.50 $128.00 365

REVENUE: Total Room Revenue Total Departmental Revenue

$6,211,000 $3,563,000

$7,019,000 $3,867,000

$7,597,307 $4,083,496

$7,825,226 $4,206,001

$8,059,983 $4,332,181

$8,301,783 $4,462,146

$8,550,836 $4,596,011

$8,807,361 $4,733,891

$9,071,582 $4,875,908

$9,343,729 $5,022,185

Gross Potential Income

$9,774,000

$10,886,000

$11,680,803

$12,031,227

$12,392,164

$12,763,929

$13,146,847

$13,541,252

$13,947,490

$14,365,914

EXPENSES: Departmental Expenses Non-Departmental Expenses Fixed Expenses Total Operating Expenses

$3,762,000 $2,819,000 $1,195,000 $7,776,000

$3,964,000 $2,995,000 $1,375,000 $8,334,000

$4,129,161 $3,142,136 $1,565,228 $8,836,525

$4,253,036 $3,236,400 $1,612,184 $9,101,621

$4,380,627 $3,333,492 $1,660,550 $9,374,669

$4,512,046 $3,433,497 $1,710,366 $9,655,909

$4,647,407 $3,536,502 $1,761,677 $9,945,587

$4,786,830 $3,642,597 $1,814,528 $10,243,954

$4,930,435 $3,751,875 $1,868,964 $10,551,273

$5,078,348 $3,864,431 $1,925,033 $10,867,811

NET OPERATING INCOME

$1,998,000

$2,552,000

$2,844,278

$2,929,606

$3,017,495

$3,108,019

$3,201,260

$3,297,298

$3,396,217

$3,498,103

ADJUSTED NET OPERATING INCOME

$1,998,000

$2,552,000

$2,844,278

$2,929,606

$3,017,495

$3,108,019

$3,201,260

$3,297,298

$3,396,217

$3,498,103

$1,998,000

$2,552,000

$2,844,278

$2,929,606

$3,108,019

$3,201,260

$3,297,298

$3,396,217

$3,498,103

$1,998,000

$2,552,000

$2,844,278

$2,929,606

$3,017,495 $30,458,590 $33,476,085

$3,108,019

$3,201,260

$3,297,298

$3,396,217

$3,498,103

$1,688,632 $126,020

$1,688,632 $126,020

$1,688,632 $126,020

$1,688,632 $126,020

$1,688,632 $126,020

$1,688,632 $126,020

$1,688,632 $126,020

$1,688,632

$1,688,632

$1,688,632

$183,347

$737,347

$1,029,625

$1,114,954

$31,661,432

$1,293,367

$1,386,607

$1,608,665

$1,707,584

$1,809,471

$304,585 $183,347

$326,604 $737,347

$350,214 $1,029,625

$375,531 $1,114,954

$18,553,013 $13,108,419

$1,293,367

$1,386,607

$1,608,665

$1,707,584

$1,809,471

CASH FLOW BEFORE DEBT: Cash Flow Before Debt Service Reversion ADJUSTED CASH FLOW BEFORE DEBT

CASH FLOW AFTER DEBT: Permanent Debt Service NMTC Debt Service Other Debt Service Cash Flow After Debt Service

Interest Rate: Loan Principle:

Loan Principal Repayment ADJUSTED CASH FLOW AFTER DEBT SERVICE

Fort Myers Riverfront Development Plan

($36,000,000)

7.00% $19,909,946

Preliminary Project Financial Forecasting Models

5-43


Preliminary Project Financial Forecasting Models Part 3 of 10

Retail Project Platform Stabilized Cash Flow Forecast

REVENUES: % GLA Retail Restaurants In-line Restaurant In-line Retail Cinema Health/Fitness Subtotal

SF

Rent/SF

35.6% 21.5% 42.9% 0.0% 0.0% 100.0%

24,880 15,000 30,000 69,880

$28.00 $25.00 $18.00 $23.06

$696,640 $375,000 $540,000 $0 $0 $1,611,640

Total Base Rent

100.0%

69,880

$23.06

$1,611,640

$0.00

$0 $1,611,640

$8.10

$566,028

Other Income Total Income

Reimbursement Revenue Gross Potential Income Vacancy & Credit Loss Effective Gross Income EXPENSES: Recoverable Expenses Operating Expenses Insurance Real Estate Taxes Total Recoverable Expenses

$29.32

$120.00 $80.00 $40.00 $0.00 $0.00 $77.07

Leasing Commission Calculation Ls. Term Commission 3.0% $2,985,600 10 $208,992 $1,200,000 10 $112,500 $1,200,000 10 $162,000 $0 10 $0 $0 10 $0 $5,385,600 $483,492

$/SF

$2,048,737

$5.00 $1.50 $2.50 $9.00

Non-Recoverable Expenses Replacement Reserves Total Non-Recoverable Expenses

$0.15 $0.15

$10,482 $10,482

Total Operating Expenses

$9.15

$639,402

$20.17

$1,409,335

Preliminary Project Financial Forecasting Models

Tenant Allowance Calculation TA/SF Total TI

$2,177,668 ($128,931)

8.00%

Total $349,400 $104,820 $174,700 $628,920

Net Operating Income

5-44

90%

Total Rent

August 19, 2009


Preliminary Project Financial Forecasting Models Part 4 of 10

Retail Project CASH FLOW FORECAST PLATFORM

Initial Capitalization: Construction Cost (Retail)

Project $20,964,000

Total Construction Cost Initial Equity Contributions New Market Tax Proceeds Tax Credit Proceeds Construction Loan Amount % of Total Cstrn

100%

Leverage:

60%

Total Required Equity

Proceeds at Stabilization: Value at Stabilization based on Cap Rate Permanent Loan Amount Permanent Loan Proceeds After Repayment of Cstrn Loan Repayment of Other Debt Permanent Loan Proceeds After Equity Repayment

8.00% 70%

Outstanding Equity After Repayment of Constr. & Other Debt

$20,964,000 $4,476,537 $2,762,437 $1,146,626 $12,578,400

$300 Cost psf 69,880 Total GLA

$4,476,537

$0

$4,476,537

$4,476,537

$0

$17,616,685 $12,331,680 -$246,721 $0 -$246,721

$0 -$246,721

$0

$4,723,257

$4,723,257

$0

Square Feet Occupied Occupancy Rate (Physical) Occupancy Rate (Economic) Expense Recovery

Assumption Summary: 75.00% Average occupancy during first operating year is 85%. 10 Year leases 8.00% Vacancy and Credit loss on all tenants (stabilized) 2.00% Average rental increases across all rental revenue beginning with stabilization 3.00% Expense growth 8.00% Reversion Cap Rate 2.00% Closing Costs (inc. commissions) 69,880 Total GLA

Year 1

Year 2

Stabilized Year 3

Year 4

Year 5

Year 6

Year 7

Year 8

Year 9

Year 10

52,410 75% 75% 68%

52,410 85% 85% 85%

69,880 100% 100% 90%

69,880 100% 100% 100%

69,880 100% 100% 100%

69,880 100% 100% 100%

69,880 100% 100% 100%

69,880 100% 100% 100%

69,880 100% 100% 100%

69,880 100% 100% 100%

REVENUE: Retail Base Rental Revenue Absorption & Turnover Vacancy

$1,343,033 $0

$1,580,039 $0

$1,611,640 $0

$1,643,873 $0

$1,676,750 $0

$1,710,285 $0

$1,744,491 $0

$1,779,381 $0

$1,814,968 $0

$1,851,268 $0

Scheduled Base Rental Revenue

$1,343,033

$1,580,039

$1,611,640

$1,643,873

$1,676,750

$1,710,285

$1,744,491

$1,779,381

$1,814,968

$1,851,268

Other Income Retail Reimbursement Revenue

$0 $400,152

$0 $549,542

$0 $566,028

$0 $647,788

$0 $667,221

$0 $687,238

$0 $707,855

$0 $729,091

$0 $750,963

$0 $773,492

$1,743,185

$2,129,581

$2,177,668

$2,291,660

$2,343,971

$2,397,523

$2,452,346

$2,508,471

$2,565,932

$2,624,760

$0 $1,743,185

($79,002) $2,050,579

($128,931) $2,048,737

($82,194) $2,209,467

($83,838) $2,260,134

($85,514) $2,312,009

($87,225) $2,365,121

($88,969) $2,419,502

($90,748) $2,475,183

($92,563) $2,532,197

EXPENSES: Recoverable Operating Expenses Non-Recoverable Expenses

$592,817 $9,880

$610,602 $10,177

$628,920 $10,482

$647,788 $10,796

$667,221 $11,120

$687,238 $11,454

$707,855 $11,798

$729,091 $12,152

$750,963 $12,516

$773,492 $12,892

Total Operating Expenses

$602,698

$620,779

$639,402

$658,584

$678,342

$698,692

$719,653

$741,242

$763,479

$786,384

$1,140,487

$1,429,800

$1,409,335

$1,550,883

$1,581,792

$1,613,317

$1,645,469

$1,678,260

$1,711,704

$1,745,813

$0 $0 $17,107 $17,107

$0 $0 $21,447 $21,447

$0 $0 $21,140 $21,140

$0 $0 $23,263 $23,263

$0 $0 $23,727 $23,727

$0 $0 $24,200 $24,200

$0 $0 $24,682 $24,682

$0 $0 $25,174 $25,174

$0 $0 $25,676 $25,676

$0 $0 $26,187 $26,187

$1,123,380

$1,408,353

$1,388,195

$1,527,619

$1,589,117

$1,620,787

$1,653,086

$1,686,028

$1,719,626

$1,123,380

$1,408,353

$1,388,195

$1,527,619

$1,558,066 $19,763,134 $21,321,199

$1,589,117

$1,620,787

$1,653,086

$1,686,028

$1,719,626

$1,045,893 $101,020

$1,045,893 $126,020

$1,045,893 $126,020

$1,045,893 $126,020

$1,045,893 $126,020

$1,045,893 $126,020

$1,045,893 $126,020

$1,045,893

$1,045,893

$1,045,893

-$23,533

$236,440

$216,281

$355,706

$20,149,286

$417,204

$448,873

$607,193

$640,135

$673,733

$188,652 -$23,533

$202,289 $236,440

$216,913 $216,281

$232,593 $355,706

$11,491,232 $8,658,054

$417,204

$448,873

$607,193

$640,135

$673,733

Gross Potential Income General Vacancy & Credit Loss Effective Gross Income

8.00%

NET OPERATING INCOME CAPITAL ITEMS: Tenant Allowances Leasing Commissions Capital Reserves Total Capital Items CASH FLOW BEFORE DEBT: Cash Flow Before Debt Service Reversion (@ cap rate net of sales cost) ADJUSTED CASH FLOW BEFORE DEBT

CASH FLOW AFTER DEBT: Permanent Debt Service NMTC Payments (Fed & State) Other Debt Service Cash Flow After Debt Service

Rate: Loan Principle:

Loan Principal Repayment ADJUSTED CASH FLOW AFTER DEBT SERVICE

Fort Myers Riverfront Development Plan

-$20,964,000

7.00% $12,331,680

Preliminary Project Financial Forecasting Models

5-45


Preliminary Project Financial Forecasting Models Part 5 of 10

Office Project Platform Stabilized Cash Flow Forecast Initial Office Program (does not include Levels 6&7) REVENUES: % GLA Office Level 2 Level 3 Level 4 Level 5 Level 6 Level 7 Subtotal

SF 33.3% 33.3% 33.3% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 100.0%

Total Base Rent

100.0%

Rent/SF 33,700 33,700 33,700 101,100

101,100

$15.00 $15.00 $15.00 $0.00 $0.00 $0.00 $15.00

$505,500 $505,500 $505,500 $0 $0 $0 $1,516,500

$15.00

$1,516,500

$0.00

$0 $1,516,500

$10.35

$1,046,385

Other Income Total Income

Reimbursement Revenue Gross Potential Income Vacancy & Credit Loss Effective Gross Income EXPENSES: Recoverable Expenses Operating Expenses Insurance Real Estate Taxes Recoverable Expenses

$24.15

$50.00 $50.00 $50.00 $50.00 $50.00 $50.00 $50.00

Leasing Commission Calculation Ls. Term Commission 3.0% $1,685,000 10 $151,650 $1,685,000 10 $151,650 $1,685,000 10 $151,650 $0 10 $0 $0 10 $0 $0 10 $0 $5,055,000 $454,950

$/SF

$2,441,565

$7.50 $1.60 $2.40 $11.50

$0.15 $0.15

$15,165 $15,165

Total Operating Expenses

$11.65

$1,177,815

Net Operating Income

$12.50

$1,263,750

Preliminary Project Financial Forecasting Models

Tenant Allowance Calculation TA/SF Total TI

$2,562,885 ($121,320)

8.00%

Total $758,250 $161,760 $242,640 $1,162,650

Non-Recoverable Expenses Replacement Reserves Total Non-Recoverable Expenses

5-46

90%

Total Rent

August 19, 2009


Preliminary Project Financial Forecasting Models Part 6 of 10

Office Project CASH FLOW FORECAST PLATFORM

Initial Capitalization: Construction Cost

Project $20,220,000

Total Construction Cost Initial Equity Contributions New Market Tax Credit Proceeds Tax Credit Proceeds Construction Loan Amount % of Total Cstrn

100%

Leverage:

60%

Total Required Equity

Proceeds at Stabilization: Value at Stabilization based on Cap Rate Permanent Loan Amount based on Stabilized Value Permanent Loan Proceeds After Repayment of Cstrn Loan Repayment of Other Debt Permanent Loan Proceeds after repay of Debt & Equity

7.50% 70%

Outstanding Equity After Repayment of Constr. & Other Debt

$20,220,000 $4,219,630 $2,762,437 $1,105,933 $12,132,000

$200 Cost psf 101,100 Total GLA

$4,219,630

$0

$4,219,630

$4,219,630

$0

$16,850,000 $11,795,000 ($337,000) $0 ($337,000)

$0 ($337,000)

$0

$4,556,630

$4,556,630

$0

Square Feet Occupied Occupancy Rate (Physical) Occupancy Rate (Economic)

