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What Are We Doing?

Moving Forward

The Crowe Valley Conservation Authority (CVCA) covers an area of approximately 2,006 km2, and includes the Crowe River, North River and Beaver Creek sub watersheds. The watershed contains many wetlands, small lakes, a high percentage of forest cover and retains much of its natural landscape.

The Crowe Valley Conservation Authority (CVCA) continues to monitor water quality within the Crowe Watershed and report on the information collected. In moving forward we are paving a path for future generations as well as future development in the Crowe Valley watershed. The data collected has been vital for the Source Water Protection Program and will be valuable for future planning, climate change and environmental challenges that lie ahead.

Crowe Valley

At five sampling sites surface water is collected for seven months of the year in the CVCA watershed. Ground water samples are collected annually from seven monitoring wells and ground water levels are continuously monitored. Benthic invertebrates are collected annually from an average of twelve sites spread throughout the watershed. With funding assistance from the MNR Experience Program, the CVCA is able to hire students to collect Benthic samples starting in May. In addition to the Benthic samples there are also water quality samples taken at the Benthic sites for the province wide Biocriteria Project with the Ministry of Environment.

Report Card 2013

For over 50 years, the CVCA has worked in partnerships with its 10 member municipalities, the Ministry of Natural Resources, Ministry of Environment and the Department of Fisheries and Oceans. With its early beginnings in dam management dating back to the 1950s, the Authority has been evolving in response to increasing environmental demands regarding the responsible management of watershed resources. This Watershed Report Card is the first of its kind released in CVCA history. The need for continued monitoring and reporting on all resources - water, forests and the management of these resources - is necessary in order to obtain critical data on the health of the watershed. With local support for sustained monitoring and reporting programs the CVCA can continue to deliver programs to protect and manage the natural resources for local watershed residents. There are some gaps that have prevented the CVCA from generating grades for all the indicators in this reporting format. The CVCA has been consistently working on closing these gaps through monitoring ground and surface water since 2006. With established monitoring programs and local support in place, CVCA will be able to improve its capacity to report on additional watershed indicators within the next reporting cycle.

Where Are We? We are one of 36 Conservation Authorities across Ontario under the umbrella organization of Conservation Ontario.

Watershed

What Does This Report Card Measure?

What You Can Do! In urban areas we can protect water by working with our Municipalities and Conservation Authorities through the Source Water Protection Program to help eliminate potential spills and leaks that could affect our drinking water sources.

Surface Water Quality

Forest Conditions

Groundwater Quality

Why Measure?

Although most of the Crowe Valley Watershed is rural, we can still help to protect our water resources in other ways. By properly maintaining septic systems and preventing spills and leaks near water features or wells we can play a important role in protecting these valuable water resources.

Measuring helps us better understand our watershed. It helps us to focus our eorts where they are needed most and track progress. It also helps us to identify healthy and ecologically important areas that requir protection or enhancement.

By ensuring we think about the impact our actions could make on the environment we can also help with such things like following best boating practises, not releasing live bait, maintain buffers around water bodies, using phosphorus free products and in general incorporate responsible actions to take care of our environment.

What is a Watershed? A watershed is an area of land drained by a river or stream. Similar to the branch of a tree, creeks empty into streams, which then empty into larger streams, eventually forming one main trunk. Within this system, everything is connected to everything else. In other words, actions which take place at the top of the system can and do aect those downstream.

Crowe Valley Conservation Authority 70 Hughes Lane, P.O. Box 416 Marmora, Ontario P. (613) 472-3137 F. (613) 472-5516 www.crowevalley.ca

Crowe Valley Conservation Authority has prepared this report card as a summary on the state of our forests, wetlands, surface water, and ground water resources.

Grading A Excellent B Good C Fair D Poor F Very Poor

The standards used in this report card were developed by Conservation Authorities to ensure consistent reportings across the Province of Ontario and are intended to provide watershed residents with information to protect, enhance and improve the precious resources that surround us.


What Are We Doing?

Moving Forward

The Crowe Valley Conservation Authority (CVCA) covers an area of approximately 2,006 km2, and includes the Crowe River, North River and Beaver Creek sub watersheds. The watershed contains many wetlands, small lakes, a high percentage of forest cover and retains much of its natural landscape.

