Issuu on Google+


From the

CEO’s Desk

Dear Passenger,

“Kuzu zangpo” and welcome aboard Drukair On behalf of Drukair, I wish you a Very Happy and Prosperous Bhutanese Earth Female Ox Year – 2009.

I

t is difficult to capture the essence of a whole year in one headline. Nevertheless, our year end issue was a look back at 2008 in the best of words and pictures. It was indeed a historic and memorable year for all Bhutanese – the nation made a smooth transition from a Monarchy to a Parliamentary Democracy thus making Bhutan the youngest democracy in the world; the Royal Coronation of His Majesty King Jigme Khesar Namgyel Wangchuck, the fifth king was an occasion that stirred every Bhutanese heart with pride and confidence. The year also celebrated 100 years of peace and prosperity under the Wangchuck Dynasty. We have much to be thankful to our Kings and we hope and pray that they will continue to be our beacon of hope and inspiration. And we at Drukair Corporation celebrated 25 years of service to the nation. From its modest beginning, Drukair has made tremendous progress and has evolved into a modern international airline.

We continue to upgrade and improve every aspect of passenger comfort on ground as well as in the air. Presently, we are offering various discounts on airfares to passengers on all sectors of our network. We have special fares packaged as ‘Group fare’ for USD paying passengers which will be effective from May 15 to August 31, 2009 and ‘Family package’ and ‘Group fare’ for local passengers effective December 1, 2008 to February 28, 2009. For further details please contact us on telephone or log onto our website www.drukair.com.bt Your safety and comfort are of utmost importance to us. Therefore, the management would appreciate receiving your written comments and suggestions on our services in the form enclosed in this magazine. Tashi Delek and wishing you a very happy, peaceful and prosperous New Year.

TANDIN JAMSO Chief Executive Officer


Volume XIV, No. 1, February – March 2009 Tashi Delek is an auspicious and versatile Bhutanese expression. It encompasses a number of meanings such as: wishing you well, good wishes, congratulations, cheers, good luck, and so on. Tandin Jamso - Chief Executive Officer Bharati Narasimhan - Editor For editorial, advertising, circulation and subscription enquiries, please contact: Tshering Penjore - General Manager (Commercial) E-mail: khadel@druknet.bt

08

Sonam Yangchen - Sr. Officer (Marketing & Commercial Planning) E-mail: sonamyangchen@drukair.com.bt Druk Air Corporation Limited H.Q. Paro, Bhutan. Tel.: +975 (8) 272634; Fax: +975 (8) 271861 E-mail: drukair@druknet.bt Rajesh Chhetri - Art Director Gunjan Sabikhi - General Manager (Marketing) Abhinav Malhotra - Manager (Marketing) Geetika Pathak - Manager (Advertising) Manish Mangla - Asstt. Manager (Marketing) Anil Kharbanda - Production Manager Head Office: Durga Das Publications 72, Todarmal Road, New Delhi - 110001, India. Tel.: 91 11 23716318; Fax: +91 11 23351503 E-mail: tashidelek@ddppl.com Mumbai Office: E-mail: mumbai@ddppl.com Middle East Office: E-mail: uae@ddppl.com © Durga Das Publications Tashi Delek, a publication of Druk Air Corporation Limited is produced and published by Rupali Narasimhan of Durga Das Publications. Views expressed in Tashi Delek are not necessarily those of Druk Air Corporation Limited and/or of Durga Das Publications. All information in Tashi Delek is derived from sources which we consider reliable. and is passed on to our readers without any responsibility on our part. Similarly, opinions/views expressed by third parties in abstract and/or in interviews are not necessarily shared by Drukair and/or Durga Das Publications. Any material appearing in Tashi Delek cannot be reproduced/stored in whole or in part without prior permission of the Publisher in writing. The Publisher reserves the right to edit, rewrite or reproduce articles according to the requirement of the publication. The publisher assumes no responsibility for returning any material nor is she responsible for material lost or damaged in transit. Most of the photographs, information, etc. are taken from different sources. If inadvertently we have violated any copyright, we would apologise for that. In our next issue. Jurisdiction for all disputes in New Delhi only.

Durga Das Publications. 72, Todarmal Road, New Delhi - 110001, India. Tel.: +91 11 23731917, 23710793; Fax: +91 11 23351503 E-mail: tashidelek@ddppl.com Printed by: Cirrus Graphics Pvt. Ltd., B-261 Naraina Industrial Area, Phase-I, New Delhi – 110028, (India)

20

contents

08

Colour and Joy Coronation of His Majesty the Fifth Druk Gyalpo

14 20 26

Thimphu Climbers The aura of Shangri-La Prayers at Dragon’s Gift Exhibition

31 34 44 47

News from Bhutan Lungchotse Lhakhang Duty Free Drukair News Update

Cover picture courtesy: www.bhutan2008.bt

14

26


LOCATION Located in the eastern Himalayas, Bhutan is bordered by China in the north and the Indian states of Arunachal Pradesh, Sikkim, Assam and West Bengal in the east, west and south. Area

- 38,394 sq. km.

Altitude

- Varying from 180 m. to 7,550 m. above sea level

Population

- 683,407 (Projected for 2009)

Capital

- Thimphu

Local time

- Six hours ahead of GMT and ½ hour ahead of IST

Religions

- Mahayana Buddhism and Hinduism.

The Bhutanese way of life is greatly influenced by religion. Most Bhutanese homes have a special room used for prayers which is known as chosum.

4

TASHIDELEK

February – March 2009

NATIONAL FLAG The national flag is rectangular and divided diagonally into two parts with a white dragon in the middle. The upper yellow half signifies the country’s secular authority of the King in fruitful action in the affairs of religion and state. The lower saffron-orange half

signifies the religious practices and spiritual power of Buddhism manifested in the Drukpa Kagyu and Nyingma traditions. The dragon symbolises the name of the country, locally known as Druk Yul, meaning land of the thunder dragon and its white colour signifies purity and loyalty of the Bhutanese people. The snarling mouth of the dragon expresses the strength of the male and female deities protecting Bhutan, while the jewels in its claws represent the wealth, prosperity and perfection of the country and the people.

NATIONAL EMBLEM The national emblem, contained in a circle, comprises a double diamond thunderbolt placed above a lotus, surmounted by a jewel and framed by two dragons. The double diamond thunderbolt represents the harmony between secular and religious power; which results from the Buddhist religion in its Vajrayana form. The lotus symbolises purity; the jewel sovereign power; and the two dragons – a male and female stand for the name of the country - the thunder dragon (Druk Yul).


NATIONAL SYMBOLS

NATIONAL DAY

National Flower: Blue Poppy (Meconopsis Grandis)

National day is celebrated on 17th of December in commemoration of the accession of Gongsar Ugyen Wangchuck, the first king of Bhutan to the throne, in Punakha dzong.

Photograph: Michael Buckley

CURRENCY

Photograph: Sonam Tobgay

National Tree: Cyprus (Cupressus Corneyana)

Ngultrum, the currency of Bhutan, has the same value as the Indian rupee, which is also a legal tender. One US$ is roughly equal to 48 NU.

FOOD Staple diet is red rice, buck-wheat, wheat, maize, pork, beef, chicken, yak meat, cheese and chillies which are taken as a vegetable and not as a spice.

Photograph: Sonam Tobgay

DRESS

National Bird: Raven (Corvus Corax Tibetanus)

PEOPLE Bhutanese are friendly and hospitable people. Large majority of Bhutanese are a homogeneous group divided linguistically into three broad sub-groups. These are Sharchops,

National Animal: Takin (Budorcas Taxicolor)

Ngalong and Lhotshampa. Besides there are a number of smaller groups, many with their own language which form about one per cent of the population. Some of these groups are: Bumthap in Bumthang, Tsangho in the east, Layapa in the north-west, Brokpa in the north-east and the Doya in the south-west Bhutan. The last century has witnessed a greater variety of Bhutanese mosaic with the addition of the people of Nepalese origin comprising many ethnic groups who now form a large section of the Bhutanese population.

Bhutanese men wear gho, which are longish robes tied around the waist by a cloth belt, known as kera. The women’s ankle-length dress is known as kira, which is made of bright coloured fine woven fabric with traditional patterns.

SPORTS The national sport of Bhutan is archery. Other traditional sports include digor - a kind of shotput, darts and wrestling. The international sports, such as soccer, basketball, volleyball, tennis, and table tennis are also popular.

February – March 2009

TASHIDELEK

5


MEDIA

ECONOMY

Kuensel, a bi-weekly newspaper, is published in Dzongkha, Nepalese and English. An online English version, updated daily, is available on the Internet. There are also two privately owned English weeklies - Bhutan Times and Bhutan Observer. Bhutan Broadcasting Service (BBS), a national radio and TV station, broadcasts news and other programmes daily on current affairs. Private cable operators through-out the country provide access to several regional and international TV channels.

Agriculture and livestock raising are the mainstay of the economy. They contribute about 45 per cent to the GNP. More than 90 per cent of the people live on subsistence farming. The farms are narrow pieces of land cut into terraces on hill slopes. Forestry contributes 15 per cent to the GNP and industry and mining 10 per cent.

ARTS AND CRAFTS Bhutan is known for handicraft items in bronze, silver and other metals. Sculpting of religious figures is widely practised and every temple houses large brightly painted and gilded statues of the Buddha and other saints.

6

TASHIDELEK

February – March 2009

ARCHITECTURE The castle-like dzongs, with their gently tapering walls, classic lines, large courtyards and beautiful galleries, are among the finest examples of Bhutanese architecture. Containing large monasteries inside and set in commanding position on hilltops or at the confluence of rivers, dzongs are also the administrative centres of their districts. But, the most common architectural sight in Bhutan are the chortens or stupas which are small shrines built to house sacred relics.