Assumption Summary: 80.00% Average occupancy during first operating year is 85%. 10 All 10-year leases 8.00% Vacancy and Credit loss on all tenants (stabilized) 1.00% Structural Reserves 2.00% Average rental increases across all rental revenue beginning with stabilization 3.00% Expense growth 7.50% Reversion Cap Rate 2.00% Closing Costs (inc. commissions) 101,100 Total GLA

Year 1

Year 2

Stabilized Year 3

Year 4

Year 5

Year 6

Year 7

Year 8

Year 9

Year 10

80,880 80% 80%

85,935 90% 90%

101,100 100% 100%

101,100 100% 100%

101,100 100% 100%

101,100 100% 100%

101,100 100% 100%

101,100 100% 100%

101,100 100% 100%

101,100 100% 100%

REVENUE: Office Base Rental Revenue Absorption & Turnover Vacancy

$1,213,200 $0

$1,364,850 $0

$1,516,500 $0

$1,546,830 $0

$1,577,767 $0

$1,609,322 $0

$1,641,508 $0

$1,674,339 $0

$1,707,825 $0

$1,741,982 $0

Scheduled Base Rental Revenue

$1,213,200

$1,364,850

$1,516,500

$1,546,830

$1,577,767

$1,609,322

$1,641,508

$1,674,339

$1,707,825

$1,741,982

Other Income Office Reimbursement Revenue

$0 $789,055

$0 $1,015,908

$0 $1,046,385

$0 $1,197,530

$0 $1,233,455

$0 $1,270,459

$0 $1,308,573

$0 $1,347,830

$0 $1,388,265

$0 $1,429,913

Gross Potential Income

$2,002,255

General Vacancy & Credit Loss

8.00%

0.00

$2,380,758

$2,562,885

$2,744,360

$2,811,222

$2,879,781

$2,950,081

$3,022,169

$3,096,090

$3,171,895

(68,242.50)

(121,320.00)

(77,341.50)

(78,888.33)

(80,466.10)

(82,075.42)

(83,716.93)

(85,391.27)

(87,099.09)

Effective Gross Income

$2,002,255

$2,312,515

$2,441,565

$2,667,018

$2,732,334

$2,799,315

$2,868,006

$2,938,452

$3,010,699

$3,084,796

EXPENSES: Recoverable Operating Expenses Non-Recoverable Expenses

$1,095,909 $14,294

$1,128,786 $14,723

$1,162,650 $15,165

$1,197,530 $15,620

$1,233,455 $16,089

$1,270,459 $16,571

$1,308,573 $17,068

$1,347,830 $17,580

$1,388,265 $18,108

$1,429,913 $18,651

Total Operating Expenses

$1,110,204

$1,143,510

$1,177,815

$1,213,149

$1,249,544

$1,287,030

$1,325,641

$1,365,410

$1,406,373

$1,448,564

NET OPERATING INCOME

$892,051

$1,169,006

$1,263,750

$1,453,869

$1,482,790

$1,512,285

$1,542,365

$1,573,041

$1,604,326

$1,636,232

ADJUSTED NET OPERATING INCOME

$892,051

$1,169,006

$1,263,750

$1,453,869

$1,482,790

$1,512,285

$1,542,365

$1,573,041

$1,604,326

$1,636,232

$0 $0 $8,921 $8,921

$0 $0 $11,690 $11,690

$0 $0 $12,638 $12,638

$0 $0 $14,539 $14,539

$0 $0 $14,828 $14,828

$0 $0 $15,123 $15,123

$0 $0 $15,424 $15,424

$0 $0 $15,730 $15,730

$0 $0 $16,043 $16,043

$0 $0 $16,362 $16,362

$883,130

$1,157,316

$1,251,113

$1,439,330

$1,526,941

$1,557,311

$1,588,283

$1,619,869

$1,157,316

$1,251,113

$1,439,330

$1,467,962 $19,760,519 $21,228,481

$1,497,162

$883,130

$1,497,162

$1,526,941

$1,557,311

$1,588,283

$1,619,869

$911,944 $101,020

$911,944 $126,020

$911,944 $126,020

$911,944 $126,020

$911,944 $126,020

$911,944 $126,020

$911,944 $126,020

$911,944

$911,944

$911,944

CAPITAL ITEMS: Tenant Allowances Leasing Commissions Capital Reserves Total Capital Items CASH FLOW BEFORE DEBT: Cash Flow Before Debt Service Reversion (@cap rate and net of closing costs) ADJUSTED CASH FLOW BEFORE DEBT

CASH FLOW AFTER DEBT: Permanent Debt Service NMTC Debt Service (State & Fed) Other Debt Service Cash Flow After Debt Service

Interest Rate: Loan Principle:

Loan Principal Repayment ADJUSTED CASH FLOW AFTER DEBT SERVICE

Fort Myers Riverfront Development Plan

($20,220,000)

6.00% $11,795,000

-$129,834

$119,351

$213,148

$401,365

$20,190,516

$459,197

$488,976

$645,367

$676,339

$707,925

$209,956 -$129,834

$222,905 $119,351

$236,653 $213,148

$251,250 $401,365

$10,874,236 $9,316,280

$459,197

$488,976

$645,367

$676,339

$707,925

Preliminary Project Financial Forecasting Models

5-47


Preliminary Project Financial Forecasting Models Part 7 of 10

Residential Project Platform Stabilized Cash Flow Forecast

REVENUES: % GLA Residential Level 2 Level 3 Level 4 Level 5 Level 6 Level 7 Subtotal

Rentable SF 33.3% 33.3% 33.3% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 100.0%

33,700 33,700 33,700 101,100

Other Income Gross Potential Income

Rent/SF/Yr $12.00 $12.00 $12.00 $12.00 $12.00 $12.00 $12.00

Total Rent $404,400 $404,400 $404,400 $0 $0 $0 $1,213,200

101,100

$0 $1,213,200

10.00% 1 0 1.00%

$121,320 $12,000 $0 $12,132

Rental Assumptions: $1.00 101 1,000 85.00% 1.00%

Rent/psf/Month #Units AverageUnitSize RentabletoGros BadDebtExpense

% of PGI Vacancy & Credit Loss Model/Employee Units Rent Concessions Bad Debt Expense Total Loss

11.99%

$1.44

Effective Gross Income EXPENSES: Operating Expenses

$1,067,748

% of PGI

Total

$/SF

Payroll Repairs & Maintenance Turnover Contract Service/Landscaping Utilities Administrative Leasing & Marketing Insurance Real Estate Taxes Management Fees Total Operating Expenses

9.00% 0.95% 1.89% 4.73% 1.42% 1.00% 2.00% 5.00% 15.00% 4.00% 44.99%

$0.95 $0.10 $0.20 $0.50 $0.15 $0.11 $0.21 $0.53 $1.58 $0.42 $4.75

$96,045 $10,110 $20,220 $50,550 $15,165 $10,677 $21,355 $53,387 $160,162 $42,710 $480,382

Net Operating Income

55.01%

$5.81

$587,366

0% 2.00% 2.00%

$0.00 $0.21 $0.21

$0 $21,355 $21,355

53.01%

$5.60

$566,011

Capital Expenditures Capital Expenditures Replacement Reserves Total Capital Expenditures Operating Cash Flow

5-48

$145,452

Preliminary Project Financial Forecasting Models

August 19, 2009


Preliminary Project Financial Forecasting Models Part 8 of 10

Residential Project CASH FLOW FORECAST PLATFORM

Initial Capitalization: Construction Cost

Project $18,198,000

Total Construction Cost Initial Equity Contributions New Market Tax Credit Proceeds Tax Credit Proceeds Construction Loan Amount % of Total Cstrn C

100%

Leverage:

30%

Total Required Equity

Proceeds at Stabilization: Value at Stabilization based on Cap Rate Permanent Loan Amount based on Stabilized Value Permanent Loan Proceeds After Repayment of Cstrn Loan Repayment of Other Debt Permanent Loan Proceeds after repay of Debt & Equity

8.00% 70%

Outstanding Equity After Repayment of Constr. & Other Debt

$18,198,000 $11,743,260 $0 $995,340 $5,459,400

$180 Cost psf 101,100 Total GLA

$11,743,260

$0

$11,743,260

$11,743,260

$0

$7,342,076 $5,139,453 ($319,947) $0 ($319,947)

$0 ($319,947)

$0

$12,063,207

$12,063,207

$0

Square Feet Occupied Occupancy Rate (Physical) Occupancy Rate (Economic)

Assumption Summary: 85.00% Average occupancy during first operating year is 85%. All 10-year leases 10.00% Vacancy and Credit loss on all tenants (stabilized) 2.00% Structural Reserves 2.00% Average rental increases across all rental revenue beginning with stabilization 3.00% Expense growth 8.00% Reversion Cap Rate 2.00% Closing Costs (inc. commissions) 101,100 Total GLA

Year 1

Year 2

Stabilized Year 3

Year 4

Year 5

Year 6

Year 7

Year 8

Year 9

Year 10

85,935 85% 85%

90,990 90% 90%

101,100 100% 100%

101,100 100% 100%

101,100 100% 100%

101,100 100% 100%

101,100 100% 100%

101,100 100% 100%

101,100 100% 100%

101,100 100% 100%

REVENUE: Base Rental Revenue Absorption & Turnover Vacancy

$1,031,220 $0

$1,189,412 $0

$1,213,200 $0

$1,237,464 $0

$1,262,213 $0

$1,287,458 $0

$1,313,207 $0

$1,339,471 $0

$1,366,260 $0

$1,393,585 $0

Scheduled Base Rental Revenue

$1,031,220

$1,189,412

$1,213,200

$1,237,464

$1,262,213

$1,287,458

$1,313,207

$1,339,471

$1,366,260

$1,393,585

$0 $1,031,220

$0 $1,189,412

$0 $1,213,200

$0 $1,237,464

$0 $1,262,213

$0 $1,287,458

$0 $1,313,207

$0 $1,339,471

$0 $1,366,260

$0 $1,393,585

123,634.20 $907,586

142,600.00 $1,046,812

145,452.00 $1,067,748

148,361.04 $1,089,103

151,328.26 $1,110,885

154,354.83 $1,133,103

157,441.92 $1,155,765

160,590.76 $1,178,880

163,802.58 $1,202,458

167,078.63 $1,226,507

Total Operating Expenses

$408,325

$432,344

$480,382

$494,793

$509,637

$524,926

$540,674

$556,894

$573,601

$590,809

NET OPERATING INCOME

$499,261

$614,468

$587,366

$594,310

$601,248

$608,176

$615,091

$621,986

$628,856

$635,698

$0 $9,985 $9,985

$0 $12,289 $12,289

$0 $21,355 $21,355

$0 $11,886 $11,886

$0 $12,025 $12,025

$0 $12,164 $12,164

$0 $12,302 $12,302

$0 $12,440 $12,440

$0 $12,577 $12,577

$0 $12,714 $12,714

$489,276

$602,179

$566,011

$582,423

$596,013

$602,789

$609,546

$616,279

$622,984

$489,276

$602,179

$566,011

$582,423

$589,223 $7,450,161 $8,039,384

$596,013

$602,789

$609,546

$616,279

$622,984

$435,895

$435,895

$435,895

$435,895

$435,895

$435,895

$435,895

$435,895

$435,895

$435,895

$53,381

$166,284

$130,116

$146,528

$7,603,489

$160,118

$166,894

$173,651

$180,384

$187,089

$78,624 $53,381

$84,308 $166,284

$90,402 $130,116

$96,938 $146,528

$4,789,181 $2,814,307

$160,118

$166,894

$173,651

$180,384

$187,089

Other Income Gross Potential Income Total General Vacancy & Credit Loss Effective Gross Income

11.99%

CAPITAL ITEMS: Capital Expenditures Capital Reserves Total Capital Items OPERATING CASH FLOW: Cash Flow Before Debt Service Reversion (@cap rate and net of closing costs) ADJUSTED CASH FLOW BEFORE DEBT

CASH FLOW AFTER DEBT: Permanent Debt Service NMTC Debt Service (State & Fed) Other Debt Service Cash Flow After Debt Service

Interest Rate: Loan Principle:

Loan Principal Repayment ADJUSTED CASH FLOW AFTER DEBT SERVICE

Fort Myers Riverfront Development Plan

($18,198,000)

7.00% $5,139,453

Preliminary Project Financial Forecasting Models

5-49


Preliminary Project Financial Forecasting Models Part 9 of 10

Subsidized Debt Evaluation TAX REVENUE FORECAST PLATFORM

Assumptions: Tax Millage Rate Assessed Value Discount Debt Coverage Ratio Interest Rate Anuual Value Increase Length of TIF (years) City Retainage Closing Costs

1.00% 80.00% 1.25 8.00% 2.00% 15 5.00% 2.00%

Year 1 Development Use

Base Value

Hotel Tax Revenue Less: City Retainage After DCR threshold TIF Funds Available (net of closing costs)

Improved Value $36,000,000

0 0 0

Retail Less: City Retainage After DCR threshold TIF Funds Available (net of closing costs)

$1,350,000

$20,964,000

Office Less: City Retainage After DCR threshold TIF Funds Available (net of closing costs)

$3,150,000

$20,220,000

Residential Less: City Retainage After DCR threshold TIF Funds Available (net of closing costs)

