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We review the re-opening of Sheffield’s Site Gallery in Arts

Check out our interview with weightlifter Jenny Tong

Do you love it? Check out our thoughts in Music

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THE UNIVERSITY OF SHEFFIELD’S INDEPENDENT STUDENT NEWSPAPER

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ISSUE 124 | WEDNESDAY 3RD OCTOBER 2018 | FREE

Students’ Union defends providing safe drug taking advice on website Ewan Somerville

Sheffield Students’ Union has defended publishing drug advice on its website, insisting that they are not ‘normalising’ drug use after coming under fire in the national press. A post on the website directed students to guidance from Loop, a company which provides drug safety testing, welfare and harm reduction services, and included advice on the safest ways to take crystallised MDMA. It suggested crushing pills into smaller amounts, avoiding mixing with other substances, and to “chill out and drink water”. In an opinion article for Metro last Friday Katharine Swindells, SU Welfare Officer, criticised the national coverage of The Telegraph, Metro and the Daily Mail, as ‘inaccurate and wrong’. She said: “This isn’t the Students’ Union normalising drug-taking; it is us taking precautions to reduce risk. In an ideal world, students won’t touch drugs, but we know in reality things are often different.” The webpage also advised

students on correct dosages for class A drugs MDMA and ecstasy. Speaking to The Telegraph, Bliss Hunter, a drama student at the University of Sheffield, said: “The Students’ Union should be looking at protecting students and deferring them away from the drug scene, not encouraging them to take them.” Sab Jones, a final year Spanish student, said: “I’m ashamed that this policy is real and on their website.” The SU brought in stricter drug policies following the death of his is Sheffield Hallam student Joana Burns, 22, who fell ill after taking £7 worth of MDMA at Tuesday Club in their venue in 2017. In her article Katharine reaffirmed the SU’s zero-tolerance policy on drugs, and the non-judgemental approach taken to students feeling unwell on SU nights out. She also pointed to the SU’s collaboration with Sheffield DACT, a support service for drug, alcohol and domestic abuse issues. The SU Welfare Officer also added: “Too many young people experiment with drugs without any knowledge of what they do, how they... (cont. on p7)

Image: Juliet Cookson

Sheffield’s Supertram network could be closed down without £230m more funding Lucas Mentken

A consultation on the future of the Sheffield Supertram network has sparked fears about the service being terminated if not enough funding is secured to maintain it. The South Yorkshire Passenger Transport Executive (SYPTE) found that around £230m of investment is needed to keep the network running

for at least another 30 years. In 2014, a study found that after 20 years of continuous operation, parts of the current Supertram network and vehicles are ‘approaching the end of their working life’. Until now, the tram’s operator Stagecoach has been covering maintenance costs but for a longterm plan monetary support from the Department for Transport funding will be required.

Supetram’s current contract will run until 2024, ensuring at least another six years of service in Sheffield. A spokesperson for Supertram said: We will continue to work closely with the Department for Transport and South Yorkshire Passenger Transport Executive until then to deliver high quality tram services for the people of Sheffield. The decision... (cont. on p7)

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PIC OF THE PRESS

Autumn is now in full swing in Sheffield’s Botanical Gardens

Editorial Team Editor-in-Chief David Anderson Managing Editor Becky Sliwa Webb Deputy Editor David Craig Deputy Editor James Pendlington Head of News Ben Warner Head of Sport Adam May LOF Coordinator VACANT Culture Coordinator Tom Buckland Culture Coordinator Gethin Morgan News Editor Lucas Mentken News Editor Niall O’Callaghan News Editor Alex Peneva Features Editor Arya Damavandy Features Editor Rebecca Lally Opinion Editor Connie Coombs Opinion Editor Matthew Hartill Arts Editor Charly Hurrell Arts Editor Sophie Maxwell Lifestyle Editor VACANT Lifestyle Editor Amelia Shaw Music Editor Harriet Evans Music Editor Ben Kempton Screen Editor Gethin Morgan Screen Editor Izzy Cridland Games Editor Luke Baldwin Games Editor Tom Buckland Tech and Science Editor Aidan Hughes Tech and Science Editor Jade Le Marquand Break Editor Robin Wilde Break Editor VACANT Sport Editor Patrick Burke Sport Editor Joshua Taylor News Online Editor Ewan Somerville News Online Editor Ynez Wahab Features/Lifestyle Online Editor VACANT Opinion Online Editor Dave Peacock Culture Online Editor Brenna Cooper Culture Online Editor Ben Kempton Sport Online Editor Michael Ekman Sport Online Editor VACANT Copy Editor Coordinator Leah Fox Copy Editor (News) Charlotte Knowles-Cutler Copy Editor (LOF) Brogan Maguire Copy Editor (LOF) Laura Foster Copy Editor (Culture) Salena Rayner Copy Editor (Culture) VACANT Copy Editor (Sports) Charlie Payne Design and Training Coordinator Chloe Dervey Secretary and Social Secretary VACANT Inclusions and Welfare Coordinator Charlotte Knowles-Cutler Marketing and Publicity Coordinator Chloe Dervey Photography Coordinator Juliet Cookson Website Coordinator VACANT In-house Artist Chloe Dervey