The Crowe Valley Conservation Authority (CVCA) continues to monitor water quality within the Crowe Watershed and report on the information collected. In moving forward we are paving a path for future generations as well as future development in the Crowe Valley watershed. The data collected has been vital for the Source Water Protection Program and will be valuable for future planning, climate change and environmental challenges that lie ahead.

Crowe Valley

At five sampling sites surface water is collected for seven months of the year in the CVCA watershed. Ground water samples are collected annually from seven monitoring wells and ground water levels are continuously monitored. Benthic invertebrates are collected annually from an average of twelve sites spread throughout the watershed. With funding assistance from the MNR Experience Program, the CVCA is able to hire students to collect Benthic samples starting in May. In addition to the Benthic samples there are also water quality samples taken at the Benthic sites for the province wide Biocriteria Project with the Ministry of Environment.

Report Card 2013

For over 50 years, the CVCA has worked in partnerships with its 10 member municipalities, the Ministry of Natural Resources, Ministry of Environment and the Department of Fisheries and Oceans. With its early beginnings in dam management dating back to the 1950s, the Authority has been evolving in response to increasing environmental demands regarding the responsible management of watershed resources. This Watershed Report Card is the first of its kind released in CVCA history. The need for continued monitoring and reporting on all resources - water, forests and the management of these resources - is necessary in order to obtain critical data on the health of the watershed. With local support for sustained monitoring and reporting programs the CVCA can continue to deliver programs to protect and manage the natural resources for local watershed residents. There are some gaps that have prevented the CVCA from generating grades for all the indicators in this reporting format. The CVCA has been consistently working on closing these gaps through monitoring ground and surface water since 2006. With established monitoring programs and local support in place, CVCA will be able to improve its capacity to report on additional watershed indicators within the next reporting cycle.

Where Are We? We are one of 36 Conservation Authorities across Ontario under the umbrella organization of Conservation Ontario.

Watershed

What Does This Report Card Measure?

What You Can Do! In urban areas we can protect water by working with our Municipalities and Conservation Authorities through the Source Water Protection Program to help eliminate potential spills and leaks that could affect our drinking water sources.

Surface Water Quality

Forest Conditions

Groundwater Quality

Why Measure?

Although most of the Crowe Valley Watershed is rural, we can still help to protect our water resources in other ways. By properly maintaining septic systems and preventing spills and leaks near water features or wells we can play a important role in protecting these valuable water resources.

Measuring helps us better understand our watershed. It helps us to focus our eorts where they are needed most and track progress. It also helps us to identify healthy and ecologically important areas that requir protection or enhancement.

By ensuring we think about the impact our actions could make on the environment we can also help with such things like following best boating practises, not releasing live bait, maintain buffers around water bodies, using phosphorus free products and in general incorporate responsible actions to take care of our environment.

What is a Watershed? A watershed is an area of land drained by a river or stream. Similar to the branch of a tree, creeks empty into streams, which then empty into larger streams, eventually forming one main trunk. Within this system, everything is connected to everything else. In other words, actions which take place at the top of the system can and do aect those downstream.

Crowe Valley Conservation Authority 70 Hughes Lane, P.O. Box 416 Marmora, Ontario P. (613) 472-3137 F. (613) 472-5516 www.crowevalley.ca

Crowe Valley Conservation Authority has prepared this report card as a summary on the state of our forests, wetlands, surface water, and ground water resources.

Grading A Excellent B Good C Fair D Poor F Very Poor

The standards used in this report card were developed by Conservation Authorities to ensure consistent reportings across the Province of Ontario and are intended to provide watershed residents with information to protect, enhance and improve the precious resources that surround us.


What Are We Doing?

Moving Forward

The Crowe Valley Conservation Authority (CVCA) covers an area of approximately 2,006 km2, and includes the Crowe River, North River and Beaver Creek sub watersheds. The watershed contains many wetlands, small lakes, a high percentage of forest cover and retains much of its natural landscape.

The Crowe Valley Conservation Authority (CVCA) continues to monitor water quality within the Crowe Watershed and report on the information collected. In moving forward we are paving a path for future generations as well as future development in the Crowe Valley watershed. The data collected has been vital for the Source Water Protection Program and will be valuable for future planning, climate change and environmental challenges that lie ahead.