$0

$18,198,000

Year 5

Year 6

Year 7

Year 8

Year 9

Year 10

Year 11

Year 12

Year 13

Year 14

Year 15

288,000 273,600 218,880

293,760 279,072 223,258

299,635 284,653 227,723

305,628 290,347 232,277

311,740 296,153 236,923

317,975 302,077 241,661

324,335 308,118 246,494

330,821 314,280 251,424

337,438 320,566 256,453

344,187 326,977 261,582

351,070 333,517 266,813

358,092 340,187 272,150

365,254 346,991 277,593

372,559 353,931 283,145

0

167,712 159,326 127,461

171,066 162,513 130,010

174,488 165,763 132,611

177,977 169,078 135,263

181,537 172,460 137,968

185,168 175,909 140,727

188,871 179,427 143,542

192,648 183,016 146,413

196,501 186,676 149,341

200,431 190,410 152,328

204,440 194,218 155,374

208,529 198,102 158,482

212,699 202,064 161,652

216,953 206,106 164,885

0

161,760 153,672 122,938

164,995 156,745 125,396

168,295 159,880 127,904

171,661 163,078 130,462

175,094 166,340 133,072

178,596 169,666 135,733

182,168 173,060 138,448

185,811 176,521 141,217

189,528 180,051 144,041

193,318 183,652 146,922

197,185 187,325 149,860

201,128 191,072 152,857

205,151 194,893 155,915

209,254 198,791 159,033

0

145,584 138,305 110,644

148,496 141,071 112,857

151,466 143,892 115,114

154,495 146,770 117,416

157,585 149,706 119,764

160,736 152,700 122,160

163,951 155,754 124,603

167,230 158,869 127,095

170,575 162,046 129,637

173,986 165,287 132,230

177,466 168,593 134,874

181,015 171,965 137,572

184,636 175,404 140,323

188,328 178,912 143,130

$1,146,626

$1,105,933

$995,340 $4,500,000

TOTAL PROJECT TIF FUNDS AVAILABLE

Preliminary Project Financial Forecasting Models

Year 4

0

$59,382,000

$3,247,900

Parking Facility Less: City Retainage After DCR threshold TIF Funds Available (net of closing costs)

5-50

Stabilized Year 3

$1,823,167

Convention Facility Less: City Retainage After DCR threshold TIF Funds Available (net of closing costs)

Subtotal Mixed Use

Year 2

TIF Potential

0

0

$5,071,067

August 19, 2009


Preliminary Project Financial Forecasting Models Part 10 of 10

NEW MARKET TAX CREDIT ANALYSIS Assumptions for NMTC Transaction: Federal Credits Credit Pricing Amount of Credit Available Amount of NMTC Allocation Gross Fed NMTC Equity Leveraged Loan Up Front CDE Fees (% of allocatio Up Front CDE Fees ($) Annual CDE Fee (% of allocation) Annual CDE Fee ($) Estimated Transaction Costs Net Federal NMTC Funds

HOTEL $0.67 39.00% 15,000,000 3,919,500 9,226,982 8.00% 1,200,000 0.50% 75,000 200,000 2,519,500

OFFICE $0.67 39.00% 10,000,000 2,613,000 5,533,482 8.00% 1,200,000 0.50% 50,000 200,000 1,213,000

State Credits Discount Rate PV of Credit Credit Pricing Amount of NMTC Allocation- Max Gross State NMTC Equity Leveraged Loan Up Front CDE Fees (% of allocatio Up Front CDE Fees ($) Annual CDE Fee (% of allocation) Annual CDE Fee ($) Estimated Transaction Costs Net State NMTC Funds

12.00% $0.28 $0.65 10,204,082 1,853,518 8,350,563 2.00% 204,082 0.50% 51,020 100,000 1,549,437

12.00% $0.28 $0.65 10,204,082 1,853,518 8,350,563 2.00% 204,082 0.50% 51,020 100,000 1,549,437

RETAIL RESIDENTIAL $0.67 $0.67 39.00% 39.00% 10,000,000 10,000,000 2,613,000 2,613,000 5,533,482 5,533,482 8.00% 8.00% 1,200,000 1,200,000 0.50% 0.50% 50,000 50,000 200,000 200,000 1,213,000 1,213,000

12.00% $0.28 $0.65 10,204,082 1,853,518 8,350,563 2.00% 204,082 0.50% 51,020 100,000 1,549,437

12.00% $0.28 $0.65 10,204,082 1,853,518 8,350,563 2.00% 204,082 0.50% 51,020 100,000 1,549,437

Cash Flows from NMTC Transaction

0.07

Year 1 HOTEL SOURCES Leveraged Loan Gross Fed NMTC Equity Project Cash Flow for Fed NMTC Fees Gross State NMTC Equity Project Cash Flow for State NMTC Fees TOTAL SOURCES OF CAPITAL

9,226,982 3,919,500 75,000 1,853,518 51,020 15,126,020

USES Up Front Fed CDE Fees QLICI Loan Mirroring Leveraged Loan Net New Sources of Funds from Fed NMTC Fed Transaction Costs Incremental Cost of Capital for Fed NMTC Up Front State CDE Fees Net New Sources of Funds from State NMTC State Transaction Costs Incremental Cost of Capital for State NMTC TOTAL USES OF CAPITAL

1,200,000 9,226,982 2,519,500 200,000 75,000 204,082 1,549,437 100,000 51,020 15,126,020

RETAIL SOURCES Leveraged Loan Gross Fed NMTC Equity Project Cash Flow for Fed NMTC Fees Gross State NMTC Equity Project Cash Flow for State NMTC Fees TOTAL SOURCES OF CAPITAL

5,533,482 2,613,000 50,000 1,853,518 51,020 10,101,020

USES Up Front Fed CDE Fees QLICI Loan Mirroring Leveraged Loan Net New Sources of Funds from Fed NMTC Fed Transaction Costs Incremental Cost of Capital for Fed NMTC Up Front State CDE Fees Net New Sources of Funds from State NMTC State Transaction Costs Incremental Cost of Capital for State NMTC TOTAL USES OF CAPITAL

1,200,000 5,533,482 1,213,000 200,000 50,000 204,082 1,549,437 100,000 51,020 10,101,020

Fort Myers Riverfront Development Plan

0.08

Year 2

0.08 Stabilized Year 3

0.08

Year 4

0.08

Year 5

Year 6

Year 7

75,000

75,000

75,000

75,000

75,000

75,000

51,020 126,020

51,020 126,020

51,020 126,020

51,020 126,020

51,020 126,020

51,020 126,020

75,000

75,000

75,000

75,000

75,000

75,000

51,020 126,020

51,020 126,020

51,020 126,020

51,020 126,020

51,020 126,020

51,020 126,020

75,000

75,000

75,000

75,000

75,000

75,000

51,020 126,020

51,020 126,020

51,020 126,020

51,020 126,020

51,020 126,020

51,020 126,020

75,000

75,000

75,000

75,000

75,000

75,000

51,020 126,020

51,020 126,020

51,020 126,020

51,020 126,020

51,020 126,020

51,020 126,020

Preliminary Project Financial Forecasting Models

5-51


Funding Strategy Sources and Uses part 1 of 11

Downtown Fort Myers Riverfront Master Plan Funding Strategy with Schedule of Sources and Uses (Public and Private Resources) Phase

Block

A1

Use

Footprint Levels (gsf)

Event Center and Parking

Level 1: Exhibit Hall

82,800

82,800

1

Building Funding Sources (gsf)

Eligible Applicant

Responsible Party

Resource Average

Resource Minimum

Matching requirement

Resource Maximum

Hotel/Tourist Development Tax

FMRA Ad Valorem TIF

Corporate naming

City of Fort Myers FMRA/City

see description

see description

see description

n/a

n/a

City/County

FMRA/City

see description

see description

see description

n/a

n/a

City

FMRA/City

see description

see description

see description

n/a

n/a

City

FMRA/City

see description

see description

see description

n/a

see description

see description

see description

n/a

1A

EB-5 Investor program

Developer/Owner/F Developer/Owner/F MRA/City MRA/City

District Organization; Indian Tribe; Local Government; Higher Education Institutions; or public or private Federal Economic non-profit Development Agency organizations. 2009 Appropriation District Organization; Indian Tribe; Local Government; Higher Education Federal Economic Institutions; or Development Agency Second Supplemental to public or private non-profit the Disaster Relief organizations. Appropriation (1)

Federal Economic Development Agency 2010 Appropriation

Aquest FUNDING STRATEGY | SOURCES AND USES

Description

82,800

State Sales Tax TIF

5-52

Application Cycle

District Organization; Indian Tribe; Local Government; Higher Education Institutions; or public or private non-profit organizations.

$1,300,000.00

$3,000,000.00

$1,300,000.00

$1,000,000.00

$1,000,000.00

$1,000,000.00

$3,000,000.00 50% match is required.

$3,000,000.00 25% match is required.

$3,000,000.00 50% match is required.

The County, per State enacted legislation, currently collects a 5% tax on room rental from hotel rooms and accomodations of 6 months or less. An additional 1% is allowed in Counties whose tourism has reached specific quantative measures. The funds are then distributed in accordance with the following: 53.6% advertsing and promotion (VCB and TDC operations), 26.4% for beach and shoreline related improvements and 20% provides debt service for the Lee County Sports Complex and promotion of not-for-profit attractions. Total collections were in excess of $23 million in fiscal 07/08. Resource minimums and maximums are not available until further discussion led by the City with the TDC and County. The tourist development tax proceeds generated by the hotel are projected to be in excess of $300,000/year in the stablized year of operation. There is precedent in many States for the redistribution of State collected sales taxes for a predetermined period to fund economic development projects. The current State sales tax is 6% and the County share is .5%. Sales tax projections for the whole development have not been forecasted as many uses are only speculative. The conceptual revenues in the stablized year from the hotel's room, food and beverage sales will alone contribute approximately $700,000 in revenue to the State. The FMRA established tax increment finance district allows for the recapture of incremental property taxes to benefit the improvement of the district or for partial redistribution to a project which will generate taxes, but is in need of an inducement for a predetermined period. Current collections of incremental revenue not pledged for other uses could be pledged as revenue for projects within the master plan.

There is precedent in many locations for corporations to pay for naming rights associated with substantive community facilities dedicated to serving a broad public audience. Given the prominence of the proposed facility and its regional and potentially national stature, an opportunity might exist to capture a one time upfront fee or regularly scheduled contractual payment for such rights. Terms in other markets have been for 10 years and between $100,000 to $1,000,000/year but are a function of market size and the use and size of the venue. n/a The resources available through this program would be represented by low cost loans. Under section 203(b)(5) of the Immigration and Nationality Act (INA), 8 U.S.C. ยง1153(b)(5), 10,000 immigrant visas per year are available to qualified individuals seeking permanent resident status on the basis of their engagement in a new commercial enterprise. Of the 10,000 investor visas (i.e., EB-5 visas) available annually, 3,000 are set aside for those who apply under a pilot program involving a USCIS-designated "Regional Center."A "Regional Center:" is an entity, organization or agency that has been approved as such by the Service; Focuses on a specific geographical area Rolling application process or within the United States; and, seeks to promote economic growth through increased export sales, improved regional productivity, creation of new jobs, and increased domestic capital investment. can work through existing "Alien investors" must: Demonstrate that a "qualified investment" (see below) is being made in a licensed entity or "regional new commercial enterprise located within an approved Regional Center; and, show, using reasonable methodologies, that 10 or more jobs are actually created either directly or indirectly by th center"

Closing date is Septermber 30, 2009

EDA will provide Public Works investments to support the construction or rehabilitation of essential public infrastructure and facilities necessary to generate or retain private sector jobs and investments, attract private sector capital, and promote regional competitiveness, including investments that expand and upgrade infrastructure to attract new industry, support technology led development, accelerate new business development, and enhance the ability of regions to capitalize on opportunities presented by free trade. The Economic Adjustment Assistance Program provides a wide range of technical, planning and infrastructure assistance in regions experiencing adverse economic changes that may occur suddenly or over time. This program is designed to respond flexibly to pressing economic recovery issues and is well suited to help address challenges faced by U.S. communities and regions. The Economic Adjustment Assistance Program is available to all eligible recipients under PWEDA, including institutions of higher education, non-profit organizations and consortia and State and local governments.

Rolling application period until money is appropriated

The Economic Adjustment Assistance program can provide a wide range of technical, planning and infrastructure assistance. This program is designed to respond adaptively to pressing economic recovery issues and is well suited to help address the challenges faced by the regions affected by the Midwest storms and floods and other recent natural disasters. Assistance can support development of a strategy to alleviate economic dislocation caused by the disaster (that is, a strategy grant) or support project implementation (an implementation grant), such as infrastructure improvements.

Rolling application period until September 30, 2010

Public Works investments to support the construction or rehabilitation of essential public infrastructure and facilities necessary to generate or retain private sector jobs and investments, attract private sector capital, and promote regional competitiveness, innovation, and entrepreneurship, including investments that expand and upgrade infrastructure to attract new industry, support technology-led development, accelerate new business development, and enhance the ability of regions to capitalize on opportunities presented by free trade. The Economic Adjustment Assistance Program provides a wide range of technical, planning and public works and infrastructure assistance in regions experiencing adverse economic changes that may occur suddenly or over time. This program is designed to respond flexibly to pressing economic recovery issues and is well suited to help address challenges faced by U.S. communities and regions.

August 19, 2009


Downtown Fort Myers Riverfront Master Plan Funding Strategy with Schedule of Sources and Uses (Public and Private Resources) 2009 Phase

Block

A1

Use

Event Center and Parking

Level 1: Exhibit Hall

Footprint Levels (gsf)

82,800

Building (gsf)

1

August

September

October

2010 November

December

January

February

March

April

May

June

July

2011 August

September

October

Novermber

December

January

February

March

April

May

June

July

August

September

82,800

82,800

1A

1,300,000 Funding Awarded

Application Submittal

Application Preparation

Estimated Submittal Rolling Application Period

3,000,000 Funding Awarded

Application Preparation

Fort Myers Riverfront Development Plan

Application Submittal

1,300,000 Funding Awarded

5-53


Funding Strategy Sources and Uses part 2 of 11

Downtown Fort Myers Riverfront Master Plan Funding Strategy with Schedule of Sources and Uses (Public and Private Resources) Phase

Block

Use

Footprint Levels (gsf)

Harborside Expansion

0

2

Building Funding Sources (gsf)

Responsible Party

Resource Average

Federal Economic Development Agency 2009 Appropriation

District Organization; Indian Tribe; Local Government; Higher Education Institutions; or public or private non-profit organizations.

$1,300,000.00

District Organization; Indian Tribe; Local Government; Higher Education Federal Economic Institutions; or Development Agency Second Supplemental to public or private non-profit the Disaster Relief organizations. Appropriation (1)

1A

Federal Economic Development Agency 2010 Appropriation

Lecture Hall (level 1), Lecture Hall (level 2), Event Center Retail, Event Center Admin, Meeting Rooms

10600 2500 2160 7600 5625

2 2 1 1 1

13100 13100 2160 7600 5625

Hotel/Tourist Development Tax

State Sales Tax TIF

Aquest FUNDING STRATEGY | SOURCES AND USES

Resource Minimum

Matching requirement

Resource Maximum

Application Cycle

Description

28,485

B1-B4

5-54

Eligible Applicant

$3,000,000.00

District Organization; Indian Tribe; Local Government; Higher Education Institutions; or public or private non-profit organizations.