Image: Juliet Cookson

Editorial Hello readers. Well, here we are again. We’re only just into October, but the leaves are already turning red and gold, there’s a chill in the air and it feels as though we’re well and truly back into the swing of university life. For all of you new to university, you may feel like you’ve just been thrown into a whirlwind and back out again - and that’s not just because of the recent turn in weather. Whether you’ve been out drinking all through Freshers’ Week or you’re just a bit overwhelmed at the dozens of new people you’ve met in such a short space of time, there’s no shame in feeling a bit flustered. University life can be hard sometimes. In this issue our Features section contains two articles by contributors who explain that it’s okay to acknowledge the stresses and get some help if you need it.

One thing that always helps me relax when things get a bit much at university is bursting that student bubble, going out and exploring the real Sheffield. You know, that place that isn’t Endcliffe, Ranmoor, Crookes or the Students’ Union? It can be easy to get caught up in the hustle and bustle of student life, so taking some time for yourself and integrating with real people for a bit is a great way to escape. Why not check out Site Gallery, which has now reopened its doors to the public (but not before our Arts Editors got a sneak peak - see p26!), go and watch a film (maybe even at Film Unit - okay, it is still in the Students’ Union, but our Screen Editors have compiled a great list of their top picks on p34), or just enjoy some of the wonderful green (but slowly turning red and gold) spaces

that Sheffield has to offer. Also remember, just because Intro Week is over, it’s not too late to get involved with a society to learn a new hobby and take your mind off university work. Even if you’re a second, third or fourth year. Dive right in. Maybe even get involved with Forge Press - our team have compiled another great issue for you, and we’d love to have even more of you involved. Enjoy the paper, enjoy the crunchy leaves, and remember to enjoy university.

Get involved Want to join the team? Get involved! No prior experience is needed, just join the Facebook group Forge Press Contributors and come along to our regular contributor meetings to meet the team and pitch your own ideas. If you’d like to be even more

involved, why not come along to our EGM on Monday 8 October and run for one of our vacant committee roles? We’d love to have you. Contact editor@forgetoday.com with any questions.


3

News

NEWS IN BRIEF SHEFFIELD Monkeys play four Sheffield shows

STUDENT Magid talks to Green students

NATIONAL PM says no GE before Brexit

Sheffield rockers Arctic Monkeys have played four homecoming Sheffield shows at the FlyDSA Arena. They are currently on tour promoting their new album Tranquility Base Hotel and Casino, and played four dates in their hometown with a mix of new music and old classics.

Sheffield’s Lord Mayor visited the Students’ Union to speak to a group of Green Party students during Freshers’ week. Magid Magid has attracted attention for his style and outspoken nature during his time in office, and welcomed some new Green supporters to the city.

The Prime Minister Theresa May has said there won’t be another general election before Britain leaves the European Union. The UK is due to leave next spring, and a deal is yet to be reached between the two parties, but May says she won’t be calling another election before then.

STUDENT SU Officer backs essay-writing ban

SHEFFIELD NATIONAL Three arrested after Labour MP calls for Yorkshire derby general strike

The Education Officer Anna Crump Raiswell has backed a ban on firms which offer to write students’ essays. This comes after 46 Vice-Chancellors or heads of higher education bodies signed a letter to the education secretary Damian Hinds calling for the services to be banned in the UK.

South Yorkshire Police say three arrests were made following the Sheffield Wednesday v Leeds United match at Hillsborough Stadium on Friday 28 September, amid reports of trams being vandalised. The match finished 1-1, with Mateusz Klich cancelling out Adam Reach’s opener.

Labour MP Laura Smith has called for a general strike at the party’s national conference in Liverpool. It would be the first one since 1926, and she hopes it would topple the government. Labour deputy leader Tom Watson has said she got “carried away”.

SU to host ‘Our Mental Health Week’ this month Ben Warner The Students’ Union is partnering up with the University to run

‘Our Mental Health Week’ from Monday 8 to Friday 12 October.

