Issuu on Google+

WWW.PORTO21WORLDFORUM.ORG  


RICHARD HUBER. OEA

5

Plenary Session

Página2  


Richard  Huber   Department  of  Sustainable  Development     Cost  Effec3veness  of  Urban  Interven3ons   Smart  Growth:  Smart,  Green,  and  Connected     Foro  Mundial  Porto  21    Portugal   April  17,  2013  

Página3  


Charles  Dickens:  the  world  today   is  “experiencing  the  best  of  3mes,  and  the  worst  of   3mes.”   •  As  a  whole,  humanity  has   achieved  unparalleled   prosperity;     •  Great  strides  are  being   made  to  reduce  global   poverty;     •  Technological  advances  are   revolu3onizing  our  lives,   stamping  out  diseases,  and   transforming   communica3on.  

Página4  


Inequality  remains  stubbornly  high   •  LAC  most  urbanized  region  with  80%  of   popula3on  living  in  urban  areas  genera3ng   75%  OF  CO2   •  By  2030  “the  world  will  need  at  least  50   percent  more  food,  45  percent  more  energy,   and  30  percent  more  water  Source:  Resilient  People,  Resilient  Planet   2012  

•  Already  using  1.5  earths  -­‐-­‐  environmental   limits  are  threatening  supply.”   Página5  


Mexico’s  largest  natural  lake  –     Lake  Chapala,  Mexico   •   1983:  Level  of  the  lake   has  declines;  no3ceable   decreases  in  wetlands  

•   2001:  Altera3on  in  the   contours  of  the   shoreline  is  clearly   visible  

Página6  


Urban  encroachment  on  Florida’s   Everglades,  United  States   •   1973:  Rapid  urban   expansion  has   converted  farmlands   to  cityscapes  

•   2002:  Existence  of   vast  wetlands   “Everglades”   threatened  by  urban   encroachment  

Página7  


Unplanned  growth  of  Brasilia,  Brazil  

• 1973-­‐2001:   Unplanned  urban   development  resulted   in  a  collec3on  of   urban  “satellites”   around  the  city    

Página8  


Home  to  more  than  one-­‐third  of   country’s  popula3on  –  San3ago,  Chile  

The  explosive  growth   of  San3ago  urban  area  

Página9  


Página10  


Página11  


Página12  


Página13  


Página14  


Página15  


Página16  


Aichi  Statement,  2005   •  Efforts  to  promote  environmentally  sustainable   transport  will  result  not  only  in  the  improvement  of   human  health  through  the  reducAon  of  urban  air   polluAon     •  have  important  complimentary  benefits,  including   the  reducAon  of  GHG  emissions,  the  reducAon  of   deaths  and  injuries  from  road  accidents,  the   reducAon  of  harmful  noise  levels,   •  and  the  reducAon  of  traffic  congesAon  levels”  

Página17  


Environmental Policy Instruments Based on Decentralization & Flexibility <---Minimum Flexibility---> <-- Moderate Flexibility ----> <--- Maximum Flexibility ------> <--- Maximum Government Involvement --->

<--- Increased Private Initiative --->

<-Control-Oriented-> <----------Market-Oriented-------------> <-Litigation-Oriented->

Regulations and Sanctions

Charges, Taxes Market & Fees Creation

Final Demand Intervention

Liability Legislation

* Consumer product labeling (ecolabels) for hybrid vehicles and high MPG cars * Education regarding recycling and reuse * Disclosure legislation requiring manufacturers to publish gas mileage * Blacklist of cars

* Damages compensation * “Zero net impact” requirements for road alignments, pipelines or utility rights of way, and water crossings

Specific Examples of Urban Applications * Land use restrictions * Construction impact regulations for roads, pipelines, ports, or communications grids * Environmental guidelines for urban road alignments

* Greening of conventional taxes e.g. Carbon tax * Tolls and User charges for roads * Congestion tax or fee * Gas guzzler tax for cars that get less than 30 mph * Tax break for buying a car that pollutes less or gets high MPG

* Tradable permits for taxis * Market-based expropriation for construction, including “environmental values” * Tradable permits for air pollution emissions such as limiting taxis in urban center

Página18  


Página19  


Página20  


Página21  


Página22  


Tool  for  Rapid  Assessment  of  City  Energy     (TRACE)    

An  Innovative  Decision  Support  Tool  for  Evaluating  Energy  Efficiency  Opportunities  in  Cities  

TRANSPORT!

BUILDINGS!

PUBLIC! LIGHTING!

WATER &
 WASTEWATER!

POWER &! HEATING!

SOLID! WASTE!

