Page 1

portfolio

2007 - 2011

hun lin, neo

FORMLESSNESS


curriculum vitae > objective

experience

Hun Lin, Neo Graduate Architect

x x x x x

Generating a creative outcome to solving problems by integrating architecture values. Active participation and excelling in either local or international architecture competitions. Dealing with experimental projects to drive conceptual ideas to be put forth in reality. Successful in producing a high level or architecture finish in every task embarked. Continuity in self conditioning to develop into an all rounder designer.

December 2009 - February 2010 ( 3 months ) | Platino Condominium, Penang,

Student Architect at Garis Architects | Summer Job

Architectural Draftsperson | Summer Job

November 2005 - February 2006 ( 4 months ) | AKEK Group of Companies No. 24 Service Road, 10050, Penang, Malaysia

Bachelor of Architectural Design ( Distinction ) February 2007 - February 2009 | 3 years

Universit채t f체r angewandte Kunst Wien Alessi Mutants ( Exhibited in Venice Biennale ) June 2010 - August 2010 | Summer Course

November 2011 - February 2014 ( 4 months ) | Mattel Malaysia Sdn. Bhd. Plot 206, Tingkat Perusahaan, 4d Prai Fiz, 13600, Penang, Malaysia

Part Time Interior Designer | Summer Job

RMIT University

Masters of Architecture ( Distinction ) February 2010 - February 2011 | 2 years

Freelance 3D Visualizer at Mattel Malaysia | Summer Job

November 2008 - February 2009 ( 4 months ) | Global Business & Convention Center Block B, First Floor No.8 Jalan 19/1 46300, Petaling Jaya, Malaysia

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education

additional information

Skype

hunlin.neo

Email

hunlin.neo@gmail.com

Linked In

www.linkedin.com/pub/hun-lin-neo/37/797/34b

Portfolio

issuu.com/formx_design


personal information > general skills

x x x

architectural skills

x x x x x

achievements

x x x x

Fluent in both written and spoken English and Malay. Currently pursuing a professional translating accreditation from Malay to English through NAATI Excellent navigation skills obtained from the King Scout’s award and have travelled extensively around South East Asia, Europe and U.S.A. Trained in First Aid & holds a Victorian Driving License

summary

My name is Hun Lin, Neo and I was born in Penang, Malaysia in the year 1987. Academically, I have completed the Masters of Architecture course at RMIT. My interest ranges from architecture, arts, digital technology, cinematography and the exploration of virtual worlds. I am fascinated by many things in life and I enjoy doing experimental designs and speculating about the future. I am a hard worker, who can multi-task and face the challenges of busy work environments. I am extremely efficient in computer aided drafting and 3d modeling. My past experience in architectural firms and renowned toy companies such as Mattel, Malaysia have allowed me to engage with heterogeneous staff and working environments. Complimentary to that are my time management skills.

Proficient in computer drafting software’s such as AutoCAD Skilled in layout composition software’s such as Adobe Illustrator, Adobe Indesign and Adobe Photoshop Highly experienced and capable in modeling complex designs within Rhinoceros 4 and T-splines for Rhino Acute taste for beauty and a strong grasp in design

I am a fast learner and I am able to pick things up quickly. I always try to expose myself to new things, both academically and personally, as it is the fastest way to learn. I do not mind being thrown into the deep end. I have demonstrated through my body of work that I am extremely efficient in communicating my ideas through drawings and putting it forth to reality. I am extremely dedicated to architecture and I am able to work within the different fields of architecture as demonstrated in the folios attached.

Design project from RMIT Advanced Fields nominated and shortlisted for the Shanghai Expo 2010 Alessi Galactic proposition was highly commended and exhibited in the Venice Biennale 2010 Studio project for Formfield 3.0 nominated to be published and exhibited with consent and retained by RMIT for the 2011 accreditation Final Thesis Project panels assessed and highly regarded by Peter Corrigan

For further reading, please refer to my resume attached with this application. I can best be contacted on my mobile: 0421 191 830, email: hunlin.neo@gmail.com

Throughout my architectural career at RMIT, I have pursued to give my all in every task embarked. Among my most notable achievements are the Alessi Galactic proposition which was presented to world renowned architects such as Hani Rashid, Hernan diaz Alonso and Tom Kovac alongside Alessi owner Alberto Alessi in the Alessi Headquarters in Italy. In addition to that, my studio project from Formfield 3.0 with Dr. Vivian Mitsogianni was selected for the Formfield publication and exhibition.