City/County

FMRA/City

$3,000,000.00 25% match is required.

$1,000,000.00

$1,300,000.00

City of Fort Myers FMRA/City

$3,000,000.00 50% match is required.

$1,000,000.00

$3,000,000.00 50% match is required.

$1,000,000.00

Closing date is Septermber 30, 2009

EDA will provide Public Works investments to support the construction or rehabilitation of essential public infrastructure and facilities necessary to generate or retain private sector jobs and investments, attract private sector capital, and promote regional competitiveness, including investments that expand and upgrade infrastructure to attract new industry, support technology led development, accelerate new business development, and enhance the ability of regions to capitalize on opportunities presented by free trade. The Economic Adjustment Assistance Program provides a wide range of technical, planning and infrastructure assistance in regions experiencing adverse economic changes that may occur suddenly or over time. This program is designed to respond flexibly to pressing economic recovery issues and is well suited to help address challenges faced by U.S. communities and regions. The Economic Adjustment Assistance Program is available to all eligible recipients under PWEDA, including institutions of higher education, non-profit organizations and consortia and State and local governments.

Rolling application period until money is appropriated

The Economic Adjustment Assistance program can provide a wide range of technical, planning and infrastructure assistance. This program is designed to respond adaptively to pressing economic recovery issues and is well suited to help address the challenges faced by the regions affected by the Midwest storms and floods and other recent natural disasters. Assistance can support development of a strategy to alleviate economic dislocation caused by the disaster (that is, a strategy grant) or support project implementation (an implementation grant), such as infrastructure improvements.

Rolling application period until September 30, 2010

Public Works investments to support the construction or rehabilitation of essential public infrastructure and facilities necessary to generate or retain private sector jobs and investments, attract private sector capital, and promote regional competitiveness, innovation, and entrepreneurship, including investments that expand and upgrade infrastructure to attract new industry, support technology-led development, accelerate new business development, and enhance the ability of regions to capitalize on opportunities presented by free trade. The Economic Adjustment Assistance Program provides a wide range of technical, planning and public works and infrastructure assistance in regions experiencing adverse economic changes that may occur suddenly or over time. This program is designed to respond flexibly to pressing economic recovery issues and is well suited to help address challenges faced by U.S. communities and regions.

see description

see description

see description

n/a

n/a

see description

see description

see description

n/a

n/a

FMRA Ad Valorem TIF

City

FMRA/City

see description

see description

see description

n/a

n/a

Corporate naming

City

FMRA/City

see description

see description

see description

n/a

n/a

The County, per State enacted legislation, currently collects a 5% tax on room rental from hotel rooms and accomodations of 6 months or less. An additional 1% is allowed in Counties whose tourism has reached specific quantative measures. The funds are then distributed in accordance with the following: 53.6% advertsing and promotion (VCB and TDC operations), 26.4% for beach and shoreline related improvements and 20% provides debt service for the Lee County Sports Complex and promotion of not-for-profit attractions. Total collections were in excess of $23 million in fiscal 07/08. Resource minimums and maximums are not available until further discussion led by the City with the TDC and County. The tourist development tax proceeds generated by the hotel are projected to be in excess p y of $300,000/year in the stablized year of operation. predetermined period to fund economic development projects. The current State sales tax is 6% and the County share is .5%. Sales tax projections for the whole development have not been forecasted as many uses are only speculative. The conceptual revenues in the stablized year from the hotel's room, food and beverage sales will alone contribute approximately $700,000 in revenue to the State. The FMRA established tax increment finance district allows for the recapture of incremental property taxes to benefit the improvement of the district or for partial redistribution to a project which will generate taxes, but is in need of an inducement for a predetermined period. Current collections of incremental revenue not pledged for other uses could be pledged as revenue for projects within the master plan. There is precedent in many locations for corporations to pay for naming rights associated with substantive community facilities dedicated to serving a broad public audience. Given the prominence of the proposed facility and its regional and potentially national stature, an opportunity might exist to capture a one time upfront fee or regularly scheduled contractual payment for such rights. Terms in other markets have been for 10 years and between $100,000 to $1,000,000/year but are a function of market size and the use and size of the venue.

August 19, 2009


Downtown Fort Myers Riverfront Master Plan Funding Strategy with Schedule of Sources and Uses (Public and Private Resources) 2009 Phase

Block

Use

Footprint Levels (gsf)

Harborside Expansion

0

Building (gsf)

August

September

October

2010 November

December

January

February

March

April

May

June

July

1A Application Preparation

Estimated Submittal Rolling Application Period

October

Novermber

December

January

February

March

April

May

June

July

August

September

3,000,000 Funding Awarded

Application Preparation

2 2 1 1 1

September

1,300,000 Funding Awarded

Application Submittal

10600 2500 2160 7600 5625

August

28,485

2

B1-B4

Lecture Hall (level 1), Lecture Hall (level 2), Event Center Retail, Event Center Admin, Meeting Rooms

2011

Application Submittal

1,300,000 Funding Awarded

13100 13100 2160 7600 5625

Fort Myers Riverfront Development Plan

5-55


Funding Strategy Sources and Uses part 3 of 11

Downtown Fort Myers Riverfront Master Plan Funding Strategy with Schedule of Sources and Uses (Public and Private Resources) Phase

Block

Use

Footprint Levels (gsf)

Hotel

39,000

Rooms Tower

12

Building Funding Sources (gsf)

Eligible Applicant

Responsible Party

Resource Average

Resource Minimum

Matching requirement

Resource Maximum

Application Cycle

Description

378,370 Could be used a private match for Harborside funding

Private Capital Traditional Debt/Equity

12

Developer/Owner

Developer/Owner

Federal New Market Tax Developer/Owner/F Developer/Owner/F Credits MRA/City MRA/City

n/a

n/a

n/a

n/a

n/a

n/a

Traditional bank debt along with equity from private sources will be available, subject to creating the requisite capital stack including public incentives which create a market rate of return and public impovements necessary to induce demand.

Allocations are made on a project basis and can involve more than one CDE per project. Generally $15,000,000-$20,000,000 million per CDE per project is a maximum. Each of the individual projects which are private sector driven is eligible to $0.00 utilize the credits. n/a

Yearly appropriation by government (add'l funds Part of the Community Renewal Tax Relief Act of 2000, the New Markets Tax Credit Program will made available through spur approximately $15 billion in investments into privately managed investment institutions. In ARRA) and application turn, these privately managed investment institutions, or Community Development Entities (CDEs), process for those seeking will make loans and capital investments in businesses in underserved areas. By making an allocations. Projects are investment in a CDE, an individual or corporate investor can receive a tax credit worth 39 percent considered by allocatees on a (30 percent net present value) of the initial investment, distributed over 7 years, along with any anticipated return on their investment in the CDE. The NMTC Program permits taxpayers to claim rolling basis subject to the a credit against Federal income taxes for Qualified Equity Investments (QEIs) made to acquire allocatees mission, project stock or a capital interest in designated Community Development Entities (CDEs). These specifics (asset type, designated CDEs must use substantially all (defined as 85 percent) of these proceeds to make location, job creation...) and Qualified Low-Income Community Investments (QLICIs). The investor, or a subsequent purchaser, is provided with a tax credit claimed over seven years. The investor receives a tax credit equal to fiv the status of the project.

$0.00

Open application - target full versus federal tax liability. The program has been allocated $250 million which is expected to be distributed within 12 months through Enterprise Florida. allocation by July , 2010

The Florida State program, enacted July 1, 2009, essentially mirrors the Federal program with several technical exceptions, most notably the application of the credits to FL corporate tax liability

State New Market Tax Credits

1A

n/a

$10,000,000 n/a

C1

Enterprise Zone

Brownfield Zone

FMRA Ad Valorem TIF

1A

C2

5-56

Developer/Owner/F Developer/Owner/F MRA/City MRA/City

Public Parking

167,400

Aquest FUNDING STRATEGY | SOURCES AND USES

1-4

224

City

City

City

City

City

FMRA/City

EB-5 Investor program

Developer/Owner/F Developer/Owner/F MRA/City MRA/City

Private Capital Traditional Debt/Equity, New Market Tax Credits, State New Market Tax Credits, Enterprise Zone/Brownfield credits, FMRA TIF, EB-5

SEE C1 AND A1, FOR DETAILS OF THE FUNDING SOURCES TO THE LEFT

n/a

see description

$2,500 per job created with 25% of $2,500 benefit being paid out yearly

n/a

see description

see description

see description

see description

see description

see description

see description

see description

The Enterprise zone designation provides businesses potential credits for application against corporate income tax and sales tax payments to the State based upon the creation of new jobs and capital investment. The credits are in an amount determined by the number and wages of new employees, weighted for employees from within the EZ, building material sales tax credits, property tax credits and new equipment sales tax credits. The program is administered through Rolling application process Enterprise Florida and the County Economic Development office. The property within the master once in designated Enterprise plan area is not currently within the Enterprise Zone and formal steps need to be taken before it is included and benefits could be realized. Zone

20% optional - without match only 80% of total potntial refund is attainable Rolling application process

Similar to the Enterprise zone designation, the Brownfield designation would provide businesses, with several qualifications if not a QTI including minimum capital investment and creation of 10 FTE, potential credits (up to $2500/job) for application against corporate and sales tax payments to the State based upon the creation of new jobs. The program is administered through Enterprise Florida. The property within the master plan area is not currently a brownfield, however given the nature of the redevelopment efforts, would qualify.

n/a

n/a

The FMRA established tax increment finance district allows for the recapture of incremental property taxes to benefit the improvement of the district or for partial redistribution to a project which will generate taxes, but is in need of an inducement for a predetermined period. Current collections of incremental revenue not pledged for other uses could be pledged as revenue for projects within the master plan. Projected ad valorem tax revenue from the hotel is estimated to be near $400,000 per year at stabliization - a portion thereof could be reimbursed as an incentive.

n/a

The resources available through this program would be represented by low cost loans. Under section 203(b)(5) of the Immigration and Nationality Act (INA), 8 U.S.C. ยง1153(b)(5), 10,000 immigrant visas per year are available to qualified individuals seeking permanent resident status on the basis of their engagement in a new commercial enterprise. Of the 10,000 investor visas (i.e., EB-5 visas) available annually, 3,000 are set aside for those who apply under a pilot program involving a USCIS-designated "Regional Center."A "Regional Center:" is an entity, organization or Rolling application process or agency that has been approved as such by the Service; Focuses on a specific geographical area within the United States; and, seeks to promote economic growth through increased export sales, can work through existing improved regional productivity, creation of new jobs, and increased domestic capital investment. licensed entity or "regional "Alien investors" must: Demonstrate that a "qualified investment" (see below) is being made in a center" subject to their ability new commercial enterprise located within an approved Regional Center; and, show, using reasonable methodologies, that 10 or more jobs are actually created either directly or indirectly by th to raise investor equity.

August 19, 2009


Downtown Fort Myers Riverfront Master Plan Funding Strategy with Schedule of Sources and Uses (Public and Private Resources) 2009 Phase

Block

Use

Hotel

Footprint Levels (gsf) 39,000

Rooms Tower

12

Building (gsf)

August

September

October

2010 November

December

January

March

April

May

June

July

August

September

October

Novermber

December

January

February

March

April

May

June

July

August

September

378,370

12

Application preparation

1A

February

2011

Traditional application deadline

Allocations determined

Next EZ Board Meeting 10/27

C1

1A

C2

Public Parking

167,400

1-4

224

Fort Myers Riverfront Development Plan

5-57


Funding Strategy Sources and Uses part 4 of 11

Downtown Fort Myers Riverfront Master Plan Funding Strategy with Schedule of Sources and Uses (Public and Private Resources) Phase

Block

D1-D2

Use

Footprint Levels (gsf)

Mixed Use

45,500

Retail/Residential/ Office

45,500

4

4

Building Funding Sources (gsf)

Private Capital Traditional Debt/Equity, New Market Tax Credits, State New Market Tax Credits, Enterprise Zone/Brownfield credits, 347,450 FMRA TIF, EB-5

Lee County Job 156,800 Opportunity Program

Lee County Financial Incentives for Recruiting Strategic Targets

D1

Eligible Applicant

Responsible Party

Resource Average

Resource Minimum

Resource Maximum

Matching requirement

Application Cycle

SEE C1 AND A1, FOR DETAILS OF THE FUNDING SOURCES TO THE LEFT

Locating or Expanding Companies in target industries

Locating or Expanding Companies in target industries

Business in targeted industry.

$6,000.00

$6,000.00

$500,000.00

Business in targeted industry.

Rolling Application Period

Qualified companies may be awarded up to $6,000 for each full-time, permanent job created, subject to a maximum award amount of $500,000. Incentives are paid in the form of reimbursements as new jobs are created. New employment paying an average wage that exceeds the Lee County average may qualify for an award of up to $2,000 per job. Businesses paying 115% of the annual average wage may qualify for an award of up to $3,000 per job; businesses paying 125% of the annual average wage may receive up to $4,000 per job; and businesses paying 150% or more of the annual average wage may qualify for up to $5,000 per job. An additional incentive of up to $1,000 for each full-time, permanent job may be provided for a company locating or expanding in the Fort Myers/Lee County Enterprise Zone. Must create at least 10 new full time permanent jobs. Incentive must be an inducement for the company to locate or expand in Lee County; application must be made prior to the companyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s making a decision. The following types of costs are eligible: payment of impact or permit fees; Infrastructure costs; Capital machinery and equipment; Existing facility improvements or rehabilitation; Selected company relocation costs; Land

Rolling Application Period

Company must be approved for participation prior tomaking a decision to locate or expand in Lee County. Must operate within a target industry or high impact sector, create at least 75 new full-time equivalent jobs within 3 years paying an average wage of at least 125% of the Lee County average wage, and make a capital investment within Lee County over the life of the project that is equal to or greater than the amount awarded.