Crowe Valley

At five sampling sites surface water is collected for seven months of the year in the CVCA watershed. Ground water samples are collected annually from seven monitoring wells and ground water levels are continuously monitored. Benthic invertebrates are collected annually from an average of twelve sites spread throughout the watershed. With funding assistance from the MNR Experience Program, the CVCA is able to hire students to collect Benthic samples starting in May. In addition to the Benthic samples there are also water quality samples taken at the Benthic sites for the province wide Biocriteria Project with the Ministry of Environment.

Report Card 2013

For over 50 years, the CVCA has worked in partnerships with its 10 member municipalities, the Ministry of Natural Resources, Ministry of Environment and the Department of Fisheries and Oceans. With its early beginnings in dam management dating back to the 1950s, the Authority has been evolving in response to increasing environmental demands regarding the responsible management of watershed resources. This Watershed Report Card is the first of its kind released in CVCA history. The need for continued monitoring and reporting on all resources - water, forests and the management of these resources - is necessary in order to obtain critical data on the health of the watershed. With local support for sustained monitoring and reporting programs the CVCA can continue to deliver programs to protect and manage the natural resources for local watershed residents. There are some gaps that have prevented the CVCA from generating grades for all the indicators in this reporting format. The CVCA has been consistently working on closing these gaps through monitoring ground and surface water since 2006. With established monitoring programs and local support in place, CVCA will be able to improve its capacity to report on additional watershed indicators within the next reporting cycle.

Where Are We? We are one of 36 Conservation Authorities across Ontario under the umbrella organization of Conservation Ontario.

Watershed

What Does This Report Card Measure?

What You Can Do! In urban areas we can protect water by working with our Municipalities and Conservation Authorities through the Source Water Protection Program to help eliminate potential spills and leaks that could affect our drinking water sources.

Surface Water Quality

Forest Conditions

Groundwater Quality

Why Measure?

Although most of the Crowe Valley Watershed is rural, we can still help to protect our water resources in other ways. By properly maintaining septic systems and preventing spills and leaks near water features or wells we can play a important role in protecting these valuable water resources.

Measuring helps us better understand our watershed. It helps us to focus our eorts where they are needed most and track progress. It also helps us to identify healthy and ecologically important areas that requir protection or enhancement.

By ensuring we think about the impact our actions could make on the environment we can also help with such things like following best boating practises, not releasing live bait, maintain buffers around water bodies, using phosphorus free products and in general incorporate responsible actions to take care of our environment.

What is a Watershed? A watershed is an area of land drained by a river or stream. Similar to the branch of a tree, creeks empty into streams, which then empty into larger streams, eventually forming one main trunk. Within this system, everything is connected to everything else. In other words, actions which take place at the top of the system can and do aect those downstream.

Crowe Valley Conservation Authority 70 Hughes Lane, P.O. Box 416 Marmora, Ontario P. (613) 472-3137 F. (613) 472-5516 www.crowevalley.ca

Crowe Valley Conservation Authority has prepared this report card as a summary on the state of our forests, wetlands, surface water, and ground water resources.

Grading A Excellent B Good C Fair D Poor F Very Poor

The standards used in this report card were developed by Conservation Authorities to ensure consistent reportings across the Province of Ontario and are intended to provide watershed residents with information to protect, enhance and improve the precious resources that surround us.


Surface Water Quality

Forest Conditions

Groundwater Quality

Indicators Phosphorous E.coli Bacteria Benthic Macro-Invertebrates

Indicators % Forest Cover % Forest Interior % Riparian Zone Forested

Indicators Nitrate and Nitrite Levels Chloride Levels Groundwater quality not reported on due to insufficient data.

¨

Bancroft

!

Coe Hill

!

!

!

!

! !

!

The Crowe Valley Conservation Authority (CVCA) was able to report on phosphorus from water samples collected over a five year period. The score achieved was excellent for the samples taken, and the watershed was graded an A for surface water. Phosphorous is crucial to many aquatic life cycles however in excess it can cause abundant aquatic vegetative growth, resulting in anoxic conditions when the vegetation decomposes.

Coe Hill

Madoc

!

Havelock

PWQMN Surface Water Sampling Sites

!

Benthic Macroinvertebrate Sampling Sites

Surface Water Quality

Marmora

!

Although CVCA does not measure E-Coli, there are other indicators of surface water health that the CVCA does measure under the Provincial Water Quality Monitoring Network. Chlorine, nitrates and lead are regularly measured. While these three parameters are not considered in the grading of this watershed report card, the water quality data on these parameters confirms there have been no exceedances of the Ontario Drinking Water Quality Standards or upward trends that might result in an exceedance. !