The week of wellbeing activities

coincides with World Mental

Health Day on Wednesday 10

October. Welfare Officer Katharine

Broomhill Friery to launch new vegetarian menu Niall O’Callaghan

Broomhill Friery are set to change their menu this week, adding more vegetarian friendly dishes to their repertoire. Despite already having vegetarian gravy and curry sauce, as well as frying all their food in vegetable oil, owner Dan Bean thinks moving towards a more vegetarianfriendly menu is the right move for Broomhill Friery. Speaking to Forge Press, he said: “After 10pm around fifty percent of the business we do is vegetarian anyway. It makes sense to add more options for the drunk vegetarians that visit us after a night out. “I don’t think we should be eating

much meat anyway, it’s better for the environment and your body not to.” Bean, nephew of Game of Thrones and Lord of the Rings star Sean Bean, has already named one of his vegetarian options after his uncle’s fame - the Lord of the Rings inspired ‘Boromir Special’. Consisting of chips, cheese, gravy and ‘lord of the onion rings’, this is already served to hungry vegetarians at Broomhill Friery along with the standard vegetarian burger. As of Friday 5 October, vegetarian ‘chicken’ nuggets will be added to the menu. Bean said: “We did a survey of vegetarians about whether they would prefer a vegetarian sausage or

Swindells say that is just a “happy coincidence”, but she does think the week is an important one.

She said: “We know from our

data that week three or four,

especially for first-year students, is when we start to see a lot of

mental health problems start to

crop up after the euphoria of term starts to die down.”

The week will see a wellbeing

hub in the SU Gallery every day,

with leaflets and people students can talk to.

“For me it was really important

around that time that we have a really visible presence, to show that this is a community that is

here to talk about mental health,

Image: Niall O’Callaghan nuggets and nearly all of them said nuggets. “I’m going to try and keep the prices as economical as possible but it’s important to add that we aren’t very vegan friendly currently.” Shaun Perryment, a vegetarian student in the area, said: “As an avid vegetarian it is swell to finally be

this is a community that will

catered for after a few Doom Bars. I know a lot of part-timer veggies that just give in and get the meat options, hopefully this will stop happening so much now. “Usually I just have to get chips but now Broomhill Friery are offering us a few options. I’ll definitely be visiting them more.”

support you through mental illness,” Katharine said.

“Mental health is something

we talk about a lot but we still

have a long way to go in terms of

incorporating some of those things that we look at into the way we

look after ourselves and how we interact with our friends.”


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Fracking event to be held in Sheffield Ben Warner

A mass protest and party against fracking is set to be held in Sheffield city centre on Saturday 13 October. Being advertised as the ‘Global Frackdown Carnival’, it will start at 2pm with a mass rally outside Sheffield City Hall, which will feature music, guest speakers and a

bubble blow against fracking. There will also be a variety of anti-fracking songs from protesters, supported by a samba band. A street theatre/circus is also listed on the Facebook event. At 4pm attendees will move to DINA on Cambridge Street for free workshops, talks and a question

64%

of the UK is currently licenced for fracking

and answer session. Food will also be provided at DINA before the fundraiser party starts at 7:30pm. Several live acts will be performing at the party, including Winston Macabre, Otis Mensah and Poppers Revival. Tickets for the meal and party at DINA are currently on sale, with options to attend one or both, as well as cheaper prices being offered to those on low/no wages and students.

press.news@forgetoday.com

Sheffield students are the most sleep-deprived in the country Richard Green

Students at the University of Sheffield have been revealed to be the most sleep deprived in the country, with almost half admitting that they feel this way on a daily basis. In a study by home interior designers Hillary’s, over 2,000 respondents from around the country were quizzed about their sleeping habits, with 74 per cent admitting that they don’t get enough sleep at night. Staying up late watching TV and nights out were among the top reasons given by students for not getting enough rest. 32 per cent gave late-night TV as their reason for a lack of sleep, while 17 per cent put their lack of sleep down to nights out. Despite only 22 per cent of respondents saying they didn’t get enough sleep due to leaving work until the last minute, the majority of respondents - 83 per cent - also admitted they have had to pull an all-nighter to meet deadlines.

Thousands of students descended on the Octagon on Wednesday 26 September for the annual Freshers’ Fair, organised by the Students’ Union. Many businesses had stalls at the fair, giving out free food, drinks and gifts while trying to make students new and old aware of the deals they offer to students. The most popular stalls were Domino’s, giving out free slices of pizza as always, and McDonald’s offering McFlurry’s to those willing to queue. The SU Development Officer Mel Kee was also present, offering out reusable drawstring bags on the way out of the fair, while SU staff made sure attendees stayed well refreshed with free cans of Lucozade. Image: Ewan Somerville

The University of Sheffield was found to be home to the most sleep deprived students, with 49 per cent, while the University of the West of England followed close behind with 47 per cent. Students at York, Warwick and Cardiff completed the top five. The study also uncovered that, if you want to get enough shut-eye, you should stay away from studying healthcare, with those studying the subject managing just under five hours of sleep per night on average. Many respondents also admitted that they snuck in naps between lectures and seminars during the day, which could cause them getting less sleep during the night. Tara Hall, spokesperson for Hillary’s, said: “Late nights are very much part of the typical student experience, whether it’s from hours spent in the library studying or out partying to celebrate exam results. “However, it’s important to try and make sure that these don’t become too regular – a decent night’s sleep brings a whole host of physical and mental benefits, ensuring you’re feeling your best.”