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“new solutions must be sought, while simple solutions are no solutions at all� wolf d. prix, 2009

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FOREWORD > Architecture is constantly faced with the challenge of uplifting our way of life, catering to the different demands of the society. It is mainly present to put forth complex solutions and ideas for the built environment of the future. As our basic needs and requirements are constantly changing as a result of the exponential growth of technology, architecture has to gradually evolve in order to retain its identity and significance in our society. We are currently in an age where digital domains preoccupies our daily routines. The digital domains also known as the information age provides us with the insight into other fields of expertise. Moreover, with the introduction of social networks, mobile and portable devices, we are able to learn from each other at an incredible pace. This has never occurred in the entire history of mankind and this is starting to shape our world. As architecture is inseparable to economic, social and technological progress, we have to find new ways to embrace these key factors into our projects. How do we as architects incorporate these new found knowledge or technologies into our design? Would these knowledge fit into our existing culture and methodology of design, or is there a proposed alternative in the way we design for the future? In my opinion, this event has created an opportunity for all architects to seek for new solutions in the way we work in the 21st Century. A famous quote by Wolf Prix which support my position “New Solutions must be sought, while simple solutions are no solutions at all� underlines the key role of an architect in the society which is to make more of good and innovative architecture, by struggling with the design process. Comparatively, traditional architects have relied on typological limitations, forcing their consistencies on to geographical constraints or to the extent of bringing an identifiable personal style to every project. Having said that, these sort of consistencies are often difficult to be implemented as the world is becoming more globalized. As projects are slowly declining in Europe along with the other parts of the western world, there is an influx of projects both in the Middle East as well as in China. How are architects able to implement the same level of consistency which has to deal with the different climatic conditions, geographical formations as well as cultural differences? How can we export architecture into the rest of the world if new sort of consistencies are not called for? My body of work has rigorously investigated into process based methodology as well as looking at the collaborative nature of different professions to put forth a proposition to help develop a systematic approach to every design task. The techniques used in this portfolio proposes a radical change by giving rise to a new kind of architectural action. In the past, architects have managed to work with sculptors and artists to produce architecture. In recent years, architects have begun working with industrial and fashion designers. Therefore, jargons and terminologies might have been conceived or used across these disciplines extensively. In contemporary terms, a universal understanding of tools and design jargons bridges the gap between design disciplines. The differences between design disciplines is the interesting moment whereby an exchange of idea can then take place. I am very keen to follow this trajectory from my recent travels to third world countries such as Cambodia and Thailand. My aim and ambitions for the future are to provide or source out jobs to third world countries by setting up a consensus between the employer and the employee. By creating a universal language and understanding in design, we can easily interact between designers from various fields. In addition, information obtained between designers and knowledge gained from expertise outside of architecture will potentially help to carve out an emerging design culture in architectural practices. In my opinion, this would equally distribute the benefits to both developed and third world countries adhering to this reciprocal relationship. This is all possible given that technology can transfer information between the subjects at an incredible pace.

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contents > PRACTICE IN THE INDUSTRY

working experience

FORMFIELD 3.0

new learning environments

HYBRID TRANSLATIONS

misappropriating typologies

designing within the virtual domains

SPACE STATION ONE

HIGH RISE

designing a student accommodation

ALESSI MUTANTS

BLADE

designing the triangle

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No Country For Old Avatar

15 ACRES IN HEATHMONT

designing within the urban environment

industrial design

designing in extreme environments


“ if the city is landscape, buildings are mountains if the house is the computer, the structure is the network “ quote from the metapolis dictionary of advanced architecture: city, technology and society in the information age, 2000

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web 2.0 Jargon:  ůŽŽƐĞůLJ ĚĞĮŶĞĚ ƚĞƌŵ ĨŽƌ ǁĞď ĂƉƉůŝĐĂƟŽŶƐ ƚŚĂƚ ŐŽ ďĞLJŽŶĚ ĚŝƐƉůĂLJŝŶŐ ŝŶĚŝǀŝĚƵĂůƉĂŐĞƐŽĨƐƚĂƟĐĐŽŶƚĞŶƚĂŶĚĂůůŽǁĂĐŽŵŵƵŶŝƚLJŽĨƵƐĞƌƐƚŽŝŶƚĞƌĂĐƚ ǁŝƚŚƚŚĞƐŝƚĞĂŶĚĞĂĐŚŽƚŚĞƌďLJĂĚĚŝŶŐŽƌƵƉĚĂƟŶŐƚŚĞĐŽŶƚĞŶƚ͘

mu·tant/myoot-nt EŽƵŶ͗ ŶĞǁƚLJƉĞŽĨŽƌŐĂŶŝƐŵƉƌŽĚƵĐĞĚĂƐƚŚĞƌĞƐƵůƚŽĨŵƵƚĂƟŽŶ

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“ architecture will exist as the result of the interaction of natural, artificial and digital natures - or it won’t exist “ quote from the metapolis dictionary of advanced architecture: city, technology and society in the information age, 2000