Colour and Joy

Colour and Joy Coronation of His Majesty the Fifth Druk Gyalpo On 6th November 2008, at the auspicious time of 8.31am, His Majesty Jigme Khesar Namgyel Wangchuck became the Fifth Druk Gyalpo as his father, the Fourth King, placed the Raven Crown on his head. Bearing Tantric skulls and a blue raven’s head, the silk crown represents Yeshe Goenpo, the protective deity said to have appeared as a raven to lead the Shabdrung who unified the country. Worn by the First King’s father and in slightly different forms, by every monarch ever since, the Raven Crown reflects the spiritual link between the King and his people.

I

nitial ceremonies were held in Punakha dzong and now on this most auspicious day chosen by royal astrologers, Thimphu was abuzz, draped in myriad colours to celebrate the Coronation of the new Dragon King and 100 years of monarchy. Banners fluttered from the rooftops, flags lined the road, flowers bloomed on the roundabout and food stalls set up shop along the streets for huge crowds were expected.

We headed for Tashichho Dzong as the sun shed the first golden light on the mountain tops. The breeze whispered in the willows and a wave of excitement passed through the air. Massive and majestic, the dzong was all dressed up for the royal event. Pine needles cushioned the bare earth, coloured rice drew patterns on the red carpet and garlands shone like rainbows along the eaves. Monks moved quietly across the courtyards where three giant thongdroels revealed precious images of the Buddha and Bodhisattvas, graced by delicate torma sculptures and votive lamps. The scent of roses drifted from the flower beds. February – March 2009

TASHIDELEK

9


Decked in ceremonial scarves, dignitaries began to arrive, followed by members of the royal family, relaxed and smiling in their beautiful kiras and ghos. Even the Fourth King’s little grandson wore traditional embroidered boots. Every entrance was perfectly timed, His Holiness the Je Khenpo or Chief Abbot, His Majesty the Fourth Druk Gyalpo, Her Excellency the President of India and guest of honour, and finally the Grand Chhipdrel Procession escorting His Majesty the King. There were dancers and ceremonial guards, pole bearers and drummers and lots of red hats and yellow sashes. Punctuated by sutras and symbolic offerings, the Coronation was held in private in the Chamber of the Golden Throne but relayed on every television

10

TASHIDELEK

February – March 2009

screen across the country. Further empowering rituals took place in the Kuenra where special guests offered their congratulations. The afternoon belonged to the King and his people. Clad in their festival best, all shimmering silk and embroidered cloth, they had come from afar to pay their respects to the newly-empowered monarch. They loved him already for he had toured the country extensively and guided them since his father stepped down in December 2006, but this was an auspicious and for many, a once in a lifetime occasion. We entered the Ceremonial Ground where after the public rituals, His Majesty slowly made his way through the crowds, offering blessings and kind words, handing out Coronation coins and receiving traditional

white scarves. Thousands of well-wishers were left at the gate but celebrations were extended by a day so the King could meet them all. We left as the sun dipped behind the mountains, deeply moved by the close relationship between the young monarch and his people. When I woke up the next day, the Chang-Lime-Thang across the river was awash with joyful crowds, wave upon wave of vivid colours rippling under a bright blue sky. Some had queued since dawn to be sure of a place for the day long entertainment. Straight out of a fairytale, the Grand Procession entered the ground at 9.55am, bugles heralded the King’s arrival and the Military Parade stood ready for inspection, gleaming silver bands and impeccable toy-like soldiers. Then all fell


Colour and Joy

silent as His Majesty addressed the nation, offering a message of hope and a promise, ‘I will protect you like a parent, care for you like a brother and serve you like a son.’ Balloons rose in celebration and gifts from the land were presented to the king – nine bags of cereals, five bales of textiles, two horses, one mule, two elephants and a calf, two yaks and more, later returned to their owners by royal request. Everyone loved the elephants who raised their trunks to show respect. Now the time had come to relax and with stars in our eyes, we watched students and children dance for the King, celebrating the diverse culture of Bhutan, the Coronation, Gross National Happiness, praying for the King’s long life, Peace and Hope for the future. We marvelled at infants waving scarves in total harmony, laughed at the men dressed up like unruly yaks, enjoyed the Indian and Nepali dances and were blessed by Guru Rinpoche and his Eight Manifestations. Now and then, His Majesty and royal relatives left their pavilion to mingle with

February – March 2009

TASHIDELEK

11


Colour and Joy

onlookers and it just felt like one big family. Back in town, the Post Office was offering the world’s first personalised stamps, your own portrait on a stamp, as part of the special events celebrating both Coronation and Centenary. Day three brought more song and dance in brilliant costumes. His Majesty watched popular games from beginning to end. There were displays of martial arts, a log pushing contest, a pillow fight which greatly amused the King and a strong man competition which involved carrying weights up to 250 kg. Meanwhile beyond the main stadium, the archers were having a busy time. The national sport is a colourful event, accompanied by offerings and prayers, ladies singing in praise of their team and a victory dance when points are scored. The royal princes took part, followed by His Majesty who delighted everyone as he shot and danced like any member of the team. By mid-afternoon, when the light took on a soft golden hue, the first notes of Tashi Lebey echoed around the Chang-LimeThang. It was time for the farewell dance and His Majesty, the royal family, dignitaries, special guests and all of us shuffled and sang with gentle Bhutanese grace in ever larger circles. Later, fireworks lit up the night sky, like great showers of stars wishing the world’s youngest reigning monarch good luck and long life. I felt truly privileged to be there and I too would like to offer heart-felt congratulations and very best wishes to His Majesty, the Fifth Dragon King. Text: Solange Hando Photographs: www.bhutan2008.bt (The author travelled to Bhutan and attended the Coronation as a guest of Blue Poppy)

12

TASHIDELEK

February – March 2009


Climbers THIMPHU

High above the Jigme Dorji Wangchuk National Referral Hospital in Thimphu, there's a rock. It's not a big rock by Himalayan standards, but is big enough to keep a group of Bhutanese climbers happy. It is called 'the Nose' due to its resemblance, from a certain angle, to the facial appendage of one of their friends.

‘The Nose’

Photograph: Murray Gunn


Photograph: Murray Gunn

Thimphu Climbers

The climbers

T

he road approaching the rock appears to have been built from the top down, winding gently for a few turns before the builders lost control and let it rush headlong into the highest of the roads traversing the west face of Thimphu valley.

It's an exhilarating ride down, but Marie and I struggled for every metre on our way up. Even in granny gear, we had to zigzag our mountain bikes up the road while kids from the surrounding shanties ran along beside us, giggling. Their parents came out of their shacks and shops, as they did every week, to watch the crazy chilip (foreigners) push their lungs to the limit. Whatever they thought of us, but they waved and cheered us on. My handlebars wobbled as I lifted my head to scan the rock. Our Bhutanese friends treated climbing with the same casual commitment as they did with every other aspect of their lives. If they didn't have anything better to do, they'd turn up, and if they were busy, well... we'd know within an hour.

an education, but I'd heard that the government was also trying to relocate the occupants of this village of poor marring the outskirts of the capital. It was good to see that education had priority over eviction. “You are faster than me,” replied Marie as she reached the gentle slope and sped up, “but can you keep up with me now?” The boy kept pace with her for a few metres, sending goats scattering from his path, before collapsing on the ground laughing. Older children at the end of the road barely gave us a glance before turning back to their game. A short stake was driven into the ground at each end of a flattened pitch and the kids were grouped at one end. While we caught our breath, we watched each boy take a turn to throw his heavy wooden dart at the far stake, the nail

“It's a good thing we rode,” said Marie between breaths. “I needed the exercise.” One of the kids beside Marie put in a burst of speed and shouted, “I'm faster than you,” as he sprinted past. I was impressed, not by his speed, but that he'd had enough schooling to speak English. Bhutan was trying to give every child February – March 2009

TASHIDELEK

15


Thimphu Climbers

Photographs : Murray Gunn Climbers getting ready

points spearing into the ground with a solid thud. When an engine revved behind us, both Marie and I span around to find our friends getting out of a truck. With his lean, muscular built and a shock of messy hair, Paldin always drew the girls' eyes. He is one of the first four Bhutanese who traversed the country on bicycle — some six hundred kilometres with no flat stretch. Robin, older and cultivating the traditional Bhutanese belly, shouted a greeting. He spent his days carting fruit up from the Indian plains, but his voice was that of a drill sergeant. We ran to help them unload the gear and carry it up past the dart game to our ledge near the base of ‘The Nose’. With four long ropes, thirty ‘friends’ to secure us to the bolts set into the cliff, and a selection of harnesses and shoes, the group was well set up. Most of these had been donated by expats and travellers, as I would donate my gear to them when I leave. From where we stood, the rock face slanted away, tapering out of sight. It wasn't much steeper than a ladder, but there were precious few holds as good as a rung. “You're not going to do ‘Easy Peasy’, are you?” Robin's booming voice held command with a hint of scathing humour, perfect for goading lesser climbers into challenging themselves. “It has been a few weeks since we last climbed. I thought I'd warm up on that, then move on to ‘Friction Dance’”, I said. “You're better than that. Warm up on ‘Friction Dance’ and then have a go at leading ‘Wedding Present’”, suggested Robin. I agreed. I remembered where to place my hands and feet all

16

TASHIDELEK

February – March 2009


Thimphu Climbers

Chilies on the roof

the way up. Climbing ‘Friction Dance’ implied plastering myself to the rock and scrambling like a spiderman. While Marie and I warmed up, Robin ran a rope up to the top of ‘Easy Peasy’ for the newer climbers, he expected to join a bit later. “You did that too easily,” said Paldin who was belaying Robin. “You should have a go at ‘Reach and Preach today’.” I looked warily at the climb that I'd seen even Robin struggle with. It started with three consecutive moves requiring a stretch angle so that you turn your head away to reach the next hold, then pray that your fingers found the right spot to avoid falling. Marie then lead the longer ‘Wedding Present’, named after for its creator who'd come climbing when he should have been on honeymoon. I watched her feet disappear over a ledge and kept letting out rope as I felt her climb higher. Soon she was back and it was my turn. It may have been only thirty metres above the ground, but clinging to the rock and looking down seemed as there was nothing between me and the collection of roofs rambling through the valley hundreds of metres below, many with red chillies laid out to dry. I was sitting in the sky and from there, even ‘Reach and Preach’ seemed possible. Text : Murray Gunn

18

TASHIDELEK

February – March 2009

Photograph : Murray Gunn

Photograph : Philip Bowen


Shangri-La The aura of

The 1933 publication of James Hilton's novel Lost Horizon gave the world a new word for paradise: 'Shangri-La', a mysterious utopia hidden in the Himalayas. And the novel launched an enduring riddle: Where is the real Shangri-La?