Norwood

Excellent (scoring is based on phosphorus data only)

Benthic Macroinvertebrates are also being collected in the Crowe Valley Watershed but are not included in this grading for Surface Water as they are not identified to family level. The CVCA is currently working to identify all samples to family level as well as have accurate reference sites for comparison established by the next watershed report card. In summary phosphorus levels scored an A, but we hope to add more data to this section in the future which will increase the accuracy of the phosphorus score.

The majority of the Crowe Valley Conservation Authority (CVCA) watershed encompasses the rugged terrain of the Canadian Shield with a number of wetlands, riparian areas and forests intertwined within the watershed.

H HE ER RS SC CH HE E LL

Bancroft

¨

M MA AY YO O D DU UN NG GA AN NN NO ON N

# F FA AR RA AD DA AY Y

#

C CA AR RD D II F FF F

C CA AS SH HE E LL

LL II M ME ER R II C CK K

Coe Hill W WO O LL LL A AS ST TO ON N

C CH HA AN ND DO OS S

A AN NS ST TR RU UT TH HE ER R

#

# T TU UD DO OR R

Marmora

Legend

¨

Bancroft

Havelock

Legend Forest Conditions

CVCA scores a Grade A in forest cover because of the significantly high percentage of forested or wooded areas within the watershed. This map is shaded entirely in blue to represent the ‘excellent’ forest coverage throughout the watershed.

Norwood

Excellent

While much of the forest was at one time harvested, the majority is now undisturbed forest cover. Within this highly forested terrain CVCA maintains four Conservation Areas and an Agreement Forest totalling over 1235 Acres. The high quality forest cover can also be contributed to a lack of major transportation corridors throughout most of the CVCA watershed. This results in development being concentrated around the few transportation corridors or localized around the water bodies in the watershed. Having such high quality forest cover is a wonderful natural feature in the CVCA watershed which requires protection to ensure it is not degraded. Under Ontario Regulation 159/06 the CVCA can ensure that this stewardship responsibility is fulfilled by protecting sensitive areas around watercourses and wetlands (including forests). The regulation also ensures that development in these areas is done in a safe and conscientious way.

LL A AK KE E

#

M ME ET TH HU UE EN N B BU UR R LL E E II G GH H

M MA AD DO OC C

Regardless of low urban densities in the Crowe Valley Conservation Authority (CVCA) watershed, groundwater still has the potential to be impacted by human actions. Nutrients, road salts, septic systems, aggregate operations and closed landfills or brownfields all could possibly contribute to potential degradation in future water quality resources.

Watershed Management Services 15 Water Control Structures to regulate water levels and flows.

¨

H HE ER RS SC CH HE E LL Bancroft

M MA AY YO O D DU UN NG GA AN NN NO ON N

F FA AR RA AD DA AY Y C CA AR RD D II F FF F

. ! C CA AS SH HE E LL

. ! LL II M ME ER R II C CK K

Coe Hill W WO O LL LL A AS ST TO ON N

A AN NS ST TR RU UT TH HE ER R

. !

# 0

. !

C CH HA AN ND DO OS S

# 0 T TU UD DO OR R

# 0

LL A AK KE E

M ME ET TH HU UE EN N B BU UR R LL E E II G GH H

# 0

M MA AD DO OC C

. ! . !

M MA AR RM MO OR RA A

M MA AR RM MO OR RA A Madoc

S SM M II T TH H

Water level data collection can also help us with climate change challenges. As everything is connected the aquifers underground can reflect the water that flows across our landscape. The groundwater flows through the Crowe system in a general southerly direction and contains mainly bedrock aquifers and overburden aquifers. B BE E LL M MO ON NT T

S SM M II T TH H

B BE E LL M MO ON NT T

D DU UM MM ME ER R

Havelock

Legend

#

GroundwaterWells

R RA AW WD DO ON N

Norwood

A AS SP PH HO OD DE E LL

S SE EY YM MO OU UR R

# #

Marmora

. !

D DU UM MM ME ER R

#

D DO OU UR RO O

. !

. !

Marmora

Legend D DO OU UR RO O

. !