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Digital and Virtual Domains - Designing the Nomadic Tower within the limitations and opportunities offered in Second Life, 2008

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< THE LIVING VESSEL

The living vessel is an organism or a machine by itself that continues to sprout and spread. It is a machine that represents the present 3d virtual environment of the ‘artabase’ which is essentially a virtual art gallery. It utilizes the idea of Web 2.0 where users are able to feed, extract and edit information from the virtual platform. The formal qualities of the vessel explores the notion of an endless space and it borrows heavily from science fiction theories such as the expansion of space.

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Plan of the Living Vessel

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Artist Interpretation of Heather Bartnett

NCOA : designing within the virtual domains 09

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Section depicting the Hierachy of the Living Vessel

Artist Interpretation of Giulio Baistrocchi

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ACCA was a given site as a starting point to the project. The representation of ACCA was an island that is built atop the living vessel. The metaphorical placement of ACCA on the actual site in Southbank is replicated with sculptural pieces resembling the motion of an abandoned site on a desert. In addition, ACCA was constantly made seen the entire time but is made unapproachable to highlight the qualities of its existence and importance. The project is divided into four components, consisting of the primary engine, the ACCA Island, the secondary engine and the tertiary exhibition. It works by having heavier components sink into the primary engine while lighter components float amid in air. This is done by organising artists with more or heavier loads in the primary engine while new and upcoming artists with less loads would have their works displayed in the tertiary exhibition. In summary, the project adapts its idea from the basis of an organism that constantly grow and adapts to the environment. It has a brain of its own that allows it to grow with the ‘artabase’. The potential of the project depicts the idea of an endless theme which constantly expands and continue to push human boundaries. It challenges the human perception and our notion of an endless space which simply does not exist.

Artist Interpretation of Jesse Hogan

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Primary Tail

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Interactivity between Users and Artworks

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Main Nerves as Structural Possibilities

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Primary Exhibition Mode

Overall View

Interactivity between Users and the Platform

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Primary Engine

Main Nerves where Flow of Information occurs

NCOA : designing within the virtual domains 10


ALESSI MUTANTS

< ALESSI MUTANTS

ALESSI MUTANTS

The description of this project comes along with a process generated form, which refers to the morphology of nature and growth. The butterfly was chosen to best represent the wing system adopted by Virgin Galactic in its first ever spaceship named Space Ship One. The tea sets would be preinstalled on the spaceship and could easily be detached once the spaceship arrive at Earthâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Orbit. Food could be consumed around this time by the push of a button to detach the tray system. Passengers would have to consume the food through mouth contact with the tea set that encompass its contents with food and fruits premade into biting pieces.

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Tray System in an open configuration

Tray System in a closed configuration

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Tray System inspired by the Wings of Virgin Spaceship

ALESSI MUTANTS : industrial design 11

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Tray System Used in Virgin Spaceship

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Virgin Galacticâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Space Ship One A

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< Space Station One

It is imperative to note that human beings have not changed for more than a 1000 years. We are constantly exposed to an environment which forces us to evolve across time. Having the task at hand, we are in search of new territories to grow and expand and are currently at the brink of occupying space. The series of questions that consequently follow are; what are the aspects of humanness that we still retain? Would our ways of interaction and socializing still remain the same? How do we communicate in this new environment? The essence of communicating face to face in this century is no longer as important as what it used to be. Instead, we are shifting to preinstalled web cameras on computers, facebook, twitter or even emails which are replacing these conventional methods at a very fast rate. Have a brief moment to digest what is currently happening around us. The world is heading towards the digital world. It is an age where books are gradually shifting into digitized copies sold across â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;i-tunesâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; or even the occasional kindle by amazon. As much as a space station might be ridiculed in the past, it is equally important to note that this is a challenging brief as it sets out with the sole requirements of elevating basic human experience and transforming it into the ultimate human experience. The Form X Design series tested a whole lot of unconventional design methods. We were encouraged to study different life forms and analyse their specific conditions. The idea of nomadic cells and behaviours were rigorously tested in a variation of experiments. The design of the new space station was based around a torus due to its nature to provide artificial gravity caused by centrifugal force. Furthermore, solar panels were included to harvest sunlight and converting it into energy in the long run. Space manufacturing in the future would also be a lucrative demand as the characteristics of space could potentially provide as a platform for the production of sophisticated microchips. The allocation for space manufacturing would also be ideal as a sort of investment to generate revenues to fund the space station. Internally, humans would be able to interact and learn based on the idea of freedom of information. The ideal scenario of a classroom in todayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s context would be abolished. Instead, we would behave like nomads once again. We would gradually move and shift accordingly to different cycles. Our pool of knowledge would be increased at an exponential rate in order to cope up with our desire to learn. Human behaviours would be represented based on the variation of colours to represent different emotions.