20

TASHIDELEK

February – March 2009


Dense forest cover close to terraced ricefields and a village, south of Gasa

H

ilton's Shangri-La is an impossible composite – a remote temple with mixed Tibetan and Chinese features backed by a towering snowcap and a fertile green valley below. It is presided over by a wizened High Lama around 250 years of age, whose grand mission is to provide a sanctuary for preserving the values of civilisation and culture during times of warfare and destruction. And now, 75 years after the first publication of Lost Horizon, the legend of Shangri-La lives on in the imagination, more powerful than ever. Tourist offices all over the Himalayan region are keen to tap into the radiant Shangri-La mystique. The contenders range from enclaves like Hunza Valley in northwest Pakistan to the newly created Shangri-La County in the highlands of Yunnan in southwest China. But to my mind, the candidate with the most genuine aura of Shangri-La is Bhutan. Indeed, this nation often refers to itself in brochures as ‘the Last Shangri-La.’ Here are some good reasons why Bhutan admirably lives up to that description.

Pristine environment

The pyramidal peak of Jichu Drake, Jigme dorji National Park

Bhutan went green and stayed green long before environment became a priority elsewhere on the planet. Bhutan's system of national parks and wildlife preserves covers over 25 per cent of its total land area which is far more than you can say about February – March 2009

TASHIDELEK

21


The aura of Shangri-La

ichael Buckley's new guidebook Shangri-La: A Travel Guide to the Himalayan Dream published by Bradt Guides, UK, in November was released to coincide with the 75th anniversary of the first publication of Lost Horizon by James Hilton. The guidebook, the first of its kind in the market, covers Tibet, Bhutan, Nepal, Sikkim, Ladakh and parts of Southwest China and effectively deals with the most remote areas of the region as well as explores the ancient Tibetan Buddhist civilisation. Targeting the adventure traveller who wants to explore some of the wildest roads in High Asia and also the armchair reader who simply wishes to browse the dream – this guide shows the way to the breathtaking landscapes and cultures of the Himalayas. For more information, go to www.bradtguides.com

M

View of Punakha Dzong, a gem of Bhutanese fortress architecture: parts of this structure date back to the 17th century

neighbouring India and China, both implicated in large-scale environmental degradation (particularly deforestation). Bhutan embraces pristine forest and soaring snowcaps. Sheltered in its park sanctuaries, wildlife is well-protected with a complete ban on hunting of rare species like the snow leopard. Bird-watchers love Bhutan which has over 700 bird species recorded, and botanists are thrilled by Bhutan’s range of unusual flowering species.

Preservation of Tibetan Buddhist culture In the Himalayas, Bhutan is the sole self-governing entity with Tibetan Buddhism as its state religion. Outer Mongolia to the north, and the republic of Tuva, are also independent countries and follow Tibetan Buddhism but there the people and language are Mongolian. Once there used to be inter-marriages between the royal families of Tibet, Bhutan and Sikkim – a situation now changed by political realities. Although Bhutan has strong links with Tibetan culture, it maintains its own distinct version of that culture. Dzongkha language, for instance, is related to Tibetan but quite distinct from Lhasa dialect. Dzongkha is a compulsory subject in school, although the medium of instruction is English. Bhutan is the best place in the Tibetan world to see traditional-style architecture, with sloping roofs (distinctly Bhutanese in design) such as the Tashichho Dzong of Thimphu and the numerous dzongs across the country. These dzongs at times incorporate the ancient skill of bridge-building, another art preserved in Bhutan.

What is not there The temple of Shangri-La is remarkable for its remote highaltitude location, nestled on the flanks of a soaring snowcapped peak. But it is equally remarkable for what is not there – no war,

22

TASHIDELEK

February – March 2009


The aura of Shangri-La

Man playing the dramyen (dragon-headed lute), prepareing for a festival march in Thimphu

Sacred masked dance, performed at a festival in eastern Bhutan

Monk from a monastery in eastern Bhutan

no sickness, no disease, no real concept of the passage of time. Shangri-La of Hilton's novel has a kind of spiritual Club Med atmosphere – remote, secluded, peaceful. Bhutan, too has some similar features. It has no traffic lights, and no big advertising signs bearing the logos of multi-national corporations. Smoking is discouraged. And plastic bags are banned. Until the dawn of the 21st century, there was no television or internet in Bhutan. These absences or low-key approaches create a certain tranquillity and timelessness in Bhutan – both qualities valued at Shangri-La.

A strong sense of spirituality This is the factor that really separates Bhutan from other contenders. Bhutan has many active monasteries, with a rich tradition, which impart spiritual training to numerous monks. The official faith of Bhutan is Drukpa Kagyu, a tantric form of Tibetan Buddhism; but Buddhism of the Nyingma school is also practised. Spirituality is deeply linked with festivals in Bhutan in the form of sacred masked dances. These festivals are definitely a tourist draw, but they are not the main spectators. The festivals are staged primarily for the Bhutanese. Though they are sacred - the locals seek blessings from real lamas behind the masks. The festivals also provide a great opportunity for the community to socialise, and indulge in archery contests and picnics--which are consuming passions of the Bhutanese. Text & Photographs: Michael Buckley

24

TASHIDELEK

February – March 2009


Amitabha Buddha (pigment on cloth)

All seeing Lord (pigment on cloth)

Prayers at Dragon’s

Vajradhara (Gilt Copper)

Gift Exhibition

26

TASHIDELEK

February – March 2009

Last September, Lopen Sonam Wangchuk, a simple monk from Bhutan, became somewhat of a celebrity in New York earning his Warholian fifteen minutes of fame when the New York Times ran a story titled – ‘Prayers at an Exhibition: Bhutan’s Art and the Monks Who Protect It’.


Walse Ngamba (pigment on cloth)

Yogambara (pigment on cloth)

Prayer’s at Dragon’s Gift Exhibition

A

I first encountered Sonam one December morning, just before the Museum opened its doors at 11:00 when he and a fellow monk Lama Karma Tenzin entered the specially created puja room for their half-hour ritual of purification and appeasement of the resident deities. A small altar was set up in the Drukpa Kagyu tradition, common to most Bhutanese monasteries, with a statue of Sakyamuni Buddha in the middle, flanked by statues of Guru Rinpoche (Padmasambhava) and Jamgon Ngawang Gyaltsen, the founder of modern day Bhutan. Little did the museum-goers present realize, that the monks while offering incense and chants punctuated by drum-beats, were praying for not only our purification but also of every being who suffers from the three poisons (desire-attachment, hatred-anger, and ignorance)

28

TASHIDELEK

February – March 2009

m ac he pa pi er A Sonam Wangchuk, the monk at the exhibition

For Sonam, who had never travelled outside Bhutan before, visiting the USA which he describes as his dreamland, came as a big adventure full of surprises and cultural shocks.

m as k

s the Times reported, 24 year-old Sonam was one of two monks selected from Bhutan’s famed Trashigang Monastery to accompany the The Dragon’s Gift, an exhibition of sacred art objects—mostly worshipable thangkas and inlaid bronze statues—unseen even by ordinary Bhutanese outside the monasteries they have adorned. The exhibition which first travelled to Hawaii was sponsored by the Honolulu Academy of Arts and then it travelled to New York’s Rubin Museum of Art where it ran from Sept 19, 2008- January 5, 2009.


Prayer’s at Dragon’s Gift Exhibition

Bhairava (Gilt Copper)

so that we would all be cleansed. So, those who paid the $10 museum admission fee got not only admission to the galleries—but also an opportunity to attain enlightenment. After the prayers in the puja room, Sonam gets up with a jug of saffron water, a small round mirror and a bunch of peacock feathers to bless the sacred images in the exhibitions—not directly, but in their hand-held mirror images, pirouetting impishly like a dervish around the two top gallery floors to the amazement of museum goers. It is believed that these objects actually embody the deities and saints, whose images and activities they depict. Most of these objects had never travelled outside Bhutan. The Bhutanese government gave the permission to take them out of the country on the condition that they be accompanied by a changing roster of monks on the exhibition’s two-year journey from museum to museum. Unlike the other objects in the Rubin Museum’s permanent collection of Himalayan art, these works are considered consecrated objects, having been chosen from Bhutan’s over 2,000 temples, monasteries and dzongs. Not only are the art works deemed national treasure, but according to museum curator Ramon Prats, they are also “living icons, whose sacredness must be maintained.” Shortly after the show opened in early September, Sonam, the only monk who spoke English, posted a diary of his daily activities and musings as “Sonam’s Big Apple Blog” on the Rubin Museum website, www.rmanyc.org.