Rolling Application Period

Applicants must be approved prior to make a decision to relocate to Lee County. Pre-approved applicants who create jobs in Florida receive tax refunds of $3,000 per net new full-time equivalent Florida job created; $6,000 in an Enterprise Zone or Rural County. For businesses paying 150 percent of the average annual wage, add $1,000 per job; for businesses paying 200 percent of the average annual salary, add $2,000 per job. New or expanding businesses in selected targeted industries or corporate headquarters are eligible. If approved, the applicant may receive refunds on the taxes it pays. This includes corporate income, sales, ad valorem, intangible personal property, insurance premium, communications services, and certain other taxes. There is a cap of $5 million per single qualified applicant in all years, and no more than 25 percent of the total refund approved may be taken in any single fiscal year. Must create at least 10 new full-time jobs, pay an average annual wage that is at least 115 percent of the state, metropolitan statistical area, or the local average wages

1B

Enterprise Florida Qualified Target Industries Tax Refund

D2

5-58

Level 1: Retail Level 2: Residential Level 3: Residential Level 4: Residential

45,000 37,100 37,100 37,100

Parking/Retail

38,130

Level 1: Garage Level 1: Retail Level 2: Garage Level 3: Garage Level 4: Garage Level 5: Garage

32,070 6,060 38,130 38,130 38,130 38,130

Aquest FUNDING STRATEGY | SOURCES AND USES

4

Description

Pre-approved companies

Business in targeted industry.

$3,000.00

$3,000.00

$5,000,000.00

190,650

August 19, 2009


Downtown Fort Myers Riverfront Master Plan Funding Strategy with Schedule of Sources and Uses (Public and Private Resources) 2009 Phase

Block

D1-D2

Use

Footprint Levels (gsf)

Building (gsf)

45,500

4

347,450

Retail/Residential/ Office

45,500

4

156,800

Level 1: Retail Level 2: Residential Level 3: Residential Level 4: Residential

45,000 37,100 37,100 37,100

Parking/Retail

38,130

4

190,650

Level 1: Garage Level 1: Retail Level 2: Garage Level 3: Garage Level 4: Garage Level 5: Garage

32,070 6,060 38,130 38,130 38,130 38,130

Mixed Use

August

September

October

2010 November

December

January

February

March

April

May

June

July

2011 August

September

October

Novermber

December

January

February

March

April

May

June

July

August

September

D1

1B

D2

Fort Myers Riverfront Development Plan

5-59


Funding Strategy Sources and Uses part 5 of 11

Downtown Fort Myers Riverfront Master Plan Funding Strategy with Schedule of Sources and Uses (Public and Private Resources) Phase

3

Block

Use

Footprint Levels (gsf)

E1 Mixed Use

12,200

Level 1: Retail Level 2: Residential Level 3: Residential Level 4: Residential

F1-F2

F1 3

F2

Mixed Use

Eligible Applicant

Private Capital Traditional Debt/Equity, New Market Tax Credits, State New Market Tax Credits, Enterprise Zone/Brownfield credits, 43,460 EB-5

SEE C1, HOTEL TOWER FOR FUNDING SOURCES AND RELATED DETAILS

Private Capital Traditional Debt/Equity, New Market Tax Credits, State New Market Tax Credits, Enterprise Zone/Brownfield credits, 154,100 EB-5

SEE C1, HOTEL TOWER FOR FUNDING SOURCES AND RELATED DETAILS

Responsible Party

13,525 & 25,000

Retail/Residential/ Office

13,525

Level 1: Retail Level 2: Residential Level 3: Residential Level 4: Residential

13,525 13,525 13,525 13,525

Resource Minimum

Resource Maximum

Matching requirement

Application Cycle

Description

Retail/Residential/Office

25,000

Level 1: Retail Level 2: Resdiential/Comm. Level 3: Potential additional levels as Residential or Commercial Level 3 & 4: Potential additional levels as Residential or Commercial

25,000 25,000

W1-W7

37 4

107

2-4 50,000100,000

25,000

25,000

#REF!

1

Private Capital Traditional Debt/Equity, New Market Tax Credits, State New Market Tax Credits, Enterprise Zone/Brownfield credits, 66,370 EB-5

Federal Economic Development Agency 2009 Appropriation

SEE C1, HOTEL TOWER FOR FUNDING SOURCES AND RELATED DETAILS

District Organization; Indian Tribe; Local Government; Higher Education Institutions; or public or private non-profit organizations. City of Fort Myers

District Organization; Indian Tribe; Local Government; Higher Education Federal Economic Institutions; or Development Agency Second Supplemental to public or private non-profit the Disaster Relief organizations. City of Fort Myers Appropriation (1)

Federal Economic Development Agency 2010 Appropriation

5-60

Resource Average

12,200 10,420 10,420 10,420

Waterfront Mixed Use

1B, 2, 3

4

Building Funding Sources (gsf)

Aquest FUNDING STRATEGY | SOURCES AND USES

District Organization; Indian Tribe; Local Government; Higher Education Institutions; or public or private non-profit organizations. City of Fort Myers

$1,300,000.00

$3,000,000.00

$1,300,000.00

$1,000,000.00

$1,000,000.00

$1,000,000.00

$3,000,000.00 50% match is required.

$3,000,000.00 25% match is required.

$3,000,000.00 50% match is required.

Closing date is Septermber 30, 2009

EDA will provide Public Works investments to support the construction or rehabilitation of essential public infrastructure and facilities necessary to generate or retain private sector jobs and investments, attract private sector capital, and promote regional competitiveness, including investments that expand and upgrade infrastructure to attract new industry, support technology led development, accelerate new business development, and enhance the ability of regions to capitalize on opportunities presented by free trade. The Economic Adjustment Assistance Program provides a wide range of technical, planning and infrastructure assistance in regions experiencing adverse economic changes that may occur suddenly or over time. This program is designed to respond flexibly to pressing economic recovery issues and is well suited to help address challenges faced by U.S. communities and regions. The Economic Adjustment Assistance Program is available to all eligible recipients under PWEDA, including institutions of higher education, non-profit organizations and consortia and State and local governments.

Rolling application period until money is appropriated

The Economic Adjustment Assistance program can provide a wide range of technical, planning and infrastructure assistance. This program is designed to respond adaptively to pressing economic recovery issues and is well suited to help address the challenges faced by the regions affected by the Midwest storms and floods and other recent natural disasters. Assistance can support development of a strategy to alleviate economic dislocation caused by the disaster (that is, a strategy grant) or support project implementation (an implementation grant), such as infrastructure improvements.

Rolling application period until September 30, 2010

Public Works investments to support the construction or rehabilitation of essential public infrastructure and facilities necessary to generate or retain private sector jobs and investments, attract private sector capital, and promote regional competitiveness, innovation, and entrepreneurship, including investments that expand and upgrade infrastructure to attract new industry, support technology-led development, accelerate new business development, and enhance the ability of regions to capitalize on opportunities presented by free trade.

August 19, 2009


Downtown Fort Myers Riverfront Master Plan Funding Strategy with Schedule of Sources and Uses (Public and Private Resources) 2009 Phase

Block

3

E1

Use

Mixed Use Level 1: Retail Level 2: Residential Level 3: Residential Level 4: Residential

F1-F2

F1 3

F2

1B, 2, 3

Mixed Use

Footprint Levels (gsf)

12,200

Building (gsf)

August

September

October

2010 November

December

January

February

March

April

May

June

July

2011 August

September

October

Novermber

December

January

February

March

April

May

June

July

August

September

43,460

4

12,200 10,420 10,420 10,420

154,100

13,525 & 25,000

Retail/Residential/ Office

13,525

Level 1: Retail Level 2: Residential Level 3: Residential Level 4: Residential

13,525 13,525 13,525 13,525

Retail/Residential/Office

25,000

Level 1: Retail Level 2: Resdiential/Comm. Level 3: Potential additional levels as Residential or Commercial Level 3 & 4: Potential additional levels as Residential or Commercial

25,000 25,000

Waterfront Mixed Use

#REF!

37 4

107

2-4 50,000100,000

25,000

25,000

1

W1-W7

66,370

1,300,000 Funding Awarded

Application Submittal

Application Preparation

Estimated Submittal Rolling Application Period

3,000,000 Funding Awarded

Application Preparation

Fort Myers Riverfront Development Plan

Application Submittal

1,300,000 Funding Awarded

5-61


Funding Strategy Sources and Uses part 6 of 11

Downtown Fort Myers Riverfront Master Plan Funding Strategy with Schedule of Sources and Uses (Public and Private Resources) Phase

Block

Use

Footprint Levels (gsf)

Building Funding Sources (gsf)

Eligible Applicant

Responsible Party

Resource Average

Resource Minimum

Matching requirement

Resource Maximum

Application Cycle

Description

P1-P7 Public Improvements

1A-2

P2, P5, P19, W2W3, W5W7

Land Acquisition Stan Mayfield Working Waterfronts Florida Forever Grant Program

Local Government and non-profit working waterfront organizations

Subtotal for Land Acquisition

FDEP - Clean Water Revolving Loan Fund PreConstruction (3) Local government

1A

P1, P3

City of Fort Myers

Local government and special districts

City of Fort Myers

Cities, counties, authorities, and special districts

City of Fort Myers

FDEP - Community Budget Issues Request (7)

State and local governments, colleges, universities, nonprofit organizations, public utilities and state water management districts. Partnering with other entities is strongly encouraged City of Fort Myers Local Government, Water Management Districts, Special Districts for Water Management City of Fort Myers

EPA Gulf of Mexico Program (5)

State and local governments, interstate agencies, tribes, colleges and universities, and other public or nonprofit organizations. City of Fort Myers

FDEP - Federal Section 319 Grant (5)

Stormwater Feature Grants

Subtotal for Stormwater Grants Stormwater Total

5-62

$0.00

Aquest FUNDING STRATEGY | SOURCES AND USES

$7,500,000.00

$0.00

No funding available for Fiscal Year 2009/2010. Funding can be used to acquire land directly used for the purpose of active commercial seafood/aquaculture. This includes piers, wharves, docks and other facilities that provide waterfront access. Funds can also be used to acquire land used for exhibitions, demonstrations, educational venues, civic spaces, and other purposes that educate the general public about Florida Working Waterfronts. It is expected the Legislature will award money for the 2010/2011 fiscal year. According to draft rulemaking, funding will be capped at 5 million per project per fiscal year. Draft rulemaking also indicates requests under 1.5 million will receive higher points than those over 1.5 million.

$5,000,000.00

$0.00

$250,000.00

$7,500,000.00

$250,000.00

$7,750,000.00

$0.00

$7,500,000.00

Subtotal for Stormwater Loans

P1, P3

$1,500,000.00

$1,500,000.00

Stormwater Feature Loans

FDEP - Clean Water Revolving Loan Fund Construction (4)(5) FDEP - Clean Water Revolving Loan Fund Green Infrastructure (ARRA 2009) (6)

1A

$2,300,000.00

$2,300,000.00

Match is strongly encouraged to earn additional points. Match can be government revenue and existing cash from non-profit organization. Draft rulemaking indicates a 35% or more match will $5,000,000.00 receive the most points.

Last Pre-construction deadline was June 1, 2009. New applications are held until new rulemaking is complete. It is believed rulemaking will do away with program for larger municipalitites. In addition, loan amount is per Sponsor, City of Fort Myers already has loans for wastewater, reducing amount available.

Loans provide up-front disbursements for project planning, administrative services and project design. The loans also provide a mechanism for continued funding for project costs, including construction. Interest rates calculated for each system using the Thomson Publishing Corporation's "Bond Buyer" 20-Bond GO Index and an affordability index developed specifically for the Bureau. Once the affordability index for a service area is determined, it is divided by 200 and the resulting number is multiplied by the 20-Bond GO Index. The maximum interest rate is limited to 80% of the market rate. The rate does not change over the life of the loan. Repayment in equal semiannual amounts begins six months after project work is scheduled to be completed. The repayment revenue source must be identified; most commonly a pledge of water and sewer utility revenues is, used but other types of revenues can be considered.

Currently, maximum cap is set at 10 million, this has fluctated in the past. Staff is hoping with the new rulemaking, 10 million maximum will be permanent. The repayment period for loans is 20 years. Interest rates are no longer the same for all projects. They are now calculated for each system using the Thomson Publishing Corporation's "Bond Buyer" 20-Bond GO Index and an affordability index developed specifically for the Bureau. Application review currently on hold for Once the affordability index for a service area is determined, it is divided by 200 and the resulting number is multiplied by the 20-Bond GO Index. The maximum interest rate is limited to 80% of the market rate. The rate new ruling making. In addition, loan amount is per Sponsor, the City of Fort does not change over the life of the loan. Repayment in equal semiannual amounts begins six months after project work is scheduled to be completed. The repayment revenue source must be identified; most commonly Myers already has loans for wastewater, reducing amount available. a pledge of water and sewer utility revenues is, used but other types of revenues can be considered.

All funding has been awarded.

Possibility of additional funding coming available. Would be added to Construction Loan Fund.

$75,000.00

Project proposals due May 22, 2009 for review and ranking. DEP will submit a draft “work plan” on August 31, 2009 containing selected proposals to EPA for their review and comment. DEP will notify applicants of the status of their 40% NonFederal Match required. Non-federal project proposals in Sept 2009. EPA expenditures starting October anticipates awarding the funds in 2009 can be counted toward Summer 2010, and DEP initiates work/contracting with grantees. $1,000,000.00 match.

Application cycle for 2010 closed, next cycle to open Feb. 2010 for FY 2011. These grant funds are used to implement projects to reduce nonpoint sources of pollution. Nonpoint source (NPS) pollution refers to diffuse sources of pollution, such as stormwater runoff from urban areas and agricultural operations, failing septic tanks, and erosion from construction sites. DEP currently awards nearly $5 million each year in Section 319 funds to local governments and others in Florida to implement projects, such as stormwater treatment facilities, demonstration projects for agricultural best management practices (BMPs), and training and education programs to reduce NPS pollution. May require the addition of monitoring to the project scope.

$50,000.00

None required; however strongly encouraged or less than 50% of request will be $1,000,000.00 funded.