Dams

# 0

Weirs

Havelock

. ! Norwood A AS SP PH HO OD DE E LL

S SE EY YM MO OU UR R

# 0

R RA AW WD DO ON N

The Crowe Valley Conservation Authority (CVCA) is unique in the way that the water levels and flows are carefully managed with a series of fifteen water control structures. By managing and operating dams throughout the watershed 365 days a year, CVCA water management includes minimizing the effects of flooding, maintaining summer recreational lake levels and monitoring periods of low flows. Some of the structures are owned by CVCA where others are owned by the Ministry of Natural Resources. The CVCA operates the majority of the water control structures while some are operated in partnership by the Ministry of Natural Resources.

In partnership with the Ontario Ministry of the Environment, the CVCA participates in the Provincial Groundwater Monitoring Network and collects groundwater samples in our watershed. Throughout the watershed we have eight groundwater wells where we collect water level data and ground water samples. Currently there is insufficient data available to report on ground water quality grading.

Water levels are also managed through each sub watershed considering the impact of upstream and downstream conditions. Having many lakes and rivers in the watershed being used for recreational purposes poses many challenges for the CVCA staff as the Authority must consider reaching its summer and winter level targets when managing the water system. This is particularly evident as people are vacationing longer or more often at their summer residences. The issue’s complexity is raised even further with the conversion of cottages to homes or the addition of homes in the watershed.

As additional data is needed to fully characterize the quality of the ground water flowing through the watershed, the CVCA will continue monitoring through the Provincial Groundwater Monitoring Network and be able to analyse results for the next reporting cycle.

There are also two Hydroelectric-Generating Stations located in Marmora on Crowe River and further upstream on Cordova Lake. The Marmora Power Generation station is managed primarily by the CVCA, however the Cordova Power Generation station is operated by Algonquin Power.


Surface Water Quality

Forest Conditions

Groundwater Quality

Indicators Phosphorous E.coli Bacteria Benthic Macro-Invertebrates

Indicators % Forest Cover % Forest Interior % Riparian Zone Forested

Indicators Nitrate and Nitrite Levels Chloride Levels Groundwater quality not reported on due to insufficient data.

¨

Bancroft

!

Coe Hill

!

!

!

!

! !

!

The Crowe Valley Conservation Authority (CVCA) was able to report on phosphorus from water samples collected over a five year period. The score achieved was excellent for the samples taken, and the watershed was graded an A for surface water. Phosphorous is crucial to many aquatic life cycles however in excess it can cause abundant aquatic vegetative growth, resulting in anoxic conditions when the vegetation decomposes.

Coe Hill

Madoc

!

Havelock

PWQMN Surface Water Sampling Sites

!

Benthic Macroinvertebrate Sampling Sites

Surface Water Quality

Marmora

!

Although CVCA does not measure E-Coli, there are other indicators of surface water health that the CVCA does measure under the Provincial Water Quality Monitoring Network. Chlorine, nitrates and lead are regularly measured. While these three parameters are not considered in the grading of this watershed report card, the water quality data on these parameters confirms there have been no exceedances of the Ontario Drinking Water Quality Standards or upward trends that might result in an exceedance. !

Norwood

Excellent (scoring is based on phosphorus data only)

Benthic Macroinvertebrates are also being collected in the Crowe Valley Watershed but are not included in this grading for Surface Water as they are not identified to family level. The CVCA is currently working to identify all samples to family level as well as have accurate reference sites for comparison established by the next watershed report card. In summary phosphorus levels scored an A, but we hope to add more data to this section in the future which will increase the accuracy of the phosphorus score.

The majority of the Crowe Valley Conservation Authority (CVCA) watershed encompasses the rugged terrain of the Canadian Shield with a number of wetlands, riparian areas and forests intertwined within the watershed.

H HE ER RS SC CH HE E LL

Bancroft

¨

M MA AY YO O D DU UN NG GA AN NN NO ON N

# F FA AR RA AD DA AY Y

#

C CA AR RD D II F FF F

C CA AS SH HE E LL

LL II M ME ER R II C CK K

Coe Hill W WO O LL LL A AS ST TO ON N

C CH HA AN ND DO OS S

A AN NS ST TR RU UT TH HE ER R

#

# T TU UD DO OR R

Marmora

Legend

¨

Bancroft

Havelock

Legend Forest Conditions

CVCA scores a Grade A in forest cover because of the significantly high percentage of forested or wooded areas within the watershed. This map is shaded entirely in blue to represent the ‘excellent’ forest coverage throughout the watershed.