Image: Jim Barter


5

News

2 Weeks 2 Make It to launch for tenth year Ben Warner

The 2Weeks 2Make It competition is set to launch for the tenth edition of its competition on Saturday 6 October. The competition is an annual event which pairs up filmmakers and bands/musicians in the city, and gives them two weeks to produce a music video together.

Rob Speranza, organiser of the event, said: “2Weeks 2Make It creates long-lasting partnerships between filmmakers and musicians and other creatives too. What I love to see every time we do this is how people meet and bond with each other, creating collaborative relationships that last for years. “It’s great for Sheffield, and helps contribute to that creative community which is getting

stronger every year.” While it’s free to apply, selected filmmakers must pay a £30 annual membership fee to join the South Yorkshire Filmmakers’ Network, whilst musicians must pay an £80 fee. Successful applicants who attend the launch event will hear from guest speakers as well as gain some insight into what makes a good video. The random pairings of musicians and filmmakers will also be made at the launch event. A two-week production period from 6 October to 20 October then follows, with a Gala Competition

Screening set to be held at the Showroom Cinema on Sunday 28 October, where the winners will be announced. The judges for this year’s competition include Nick Wild, a local music and media producer who has worked with Pulp in the past, and Rob Speranza. There are several prizes on offer, including £500 for the overall winner plus more than £3,000 worth of equipment hire from Pro Vision in Leeds. The Audience Winner will also receive £150 in prize money.

Image: Graham Hogg

SU introduce reusable soft drinks cups Ynez Wahab

Image: Ben Warner

SU Council changes for greater efficiency Alex Peneva

Nominations for SU Council have opened and this year it will be working under a brand new system to promote engagement among students. Last year suffered from low elections turnout and several Council meetings being canceled due to not meeting quorum - essentially, not enough councillors turning up. To make councillors more efficient at holding the SU officers to account and engaging with the policy agenda, the SU will be introducing several rather informal changes to the way the Council works. Lilian Jones, SU President, said:

“The Council is about making change in the SU, creating debate and discussing policy. It is the highest student decision-making body which allows the students to have a very clear voice in the SU.” The SU Council consists of 46 Departamental councillors, each representing their own Department, eight Representative councillors, who express the views of different groups at the University, such as Women, BME, LGBT+, etc., and an Ethical and Environmental councillor. Until last year the members of the Council were mostly focused on expressing the views of the people they represent, which made them rather inefficient in holding the SU

officers to account. This year they will be more ‘issue-oriented’ by focusing on the policy agenda of the SU and voting on decisions to be made by the officers. Lilian insists the changes are necessary. She said: “How the Council was before wasn’t effective in holding the officers to account or implementing policies. “But it’s such an important thing that we can’t just let it drift. So I have taken the decision to really make this a priority of mine and I hope this is reflected in the result we will see.” The councillors will still be responsible for putting forward the ideas and thoughts of students they represent at the Council meetings. Their names and the work they do

will be widely promoted around the SU to ensure students understand the role of the Council and the opportunities interacting with it gives. Meetings will be held every two weeks and will start with a conference to bring the councillors up-to-date with the SU policy agenda and current issues which require attention. This should make the work process easier, more relaxed and effective. Nominations for SU councillors are still open until Friday 5 October. All students will have the chance to vote for a representative of their department or community from Monday 15 October onwards.

The Students’ Union shop is now selling reusable plastic cups for £5 as part of the #ReusableRevolution initiative. With every purchase, students are now entitled to refills of drinks from a Post Mix machine. The refills available include full-fat Coca-Cola as well as a range of other drinks at a cheaper price than the bottles also on sale. To highlight the importance of sustainability, the SU has been working on reducing plastic waste whilst expanding the range of plastic-free goods on offer. Discarded plastic is one of the greatest forms of waste.In the UK alone, about 2.5 billion nondegradable coffee cups are being thrown away annually and since recycling is not always an option, it can take many years for them to fully breakdown. To combat this issue, the Sheffield Students’ Union and the University have collaborated to introduce the Campus Cup Scheme which helps to raise awareness about the damaging effects of plastic pollution. This scheme has seen students opting to use reusable cups instead of disposables to create less waste. In return for doing their bit to save the planet, they then receive 20p off any hot beverages purchased within the University.