Text: Daniel Haber Photographs: Rubin Museum of Art, New York

30

TASHIDELEK

February – March 2009


News from Bhutan Highest honour for the Royal Grandmother

A

t an extremely moving ceremony in the Throne Room of Trashichhoedzong on November 15 last year, the Fifth Druk Gyalpo, His Majesty Jigme Khesar Namgyel Wangchuck conferred the Order of Druk Gyalpo, the highest medal of honour on his grandmother, Her Majesty Ashi Keang Choden Wangchuck for her lifetime service to the nation and to three generation of Bhutanese people. Her Majesty was born on May 21 1930 to Raja Sonam Tobgye Dorji, Gongzin (Agent in Kalimpong) to the first three Kings of Bhutan and Mayum Choying Wangmo Dorji, Princess of Sikkim. After completing

her studies in Kalimpong and the United Kingdom, she married the third Druk Gyalpo His Majesty Jigme Dorji Wangchuck in 1951. As the Queen of Bhutan at a time of critical changes in the country, she became a figure of resilience at home and friendship overseas. As a Royal matriarch, she is a fountain of dignity and role model for her immediate as well as extended family. In her quiet way, she has helped preserve Bhutan’s cultural heritage through her keen interest in preserving and restoring the living art and religious traditions as well as architecture of the country. Kuensel, November 19, 2008

Galleries of the Ta-dzong museum

T

he newly consecrated Ta-dzong museum gives a glimpse of Bhutan in the last 100 years with two galleries showcasing the history of monarchy in Bhutan with many royal possessions. The first gallery on the ground floor showcases the guardians of the four directions, that protects the entrances to monasteries and temples and ward off evil influences from all directions. The second gallery describes the foundation of Trongsa Dzong, its deities and holy men. It houses a statue of Yongzin Ngagi Wangchuk (1517-1554) who founded the Trongsa Dzong in 1543, his jacket and robe, diamond scepter, bell and statues of the Zhabdrung’s father. A special feature of the third gallery is the Raven Crown, designed by Lam Jangchub Tsendrue and worn by the first King Gongsar Ugyen Wangchuck. It also houses his ceremonial silk robe and four chests of the second Gyalpo Jigme Wangchuck which were used in the Wangdue Choling palace in Bumthang to store personal belongings of the royal family and the King. The fourth gallery has a silk kira and tego of the first Queen Ashi Choden, the oath of allegiance that was signed on a 3.5 metre scroll by the representatives of clergy during the Coronation of second King in 1926, his prayer book and silver box, the third king Jigme Dorji Wangchuck’s amulet, ivory flask, container for betel, areka and lime, and a zenith radio. It also showcases a sword, gho, scarf and traditional boots belonging to His Majesty the Fourth Druk Gyalpo.

32

TASHIDELEK

February – March 2009

The fifth gallery showcases the message of the sacred dances including the wheel of life, masks and costumes while the six gallery is about Buddhism and rituals. On the seventh gallery are a Khesar Ling Lhakhang and the statues of Guru Rinpoche. The ninth gallery houses Guru Rinpoche’s eight manifestations and Maitreya Buddha Lhakhang. The five Tathagata Buddhas (Gyalwa Rignga) sit The Raven Crown in the tenth gallery. Each of the Buddhas represents one of the five transcendental insights, which are antidotes to the five mental poisons – anger and hatred, pride, desire and greed, envy and jealously, delusion and ignorance. The top gallery showcases the body, the speech and the mind of the Adibuddha. Kuensel, December 13, 2008


News from Bhutan

Sacred dances digitally documented Jewel fo Men released

T

he sacred mask dances of Bhutan which date back to the thirteen century have now been documented and digitally recorded. It has been done by Gerad Houghton, Technology Director of Core of Culture assisted by Karma Tshering, a Bhutanese film director. The dances of Bhutan are unique and do not exist anywhere in the world. The documentation was done as a part of The Dragon’s Gift Exhibition Project of the

Bhutan Government and the Honolulu Academy of Arts. The 300 hours of digital recording contains dance clips from 20 different tsechus across the country, some of which are endangered today. About one million dollars are spent in its making and its completion took five years. “It is perhaps the most expensive documentation and digital recording of the world on dance,” said Gerad Houghton. A copy of the document will be kept at the National Library as well as in New York Public Library for the Performing Arts at Lincoln Centre, which is the world’s largest archive of original documents and films on dance. Kuensel, December 27, 2008

A

collection of poems entitled Jewel of Men dedicated to His Majesty the Fourth Druk Gyalpo Jigme Singye Wangchuck was formally launched by Her Majesty the Queen Mother Ashi Dorji Wangmo Wangchuck. The book was compiled through a national poetry competition organised by Tarayana Foundation. About 200 participants took part in the competition. From that 25 best poems were selected for the book. Addressing the launch, Her Majesty said that the book was a reflection of the sentiments of love and respect towards His Majesty the Fourth Druk Gyalpo who has given the country so much. The book is published by Tarayana Foundation with funds from National Steering Committee for Coronation and Centenary celebration. Kuensel, December 10, 2008

Expanded Dechenphu Lhakhang consecrated

G

yenyen Jagpa Milen, the revered protector deity of the 13th century Dechenphu (cave of consummate bliss) Lhakhang that sits at the north end of Thimphu Valley is one of the most spiritual guardians of the Bhutanese people. For the expansion of the lhakhang, the government initiated Nu 35 million project in October 2005. During the process of expansion, the old timber of the lhakhang was replaced with the new while retaining the original features. A Guru Lhakhang was dismantled and rebuilt. The original statues were retained and a new six foot gold statue of Zhabdrung Ngawang Namgyal offered by his Majesty the Fourth Druk Gyalpo was

installed. For landscaping and extension of the boundary wall, gate and dungkhar, 14.20 acres of land was acquired. Now the complex that was originally cramped against the steep hillside, has a wide courtyard and a clean wooded landscape. The consecration ceremony of the expanded lakhang, a part of the Centenary Celebrations, was conducted by Dorji Lopan of the Central Monk Body. It was attended by His Majesty the Fourth Druk Gyalpo along with the members of the Royal family, ministers, army officers, senior government officials and people from different parts of Thimphu. Kuensel, December 13, 2008

February – March 2009

TASHIDELEK

33


Lungchotse

Lhakhang Long back, over two hundred and fifty years ago Terton Drukda Dorji built a small but a beautiful lhakhang in Lungchotse. The story goes that the legendary sculptor Joenzop Phugay on a pilgrimage to Tshaluna took refuge in a cave known to be a ney (holy place).

T

here on one night he had a dream in which he was asked by a handsome monk to go to Lungchotse, meet a resident there and build a statue just like him (the handsome monk). The next night, he had the same dream. So he went to Lungchotse, met the resident who happened to be Terton (treasure revealer) Drukda Dorji and made a statue according to what he was told in his dream. The result was a stunning, larger than life statue of Guru Padmasambhava. It was installed in the lhakhang built by Terton Drukda Dorji.

It was Terton Drukda Dorji who had predicted that in the year of the wood sheep, a ruler of Bhutan by the name of Jigme will be born in a place called Wamtang (now Dechencholing) and there will be unprecedented peace and prosperity in the country during his rule. Today the lhakhang stands bigger and more beautiful than ever on a ridge high above Dochula at approximately 3,566 metres, looking over the

34

TASHIDELEK

February – March 2009

surrounding hills and valleys. It has been restored and enlarged by Her Majesty Ashi Dorji Wangmo Wangchuck to fulfill a pact she made in December 2003 with Ap Tashi Bau – the guardian deity of Lungchotse. Inside the lhakhang stands one of the most beautiful and lifelike statue of Guru Padmasambhav. While expanding the lhakhang, the Guru’s statue was not touched. The expansion and renovation was done around the statue. While working on the main altar, a hidden altar was discovered which is now on display at the lhakhang. Beside the main lhakhang, Her Majesty has built a residence for the lam (chief monk) and monks living there. A common room with a kitchen has also been built to accommodate the public who come to perform special ceremonies at the lhakhang. Behind the lhakhang is a chorten (stupa) built by Her Majesty in 2003. Below this chorten is a huge boulder where it is said that the mother of Terton Drukda Dorji was cremated.


Lungshotse Lhakhang

The location of the Lungchotse Lhakhang is perfect for a day hike. For those who do not fancy walking for hours seeking solitude and peace of mind yet would like to have that, this is the place to go. It is a perfect place to enjoy the bounties of nature. Many a disturbed soul has found tranquility and solace here. On a clear sunny day one can see the entire Jigme Singye Wanchuck Range with its snow covered peaks. The sunset from Lungchotse with different colours playing against the sky is a splendid

February – March 2009

TASHIDELEK

35


Lungchotse Lhakhang

spectacle. The view from the ridge as the sun sets over the rolling hills remains etched in mind for a long time. The way to the Lungchotse Lhakhang is no less striking. It is a gentle one and half hour trek from Dochula, home to the beautiful 108 Druk Wangyal Chortens and the magnificent and unique Druk Wangyal Lhakhang. The route is well shaded with rhododendron trees growing in abundance all over the place. The path is well padded with fallen leaves. In April and May when the flowers are in bloom it is a magical trek amidst the various hues of white, red, pink and purple. I remember walking down in the twilight hours – underneath a beautiful star spangled night sky playing hide and seek in between the tree leaves. Except the rustling of leaves and our footsteps making the occasional noise there was a complete silence. Memories of such primeval moments remain alive for a long time. You know you are half way up to Lungchotse when you reach Pang Melong – a big clearing in the middle of the forest at an altitude of 3302m. Above the ground on a little ridge, is a yak herders’ camp. Pang Melong is a good place to rest for sometime and enjoy the packed lunch. They say heaven is a place on earth – perhaps Lungchotse is one such place. Anyway it is as close as you can get to in a day!!! Text : Chhimmy Pem Photographs : Chhimmy Pem & TCB