Developed  by  Energy  Efficient  CiIes  IniIaIves  (EECI),     Energy  Sector  Management  Assistance  Program,  The  World  Bank  

Página23  


Problems:  Where  can  the  greatest  and   cheapest  performance  gains  be   achieved   •  Traffic  results  in  3me  wasted;     •  high  city-­‐wide  u3liza3on  of  public  transport  but  equally   growing  ownership    of  private  motor  vehicles,  resul3ng   in  higher  opera3ng  energy  intensity  for  mobility;     •  high  city-­‐wide  electricity  use  on  public  lighIng;    

Página24  


Interven3ons:     Where  can  the  most  cost  effec3ve   performance  gains  be  achieved   •  Potable Water! •  Active Water System Leak Detection and Pressure Management! •  Improve Efficiency of Water Pumps and Motors! •  Water Efficient Fixtures and Fittings!

•  Transport!

•  Public Transport Development! •  Municipal and City Bus Fleet Efficiency! •  Traffic Flow Optimization and congestion fee ! •  Buildings! •  Mandating Building Energy Efficiency Codes for New Buildings! •  Municipal office Audit and Retrofit Program!

• Public Lighting! •  Street lighting timing system! •  Street lighting audit and retrofit!

Página25  


In  Colombia,  the   Transmilenio  is  a   successful  bus   rapid  transit   program   spreading  to   Brazil,  Mexico,   Guatemala,   Ecuador,  and   beyond.      

Bus  Rapid  Transit  

Página26   26


Página27  


Página28  


Página29  


Página30  


Green,  Walk  and  Bike   Barbados,  Belize,  and  Trinidad  Tobago     Global  warming   Reduce  carbon  footprint.     Green  Barbados  2007  -­‐  2025  NaAonal  Strategic  Plan   Belize  City  advances  in  a  Waterfront  Development   Strategy  and  Fort  Point  Pedestrian  Walk     •  T&T  has  iniAated  The  Green  Fund.     •  Buenos  Aires  comprehensive  bicycle  program,  Brazil   -­‐-­‐  Rio,  Belo  Horizonte,  and  Sao  Paolo.         •  Mexico  City  bike  share  program,  Ecobici,  in  2010.   number  of  cyclists  in  the  city  from  one  to  five  percent   by  2012.     •  •  •  •  • 

Página31  


Riverscape  Revival  

Página32  


Página33  


Página34  


Página35  


LUIS REIS. SONAE

5

Plenary Session

Página36  


MOBILIDADE   SUSTENTÁVEL   Abril  2013  

Página37  


VIAJAR sem  viajar

 

 

Página38  


CONECTIVIDADE Página39  


REINVENÇÃO Página40  


Página41  


Antecipação  dos  

DESEJOS DOS  CONSUMIDORES

 

Página42  

 


Caso  

PORTAL  MÓVEL  

Página43  


~27.000 214,5  M  

colaboradores  

 

clientes  

Nota:  Em  todas  as  insígnias  do  Retalho   Página44  


10   Km  

2   Km  

Página45  


MOBILIDADE   SUSTENTÁVEL   Abril  2013  

Página46  


5

Plenary Session

JESUS DE PRADO FELIPE. CEU CASTILLA Y LEON

Página47  


Movilidad  Sostenible  como  medida  de   RESPONSABILIDAD  SOCIAL  EMPRESARIAL   Sensibilización  a  través  de  la  Formación  ConInua  

Porto, Abril 2013 Página48  


Posicionamiento  CEU  en  FORO  PORTO  21.   Aunque  tradicionalmente  se  iden3fica  a  CEU   con  la  formación  universitaria  y  de  postgrado,   la  División  de  Formación  Con3nua  en   Empresas,  formación  IN  COMPANY,  nos   permite  detectar  evidencias  significa3vas   sobre  todo  en  el  ámbito  de  PYMES.   49   Página49  


Importancia  de  las  actuaciones  empresariales   en  la  sociedad.  

50  

Según  el  úl3mo  informe  del  INSTITUTO   UNIVERSITARIO  DE  ANALISIS  ECONOMICO  Y   SOCIAL  y  la  FUNDACIÓN  ALTERNATIVAS,  las   empresas  españolas,  según  la  opinión   generalizada,  (ra3os  por  encima  del  90  %),   contribuyen  al  bienestar  de  la  sociedad.   Este  informe  también  nos  señala    que  lo  más  

Página50  


Valores  tradicionales.  