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Welfare Officer defends safe drug taking advice on Students’ Union website Ewan Somerville

(cont. from front page) ...work and what the risks are. “As a responsible students’ union, our role is about more than just telling students not to take drugs. It’s important to recognise the clear difference – health protection is not promoting use.”

The University also denied supporting ‘substance misuse’ but recognises some students may still try drugs during their time at University. They said: “We think it is important to ensure that, while we cannot condone this, if a student does choose to take drugs, they are as informed as possible, and take steps to take all reasonable precautions.”

press.news@forgetoday.com

This isn’t the Students’ Union normalising drug-taking; it is us taking precautions to reduce risk. In an ideal world, students won’t touch drugs

Uni of Sheffield is top in the North for graduate prospects Ellie Nodder

Image: Charlie Heywood-Heath

The University of Sheffield is celebrating being ranked top in the North for graduate prospects. The Times and Sunday Times Good University Guide 2019 has named the institution as top in the country after statistics confirmed that nearly 85 per cent of University of Sheffield students secure graduate-level employment or further study within six months of finishing their degree. Professor Wyn Morgan, VicePresident for Education at the University of Sheffield, said: “I am pleased to see that the University has been acknowledged for its extensive work with students to help ensure they graduate with the experience, tools and skills needed to succeed in their careers. “Our close working relationships with a host of world-leading businesses and organisations has helped provide students with valuable work, enterprise and volunteering experience during their studies, linking their learning to real world application.” Alongside the University’s exceptional graduate prospects, The Times and Sunday Times Good University Guide 2019 also placed the University of Sheffield within

the top three best universities in the north. The University also provides a wide range of opportunities for students including placements and study abroad. Claire Conway, Deputy Director of Careers and Employability at the University of Sheffield, said: “Our arts and humanities students for example can undertake a placement in a variety of businesses both in the UK and overseas. “Students from our Faculty of Medicine, Dentistry and Health can gain crucial experience from placements in Sheffield’s leading teaching hospitals and health service providers; while in engineering, students can take a year in industry. “Our science students can gain experience working with national and multinational organisations and our social sciences students can apply their learning in organisations across the UK and beyond.” Professor Wyn Morgan added: “We’re delighted that companies are keen to recruit talented graduates from the University, from engineers and scientists to geographers and trainee doctors and dentists. The impact our graduates have on society as they apply their studies to make a difference is something to be proud of.”


7

News

Sheffield could be saying goodbye to its tram network unless new funding is secured Lucas Mentken

(cont. from front page) ...around what happens beyond that date is a matter for the SYPTE.” Dan Jarvis, the mayor of the Sheffield City Region, said: “For more than 20 years the Supertram has been a fixture within Sheffield and the region and has been making more than 12 million passenger journeys a year.

£230m

of investment is needed to keep the tram network running

Sheffield’s tram lines could be a thing of the past without additional funding. Image: Dan West

“We are now working with South Yorkshire Passenger Transport Executive to establish what the future of the Supertram system might look like. “We want to hear from those people who currently use the Supertram, and those who don’t, about what its future should be. I would encourage as many people as possible to have their say.” Trams are a popular mode of

Doctor Who premieres its 11th series in Sheffield Ben Warner

The stars of the hit BBC TV series Doctor Who visited Sheffield on Monday 24 September for the premiere of the first episode of the 11th series. The premiere was held at the Light in Sheffield City Centre because much of the first episode is expected to be set in the Steel City. Cast members including Jodie Whittaker and Bradley Walsh were spotted filming scenes at Park Hill flats earlier this year, which have

previously been used for shows such as This is England. Whittaker is the first female actor to play the Doctor in the show’s 55 year history, having taken over from Scottish actor Peter Capaldi last Christmas. She told the BBC: “It’s exciting because we’ve worked so hard on it for the last couple of years, so to get to celebrate and share with the fans and potentially with new fans... we know what’s coming and we can’t wait to share it. “And also being in Sheffield - to conclude this epic journey here is

great.” This series sees a new showrunner take the lead, with Broadchurch’s Chris Chibnall replacing Steven Moffat. Chibnall is an alumnus of the University of Sheffield, having completed a Master’s in Film and Theatre at the institution. The first episode of the new series airs on 7 October, in its new Sunday night slot, as opposed to the usual Saturday slot it has had in the past.