36

TASHIDELEK

February – March 2009


DutyFree 44

TASHIDELEK

Catering Service Department – Paro Airport D.F.S Selling Rate — 25-12-2008 Items Description

Selling Rate in USD Jw Black Label 6/200 cl..............................................55 Jw Black Label 12/100 cl............................................30 Jw Black Label 12/750 cl............................................24 Hennessy VSO 1 Ltr ..................................................65 Singleton 12 Yo 6/750 cl ............................................64 Jw Blue Label 6/100 cl ..............................................150 Jw Blue Label 6/75 cl ................................................125 Jw Gold Label 12/75 cl ..............................................45 Jw Red Label 6/200 cl ................................................28 Jw Red Label 6/100 cl ................................................14 Jw Red Label 12/75 cl ................................................11 Jw Swing 12/75 cl ......................................................35 Haig 12/100 cl ............................................................11 Chivas Regal 12/750 cl ..............................................25 J&B Rare 12/100 cl ....................................................11 J&B Rare 12/750 cl ......................................................9 Vat 69 12/100 cl ..........................................................13 Vat 69 12/75 cl ............................................................9 Black Centurion 12/750 cl ..........................................40 Bailey Irish Cream 12/750 cl ......................................15 B&G 1725 Bordeaux Rsv Blc 12/750 ..........................9 B&G Beaujolais Villages 12/750 cl ..............................9 Dimple 12/700 cl ........................................................27 Glenkinchie 10 Yo 6/75 cl ..........................................40 Old Bushmill 12/100 cl................................................20 Jc Tequila Gold 12/75 cl ............................................12 S/Vodka 12/750 cl........................................................8 Jw Label 12/100 cl ......................................................35 Jw Green Label 12/750 cl ..........................................28 White Horse 12/100 cl ................................................12 Glen Ord Singleton 12/750 cl ....................................40 White Horse 12/750 cl ................................................9

February – March 2009

Perfume Selling Rate Item/Description

Size

Rate in USD Premier Jour edp (L) ..........................50 ml ..............35 Anais Eadu legre edt ..........................50 ml ..............40 Bulgair Omnia cristline (L) ..................65 ml ..............40 Bijan Black (L) edt ..............................75 ml ..............30 Bijan Black (M) edt..............................75 ml ..............30 Bvlgari Voile De Jasmin (L) edt ..........50 ml ..............40 Cool water game (M) edt ..................100 ml ............40 Givenchy my conture edp..................100 ml ............30 Gucci Envy Me2 (L) edt ....................100 ml ............60 Moschino Friends edt ........................125 ml ............35 Dkny Be Delicious (M) edt ..................50 ml ..............40 Tommy True Star edp ..........................30 ml ..............24 Visit by Azzaro (L) edt ........................30 ml ..............20 Hugo Pure Purple EDP (L) spray........90 ml ..............45 Jlo Live edp (L) Spray ........................30 ml ..............25 Obsession night edp (L) spray ..........50 ml ..............35 Obsession Night edt (M) spray ..........75 ml ..............35 YSL Paris Spring Time EDT spray......125 ml ............60 Ralph Cool EDT (L) Spray..................100 ml ............50 Bulgari (L) EDP spray ........................100 ml ............50 Cerruti Sl’ edt (M) Spray ....................40 ml ..............25 CK one Electronic edt Spray..............100 ml ............45 Dior Star EDT (L) Spray ......................50 ml ..............55 Dior Homme Edt (M) Spray ................50 ml ..............55 Dkny Energi Edt (M) Spray ................50 ml ..............40 Tommy Truestar (L) edt spray ............75 ml ..............50 Versace L’ home Edt..........................100 ml ............30 XS (M) Edt Spray ................................30 ml ..............20 XS Extreme Edt (L) Spray ..................50 ml ..............20


Drukair News Update

Drukair News Update Drukair Annual Golf Tournament

New route to Bagdogra

T

S

his tournament is a prestigious event in a golfer’s diary. It was started to give an opportunity to build a long lasting friendship and camaraderie as well as to encourage young upcoming golfers. This tournament is being played for the last 10 years.

This year’s tournament was graced by Lyonchhoen Jigme Y. Thinley, the Prime Minister and other Ministers as guest players. The three day tournament which started on 26th December, 2008 saw about 70 players including 4 women. A dinner for the golfers was organised in Druk Hotel on December 28, 2008. On the occasion, the Prime Minister Lyonchhoen Jigme Y. Thinley gave away the prizes to the winners. The overall net winner prize was bagged by Mr. Karma J. Thinlay and the Women’s Championship was awarded to Aum. Jigme Wangmo. The tournament was sponsored by Airbus, CFMI, Yale Air Services from Korea, Aeroglobal from Hong Kong , Stone Travels & Eco Expedition from Delhi, Air France Industries and ABTO.

tarting March 29, 2009, Drukair will launch its first flight to Bagdogra with onward flight to Bangkok. There will be two flights a week namely on Tuesdays and Saturdays.

With the operation of this new route, Drukair hopes to target tourists from West Bengal, Sikkim and the North -Eastern states of India. ..............................................................................................................

Discount on Airfare

D

rukair is offering Low Season Discount of 25% of the airfare on all sectors of its network from December 1, 2008 to February 28, 2009. We also have economical fares packaged as ‘Group Fare’ and ‘Family Package’. For further details and terms and conditions, please call our ticketing counter or log onto www.drukair.com.bt

Prime Minister Lyonchhoen Jigme Y. Thinley as guest player during the Drukair Annual Golf Tournament

Tandin Jamso, Drukair CEO, addressing the golfers

Aum. Jigme Wangmo receiving Women’s Championship award

Golfers in action

February – March 2009

TASHIDELEK

47


Earth Female Ox Year 2009


Earth Female Ox Year 2009


Photograph : © TCB

Dzongs, places festivals open to visitors

Photographs : Michael Fardeen

&

Bumthang Dzongkhag Jakar Dzong Wangduechholing Dzong Membar Tsho Peling Sermon Chorten, Palrithang Ura new Lhakhang

Punakha Dzongkhag Punakha Dzong (when monk body is in Thimphu) Punakha Dromche

Chukha Dzongkhag Phuentsholing Lhakhang, Phuentsholing Kharbandi Lhakhang, Phuentsholing Kamji Lhakhang, Phuentsholing Chasilhakha Lhakhang, Bongo block Chima Lhakhang, Chima block Chacha Dzong, Chapcha

Thimphu Dzongkhag Trashichodzong (after 5.00 P.M. during the working days) Thimphu Tsechu Festival National Memorial Chorten Changlimethang Lhakhang, Thimphu

Gasa Dzongkhag Gasa Dzong Lhuntse Dzongkhag Lhuntse Dzong Mongar Dzongkhag Mongar Dzong Paro Dzongkhag Rinpung Dzong Paro Tsechu Festival Ta Dzong Museum Drukgyal Dzong Taktshang Monastery (view from tourist cafeteria) Bitekha Dzong (en route to Ha)

50

TASHIDELEK

February – March 2009

Samdrup Jongkhar Dzongkhag Zangtogpelri

Trashiyangtse Dzongkhag Trashiyangtse Dzong Trashigang Dzongkhag Trashigang Dzong Trashigang Tsechu Festival Zangto Gpelri Lhakhang, Kanglung Kanglung Lhakhang Khaling Lhakhang Radhi Lhakhang Trongsa Dzongkhag Trongsa Dzong Trongsa Tsechu Chendebji Chorten Ta Dzong Wangdue Phodrang Dzongkhag Wangdue Dzong Gantey to observe the black necked crane Wangduephodrang Tsechu

National Holidays 2009 January 2 27

Winter Solstice Traditional Day of Offering

February 21, 22 & 23 25 & 26

Birth Anniversary of His Majesty the King Earth Female Ox Year (Losar)

May 2 4

Birth Anniversary of the 3rd Druk Gyalpo Death Anniversary of Zhabdrung (Zhabdrung Kuchhoe)

June 7

Lord Buddha´s Parinirvana

July 2 25

Birth Anniversary of Guru Rimpoche First Sermon of Lord Buddha

September 24 28 28, 29 & 30

Thimphu Drubchen ( Thimphu only ) Dasain Thimphu Tshechu (Thimphu only )

November 6 9 11 December 17

Coronation Day of Fifth Druk Gyalpo Descending Day of Lord Buddha Birth Anniversary of the 4th Druk Gyalpo and Constitution Day National Day

Tentative Festival dates for 2009 (Earth Female Ox Year)