No funding available for Fiscal Yea 2009/2010. To be eligible projects must protect public health and environment and implement a State, regional or local plan related to water quality protection. Projects eleigble for funding include stormwater construction, surface water improvement and restoration construction, other water management project construction.

$173,000.00

$13,000.00

No matching requirement; however, the extent of partnerships and leveraged funding will be considered during the evaluation process. Other federal grant funds may be be used as voluntary matches or cost shares without statute $333,000.00 authority.

$1,173,000.00 $8,673,000.00

$138,000.00 $338,000.00

$1,000,000.00

$0.00

Application deadline June 5, 2009

Successful proposals must have clear and measurable environmental results directly related to EPA’s Strategic Plan specifically Goal 4, Objective 4.3 and Subobjective 4.3.5. EPA’s Strategic Plan: http://www.epa.gov/ocfo/plan/plan.htm All proposed projects must demonstrate the linkage to the Strategic Plan and include specific statements describing the environmental results of the proposed project in terms of welldefined outputs, and, to the maximum extent practicable, well-defined outcomes that demonstrate how the project will contribute to the overall goal of restoring and protecting ecosystems.

$2,333,000.00 $8,833,000.00

August 19, 2009


Downtown Fort Myers Riverfront Master Plan Funding Strategy with Schedule of Sources and Uses (Public and Private Resources) 2009 Phase

Block

Use

Footprint Levels (gsf)

Building (gsf)

August

September

October

2010 November

December

January

February

March

April

May

June

July

2011 August

September

October

Novermber

December

January

February

March

April

May

June

July

August

September

P1-P7 Public Improvements

1A-2

P2, P5, P19, W2W3, W5W7

Land Acquisition

Application Preparation

Max 5,000,000 Funidng Awarded

Application Submittal

Subtotal for Land Acquisition

1A

P1, P3

Stormwater Feature Loans

Application Preparation

Application Submittal

7,500,000 Funding Awarded

Application Hearing

Subtotal for Stormwater Loans

1A

P1, P3

Application Preparation

Application Submittal

Application Preparation

Application Submittal

1,000,000 Funding Awarded

Stormwater Feature Grants

173,000 Funding Awarded

Subtotal for Stormwater Grants Stormwater Total

Fort Myers Riverfront Development Plan

5-63


Funding Strategy Sources and Uses part 7 of 11

Downtown Fort Myers Riverfront Master Plan Funding Strategy with Schedule of Sources and Uses (Public and Private Resources) Phase

Block

Use

Footprint Levels (gsf)

Building Funding Sources (gsf)

P1

Responsible Party

$400.00

FDEP - Florida Recreation Development Assistance Program (FRDAP) (5) Local government

City of Fort Myers

$200,000.00

$200,000.00

$200,000.00

Match ratio is 1:1 Cash; Inkind services; Value of donated real property owned by applicant can be used for match if pre$500,000.00 approved by DEP.

Local government

City of Fort Myers

Local government

Local government

City of Fort Myers

City of Fort Myers

Subtotal for Seawall

FDEP - Florida Recreation Development Assistance Program (FRDAP) (5) Local government

National Park Service (NPS) through FDEP Land and Water Conservation Fund Program (5)

FDEP - Coastal Partnerships Initiative Grants - Access to Coastal Resources (5)

Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission (FWC) Florida Boating Improvement Program Tier II (5)

5-64

$200,000.00

$20,000.00

Grant recipients will be required to provide 100% (1 to 1) matching funding. Match may include cash, employee salaries, value of volunteer work time volunteers, or value of construction materials. Federal funds from any source may not be used $60,000.00 as match

$200,000.00

$5,000.00

Must identify in kind and cash matches. Non cash matches may be administrative/ contract mngmnt, Engineering/ Construction Mngmnt, equipment through in house resources. No more than 5% of total project costs may be administrative/constructio n management match and no more than 10% may be engineering/ construction mngmnt. No advanced $500,000.00 funds will be awarded.

$765,000.00

$425,400.00

Local government

City of Fort Myers

City of Fort Myers

$40,000.00

$200,000.00

$200,000.00

Aquest FUNDING STRATEGY | SOURCES AND USES

Local government

Local government

City of Fort Myers

$200,000.00

$200,000.00

Match ratio is 1:1 Cash; Inkind services; Value of donated real property owned by applicant can be used for match if pre$500,000.00 approved by DEP.

$20,000.00

Grant recipients will be required to provide 100% (1 to 1) matching funding. Match may include cash, employee salaries, value of volunteer work time volunteers, or value of construction materials. Federal funds from any source may not be used $60,000.00 as match

$200,000.00

$5,000.00

Must identify in kind and cash matches. Non cash matches may be administrative/ contract mngmnt, Engineering/ Construction Mngmnt, equip through in house resources. No more than 5% of total project costs may be administrative/ construction mngmnt match and no more than 10% may be engineering/ construction mngmnt. No advanced funds will be $500,000.00 awarded.

City of Fort Myers

$640,000.00

$425,000.00

$40,000.00

Application Cycle

Description

Application period was from February 2 to April 2, 2009

Projects includes shoreline stabilization, waterway related recreation, environmental education, public navigation, boating safety and recreation and any other improvements/construction that improve boat access or navigation. Projects are funded on a reimbursement basis and are limited to one year. http://www.wcind.net/

Submission period September 115, 2009. Administered by FDEP.

Grants for acquisition or development of land for public outdoor recreation. http://www.dep.state.fl.us/parks/OIRS/ Funds can be used for outdoor recreation areas and facilities such as beaches, picnic areas, trails, ball fields, tennis and basketball courts and playgrounds along with associated support facilities such as lighting, parking, restrooms and landscaping, and acquisition of land for outdoor recreation purposes. Enclosed buildings and structures (except restrooms, restroom/concession buildings and bathhouses) are ineligible. http://www.dep.state.fl.us/parks/OIRS/

August - October 2009 - Notice of Availability of Funds is published in the Florida Administrative Weekly, posted on www.dep.state.fl.us/cmp/grants/ind ex.htm Applications are due 60 days after the Notice is published in the FAW. Applications should be for projects that can be completed from July 1, 2010 – June 30, 2011

The Coastal Partnership Initiative intends to inspire community action and promote the protection and effective management of Florida’s coastal resources. Access to Coastal Resources: Communities are encouraged to accommodate public access to coastal and marine resources while protecting fragile and overused environments. Access projects could include developing plans for land acquisition and management; developing site plans for nature trails; developing recreational surface water use policies; exotic species removal and restoration of native species; and small-scale capital improvements such as dune walkovers, boardwalks, and canoe launches. http://www.dep.state.fl.us/cmp/grants/index.htm

Application is announced on February 1 of every year. Application must be submitted within 60 days.

A competitive grant program with 4 categories (1 Boat Ramps, Piers and Docks, 2 Public Launching Facilities, 3 Boater Education, 4 Economic Development Initiatives) which includes the construction and maintenance of publicly owned boat ramps, piers and docks, boater education and economic development initiatives that promote boating in the state, and for public launching facilities. http://www.myfwc.com/RECREATION/boat_grant_fbip.htm

Submission period September 115, 2009. Administered by FDEP.

Grants for acquisition or development of land for public outdoor recreation. http://www.dep.state.fl.us/parks/OIRS/

$1,810,000.00 Match requirement depends on total project cost: Total Project, Cost FRDAP Grant, Local Match $50,000 or less, 100%, $500,000.00 0%

Pier

Subtotal for Pier

Matching requirement

$125,000.00

Seawall

Downtown Fort Myers Riverfront Master Plan

Resource Maximum

City of Fort Myers

Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission (FWC) Florida Boating Improvement Program Tier II (5)

P2, P5

Resource Minimum

Match must be cash only and constitute 50% of funds for Boating safety and recreation programs. Encouraged for other $250,000.00 categories as well. Match requirement depends on total project cost: Total Project, Cost FRDAP Grant, Local Match $50,000 or less, 100%, $500,000.00 0%

FDEP - Coastal Partnerships Initiative Grants - Access to Coastal Resources (5)

1A, 1B

Resource Average

West Coast Inland Navigation District Grants (WCIND) - Waterway Development Program (5) Local government

National Park Service (NPS) through FDEP Land and Water Conservation Fund Program (5)

1A

Eligible Applicant

$1,560,000.00

Funds can be used for outdoor recreation areas and facilities such as beaches, picnic areas, trails, ball fields, tennis and basketball courts and playgrounds along with associated support facilities such as lighting, parking, restrooms and landscaping, and acquisition of land for outdoor recreation purposes. Enclosed buildings and structures (except restrooms, restroom/concession buildings and bathhouses) are ineligible. http://www.dep.state.fl.us/parks/OIRS/ August - October 2009 - Notice of Availability of Funds is published in the Florida Administrative Weekly, posted on www.dep.state.fl.us/cmp/grants/ind ex.htm Applications are due 60 days after the Notice is published in the FAW. Applications should be for projects that can be completed from July 1, 2010 – June 30, 2011

The Coastal Partnership Initiative intends to inspire community action and promote the protection and effective management of Florida’s coastal resources. Access to Coastal Resources: Communities are encouraged to accommodate public access to coastal and marine resources while protecting fragile and overused environments. Access projects could include developing plans for land acquisition and management; developing site plans for nature trails; developing recreational surface water use policies; exotic species removal and restoration of native species; and small-scale capital improvements such as dune walkovers, boardwalks, and canoe launches. http://www.dep.state.fl.us/cmp/grants/index.htm

Application is announced on February 1 of every year. Application must be submitted within 60 days.

A competitive grant program with 4 categories (1 Boat Ramps, Piers and Docks, 2 Public Launching Facilities, 3 Boater Education, 4 Economic Development Initiatives) which includes the construction and maintenance of publicly owned boat ramps, piers and docks, boater education and economic development initiatives that promote boating in the state, and for public launching facilities. http://www.myfwc.com/RECREATION/boat_grant_fbip.htm

August 19, 2009


Downtown Fort Myers Riverfront Master Plan Funding Strategy with Schedule of Sources and Uses (Public and Private Resources) 2009 Phase

Block

Use

Footprint Levels (gsf)

Building (gsf)

August

September

October

2010 November

December

January

February

Application Preparation

March

April

May

June

July

1A

P1

August

September

Application Submittal

October

Novermber

December

January

February

March

April

May

June

July

August

September

125,000 Funding Awarded

Application Submittal

Application Preparation

Application Preparation

2011

Application Submittal

200,000 Funding awarded

200,000 Funding awarded

Seawall

Application Preparation

Application Preparation

40,000 Funding Awarded

Application Submittal

200,000 Funding Awarded

Application Submittal

Subtotal for Seawall

Application Preparation

Application Preparation

1A, 1B

P2, P5

Application Submittal

Application Submittal

200,000.00 Funding awarded

200,000 Funding awarded

Pier

Application Preparation

Application Preparation

Application Submittal

Application Submittal

200,000 Funding Awarded

200,000 Funding Awarded

Subtotal for Pier

Downtown Fort Myers Riverfront Master Plan

Fort Myers Riverfront Development Plan

5-65


Funding Strategy Sources and Uses part 8 of 11

Downtown Fort Myers Riverfront Master Plan Funding Strategy with Schedule of Sources and Uses (Public and Private Resources) Phase

Block

Use

Footprint Levels (gsf)

Building Funding Sources (gsf)

Eligible Applicant

FDEP - Florida Recreation Development Assistance Program (FRDAP) (5) Local government

National Park Service (NPS) through FDEP Land and Water Conservation Fund Program (5)

2

P6

Boardwalks

FDEP - Coastal Partnerships Initiative Grants - Access to Coastal Resources (5)

Local government

Local government

Responsible Party

City of Fort Myers

City of Fort Myers

City of Fort Myers

Edwards Drive/ Monroe/ Hendry infrastructure/ streetscape

5-66

Aquest FUNDING STRATEGY | SOURCES AND USES

$200,000.00

$40,000.00

$200,000.00

Match ratio is 1:1 Cash; Inkind services; Value of donated real property owned by applicant can be used for match if pre$500,000.00 approved by DEP.

Grants for acquisition or development of land for public outdoor recreation. http://www.dep.state.fl.us/parks/OIRS/ Funds can be used for outdoor recreation areas and facilities such as beaches, picnic areas, trails, ball fields, tennis and basketball courts and playgrounds along with associated support facilities such as lighting, parking, restrooms and landscaping, and acquisition of land for outdoor recreation purposes. Enclosed buildings and structures (except restrooms, restroom/concession buildings and bathhouses) are ineligible. http://www.dep.state.fl.us/parks/OIRS/

Must identify in kind and cash matches. Non cash matches may be administrative/ contract mngmnt, Engineering/ Construction Mngmnt, equipment through in house resources. No more than 5% of total project costs may be administrative/constructio n management match and no more than 10% may be engineering/ construction mngmnt. No advanced $500,000.00 funds will be awarded.

Application is announced on February 1 of every year. Application must be submitted within 60 days.

A competitive grant program with 4 categories (1 Boat Ramps, Piers and Docks, 2 Public Launching Facilities, 3 Boater Education, 4 Economic Development Initiatives) which includes the construction and maintenance of publicly owned boat ramps, piers and docks, boater education and economic development initiatives that promote boating in the state, and for public launching facilities. http://www.myfwc.com/RECREATION/boat_grant_fbip.htm

$900,000.00 None listed

Application was due March 18, 2009

Funding made available through the Tourist Development Tax and provided for beach maintenance, beach renourishment, and park development projects. Goals of the program are to promote tourism while preserving and enhancing beaches and shorelines.

Tourism Development Council - Beach and Shoreline Capital Improvements Program (5) (8)

Local Government City of Fort Myers

$500,000.00

$10,000.00

$1,140,000.00

$435,000.00

Local government, non-profits, educational institutions City of Fort Myers

Submission period September 115, 2009. Administered by FDEP.