51  

  A   medida   que   los   efectos   de   la   situación   económica   se   asientan,   detectamos   que   muchas  empresas    consideran  la  adopción  de   valores   tradicionales   como   FORTALEZA     prioritaria   para   ser   sostenible   económica   y   socialmente.   Sin   embargo,   todavía   no   se   traduce   en   la   adopción   sistema3zada   de   polí3cas   y  

Página51  


52  

¿Por  qué  entendemos  que  la  formación     de  los  trabajadores  en  las  empresas   juega  un  papel  fundamental  en  el   avance  de  la  RSE?       La  educación  /  formación  como  base  del   comportamiento  humano  nos  ra3fica  en   la  importancia  de  integrar  contenidos   rela3vos  a  RS    en  todos  los    ámbitos  /   etapas  académicas  y  en  los  planes  de   formación  con3nua  de  los  trabajadores.   Página52  


53  

Las   necesidades     de   formación   más   demandadas   se   orientan   fundamentalmente   en   aspectos   relacionados   con   Estrategia   y   Capital  Humano.       O b s e r v a m o s   c o m o   h a b i t u a l ,   q u e   l a   MOVILIDAD   SOSTENIBLE   se   enmarque   de   manera   generalizada     en   la   “dimensión   medioambiental”  de  la  RS.   Aunque   compar3mos   esta   vía,   las   empresas  

Página53  


54  

Aquí   nos   encontramos   siempre   con     dos   aspectos  que  consideramos  perjudiciales   • O rientación   a   la   obligatoriedad   en   el   cumplimiento  de  las  leyes.   •    Alto   nivel   de   enfoque     hacia   la   captura   de   subvenciones  y  beneficios  fiscales       Detectamos   mayor   compromiso   y   mayor   número  de  evidencias  significa3vas  cuando  las   actuaciones     asociadas   a     la   movilidad  

Página54  


¿Qué  conclusión  sacamos  de  esto?   Hay  que  unir  las  dos  premisas:   •  En  las    PERSONAS,  hay  que  fundamentar  la   estrategia  de  las  empresas  para  hacer  de  ellas   su  ac3vo  fundamental.   •  La  RS  se  introduce  como  elemento  estratégico   de  excelencia    y  sostenibilidad  empresarial.   55   Página55  


¿Cómo  incide  la  formación  IN   COMPANY  en  estos  ámbitos?     Quizá,  como  ocurrió  en  los  años  90  con   la  CALIDAD  y  más  recientemente  con  la   INNOVACION  el  camino  comience  con   acciones  de  sensibilización  con  obje3vos   de  impacto:  

56  

• Sensibilización  hacia  la  Responsabilidad  Social  Empresarial.   • Toma  de  conciencia  de  los  beneficios  de  la  Responsabilidad  Social   Empresarial.   • Cambio  de  enfoque  en  las  metodologías  de  planificación,   despliegue  y  seguimiento  de  las  acciones  de  la  organización.    

Página56  


Ciertamente,  estamos  lejos  de  poder  decir  que   seminarios  y  cursos  sobre  RSE  formen  parte   de  las  demandas  prioritarias  de  las  empresas.   Existen  en  sus  planes  de  formación  otras   prioridades.  

57  

Esta  sensibilización  permi3rá  a  la  Dirección  a   integrar  la  RS  en  sus  modelos  de  ges3ón  como   parte  de  su  definición  estratégica:  

Página57  


En  algunas  organizaciones,  aparece  el  GESTOR   DE  MOVILIDAD.   Entre  otras  responsabilidades  elabora  planes   de  formación  que  aportan  información  sobre   el  impacto  y  beneficios  del  cambio,  tanto  para   el  empleado  como  para  el  empresario  y  la   sociedad   58   Página58  


5

Plenary Session

GUILHERME MAGALHÃES. BRISA

Página59  


Página60  


Página61  


Página62  


Página63  


Página64  


Página65  


Página66  


Página67  


Página68  


Página69  


Página70  


Página71  


Página72  


Página73  


Página74  


Página75  


Página76  


Página77  


FREDERICO RAUTER. SIEMENS

6

Plenary Session

Página78  


Página79  


Página80  


Página81  


Página82  


Página83  


Página84  


Página85  


Página86  


Página87  


Página88  


Página89  


Página90  


Página91  


Página92  


WWW.PORTO21WORLDFORUM.ORG  

Foro  de  Soria21  para  el  Desarrollo  Sostenible   Paseo  de  la  Castellana  150,  3º  D.  28046  MADRID  

Tlf.  +34  91  458  62  62   E-­‐mail:  amstdespacho@telefonica.net   am@foromundialsoria21.org  


5ª Mesa Redonda "Mobilidade Sustentável"