March 3- 5 ............................................Punakha Dromche (Punakha) March 6-8 ............................................Punakha Tsechu (Punakha) March 11 ..............................................Tharpaling Thongdrol, (Bumthang) March 11-14 ........................................Tangsibi Mani Ura (Bumthang) March 11 & 26 ......................................Chorten Kora (Trashiyangtse) March 12-14 ........................................Bulli Mani (Chummi), (Bumthang) March 24-26 ........................................Gayden Chodpa Ura (Bumthang) April 2-4 ................................................Gomkora (Trashigang) April 5-9 ................................................Paro Tsechu (Paro) April 7-9 ................................................Chhukha Tsechu (Chhukha) May 5-9 ................................................Ura Yakchoe (Bumthang) June 30 - July 2 ....................................Nimalung Tsechu (Bumthang) July 2 ....................................................Kurjey Tsechu (Bumthang) September 23-27 ................................Thimphu Drupchen (Thimphu) September 26-28 ................................Wangdue Tsechu (Wangdue Phodrang) September 28-30 ................................Tamshingphala Choepa (Bumthang) September 28-30 ................................Thimphu Tsechu (Thimphu) October 3-5 ..........................................Tangbi Mani (Bumthang) October 24-28 ......................................Shingkhar Rabney (Ura, Bumthang) October 26-29 ......................................Jakar Dzong Tsechu (Bumthang) November 2-6 ......................................Jambay Lhakhang Drup (Bumthang) November 3-5 ......................................Prakhar Duchhoed (Bumthang) November 13-16 ..................................Sumdrang Kangsol (Ura, Bumthang) November 25-27 ..................................Mongar Tsechu (Mongar) November 25-27 ..................................Pemagatshel Tsechu (Pemagatshel) November 26-28 ..................................Trashigang Tsechu (Trashigang) November 27-28 ..................................Namkha Rabney (Tang, Bumthang) December 2-4 ......................................Nalakhar Tsechu (Bumthang) December 2-5 ......................................Chozam Rabney (Tang, Bumthang) December 25-27 ..................................Trongsa Tsechu (Trongsa) December 25-27 ..................................Lhuntse Tsechu (Lhuntse) December 31, 2009 ..............................Shingkhar Metochodpa (Ura, Bumthang) December 31, 2009 ..............................Nabji Lhakhang Drup (Nabji, Trongsa) January 4, 2010


Photograph : © TCB

Trekking seasons in Bhutan

Driving time between various places in Bhutan

(Months) Name of the trek

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

10

11

12

Bumthang

x

x

s

s

s

s

m

m

s

s

s

x

Gangtey

s

s

s

s

s

s

m

m

s

s

s

s

Samteygang

s

s

s

s

s

s

m

m

m

s

s

s

Lunana Snowman

x

x

s

m

s

s

s

s

m

x

x

x

Mode of transport within Bhutan is by motor vehicles only. There are no domestic airlines or trains. The main highway runs from west to east connecting all the major towns. The distance between them are given below.

Lingshi/Laya/

From

To

Distance (km.)

Driving Time (approx)

Gasa Hot Spring

s

s

s

s

s

m

m

m

m

s

s

s

Thimphu

Paro

54

1.30 hrs.

Jhomolhari

x

x

s

s

s

s

m

m

s

s

x

x

Thimphu

Phuentsholing

171

6 hrs.

Druk Path

x

x

s

s

s

s

m

m

s

s

s

x

Phuentsholing

Bagdogra (India)

170

4 hrs.

Dagala

x

x

s

s

s

s

m

m

s

s

x

x

Thimphu

Wangdue Phodrang

70

3 hrs.

Thimphu

Punakha

71

3 hrs.

Punakha

Wangdue Phodrang

23

45 min

Wangdue Phodrang

Trongsa

129

4 hrs. 30 min

‘s’ ‘m’ ‘x’ Note:

refers to good season for trekking, refers to moderate season as there are chances of rain during the trek in these months. refers to the months when the trekking routes are closed due to snow. Normal weather conditions.

For detailed trek itinerary, please check with Department of Tourism, Bhutan.

Trongsa

Bumthang

68

2 hrs. 30 min

Bumthang

Mongar

193

7 hrs.

Mongar

Lhuentse

75

3 hrs.

Mongar

Trashigang

91

3 hrs. 30 min

Trashigang

Chorten Kora

51

2 hrs.

Trashigang

Samdrup Jongkhar

180

6 hrs. 30 min

Samdrup Jongkhar

Guwahati (India)

101

3 hrs.

Samdrup Jongkhar

Phuentsholing

356

9 hrs.

AVERAGE TEMPERATURE Figures in Centigrade

JAN

FEB

PLACES

Max

Min

Max

Paro

9.4

-5.8

13.4 1.5

Min

MAR Max

Min

14.5 0.6

APR Max

Min

17.6 4.6

MAY Max

Min

23.5 10.6

JUN Max

Min

25.4 14.1

JUL Max

Min

26.8 14.9

AUG Max

Min

25.3 14.7

SEPT Max

Min

23.4 11.7

OCT Max

Min

18.7 7.4

NOV Max

DEC

Min

Max

Min

13.9 1.4

11.2

-1.7

Thimphu

12.3 -2.6

14.4 0.6

16.4 3.9

20.0 7.1

22.5 13.1

24.4 15.2

18.9 13.4

25.0 15.8

23.1 15.0

21.9 10.4

17.9 5.0

14.5 -1.1

Punakha

16.1 4.2

19.6 5.3

21.12 9.2

24.4 11.2

27.2 14.8

31.2 19.5

32.0 21.6

31.4 19.8

29.9 20.4

27.8 18.9

22.3 13.0

15.0 7.9

Wangdue

17.0 4.3

19.0 7.8

22.8 10.4

26.2 12.9

29.1 17.7

29.2 20.1

18.4 16.2

29.1 20.0

27.5 19.1

26.1 14.7

22.6 9.6

19.1 6.3

Trongsa

13.0 -0.2

13.9 0.4

16.7 4.4

20.1 6.6

21.0 11.6

22.2 13.6

25.3 15.3

23.8 15.0

22.6 14.2

21.8 11.7

19.8 6.4

18.2 2.5

Bumthang

10.8 -5.1

10.0 -1.4

16.2 3.5

18.7 3.9

21.3 9.5

22.5 3.5

14.1 10.9

23.0 13.7

21.6 12.1

19.5 5.9

16.1 -0.5

12.3 -2.3

Mongar

15.5 8.2

15.9 8.3

20.0 11.6

2.8

14.0

25.1 17.4

26.1 19.5

16.1 15.8

25.4 19.6

24.7 19.4

22.7 15.8

19.9 11.2

15.7 9.5

Trashigang

20.4 10.5

21.7 11.5

24.8 14.4

28.3 17.0

30.0 20.6

30.7 22.6

31.5 23.1

30.2 22.7

30.0 23.9

29.1 17.7

26.1 13.6

23.0 11.6

February – March 2009

TASHIDELEK

51


We are happy to welcome you aboard this flight and will strive to provide the best service in the sky. n CONDITIONS OF CARRIAGE You are requested to go through the conditions of carriage on all sectors of Drukair. Relevant excerpts from these conditions are printed on the inside front cover of the passenger ticket. Similarly, the conditions pertaining to the carriage of freight are given on the reverse of the Drukair Airway Bill. n CHECK-IN The reporting time is two hours prior to flight departure. All counters are closed 30 minutes prior to the scheduled departure of the flight. Check-in counters at Delhi will close 1 hour prior to the scheduled departure of the flights. n RESERVATION For all travel requirements, please contact the nearest Drukair booking office or a travel agent. International airlines, tour promoters and travel agents abroad are invited to communicate their reservation requirements to the Central Space Control of Drukair in Thimphu. n RECONFIRMATION All reservations must be reconfirmed at least 72 hrs before scheduled departure. Failure to reconfirm will result in cancellation of booking without any notice. n VALIDITY Ticket issued against full fare is valid for a period of one year, except as otherwise provided in the ticket. n Airport/Travel Tax Airport/travel tax is payable by all passengers before embarking a flight. The amount of airport/travel tax varies with sectors: Bangkok: THB 700.00 or US$ 25. Payable at the time of ticket issuance. Paro:

Departure tax Nu. 500.00 plus Passenger Surcharge Nu. 300.00 collected at the time of ticket issuance.

Kathmandu: NER 781 for travel to SAARC countries for nationals only. NER 1356 for travel to SAARC countries for foreigners. NER 1130 for travel to other countries for nationals only. NER 1685 for travel to other countries for foreigners.

52

TASHIDELEK

February – March 2009

n INSURANCE SURCHARGE (YQ) An Insurance Surcharge of US$ 5.00 per segment is levied on all passengers. The YQ is collected at the time of ticket issuance, however if omitted in the ticket, airline check-in personnel will collect the YQ. n FUEL SURCHARGE (YR) Fuel Surcharge of US$ 7.00 per segment is levied on all passengers except for the fifth freedom segments. The Fuel Surcharge for the fifth freedom segments are as below: Gaya-Bangkok v.v. US$ 25.00 per segment Dhaka-Bangkok v.v. US$ 25.00 per segment Kolkata-Bangkok v.v. US$ 25.00 per segment Kathmandu-Delhi v.v. US$ 30.00 per segment The YR is collected at the time of ticket issuance, if erroneously omitted in the ticket; airline check-in personnel will collect the YR. n PASSENGER SERVICE FEES (PSF) For travel ex-India, a Passenger Service Fee of Rs 225 is levied on passengers for tickets issued in India and US$ 6 in equivalent local currency for tickets issued outside India. The PSF is collected at the time of issuance of ticket, however if omitted in the ticket, airline check-in personnel will collect the PSF. n SERVICE TAX ON BUSINESS CLASS All business class passengers embarking from India are subject to an additional 12.36 per cent Service Tax on the fare inclusive of surcharges and taxes. The tax will be collected at the time of issuance of ticket. If mistakenly omitted, the airline check-in personnel will collect the tax. Service Tax is not applicable to U.N. Agencies. This is as per the directives issued by the Service Tax Directorate, Government of India. n CHANGE IN FARES Fares are subject to change without notice. In the event of a passenger commencing journey after a revised tariff becomes effective, the


Drukair Rules and Regulations

n CANCELLATION n COMPUTERISED RESERVATION SYSTEM The Drukair subscribes to Gabriel Reservation System. The advantage of this system is that the other CRSs, viz., Amadeus and Galileo, can also access it for checking the status of the flight booking. n IMPORTANT INSTRUCTIONS Safety For safety, passengers are required to fasten seat belts during takeoff and landing. However, they are advised to keep seat belts fastened during the entire flight. Smoking In the aircraft, it is strictly prohibited. n FREE

BAGGAGE

n NO-SHOW There will be a rebooking administration fee of US$ 25 for No-show passengers wishing to travel at later date. Please check with any Drukair office for our No-show refund rules. n VALUABLE

Class

Adult

Child

Infant

Executive

30 kg

30 kg

Nil

Economy

20 kg

20 kg

Nil

Unless otherwise stated by the ticketing carrier, the free baggage allowed when travelling under concessional fares shall be the same as that of full fare paying passengers.