Description

$20,000.00

$5,000.00

$400,000.00

Application Cycle

Grant recipients will be required to provide 100% (1 to 1) matching funding. Match may include cash, employee salaries, value of volunteer work time volunteers, or value of construction materials. Federal funds from any source may not be used $60,000.00 as match

$200,000.00

Municipal, County, State, or Federal government Agency City of Fort Myers

Matching requirement

$200,000.00

City of Fort Myers

Lee County MPO Transportation Enhancement Activities (5)

Resource Maximum

Match requirement depends on total project cost: Total Project, Cost FRDAP Grant, Local Match $50,000 or less, 100%, $500,000.00 0%

Local government

Economic Development Agency - 2010 Appropriation

Subtotal for Edwards Drive

$200,000.00

Resource Minimum

Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission (FWC) Florida Boating Improvement Program Tier II (5)

Subtotal for Boardwalks

Various beg. with P10 - P18 1A

Resource Average

$100,000.00

$1,300,000.00

$1,000,000.00

$1,700,000.00

$1,100,000.00

August - October 2009 - Notice of Availability of Funds is published in the Florida Administrative Weekly, posted on www.dep.state.fl.us/cmp/grants/ind ex.htm Applications are due 60 days after the Notice is published in the FAW. Applications should be for projects that can be completed from July 1, 2010 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; June 30, 2011

The Coastal Partnership Initiative intends to inspire community action and promote the protection and effective management of Floridaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s coastal resources. Access to Coastal Resources: Communities are encouraged to accommodate public access to coastal and marine resources while protecting fragile and overused environments. Access projects could include developing plans for land acquisition and management; developing site plans for nature trails; developing recreational surface water use policies; exotic species removal and restoration of native species; and small-scale capital improvements such as dune walkovers, boardwalks, and canoe launches. http://www.dep.state.fl.us/cmp/grants/index.htm

$2,460,000.00 District uses a soft match for 100% federally funding. Projects on the State Highway system may use FDOT funds for the federal match if not 100% federally funded. Projects not on the State Highway system may split the federal match with the local government or sponsoring agency if not Always due the Friday before Memorial Day. $600,000.00 100% federally funded.

$3,000,000.00 50% match is required

Typically funding is for year five of the 5 year work program; however, local government can make the recommendation for project to be moved to an earlier fiscal year. Transportation enhancement improvements include: facilities for pedestrians and bicycles, safety and educational activities for pedestrians and bicyclists, acquisition of scenic easements and scenic or historic sites, Scenic or historic highway programs (including tourist and welcome center facilities), landscaping and other scenic beautification, historic preservation rehabilitation and operation of historic transportation buildings, structures, or facilities (including historic railroad facilities and canals), preservation of abandoned railway corridors (including the conversion and use thereof for pedestrian or bicycle trails), control or removal of outdoor advertising, archaeological planning and research, environmental mitigation to address water pollution due to highway runoff or reduce vehicle-caused wildlife mortality while maintaining habitat connectivity, and establishment of transportation museums.

Public Works investments to support the construction or rehabilitation of essential public infrastructure and facilities necessary to generate or retain private sector jobs and investments, attract private sector capital, and promote regional competitiveness, innovation, and entrepreneurship, including investments that expand and upgrade infrastructure to attract new industry, support technology-led development, accelerate new business development, and enhance the ability of regions to capitalize on opportunities presented by free trade. The Economic Adjustment Assistance Program provides a wide range of technical, planning and public works and infrastructure assistance in regions experiencing adverse economic changes that may occur suddenly or over time. This program is designed to respond flexibly to pressing September 30, 2010. Applications economic recovery issues and is well suited to help address challenges faced by U.S. communities accepted continuously and regions.

$3,600,000.00

August 19, 2009


Downtown Fort Myers Riverfront Master Plan Funding Strategy with Schedule of Sources and Uses (Public and Private Resources) 2009 Phase

Block

Use

Footprint Levels (gsf)

Building (gsf)

August

September

October

2010 November

December

January

February

March

April

May

June

July

Application Preparation

Application Preparation

2

P6

August

September

October

Novermber

December

January

February

March

April

May

June

July

August

September

200,000 Funding awarded

Application Submittal

200,000 Funding awarded

Application Submittal

Application Preparation

Boardwalks

Application Preparation

2011

40,000 Funding Awarded

Application Submittal

200,000 Funding Awarded

Application Submittal

500,000 Funding Awarded via Lee County BOCC Budget Hearing

Application Submittal

Subtotal for Boardwalks

Various beg. with P10 - P18 1A

Edwards Drive/ Monroe/ Hendry infrastructure/ streetscape

Application Preparation

Application Submittal

Application Preparation

Application Submittal

1,300,000 Funding Awarded

Subtotal for Edwards Drive

Fort Myers Riverfront Development Plan

5-67


Funding Strategy Sources and Uses part 9 of 11

Downtown Fort Myers Riverfront Master Plan Funding Strategy with Schedule of Sources and Uses (Public and Private Resources) Phase

Block

Use

Footprint Levels (gsf)

Building Funding Sources (gsf)

Eligible Applicant

Responsible Party

land trusts, local governments, and other organizations. The Conservation Fund - Community, nonprofits and The Eastman Kodak organizations will American Greenways receive preference City of Fort Myers Program Grant (5)

Florida Division of Forestry - Urban and Community Forestry Program (5)

local governments, educational institutions, NativeAmerican tribal governments, and legally organized nonprofit (volunteer) organizations City of Fort Myers

FDEP - Florida Recreation Development Assistance Program (FRDAP) (5) Local government

National Park Service Land and Water Conservation Fund Program (5)

2

P7, W1

Park Pavillion (Art of Olympians/other private use)

5-68

Aquest FUNDING STRATEGY | SOURCES AND USES

City of Fort Myers

Local governments, State or Federal FDEP Recreational Trails governmental agencies City of Fort Myers Program (5)

FDEP - Coastal Partnerships Initiative Grants - Access to Coastal Resources (5)

Subtotal for Park Pavilion

local government

City of Fort Myers

Resource Average

$1,000.00

$10,000.00

$200,000.00

$200,000.00

$250,000.00

Resource Minimum

$500.00

$3,000.00

$200,000.00

$200,000.00

$10,000.00

Resource Maximum

Matching requirement

No specific percentage listed, although match is $2,500.00 expected.

$10,000.00 50-50 matching required

Grant recipients will be required to provide 100% (1 to 1) matching funding. Match may include cash, employee salaries, value of volunteer work time volunteers, or value of construction materials. Federal funds from any source may not be used $60,000.00 as match

$20,000.00

Southwest Florida Community Foundation Major Annual Grant Cycle non-profit (5) organizations

City of Fort Myers

$25,000.00

$3,000.00

$25,000.00 during scoring.

Southwest Florida Community Foundation Arts and Attractions (5)

non-profit organizations

City of Fort Myers

$12,500.00

$3,000.00

$25,000.00 during scoring.

Tourism Development Council - Beach and Shoreline Capital Improvements Program (5)

Local Government City of Fort Myers

Matches are not outlined but strongly favored

Matches are not outlined but strongly favored

$500,000.00

$10,000.00

$433,500.00

Application deadline was April 17, 2009

As part of the federal government’s Urban and Community Forestry Matching Grant Program, funds will be available to organizations to develop or enhance their urban and community forestry programs. Demonstration or Site Specific Projects . This includes tree planting on public land, tree protection projects, and tree maintenance projects. A maximum of $10,000 will be awarded to successful applicants for demonstration and for information and education projects. Staffing grants will be limited to three years, and the applicant will have to reapply on an annual basis.

Grants for acquisition or development of land for public outdoor recreation. http://www.dep.state.fl.us/parks/OIRS/ Funds can be used for outdoor recreation areas and facilities such as beaches, picnic areas, trails, ball fields, tennis and basketball courts and playgrounds along with associated support facilities such as lighting, parking, restrooms and landscaping, and acquisition of land for outdoor recreation purposes. Enclosed buildings and structures (except restrooms, restroom/concession buildings and bathhouses) are ineligible. http://www.dep.state.fl.us/parks/OIRS/

All grant awards must be matched. You choose either 50:50, 60:40 or 80:20 match. The more match provided, the more Application Period was March 18 – A competitive program which provides grants for projects that provide, renovate or maintain 31, 2009 recreational trails, trailhead and trailside facilities. Applications must involve only one project site $200,000.00 points awarded.

$40,000.00

$2,500,500.00

Description

Small grant awards to stimulate the planning and design of greenways in communities throughout America. Grants may be used for activities such as: mapping, ecological assessments, surveying, conferences, and design activities; developing brochures, interpretative displays, audio-visual The 2009 application deadline has productions or public opinion surveys; hiring consultants, incorporating land trusts, building a foot been extended to July 15. Grant bridge, planning a bike path, or other creative projects. In general, grants can be used for all notifications will be made during appropriate expenses needed to complete, expand or improve a greenway project including the first week of September. planning, technical assistance, legal and other costs. Funding must be used within 12 months

Match requirement depends on total project cost: Total Project, Cost FRDAP Grant, Local Match; $50,000 or less, 100%, 0%; $50,001 150,000, 75%, 25%; Over $150,000, 50%, 50% Match can be cash, vlaue of undeveloped land and Submission period September 115, 2009. Administered by FDEP. $500,000.00 in kind services Match ratio is 1:1 Cash; Inkind services; Value of donated real property owned by applicant can be used for match if pre$500,000.00 approved by DEP.

City of Fort Myers

Local government

Application Cycle

$1,300,000.00 None listed

August - October 2009 - Notice of Availability of Funds is published in the Florida Administrative Weekly, posted on www.dep.state.fl.us/cmp/grants/ind ex.htm Applications are due 60 days after the Notice is published in the FAW. Applications should be for projects that can be completed from July 1, 2010 – June 30, 2011

The Coastal Partnership Initiative intends to inspire community action and promote the protection and effective management of Florida’s coastal resources. Access to Coastal Resources: Communities are encouraged to accommodate public access to coastal and marine resources while protecting fragile and overused environments. Access projects could include developing plans for land acquisition and management; developing site plans for nature trails; developing recreational surface water use policies; exotic species removal and restoration of native species; and small-scale capital improvements such as dune walkovers, boardwalks, and canoe launches. http://www.dep.state.fl.us/cmp/grants/index.htm

Provides grants of up to $25,000 to organizations in seven different program areas: Animal Welfare, Community Development, Conservation and Preservation, Education, Environment, Major Annual Grant - May 8, 2009 Healthcare and Human Services. .

Arts and Attractions Grant - June 12, 2009

Assist arts and attractions agencies with both marketing and operational expenses. The two types of grants offered are Marketing and Visitor Enhancement Grants and Basic Operating grants

Application was due March 18, 2009

$1,272,500.00

August 19, 2009


Downtown Fort Myers Riverfront Master Plan Funding Strategy with Schedule of Sources and Uses (Public and Private Resources) 2009 Phase

Block

Use

Footprint Levels (gsf)

Building (gsf)

August

September

October

2010 November

December

January

February

March

April

May

June

Application Preparation

Application Preparation

July

Application Submittal

2

P7, W1

August

September

October

Novermber

December

January

February

March

April

May

June

July

August

September

1,000 Funding Awarded

10,000 Funding Awarded

Application Submittal

Application Preparation

Application Preparation

2011

200,000 Funding awarded

Application Submittal

200,000 Funding awarded

Application Submittal

Park Pavillion (Art of Olympians/other private use) Application Preparation

250,000 Funding Awarded

Application Submittal

Application Preparation

Application Preparation

Application Submittal

Application Preparation

Application Submittal

40,000 Funding Awarded

Application Submittal

25,000 Funds Awarded

Application Submittal

12,500 Funds Awarded 500,000 Funding Awarded via Lee County BOCC Budget Hearing

Subtotal for Park Pavilion

Fort Myers Riverfront Development Plan

5-69


Funding Strategy Sources and Uses part 10 of 11

Downtown Fort Myers Riverfront Master Plan Funding Strategy with Schedule of Sources and Uses (Public and Private Resources) Phase

1B

Block

P4

Use

Footprint Levels (gsf)

Building Funding Sources (gsf)

Eligible Applicant

Responsible Party

Local government

City of Fort Myers

Subtotal for Relocation of Hall of 50 States

FDEP - Florida Recreation Development Assistance Program (FRDAP) (5) Local government

National Park Service Land and Water Conservation Fund Program (5)

P8

Boat ramp relocation

FDEP - Coastal Partnerships Initiative Grants - Access to Coastal Resources (5)

Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission (FWC) Florida Boating Improvement Program Tier II (5)

local government

Local government

Local government

West Coast Inland Navigation District Grants (WCIND) - Waterway Development Program (5) Local government

City of Fort Myers

City of Fort Myers

City of Fort Myers

City of Fort Myers

City of Fort Myers

Subtotal for Boat Ramp Relocation

2, 3

P17, P19

$40,000.00

$20,000.00

$40,000.00

$20,000.00

$200,000.00

$200,000.00

$40,000.00

$200,000.00

$200,000.00

$200,000.00

Subtotal for Marina Expansion

Aquest FUNDING STRATEGY | SOURCES AND USES

Local government

City of Fort Myers

Resource Maximum

Matching requirement

Grant recipients will be required to provide 100% (1 to 1) matching funding. Match may include cash, employee salaries, value of volunteer work time volunteers, or value of construction materials. Federal funds from any source may not be used $60,000.00 as match

$5,000.00

Must identify in kind and cash matches. Non cash matches may be administrative/ contract mngmnt, Engineering/ Construction Mngmnt, equipment through in house resources. No more than 5% of total project costs may be administrative/constructio n management match and no more than 10% may be engineering/ construction mngmnt. No advanced $500,000.00 funds will be awarded.

$125,000.00

$400.00

$425,400.00

$200,000.00

$5,000.00

$200,000.00

$5,000.00

August - October 2009 - Notice of Availability of Funds is published in the Florida Administrative Weekly, posted on www.dep.state.fl.us/cmp/grants/ind ex.htm Applications are due 60 days after the Notice is published in the FAW. Applications should be for projects that can be completed from July 1, 2010 – June 30, 2011

Match requirement depends on total project cost: Total Project, Cost FRDAP Grant, Local Match; $50,000 or less, 100%, 0%; $50,001 150,000, 75%, 25%; Over $150,000, 50%, 50% Match can be cash, vlaue of undeveloped land and Submission period September 115, 2009. Administered by FDEP. $500,000.00 in kind services Match ratio is 1:1 Cash; Inkind services; Value of donated real property owned by applicant can be used for match if pre$500,000.00 approved by DEP.