^

In conclusion, we have come to know that the fundamentals of our way of life would be shifted drastically when we explore the dimensions of outer space. The survival of mankind would be extended dramatically in the case of any Armageddon or its equivalence. The benefits of space colonization might just be the solution to further extend our existence in the galaxy.

Overall View of Space Station One

SPACE STATION ONE : designing in extreme environments 13

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< UAMBI GARDEN HOUSING S IN AVATAR SCENE

The Uambi Gardens is a project sited in Heathmont, which is a 15 acre piece of land donated to the Maroondah council in late 2009. The site is situated adjacent to the railway track which services the Belgrave line. There is a row of shop fronts and bungalows sited north to the site with native bush lands at the lower end of the site. The existing Uambi House poses both as an opportunity and challenge for this project. There were a series of strategies that were employed to the site. Urban considerations were vital to maintain the qualities of both the gardens and the native bush lands. From the urban planning standpoint, the activation of a direct linkage to the Heathmont Train Station were proposed to provide an alternative for the residents instead of utilizing cars as a primary mode of transport. A proposed entry from Allens Road and additional driveway access from the laneways behind the bungalows, were proposed to ease traffic congestion and to maximize the use of the road, servicing to both the private residences and the public amenities. The programmatic requirements for the site were derived from the investigation of the existing density and lot allocation in Heathmont. Based on the research, there was a need for a kindergarten, an aged care facility and affordable housing catering to various communities. The architectural qualities that was emphasized in this project were the establishment of hinges to negotiate the permeable spaces on site. This was used as a strategy to divide spatial qualities and negotiating a common ground between the private and semi private spaces. The placement of buildings were another concern to ensure that there is a continuous flow of spaces, leading from a main courtyard to subsequent smaller courtyards. Verandahs were used as a way to link these spaces together.

Urban Model & Strategies

15 ACRES IN HEATHMONT : designing within the urban environment 15

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The architectural intent of designing a wall on the periphery of the site is to retain the existing qualities of the Uambi House and its gardens which is considered a â&#x20AC;&#x153;treasureâ&#x20AC;? inherited from its previous owners. A

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15 ACRES IN HEATHMONT : designing within the urban environment 17

Site Plan

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Fragment Plan (Type A)

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Fragment Plan (Type B)

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Fragment Plan (Type C) A

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Section A-A

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View of the Aged Care Accommodation and Link to the Train Station

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View of the Uambi Wall

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View of the Inner Courtyard Space

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Section B-B

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View of the Interior Town House

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View of the Rudolf Steiner Kindergarten

15 ACRES IN HEATHMONT : designing within the urban environment 18


<

RMIT School of Aerospace Mechanical and Manufacturing Engineering Campus, Bundoora

S IN AVATAR SCENE

Formfield 3.0 studio is a laboratory for process based experiments that examines new possibilities for the architectural project. It is a particular approach to architectural design to initiate and develop architectural projects. The project adopts its brief from the RMIT School of Aeronautical and Engineering in Bundoora. It is a speculative campus which studies the various means of exploring a new type of learning environment. A series of experiments are choreographed to achieve a desired effect and affect, to help generate both formal qualities and internal organization. The key ideas for new learning environments are that studies or learning takes place as clusters each time we have an interest over a subject matter. Secondly, informal learning spaces are seen as integral whereby learning would happen outside of class, through the use of technology and social interaction. The third idea was that visual connections and engagements within different programmes would cultivate learning as there are no finite boundaries between areas of knowledge.

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RMIT Bundoora Campus Overall View

The intent was carefully choreographed into each closed system experiments to make more or less of the qualities intended. The result of this project delivers some of these intended experiences. In an optimistic point of view, it delivered forced interactions amongst students in some of the bottleneck spaces which are seen as a positive outcome.