ARTICLES

Currency, precious metals, jewellery, negotiable instruments, securities, personal identification documents and other items of value are best carried with the passenger in the cabin. n HAN

Following registered baggage is allowed free of charge:

n DRUKAIR

Please check with any Drukair office for our cancellation and refund rules.

D BAGGAGE

To comply with the security regulations, passengers may carry only one hand baggage which may comprise: • A lady’s handbag • An overcoat or a wrap • An umbrella or a walking stick • A small camera and a pair of binoculars • A reasonable amount of reading material for the flight

IN-FLIGHT SERVICES

Food and beverages Meals are served after a flight is airborne for reasonable duration. The timings are: Breakfast

:

0730 - 1030 hrs

Lunch

:

1030 - 1430 hrs

Dinner

:

1830 - 2130 hrs

On one hour sector flight, snacks are served. Refreshments and drinks are served throughout the duration of the flight.

difference between the fare paid and the fare applicable will be collected from the passenger before embarkation. n REFUND Refund of ticket can only be made at the issuing office. For conditions for refund, please contact the Drukair offices. n NO REFUND CAN BE MADE AGAINST LOST DOCUMENTS Passengers are particularly requested to note that tickets are cash value documents and must be physically presented for refund.

• For invalid passengers, a fully collapsible invalid wheel chair and/or a pair of crutches. All other items, such as typewriters, briefcases, overnight bags, personal radios, vanity cases, large cameras, etc. will be weighed with other baggage, and will be subject to payment of excess baggage charges if the total weight exceeds the free baggage allowance. n DANGEROUS

GOODS

For safety reasons the following articles are not allowed to be carried in passenger baggage: • Compressed gases (nonflammable and poisonous). • Corrosives (such as acids, alkalis and wet cell batteries). • Explosives, ammunitions, fireworks and flares. • Flammable liquids and solids (such as lighter and heating fuels, matches and articles which are easily ignited). • Oxidising material (such as bleaching powder and peroxides). • Poisons. February – March 2009

TASHIDELEK

53


Drukair Travel Tips

• Radioactive material.

Aircraft configuration Chart

• Other restricted articles (viz., mercury, magnetised material, offensive or irritating material). • Briefcases or attache cases with installed alarm devices, or incorporative lithium batteries and pyrotechnic material. Also carriage of dry cell batteries, knives, scissors, sharp instruments, tools, firearms, ammunition, toy replicas are prohibited in the passenger ca bin. Note: Medicinal and toilet articles which are necessary for a passenger during the journey, may be carried in small quantities in the passenger cabin without prior approval. n CARRIAGE OF FIREARMS Carriage of firearms, ammunition, and other weapons on the passenger ’s person is expressly prohibited. These should be handed over to Drukair before embarking for delivery at the destination. n SECURITY

REGULATIONS

According to security regulations, passengers are advised: • Not to accept any baggage/packet from unknown persons. • Not to leave baggage unobserved at anytime especially within airport area. Unattended baggage may be removed by Airport/Security Staff as object of suspicion. • To declare before check-in, if carrying any arms or explosive substance. Concealment is an offence under Aircraft Act & Rules.

Seat Pitch: 38” – J class & 32” – Y class

• To carry only one hand baggage. Its sum of three dimensions (viz. length, breadth and height) should not exceed 100 cms. • To remove battery cells/dry cells from radios, transistor sets, two-in-ones and other such electrical/electronic items and hand them over to the airline staff before security check or carry them in registered baggage. n SECURITY CHECKS All passengers and their baggage are subjected to security checks before boarding a flight. Transit passengers are therefore requested to remain on board at transit stations as, otherwise, they will be again subjected to security checks. v

54

TASHIDELEK

February – March 2009

TRAVEL TIPS n

All passengers are advised to maintain a minimum of 24 hours connection time to avoid misconnections due to weather, which is one of the major causes for misconnections.

n

Only one piece of baggage is permitted in the cabin. The weight of such baggage may not exceed 5 kg. The size of the cabin baggage should be restricted to 17.5 x 13.5 x 6 inches.

n

The normal checked/registered free baggage allowance permissible per person/ticket is 30 kg in business class (J) and 20 kg in economy class (Y). However, an infant is not entitled to any free baggage allowance.


Drukair Winter Schedule

n

n

n

n

n

Valuable items such as money, jewellery, precious metals, personal electronic devices, negotiable papers, and other valuable business documents etc must not be included in the checked baggage. Despite being prohibited, if any of these items are included in the checked baggage, we shall not be responsible for any loss or damage to such items. Passengers traveling to Dhaka, Bangladesh are required to submit their embarkation/disembarkation forms online prior to date of travel. This is available on their website www.immi.gov.bd and should click on "click here to fill embarkation/disembarkation form online" and fill in their details. The ISC number issued must be presented at the immigration counter on arrival in Dhaka As per the notice circulated to all airlines by the Thai Immigration office, visa on arrival for passengers holding one way or open tickets will not be extended. Therefore, such passengers are advised to obtain necessary prior visa from the concerned diplomatic representations abroad to avoid being inconvenienced and deported. Through check-in facility is yet to be introduced in Drukair. Therefore, all transit passengers are requested to observe the following procedures pertaining to transit check-in.

a)

On arrival at Bangkok, transit passengers must proceed to the transfer desk on the 2nd floor.

b)

Two transfer desks are available, one dedicated to Thai Airways handling and the other for self-handling airlines.

Ensure that your baggage has been received from Druk Air.

e)

Hand over baggage tags to the transfer desk personnel for baggage to be transferred to the next carrier.

Effective from February 1, 2009 to March 28, 2009 DAY

FLIGHT NO.

SECTOR

DEP.

ARR.

1

KB 205

DEL-KTM KTM-PBH

0700 0935

0855 1055

KB 121

BKK-CCU CCU-PBH

0650 0840

0800 1020

KB 124

PBH-CCU CCU-BKK

1140 1300

1220 1710

KB 123

BKK-GAY GAY-PBH

0650 0905

0835 1050

KB 126

PBH-DAC DAC-BKK

0850 1030

0950 1400

KB 127

BKK-DAC DAC-PBH

0650 0900

0820 1000

KB 204

PBH-KTM KTM-DEL

1100 1230

1150 1405

KB 120

PBH-CCU CCU-BKK

0830 0950

0910 1400

KB 205

DEL-KTM KTM-PBH

0700 0935

0855 1055

KB 121

BKK-CCU CCU-PBH

0650 0840

0800 1020

KB 122

PBH-GAY GAY-BKK

1110 1225

1155 1655

KB 123

BKK-GAY GAY-PBH

0650 0905

0835 1050

KB 120*

PBH-CCU CCU-BKK

0900 1020

0940 1430

KB 206

PBH-KTM KTM-DEL

1140 1310

1230 1445

KB 207

DEL-KTM KTM-PBH

0700 0935

0855 1055

KB 121

BKK-CCU CCU-PBH

0650 0840

0800 1020

KB 130

PBH-DAC DAC-BKK

1120 1300

1220 1630

KB 131

BKK-DAC DAC-PBH

0650 0900

0820 1000

KB 204

PBH-KTM KTM-DEL

1100 1230

1150 1405

KB 122

PBH-GAY GAY-BKK

0930 1045

1015 1515

2

3

4

5

6

Travel into Paro (International-International) On arrival at Bangkok, transit passengers must proceed to the Thai Airways transfer desk on the 2nd floor.

b)

Ensure that your baggage has been received from the last carrier.

c)

Handover baggage tags to the transfer desk personnel for baggage to be transferred to Druk Air.

Travel ex Paro (International to Domestic) a)

Transit check-in and transit transfer of baggage is not permitted from International to domestic flights except

On arrival, you must collect your baggage from the baggage belt; proceed through Passport & Customs Formalities and check-in for the domestic flight on the 4th floor. v

DRUKAIR’S WINTER SCHEDULE

Depending on the airline that your onward journey is booked on, report to the relevant transfer desk.

d)

a)

n

b)

Travel ex-Paro (International-International)

c)

n

for Thai Airways to Thai Airways flight, that too on special arrangements.

7

AIRCRAFT TYPE: A319-115 All schedules are in local time NOTE: Schedule subject to aeronautical clearances. Therefore, no responsibility can be assumed for delay, cancellation or unavailability of flight or missed connections.

* For 6 & 13 Feb, the flight time of KB 120 will be:

PBH - CCU CCU - BKK

0920 1115

1000 1520

1-Monday, 2-Tuesday, 3-Wednesday, 4-Thursday, 5-Friday, 6-Saturday, 7-Sunday BKK - Bangkok, CCU-Kolkata, DEL-Delhi, GAY-Gaya, KTM-Kathmandu, PBH-Paro, DAC-Dhaka

February – March 2009

TASHIDELEK

55


Drukair Import Regulations

Import regulations BHUTAN

n Cigarettes and any other tobacco related products are forbidden in the kingdom. For personal consumption passengers are permitted to bring in 200 cigarettes (10 packets - 1 ctn) on payment of 200 per cent duty.

n Alcoholic beverages upto 1 litre for personal consumption.

THAILAND Each passenger holding a passport of his/her own, irrespective of age is allowed:

n 200 cigarettes or 250 grams of tobacco or equal weight of cigars

n 1 litre of alcoholic liquor Rules for taking Liquids, Aerosols and Gels through Suvarnabhumi Airport (Thailand).