$20,000.00

$640,000.00

Application Cycle

Description

The Coastal Partnership Initiative intends to inspire community action and promote the protection and effective management of Florida’s coastal resources. Access to Coastal Resources: Communities are encouraged to accommodate public access to coastal and marine resources while protecting fragile and overused environments. Access projects could include developing plans for land acquisition and management; developing site plans for nature trails; developing recreational surface water use policies; exotic species removal and restoration of native species; and small-scale capital improvements such as dune walkovers, boardwalks, and canoe launches. http://www.dep.state.fl.us/cmp/grants/index.htm

$60,000.00

Grant recipients will be required to provide 100% (1 to 1) matching funding. Match may include cash, employee salaries, value of volunteer work time volunteers, or value of construction materials. Federal funds from any source may not be used $60,000.00 as match

Marina expansion

Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission (FWC) Florida Boating Improvement Program Tier II (5)

5-70

Resource Minimum

Relocation of Hall of 50 States FDEP - Coastal Partnerships Initiative Grants - Access to Coastal Resources (5)

2

Resource Average

Grants for acquisition or development of land for public outdoor recreation. http://www.dep.state.fl.us/parks/OIRS/ Funds can be used for outdoor recreation areas and facilities such as beaches, picnic areas, trails, ball fields, tennis and basketball courts and playgrounds along with associated support facilities such as lighting, parking, restrooms and landscaping, and acquisition of land for outdoor recreation purposes. Enclosed buildings and structures (except restrooms, restroom/concession buildings and bathhouses) are ineligible. http://www.dep.state.fl.us/parks/OIRS/

August - October 2009 - Notice of Availability of Funds is published in the Florida Administrative Weekly, posted on www.dep.state.fl.us/cmp/grants/ind ex.htm Applications are due 60 days after the Notice is published in the FAW. Applications should be for projects that can be completed from July 1, 2010 – June 30, 2011

The Coastal Partnership Initiative intends to inspire community action and promote the protection and effective management of Florida’s coastal resources. Access to Coastal Resources: Communities are encouraged to accommodate public access to coastal and marine resources while protecting fragile and overused environments. Access projects could include developing plans for land acquisition and management; developing site plans for nature trails; developing recreational surface water use policies; exotic species removal and restoration of native species; and small-scale capital improvements such as dune walkovers, boardwalks, and canoe launches. http://www.dep.state.fl.us/cmp/grants/index.htm

Application is announced on February 1 of every year. Application must be submitted within 60 days.

A competitive grant program with 4 categories (1 Boat Ramps, Piers and Docks, 2 Public Launching Facilities, 3 Boater Education, 4 Economic Development Initiatives) which includes the construction and maintenance of publicly owned boat ramps, piers and docks, boater education and economic development initiatives that promote boating in the state, and for public launching facilities. http://www.myfwc.com/RECREATION/boat_grant_fbip.htm

Match must be cash only and constitute 50% of funds for Boating safety and recreation programs. Encouraged for other Application period was from February 2 to April 2, 2009 $250,000.00 categories as well.

Projects includes shoreline stabilization, waterway related recreation, environmental education, public navigation, boating safety and recreation and any other improvements/construction that improve boat access or navigation. Projects are funded on a reimbursement basis and are limited to one year. http://www.wcind.net/

$1,810,000.00 Must identify in kind and cash matches. Non cash matches may be administrative/ contract mngmnt, Engineering/ Construction Mngmnt, equipment through in house resources. No more than 5% of total project costs may be administrative/ construction mngmnt match and no more than 10% may be engineering/ construction mngmnt. No advanced funds will be $500,000.00 awarded.

Application is announced on February 1 of every year. Application must be submitted within 60 days.

A competitive grant program with 4 categories (1 Boat Ramps, Piers and Docks, 2 Public Launching Facilities, 3 Boater Education, 4 Economic Development Initiatives) which includes the construction and maintenance of publicly owned boat ramps, piers and docks, boater education and economic development initiatives that promote boating in the state, and for public launching facilities. http://www.myfwc.com/RECREATION/boat_grant_fbip.htm

$500,000.00

August 19, 2009


Downtown Fort Myers Riverfront Master Plan Funding Strategy with Schedule of Sources and Uses (Public and Private Resources) 2009 Phase

Block

Use

1B

P4

Relocation of Hall of 50 States

Footprint Levels (gsf)

Building (gsf)

August

September

October

2010 November

December

January

February

March

April

May

June

July

2011 August

September

October

Novermber

December

January

February

March

April

May

June

July

August

September

40,000 Funding Awarded

Application Submittal

Subtotal for Relocation of Hall of 50 States

Application Preparation

Application Preparation

2

P8

200,000 Funding awarded

Application Submittal

200,000 Funding awarded

Application Submittal

Boat ramp relocation Application Preparation

Application Preparation

Application Submittal

Application Preparation

40,000 Funding Awarded

Application Submittal

200,000 Funding Awarded

125,000 Funding Awarded

Application Submittal

Subtotal for Boat Ramp Relocation

2, 3

P17, P19

Marina expansion

Application Preparation

Application Submittal

Funds Awarded

Subtotal for Marina Expansion

Fort Myers Riverfront Development Plan

5-71


Funding Strategy Sources and Uses part 11 of 11

Downtown Fort Myers Riverfront Master Plan Funding Strategy with Schedule of Sources and Uses (Public and Private Resources) Phase

Block

Use

2

P18

Trolley (9)

Footprint Levels (gsf)

Building Funding Sources (gsf)

Eligible Applicant

Responsible Party

Resource Average

Resource Minimum

Resource Maximum

Matching requirement

Application Cycle

Need to coordinate with LeeTran or provide City operated

Lee County Transit

Grand Total of Loan Funding Grand Total of Grant Funding

GRAND TOTAL OF PROPOSED LEVERAGED FUNDING (excluding funding for trolley)

Preparation

Description

$7,500,000.00 $11,098,500.00

$250,000.00 $4,902,300.00

$7,750,000.00 $19,905,500.00

$18,598,500.00

$5,157,300.00

$28,155,500.00

Notes (1) Example timing given, application submittal available on a rolling timeframe until funds are distributed.

Application Submittal

(2) P2, P5, P19, W2-W3, W5-W7 were identified as applicable improvements for the Stan Mayfield Working Waterfront Grant because they have the ability to provide direct access to the river to enhance active commercial fishing activities. (3) FDEP Clean Water Revolving Loan Fund Pre-Construction - It is expected that new rulemaking will alter this program's requirements. Future funding from this program is expected to be for rural or underserved communities.

Funding Awarded

(4) FDEP Clean Water Revolving Loan Fund Construction - The City of Fort Myers already has a loan, the remainder of funding available is 7.5 million. To be awarded funding in July 2010 application should be submitted prior to January hearing. If the City did not have a loan, the total available would be $10,000,000.00 (5) General Notation - The 2009 grant schedule was used to estimate all future schedules. (6) FDEP Clean Water Revolving Loan Fund Green Infrastructure - These funds have been placed into the general SRF fund and are already allocated. There may be an additional funding opportunity in the future. (7) Community Budget Issues Request - There is a possibility funding will be available during the 2010/2011 fiscal year. Projects are funding through legislative approval. Not expected to be discussed until later in the legislative session. (8) Fuding awards are a part of the Lee County CIP Budget and voted on by the Board of County Commissioners during the annual CIP budget process each year. (9) It is not expected that Trolley funding will be awarded to the City as a sole applicant as sll funds listed are for community wide projects not specific routes such as a trolley.

5-72

Aquest FUNDING STRATEGY | SOURCES AND USES

August 19, 2009


Downtown Fort Myers Riverfront Master Plan Funding Strategy with Schedule of Sources and Uses (Public and Private Resources) 2009 Phase

Block

Use

2

P18

Trolley (9)

Footprint Levels (gsf)

Building (gsf)

August

September

October

2010 November

December

January

February

March

April

May

June

July

2011 August

September

October

Novermber

December

January

February

March

April

May

June

July

August

September

Grand Total of Loan Funding Grand Total of Grant Funding

GRAND TOTAL OF PROPOSED LEVERAGED FUNDING trolley)

Preparation

Application Submittal

Funding Awarded

Fort Myers Riverfront Development Plan

5-73


City of Fort Myers Riverfront Redevelopment Stormwater Treatment Requirements The SFWMD will require any redevelopment (other than building remodeling) within the City of Fort Myers to provide treatment for the project’s runoff. This treatment is typically provided within a stormwater Best Management Practice (BMP) such as, dry detention, wet detention or underground storage areas. Some credit can be obtained by implementing Low Impact Development (LID) practices. However, this credit is not formalized and typically needs to be negotiated on a case-by-case basis. LID credits would likely not cover all treatment requirements. Additional treatment would be required within dry detention, wet detention or underground storage areas. Following is a summary of each typical BMP: Dry detention areas – These are depressed grassed or landscaped areas that hold water after a storm event. Ideally, a dry detention area will dry out between storm events. Due to the high ground water table, fine soils and frequency of storm events during the summer they typically do not dry out during the summer. They can become muddy and hard to maintain. Dry detention is likely not applicable to the riverfront redevelopment project due to the likely aesthetics associated with it. Wet detention area – These are ponds with bottoms excavated below the water table to create a permanent pool of water. These systems typically perform well in south Florida and are often used as an amenity as well as a treatment area. Wet detention areas can provide needed fill material for adjacent development.

Underground storage is applicable to the riverfront redevelopment but has some challenges associated with it. The cost is typically high compared to the other options and they need to be placed under paved areas such as parking lots or grassed areas. They can’t be placed under buildings, parking garages or areas with large trees. LID – These are source based practices that are intended to reduce the volume of stormwater runoff by encouraging increased infiltration and reuse of stormwater runoff. So examples include reduced impervious area, pervious pavement, greens roofs, stormwater cisterns and filter boxes. Proposed Riverfront Redevelopment Plan: To accommodate the requirement for stormwater treatment, the Fort Myers Riverfront Redevelopment project is proposing to construct a wet detention area that extends from the river to Bay Street. The wet detention area will create a focal point for the City, creating more marketable space for the adjacent uses, as well as treat runoff from the City prior to discharging to the River. The construction of the wet detention area will provide fill material that could be used to fill the adjacent development (depending on the fill quality). This will reduce construction costs. Wet detention is also significantly less expensive to construct than underground storage, which is the other most likely treatment alternative for a downtown redevelopment project.

Wet detention could function well within the riverfront redevelopment by providing the needed treatment and by bringing the river into the City. Underground storage – These are underground vaults or chambers that store water and promote percolation into the surrounding soil. They can provide the required storage volumes while not reducing the developable area. These systems can be challenging in south Florida due to the high groundwater table and fine soils. They typically don’t provide sufficient percolation into the surrounding soil to meet SFWMD treatment requirements. Due to the existing fill material, within the project limits percolation of underground storage areas could be challenging. Underground storage areas are typically significantly more expensive to construct than wet or dry detention areas.

5-74

REGULATORY REQUIREMENTS

August 19, 2009


FEMA Map Fort Myers Riverfront Redevelopment Minimum Finished Floor Elevation The City of Fort Myers Riverfront redevelopment area is located within the Caloosahatchee FEMA flood zone AE. FEMA has established a base flood elevation (BFE) of 7 to 9 ft, NAVD within the project area. The BFE is the peak stage for a 100year storm event. Per 44 CRF Ch 1 Section 60.3(c)(3), FEMA requires all non-flood proofed non-residential building finished floor elevations be constructed at or above this elevation. FEMA does allow commercial buildings to be built below the BFE, as long as those buildings are flood proofed. However, SFWMD has stated all finished floor elevations (commercial or residential) must be constructed above the BFE. SFWMD would require a variance to construct a building finished floor elevation (other than an accessory structure) below the BFE. SFWMD staff stated that to their knowledge no variances to this requirement have been issued by SFWMD.

EA

DY

AR

U ST

The design team for this riverfront master plan has indicated the need for retail and service oriented businesses to be connected to the street frontage without the steps, ramps and terraces that would be required with the higher finished floor elevations. It is important to maintain pedestrian connectivity to the proposed uses within the riverfront redevelopment area. Saeed Kazemi, P.E., Public Works Director has indicated the City of Fort Myers will assist in obtaining a variance from SFWMD, per Chapter 40E-0.113. If successful, the need to elevate the buildings to the extent required by SFWMD could be reduced and provide the pedestrian connectivity being sought by the design team. The proposed building finished floor elevations could remain close to the existing elevations and be flood proofed above the BFE. A majority of the existing structures within the Downtown redevelopment area do not meet this minimum finished floor elevation required by SFWMD. Incorporating new higher finished floor elevations with the existing lower elevations would require ramps, steps and terraces. The City would like to eliminate the need for these additional design requirements.

The entire redevelopment zone is within the 100 year flood hazard area as defined by FEMA.

Fort Myers Riverfront Development Plan

FEMA MAP ENHANCED

5-75


2 FEET - 6 FEET Elevation Change Concepts Description of Illustrative Plans These diagrams illustrate a series of approaches to ground floor elevation (see discussion of FEMA requrements (5-65). Full compliance with FEMA/SFWMD requrements will resut in a 5 foot differential as shown in the bottom row of drawings.

5-76

2FEET - 6FEET ELEVATION CHANGE CONCEPTS

August 19, 2009


Grade Transition Views

Plan

Perspective

Basic stair with wrapped edges.

Plan

Perspective

Basic straight stair.

Plan

Perspective

Basic straight stair with switch-back ramp

Fort Myers Riverfront Development Plan

GRADE TRANSITION VIEWS

5-77


Grade Transition Views

Plan

Perspective

Basic corner condition with (2) 30’-0” ramps

Plan

Perspective

Bumped out patio with curved stairs

Plan

Perspective

Bumped out patio with straight stairs and switch-back ramp

5-78

GRADE TRANSITION VIEWS

August 19, 2009

Fort Myers Downtown Plan  

Fort Myers CRA

Fort Myers Downtown Plan  

Fort Myers CRA