Image: Hannah Robinson

travel, serving more than 12 million passengers every year, with people relying on it as an efficient way to get around the region. The Supertram network plays a major role in connecting the city and serves key location such as the Interchange, Meadowhall, IKEA, Hillsborough and both universities. Traveling by tram is also convenient as it allows passengers to escape part of the traffic on busy Sheffield streets. Each Supertram can accommodate about 250 people, which is around three times the capacity of a double-decker bus. Travel South Yorkshire urges residents across Sheffield City Region to contribute to the discussion using its online form accessible at www.travelsouthyorkshire.com/ futuretram. People can also complete a paper questionnaire from Sheffield, Meadowhall, Hillsborough, Arundel Gate, Rotherham, Doncaster and Barnsley Travel South Yorkshire Interchanges and return it to a Customer Service Desk at a South Yorkshire Travel Interchange. The consultation lasts from 24 September to 5 November 2018 and will shape the business case regarding the preservation of the Supertram in Sheffield.


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10

Features Features Editors Arya Damavandy Rebecca Lally Hi guys, we’ve got some great stuf lined up for you this week! We’ve got a feature on The Loop’s drug testing service at Boomtown Festival that goes into great detail over the service they provide and how you can help support it and expand it’s service. If you’re an estranged student seeking support there’s a fantastic piece about what it’s like to be in that situation on page 11 with general advice on getting through as well as specific services that can help. The other two pieces are an interview with some freshers about their experiences so far, and an article detailing how you can stay on top of your mental health whilst at university. So all in all, a great selection; enjoy!

press.features@forgetoday.com

My experience using The Loop’s drug testing service

Anonymous

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I went to Boomtown Festival this year, and was one of the thousands of people there who chose to take drugs. No drugs, nitrous oxide or even spirits were allowed through the gates, but no matter what security systems are put in place, it’s always going to be near impossible to keep these substances out of a festival. Every year, when festival season is upon us, we begin to hear of more tragic stories of what can happen when drug taking goes wrong. Figures from the Office for National Statistics show that there were 3,756 deaths relating to drug poisoning in England and Wales in 2017; the majority

of which were from accidental poisoning, including at festivals. The reality is that no matter what we hear about drug related deaths, people will continue taking drugs. So what can festival organisers do to help keep drug users safe? Last year, Boomtown introduced ‘The Loop’, which is an award-winning non-profit organisation which provides drug safety testing, as well as welfare and harm reduction services at nightclubs, festivals and other recreational events. The service provides a non-judgemental and confidential service for festival attendees where you take in a small sample of your drugs for them to test and come back a few hours later to have a consultation about your results and drug use. You are

given the option to throw away your drugs after the consultation, but not specifically encouraged to do so. The organisation’s aim is to educate drug users on not only the dangers of the substances, but also to advise them on how they can take them safer. Before coming to Boomtown I’d bought one gram of MDMA crystals - or so it was sold to me. It was from my usual dealer, who I’ve bought multiple substances from before and never experienced any problems with. We decided to use the testing service because we were intrigued about what we were actually taking, rather than being scared. Has our dealer been selling us something that’s been cut with something? Is what we were intending to take even MDMA?

And just how pure is it? These were all questions we wanted answered, so we went to see the people at The Loop to drop off a sample. Outside the tent, there was a huge chart which briefly explained the interactions between almost every drug imaginable, using terms like ‘low risk & synergy’, ‘low risk & no synergy’, ‘decrease’, ‘caution’, ‘unsafe’ and ‘dangerous’. The chart is useful to quickly check if what you’re intending to take is relatively safe, or potentially harmful. Although we already had an idea of what our substance was, The Loop provided a brilliant service for those who buy drugs from unfamiliar dealers inside the festival itself. These dealers often missell or don’t know the strength of the drugs


11

Features

Perspectives on freshers’ week: An interview with two freshers on their first week at university that they are selling, which is even more dangerous. Many of the drug related deaths at festivals come from people buying extremely strong drugs without realising and accidentally overdosing, which is why this service is so important. Samples must be brought in by around 7pm, as staff at The Loop need time to test everything that’s already been brought in. We returned on Friday afternoon to get our results and were shocked to see how busy it still was in there. We were told by a member of staff that they’d tested as many samples on Thursday as they did for the whole of the festival last year. Despite this, they still managed to provide everyone with a one-on-one consultation. After a short wait, we were called through to a private booth with a member of the team. First, he asked us to complete a short survey about our background of drug use. He told us this was so that they can get an idea of the people using the service and what other recreational drugs we use in order to spot any trends. Before the member of staff gave us the results of our sample, we were asked what we thought we had been sold, to which we replied MDMA. To our relief, he told us we were correct and that the substance had tested as high in purity, between 70 to 95 per cent MDMA, although he couldn’t give us an exact number. The sample also didn’t test positive for any other substances. He talked us through the safety precautions we should take when using the drugs, namely The Loop’s ‘Crush Dab Wait’ campaign, which encourages users of crystal MDMA (who haven’t measured out their drugs beforehand) to crush up crystals into a fine powder, lick