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Aerial View of the RMIT Bundoora Campus

FORMFIELD 3.0 : new learning environments 19

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View of the Main Atrium - Expansion of Space

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View of the Social Space - Outdoor Cafeteria

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[PROJECT PATRIDGE CREEK MALL ONTO GRID]

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[ROTATE 90 DEGREES CLOCKWISE - UP FACE]

PACK SURFACE INTO A CUBE

[ROTATE 90 DEGREES CLOCKWISE - DOWN FACE]

[ROTATE 90 DEGREES CLOCKWISE - RIGHT FACE]

[ROTATE 90 DEGREES CLOCKWISE - LEFT FACE]

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sect 1

sect 2

sect 3

sect 4

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[UNPACK SURFACE INTO A GRID]

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sect 5

sect 6

sect 7

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sect 12

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Choreographing an Epicentre Process - Establishing Figure Ground Relationship

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Choreographing a Rubik’s Cube Process - Fracturing Internal Organisation

FORMFIELD 3.0 : new learning environments 20


Peter Eisenman - Church of the Year 2000

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Ali Rahim - Figure Ground Relationship

Rock Formations - Forced Social Interactions

Laneways as Ideal Social Spaces

Oppenheim Architect - Wadi Resort

Recreate definition of Classrooms

Visual Connections

Precedence Studies

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Basement Plan

FORMFIELD 3.0 : new learning environments 21

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Ground Floor Plan A

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View of social space - library

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FIGURE 1 : nasa research and analytical studies

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View of the Main Atrium - Visual Connections

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View of social space - cafeteria

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View of administrative office and working spaces

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FORMFIELD 3.0 : new learning environments 22


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Section A-A

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Cross Section - Elevation

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Cross Section - Elevation

FORMFIELD 3.0 : new learning environments 23

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< HEADING 1

S IN AVATAR SCENE

This project, located within the Digital Harbour Precinct in Melbourne’s Docklands, provides a proposition for a new learning environment - where an integration of a market hall and a science learning centre takes place. The project engages with the making of architecture through a morphing process which facilitates the integration of office tower and market typologies and develops new structural and organisational possibilities. The hybridised building is investigated and used as a strategy to integrate the two distinctive programmes. The inherent qualities of a market space, as a centre of activity compliments the learning environment serving to promote interaction. The new building accommodates a variety of learning clusters, ranging from those with a highly permeable relationship to the city to more secluded environments and private learning spaces. The development of voids, split levels and intersecting programmes in the project creates a distinct division of public and private spaces, yet maintains visual connections to keep a constant flow of knowledge sharing. Complying with the “Docklands: The Second Decade” Strategic Plan, this project serves to fill the gap for the need for a centralised gathering space in Docklands, and serves as a contrast to the privatised buildings in its surroundings.

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Overall View of Project

HYBRID TRANSLATIONS : hybrid translations 25

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Barcelona Market by Mias Architects Experiment Outcome 1

Experiment Outcome 2

Divided into 6 Sections

Experiment Outcome 3

LILLE Office Building by LAN Architects

Experiment Outcome 4

Divided into 6 Sections

Experiment Outcome 5

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Morphing Experiment

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HYBRID TRANSLATIONS : misappropriating typologies 26


View of Market Hall and Mixed Classrooms

HYBRID TRANSLATIONS : misappropriating typologies 27

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View of Void - Visual Connections

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View of Outdoor Space - Clusters

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View of Outdoor Market Space

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Aerial View A

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legend:

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Ground Floor Plan

legend: semi public

semi public

public

public

public

market pallettes

exhibition pods

exhibition space

classrooms

classrooms

exhibition

seatings

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1st Floor Plan

Section A-A A

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legend:

semi public

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2nd Floor Plan

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3rd Floor Plan

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4th Floor Plan

Section B-B

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5th Floor Plan

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6th Floor Plan

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7th Floor Plan

Section C-C

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HYBRID TRANSLATIONS : misappropriating typologies 28