INDIA (Import by non-residents is only permitted if they enter India for a stay of not less than 24 hours and not more than two months, provided they visit India not more than once a month.) A person of 17 years and older is allowed:

n 200 cigarettes or 50 cigars or 250 grams of tobacco n One bottle (0.95 L) of alcoholic liquor n 2 ounces of perfume and 1/4 litre of toilet water

If you wish to take liquids, aerosols and gels which include items such as drinks, creams, perfumes, sprays, gels, toothpaste, lipstick, lip balm and similar substances. Items through the screening point as "carry on" make sure:

n Each item is 100ml or less n All items fit in a transparent, one litre bag. (about 20x20cm)

NEPAL

n The bag is sealed.

n 100 cigarettes or an equivalent of other tobacco

n Only one bag per person is allowed.

articles

n 1 quart of alcoholic liquor n A reasonable quantity of perfume for personal use

56

TASHIDELEK

February – March 2009

n If the items weigh more than 100ml, place them in your check-in baggage. Kindly adhere by the rules as items once seized are not returned.


Drukair Reservation Offices

Drukair’s

Reservation Offices BHUTAN: PARO Head Office DRUKAIR CORPORATION LTD. Nemeyzampa, Paro, Bhutan Tel. : +975 8 271856/57/58/271860 : +975 8 271861 Fax E-mail : reservationparo@drukair.com.bt Airport : +975 8 271423 Tel. Fax : +975 8 271855 E-mail : parostation@drukair.com.bt spccontrol@drukair.com.bt THIMPHU DRUKAIR CORPORATION LTD. (Branch Office) Chang Lam Plaza Building, Chang Lam, Thimphu, Bhutan Tel. : +975 2 322215/323420/322825 Fax : +975 2 322775 E-mail : drukairthimphu@druknet.bt

BANGLADESH: DHAKA DRUKAIR CORPORATION LTD. Room # 52, Terminal 2, 2nd Floor, Zia International Airport, Dhaka, Bangladesh Tel. : + 880 2 8911066/8917347 Fax : + 880 2 8913038 E-mail : ogyenpdorji@drukair.com.bt dhaka@drukair.com.bt

58

BORAK TRAVELS PVT. LTD. Unique Trade Centre, Level 5, 8 Panthapath, Kawran Bazaar, Dhaka - 1215, Bangladesh : + 880 2 9137662/9129682/ Tel. 9146127/9118725 : + 880 2 9131261/8823392 Fax E-mail : borak@cyberbangla.com

KOLKATA DRUKAIR CORPORATION LTD. (City Office) 51, Tivoli Court, 1A, Ballygunge Circular Road, Kolkata - 700019 : +91 33 22902429/22805376 Tel. Fax : +91 33 22900050 : reservation@drukairccu.com E-mail cityoffice@drukairccu.com

BORAK TRAVELS PVT. LTD. 51/B Kemal Ataturk Avenue, Banani, Dhaka - 1213, Bangladesh Tel. : + 880 2 9885116-23 Ext:135/137/138 Fax : + 880 2 8823392 E-mail : utt@bangla.net

DRUKAIR CORPORATION LTD. (Airport Office) Room No. 16, (International Building), NTB N.S.C.B.I Aiport, Kolkata - 700017 Tel. : +91 33 25119976/25111973 Fax : +91 33 25117094 E-mail : aic@drukairccu.com airport@drukairccu.com

INDIA: NEW DELHI DRUKAIR CORPORATION LTD. (City Office) Ansal Bhawan Building, G Floor - 3, 16 KG Marg, Connaught Place, New Delhi - 110001 Tel. : +91 11 23357703-04/23358968 Fax : +91 11 23357768 Email : sales.delh]i@drukair.com.bt

UNIQUE AIR TRAVELS PVT. LTD. (PSA) G2, Circular Centre, 222, AJC Bose Road, Kolkata - 700 017 Tel. : +91 33 22807419/22907917 Fax : +91 33 22807418 E-mail : uniqueair@hotmail.com

DRUKAIR CORPORATION LTD. (Airport Office) Room No. 43, New Visitor’s Lounge, IGI Airport, Terminal - II, New Delhi Tel. : +91 11 25653207 Fax : +91 11 25653147 E-mail : delkkkb@drukair.com.bt

STONE TRAVELS PVT. LTD. 55BB, Mirza Galib Street, Kolkata - 700016 Tel. : +91 33 40059780-83 Fax : +91 33 40059784 E-mail : stplcal@stonetravels.com SAPPHIRE TRAVELS 1, Cock Burn Lane, 3rd Floor,Kolkata - 700016 Tel. : +91 98360-55576/98361-55576 98362-55576 Fax : +91 33 2282-7265 E-mail : sappiretravels@vsnl.net

MAMS AVIATION LTD. (PSA) 33, Gulshan North Avenue, Road 45, Gulshan 2, Dhaka - 1212, Bangladesh PABX : +880 2 9890802/8827969/8826896 Phone : +880 2 9892862/9862243 Fax : +880 2 8828439 E-mail : mams@bdmail.net

STONE TRAVELS (PSA) IC-3, Taj Apartments, Rao Tula Ram Marg, New Delhi - 110022 Phone : +91 11 26711163/64/26176594/6597 Fax : +91 11 26164928 E-mail : drukinfo@stonetravels.com

A&A TRAVEL ZONE PVT. LTD. 13, Chowranghee Lane, Kolkata - 700016 Phone : +91 33 22172792/22521076 E-mail : travel_zone@yahoo.co.in

SKY BANGLA AVIATION LTD. (PSA) Suite No. 6C (6th Floor), Sonartori Tower, 12 Sonargaon Road, Dhaka - 1000, Bangladesh Phone : + 880 2 8651270/8551271 Fax : + 880 2 9675624 Email : ali@skybangla.com

ECO EXPEDITIONS & TOURS PVT. LTD. 505, Jaina Tower II, District Centre,Janakpuri, New Delhi - 110 058 Phone : +91 11 41579134/35 Fax : +91 11 41579136 E-mail : akhilesh@visitbhutan.com

GAYA DRUKAIR CORPORATION Happy Guest House, Near Mahabodhi Society of India, Bodh Gaya, Bihar - 824231 Tel/Fax : +91 631 2200264 E-mail : peman@drukair.com.bt pemagaya@drukair.com.bt

TASHIDELEK

February – March 2009


Drukair Reservation Offices OFF LINE OFFICES MYANMAR: YANGON DRUKAIR CORPORATION LTD. No. 52, Phyapon Street, Sanchaung, Yangon, Myanmar : +95 1 527724 Tel. Fax : +95 1 537873 : drukair@mptmail.net.mm E-mail

NEPAL: KATHMANDU DANFE TRAVEL CENTRE PVT. LTD. (GSA) P.O. Box 4429, Durbar Marg, Kathmandu, Nepal : +977 1 4239988/4239922/4239651 Tel. Fax : +977 1 4239658 E-mail : sales@drukair.danfetravels.com Airport Tel. : +977 1 4471712 E-mail : ktmkkkb@drukair.com.bt MALLA TREKS PVT. LTD. (PSA) P.O. Box 5227, Leknath Marg, Kathmandu, Nepal Tel. : +977 1 4410089 Fax : +977 1 4423143 E-mail : info@mallatreks.com

THAILAND: BANGKOK DRUKAIR, ROYAL BHUTAN AIRLINES (Airport Office) Room No Z 3-013, (3rd Floor), Airlines Office Building, Suvarnabhumi International Airport, 999/Moo 7, Racha Thewa, Bang Phi, Samut Prakan - 10540 : +66 2 1343040/41 Tel. Terminal : +66 2 1343041 Check-in counter Fax : +66 2 1343042 E-mail : drukairbkk@drukair.com.bt DRUKAIR, ROYAL BHUTAN AIRLINES (City Office) 5th Floor, Suite No. 141/4, Skulthai Surawong Tower, Suriyawong Bangrak, Bangkok 10500, Thailand Tel. : +66 2 2379202/03/04/05 PABX Fax : +66 2 2334534 Oriole Travels & Tours Co. Ltd. 5th Floor Suite No 141/4 Skulthai, Surawong Tower Surawong Road, Bangkok - 10500, Thailand Tel. : +66 2 237-9201-3 Fax : +66 2 237-9200 E-mail : oriole@samarts.co.th

HONG KONG GLOBAL UNION TRANSPORTATION LTD. RM, 22-24, New Henry House, 10 Ice Street, Central Hong Kong : +852 28683231 Tel. Fax : +852 28455078 E-mail : josephlo@aeroglobal.com.hk CHEUNG HUNG TOURIST SERVICES CO. LTD. 2/F1, Block-B, Carnarvon Mansion, 12, Carnarvon Rd., TST. Kowloon, Hong Kong : +852 23695333 Tel. Fax : +852 2739899 E-mail : chts@netvigator.com KOREA YALE SKY NET CO., LTD. 1F/Hangang Building, 606-15 Mok 3 dong, Yangchun-Ku, Seol, Korea Tel. : +82 2 2652 3361 Fax : +82 2 2643 9614 : yiandres@hotmail.com E-mail gulee838@yahoo.co.kr SRI LANKA HEMAS AIR SERVICES (PTE) LTD. 75 York Street, Colombo-1, Sri Lanka Tel. : +94 1 243711 Fax : +94 1 4731399 E-mail : drukair@hemas.com TAIWAN GLOBAL AVIATION SERVICES P. LTD. 11F-2, 103, Nanking E. Road, Sector 4, Taipei, Taiwan Tel. : +886 2 87122113 Fax : +886 2 87123151 E-mail : pax@gastwn.com

February – March 2009

TASHIDELEK

59



test