Norwood

Excellent

While much of the forest was at one time harvested, the majority is now undisturbed forest cover. Within this highly forested terrain CVCA maintains four Conservation Areas and an Agreement Forest totalling over 1235 Acres. The high quality forest cover can also be contributed to a lack of major transportation corridors throughout most of the CVCA watershed. This results in development being concentrated around the few transportation corridors or localized around the water bodies in the watershed. Having such high quality forest cover is a wonderful natural feature in the CVCA watershed which requires protection to ensure it is not degraded. Under Ontario Regulation 159/06 the CVCA can ensure that this stewardship responsibility is fulfilled by protecting sensitive areas around watercourses and wetlands (including forests). The regulation also ensures that development in these areas is done in a safe and conscientious way.

LL A AK KE E

#

M ME ET TH HU UE EN N B BU UR R LL E E II G GH H

M MA AD DO OC C

Regardless of low urban densities in the Crowe Valley Conservation Authority (CVCA) watershed, groundwater still has the potential to be impacted by human actions. Nutrients, road salts, septic systems, aggregate operations and closed landfills or brownfields all could possibly contribute to potential degradation in future water quality resources.

Watershed Management Services 15 Water Control Structures to regulate water levels and flows.

¨

H HE ER RS SC CH HE E LL Bancroft

M MA AY YO O D DU UN NG GA AN NN NO ON N

F FA AR RA AD DA AY Y C CA AR RD D II F FF F

. ! C CA AS SH HE E LL

. ! LL II M ME ER R II C CK K

Coe Hill W WO O LL LL A AS ST TO ON N

A AN NS ST TR RU UT TH HE ER R

. !

# 0

. !

C CH HA AN ND DO OS S

# 0 T TU UD DO OR R

# 0

LL A AK KE E

M ME ET TH HU UE EN N B BU UR R LL E E II G GH H

# 0

M MA AD DO OC C

. ! . !

M MA AR RM MO OR RA A

M MA AR RM MO OR RA A Madoc

S SM M II T TH H

Water level data collection can also help us with climate change challenges. As everything is connected the aquifers underground can reflect the water that flows across our landscape. The groundwater flows through the Crowe system in a general southerly direction and contains mainly bedrock aquifers and overburden aquifers. B BE E LL M MO ON NT T

S SM M II T TH H

B BE E LL M MO ON NT T

D DU UM MM ME ER R

Havelock

Legend

#

GroundwaterWells

R RA AW WD DO ON N

Norwood

A AS SP PH HO OD DE E LL

S SE EY YM MO OU UR R

# #

Marmora

. !

D DU UM MM ME ER R

#

D DO OU UR RO O

. !

. !

Marmora

Legend D DO OU UR RO O

. !

Dams

# 0

Weirs

Havelock

. ! Norwood A AS SP PH HO OD DE E LL

S SE EY YM MO OU UR R

# 0

R RA AW WD DO ON N

The Crowe Valley Conservation Authority (CVCA) is unique in the way that the water levels and flows are carefully managed with a series of fifteen water control structures. By managing and operating dams throughout the watershed 365 days a year, CVCA water management includes minimizing the effects of flooding, maintaining summer recreational lake levels and monitoring periods of low flows. Some of the structures are owned by CVCA where others are owned by the Ministry of Natural Resources. The CVCA operates the majority of the water control structures while some are operated in partnership by the Ministry of Natural Resources.

In partnership with the Ontario Ministry of the Environment, the CVCA participates in the Provincial Groundwater Monitoring Network and collects groundwater samples in our watershed. Throughout the watershed we have eight groundwater wells where we collect water level data and ground water samples. Currently there is insufficient data available to report on ground water quality grading.

Water levels are also managed through each sub watershed considering the impact of upstream and downstream conditions. Having many lakes and rivers in the watershed being used for recreational purposes poses many challenges for the CVCA staff as the Authority must consider reaching its summer and winter level targets when managing the water system. This is particularly evident as people are vacationing longer or more often at their summer residences. The issue’s complexity is raised even further with the conversion of cottages to homes or the addition of homes in the watershed.