< DESIGNING THE TRIANGLE S IN AVATAR SCENE

The St.Kilda triangle site was a given in this studio. Initial site studies discovered that there is a lack of circulation and connection between the Upper Esplanade and Jacka Boulevard. Therefore, a strategy to treat the site as a well molded, piece of soil seemed appropriate to direct circulation across the site at this instance. Firstly, the patterns of the soil were broken down to four components; the organic, the soil, the subsoil and the substratum. The patterns were then used to define the floor plans as well as to generate a variety of facades to differentiate the different programmatic functions. This was done planimetrically because we wanted users to be able to experience the section cut physically. The project was further explored by the implementations of framed views via the intended â&#x20AC;&#x153;sawedâ&#x20AC;? lines looking towards the shore by considering the urban environments within St.Kilda. In addition, we have always intended to create smaller split plazas as opposed to larger ones. We believe that the key is to have smaller and more intimate urban spaces rather than more open, overwhelming ones so that the visitors would feel more comfortable being in one. What was successful in this project was the execution of a singular theme throughout the entire project via the employment of the soil structure. The translation of the soil structure has enabled a strategy to make design decisions throughout the project. However, it could have been improved by acknowledging the presence of the historical Palais Theatre. This could be achieved by having better circulation spaces around it.

BLADE : designing the triangle 29

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RETAILS

RETAILS

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Existing and Proposed Connections

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Soil Patterns

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Identifying Significant Landmarks

ST.KILDA ARTS MARKET DINING HALL STEPPED PLAZA

LANDSCAPE AND PLAZA

SOUVENIR SHOPS PALAIS THEATRE

TICKETING

BAR AND NIGHT CLUB

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Ground Floor Plan

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First Floor Plan

BLADE : designing the triangle 30


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Site Plan

BLADE : designing the triangle 31

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View of the Market Area

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View of St Kilda Beach from the Upper Esplanade

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View from Jacka Boulevard

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Section A-A

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Section B-B A

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View from the Upper Esplanade

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View from Jacka Boulevard

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BLADE : designing the triangle 32


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Lift Core and Stairs

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Columns, Lift Cores and Stairs

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Beams

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First Floor

QUEENSBERRY STUDENT ACCOMMODATIONS IN AVATAR

SCENE

The main idea of the Queensberry Student Accommodation is to provide students with sufficient living spaces within the city. The function of the balcony allows the building to filter the noise from the main street, keeping the temperature of the building right. Therefore offering a better living condition environment for its residences.

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Columns, Lift Cores

Beams

HIGH RISE SE : designingg a student accommodation 33

Columns, Lift Cores and Stairs

Second Floor A

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A

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Ground Floor Plan

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North Elevation

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Typical Floor Plan

Section A-A

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Roof Plan

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West Elevation

Section B-B

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HIGH RISE : designing a student accommodation 34


< Renovation work for S.E. Tan S IN AVATAR SCENE

This is a project designed for S.E. Tan during my architectural internship with Garis Architects. The brief for this project was an extension for the living area and outdoor space on the ground floor. There is also a proposition for a library and an exhibition space on the first floor. The typology of the unit is a corner terrace house 3 storey in height. Louvers and sliding doors are utilized in the design for this extension to allow for cross ventilation to cool down the house against the harsh weather of Malaysia.

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View of the proposed extension for S.E. Tanâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s house

PRACTICE IN THE INDUSTRY : working experience 35

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North Elevation

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East Elevation

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West Elevation

South Elevation

First Floor Plan - Library and Exhibition

Ground Floor Plan - Extension of Living Area and Outdoor Space

PRACTICE IN THE INDUSTRY : working experience 36


< PROPOSED PLATINO 13-06 RENOVATION S IN AVATAR SCENE

The project is located within close proximity to the heart of Georgetown, which is listed as a World Unesco Heritage Site. The project is an internal renovation work with a very limited budget. The client of this project specifically requested for the design to be very minimal as the condominium would only be used as a weekend retreat. The total area of this project is 2500 sq.ft, with three bedrooms, a guest room and a store room.

table top mahjong table

stool table legs

stool table legs

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Modular Mahjong Table

PRACTICE IN THE INDUSTRY : working experience 37

The design of the Mahjong Table utilizes the idea of modularity where each module is designed to serve more than one purpose aiming to save space. This is customized to the clientâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s preference for a seasonal mahjong occasion located in the karaoke room. A

forMLESSNESS


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Bedroom 1: Bed and working table

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Bedroom 1: Bed and working table

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forMLESSNESS

Bedroom 1: Built in wardrobe

Bedroom 2: Built in wardrobe and dressing table

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Living Room : 5 piece sofa set with a coffee table

PRACTICE IN THE INDUSTRY : working experience 38


Formlessness Portfolio  

This is a collection of my studio works at RMIT University. It comprises of design project covering all three architectural poles at RMIT be...