the finger tip of their first digit, and dab the powder to consume a small amount (estimated to be approximately 100mg of MDMA, the same as an average sized adult dose), then wait 1-2 hours for the effects of that dose before considering taking another. The member of staff gave us other useful advice: if we were going to take it in bombs we should use rizla papers as it helps it to absorb slowly, we were told not to take MDMA two nights in a row due to the extra strain on your heart, and we were told to aim to drink approximately one 500ml bottle of water per hour to ensure we were adequately hydrated throughout the night. The consultation we had with the member of staff was in no way judgemental or condescending about our decision to use drugs. He had a laugh with us while talking us through the safety tips, and although we had both taken MDMA multiple times before, we still learnt something new. As earlier stated, The Loop is a not for profit organisation so after our consultation we were asked to consider giving a small donation to ensure the service can be continued, as it costs £5 to test each sample. You can donate to their crowdfunding page online at crowd.science/campaigns/timeto-test to help them to continue expanding their service across the country.

Abbie McDiarmid and Emily Finan give us their thoughts coming off the tail end of Freshers’ Week So first of all, how was freshers week?

Emily: Disappointing. Disappointing?

Emily: For me, personally yeah. Because no one prepares you for the weird uprooted feeling and the loneliness, and you’re not prepared at school to suddenly be dealing with this all at once. Abbie: Yeah, there’s a lot of pressure. You’ve got to meet all your flatmates, you’ve got to get settled in and get used to doing everything on your own. I know that’s a bit childish, but you obviously rely on little things and then you don’t notice when they’re gone. Then you’re expected to go out and socialise with all the pressure that you’re under and I think it’s a bit intimidating. Emily: It didn’t live up to the hype people created, and by the end of the week I felt “Oh, I’ve wasted my freshers’ week” because I hadn’t done everything I thought I would. Abbie: Yeah, I felt like I hadn’t done it properly because people were like “Oh, you haven’t properly gone out.” Emily: It’s a lot of pressure to do certain things which may not suit everyone. Are you going to join any societies?

Emily: Yeah, I’ve joined the English and the photography societies, as well as Forge Press, obviously. Abbie: Yes, I joined the psychology society and the events management one, and Forge Press.

Emily: I joined the socialist society, by accident. Abbie: Yeah same! Emily: Yeah, we kind of got recruited... my friend was talking to them and I was like now I sort of have to join! What do you think of your accommodation?

Abbie: I love it. We’re in Crewe flats and we’ve got such nice views, like over all the greenery. Emily: It’s really pretty on the outside and our rooms are huge. It’s not as trendy as some of the other ones in Endcliffe, but it’s quite homely. What do you think of your course so far?

Abbie: It’s pretty interesting. I mean, we haven’t had that many lectures yet. I had a two hour one today which was interesting, but it’s pretty intense. Emily: I think you have to give yourself some time to get into it. Abbie: Yeah, I think it’s just because you’re with so many people and you’re just being talked at. I don’t mind that because I’d rather just take notes but it does make it hard to concentrate sometimes. I’m looking forward to some of my modules though, like the clinical psychology aspect. Are there any events you’re looking forward to?

Emily: We’re going to a Halloween ghost walk as a flat, I think. Abbie: Yeah, and we’re going to the fresher’s fair tomorrow too, because I’ve heard it’s just a load of free stuff. Have you made many friends yet?

Both: Each other! Abbie: Well, we’ve got 10 people in our flat in total.

Emily: And we’ve become good friends really fast which is good. Abbie: I’ve made friends with a few people on my course, but it’s more just like I sit next to them and you’re friends for that lecture, and then you never see them again. Emily: You just talk to random people and then that’s it and it’s like “Okay, bye”. Abbie: We’ve made quite a few friends from other flats when you can just all sit around and chat, everyone’s really nice. What’s your favourite thing about the university?

Emily: Everything is pretty central, which is nice because you’re not confined to a boring campus. You’re a little out of the city but everything’s just a short walk away. Abbie: I think that’s my favourite thing about it – it doesn’t matter what time of day it is, there’s always something going on and the city is always buzzing. There are so many hidden gems, you can go into any of the little cafes and they’re amazing. Why did you choose to come to Sheffield?

Abbie: I really liked the course and accommodation Emily: I liked the student’s union, and it’s a nice city. It’s not amazingly far from home, only a couple of hours, but you can be independent. Abbie: Yeah, it’s like close enough for comfort, but far enough away to do your own thing, which I think is important. And then you walk out your front door and everything’s just fifteen minutes away which is amazing.