As additional data is needed to fully characterize the quality of the ground water flowing through the watershed, the CVCA will continue monitoring through the Provincial Groundwater Monitoring Network and be able to analyse results for the next reporting cycle.

There are also two Hydroelectric-Generating Stations located in Marmora on Crowe River and further upstream on Cordova Lake. The Marmora Power Generation station is managed primarily by the CVCA, however the Cordova Power Generation station is operated by Algonquin Power.


What Are We Doing?

Moving Forward

The Crowe Valley Conservation Authority (CVCA) covers an area of approximately 2,006 km2, and includes the Crowe River, North River and Beaver Creek sub watersheds. The watershed contains many wetlands, small lakes, a high percentage of forest cover and retains much of its natural landscape.

The Crowe Valley Conservation Authority (CVCA) continues to monitor water quality within the Crowe Watershed and report on the information collected. In moving forward we are paving a path for future generations as well as future development in the Crowe Valley watershed. The data collected has been vital for the Source Water Protection Program and will be valuable for future planning, climate change and environmental challenges that lie ahead.

Crowe Valley

At five sampling sites surface water is collected for seven months of the year in the CVCA watershed. Ground water samples are collected annually from seven monitoring wells and ground water levels are continuously monitored. Benthic invertebrates are collected annually from an average of twelve sites spread throughout the watershed. With funding assistance from the MNR Experience Program, the CVCA is able to hire students to collect Benthic samples starting in May. In addition to the Benthic samples there are also water quality samples taken at the Benthic sites for the province wide Biocriteria Project with the Ministry of Environment.

Report Card 2013

For over 50 years, the CVCA has worked in partnerships with its 10 member municipalities, the Ministry of Natural Resources, Ministry of Environment and the Department of Fisheries and Oceans. With its early beginnings in dam management dating back to the 1950s, the Authority has been evolving in response to increasing environmental demands regarding the responsible management of watershed resources. This Watershed Report Card is the first of its kind released in CVCA history. The need for continued monitoring and reporting on all resources - water, forests and the management of these resources - is necessary in order to obtain critical data on the health of the watershed. With local support for sustained monitoring and reporting programs the CVCA can continue to deliver programs to protect and manage the natural resources for local watershed residents. There are some gaps that have prevented the CVCA from generating grades for all the indicators in this reporting format. The CVCA has been consistently working on closing these gaps through monitoring ground and surface water since 2006. With established monitoring programs and local support in place, CVCA will be able to improve its capacity to report on additional watershed indicators within the next reporting cycle.

Where Are We? We are one of 36 Conservation Authorities across Ontario under the umbrella organization of Conservation Ontario.

Watershed

What Does This Report Card Measure?

What You Can Do! In urban areas we can protect water by working with our Municipalities and Conservation Authorities through the Source Water Protection Program to help eliminate potential spills and leaks that could affect our drinking water sources.

Surface Water Quality

Forest Conditions

Groundwater Quality

Why Measure?

Although most of the Crowe Valley Watershed is rural, we can still help to protect our water resources in other ways. By properly maintaining septic systems and preventing spills and leaks near water features or wells we can play a important role in protecting these valuable water resources.

Measuring helps us better understand our watershed. It helps us to focus our eorts where they are needed most and track progress. It also helps us to identify healthy and ecologically important areas that requir protection or enhancement.

By ensuring we think about the impact our actions could make on the environment we can also help with such things like following best boating practises, not releasing live bait, maintain buffers around water bodies, using phosphorus free products and in general incorporate responsible actions to take care of our environment.

What is a Watershed? A watershed is an area of land drained by a river or stream. Similar to the branch of a tree, creeks empty into streams, which then empty into larger streams, eventually forming one main trunk. Within this system, everything is connected to everything else. In other words, actions which take place at the top of the system can and do aect those downstream.

Crowe Valley Conservation Authority 70 Hughes Lane, P.O. Box 416 Marmora, Ontario P. (613) 472-3137 F. (613) 472-5516 www.crowevalley.ca

Crowe Valley Conservation Authority has prepared this report card as a summary on the state of our forests, wetlands, surface water, and ground water resources.

Grading A Excellent B Good C Fair D Poor F Very Poor

The standards used in this report card were developed by Conservation Authorities to ensure consistent reportings across the Province of Ontario and are intended to provide watershed residents with information to protect, enhance and improve the precious resources that surround us.


Crowe Valley Watershed Report Card