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Advice for estranged students Helpful tips from someone who has been there and understands how it feels Dorothy Hakim

Coming to University can be hard. You can have great fun but, at the same time, you can end up feeling anxious, lost and lonely. This is especially so if you are an estranged student, or at risk of becoming one. This article should hopefully give you some advice to make it that bit easier. Officially, being an estranged student means that you have zero contact with your parents or guardian. People end up estranged with their families for all kinds of reasons, common reasons including: abusive homes; their families have kicked them out for being LGBT+ or for leaving their religion; being in and out of care, or having very toxic or narcissistic parents. All of these are very real, very valid experiences. Being an estranged student is also a lot more common than you might think. According to Student Finance England data from 2014, there were just under 10,000 estranged students studying in the UK. This university has at least 54 estranged students and Sheffield as a whole is home to over 200. You are not alone. Here are my three top tips: 1: Don’t do it alone. Tell your personal tutor, GP, mentor at DDSS and someone at the Student Advice Centre about your situation as soon as possible. f you need to send evidence to SFE, these people can vouch for you. 2: Get counselling from the University, the NHS or online. You need to find some way to talk about your experiences and, from what I’ve heard from older estranged people, it’s a bit easier when you’re younger. (Although old people tend to say that about everything!) 3: Keep a diary. This can be whatever you want it to be. I used mine to write down my feelings whenever I woke up from a night terror or when I was

Image: 7giO-rni

sobbing in Ranmoor because I was still scared of my abusive family. Your experience might be different from mine but writing or recording a diary can help validate yourself and your feelings. Where you can seek help close to home: University Counselling Service (UCS); you can book a triage appointment on the University Website. University Health Service GPs tend to be pretty sympathetic towards estranged students and can provide advice on many different antidepressants, anti-anxiety medication, sleeping pills, PTSD medication, drug and alcohol problems and eating disorders

Student Advice Centre (next to the SSID in the Student’s Union) is where to go if you are applying for estranged student finance, the estranged bursary or just need some help with signposting. They have trained professionals who help estranged students often. Student Advice Centre can also give advice for the holidays, and University-owned accommodation can help you out during the gap between moving from one house to another without family. The SU Volunteering Shop and the Jobshop are somewhere to look if you want to fill your holidays with experiences. Similarly, GLOSS and Global Opportunities have loads of adventures abroad to fill your time. The University also runs many social events for those students

staying in halls or in Sheffield over holiday periods. These are not just for any specific group! They’re open to everyone. Where you can seek help online or by phone: Stand Alone is a charity that exists solely to support people who are estranged. It provides excellent advice for applying to SFE for estranged student finance Facebook has, amongst its millions of groups, several groups for estranged people. Some of the best ones are ‘Estranged from parents and thriving’ and ‘Estranged adult children in healing’. One of the nicest things about these groups is that people share both the troubles that they are going through and their

success stories. It can make you feel a lot less alone seeing others facing similar struggles. UCAS also has a page for estranged students at www.ucas. com/estranged-students that has a helpful list of charitable organisations who you can apply to fort financial and emotional support. Samaritans are great for just ringing up at any time of day or night to chat about how you’re feeling. They are there for crisis moments in whatever form. Emailing your questions or story to thrivingandsurvivinguk@gmail. com: this is an email service run by estranged students for estranged students in the UK and you can talk to them about your own issues. They are basically an agony Aunt, and more than willing to provide an ear.


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Features

Dealing with the stresses of university life: don’t ignore it If only university prospectuses came with a warning to take off the rose-tinted glasses Vavi Maniichuk

University is often hailed as the ‘best years of your life’. But is it? More often than not, you come across students who have found the transition between school and university as the most difficult of their lives so far. But why? Why is it that your friends, family, teachers and society paint this romantic picture of university as the most wonderful period of your life? Why do so many students’ high expectations of university end in disillusionment and an uncomfortable sense of shock? As well as the workload and change in learning style, the social change can also be overwhelming. You can be among thousands of seemingly nice and friendly students your age, and still feel like a complete outcast that is undeserving of their place at university. Don’t get me wrong, university can be one of the most exciting and memorable periods in your life. But it can equally be full of the most isolating moments. This was the case for me last year, and I have realised it wasn’t unique. One student I spoke to talked about how ready she felt coming into university, after which things started to crumble: “[For the] first few months of uni, [things] were going fine: I felt prepared, made lots of new friends and was on top of my work. Then one day, after coming into lectures, I began to feel off. I had no clue what was going on; I felt nauseous, was hyperventilating, shivering uncontrollably, overheating, sweating and just laughing thinking what on earth is happening to me… I felt out of control.” Despite this, she told all her friends that she was fine, even though she stopped studying and eventually stopped going to lectures.

“The day after the first ‘panic attack’ I visited my doctors: it took a month to find a diagnosis of anxiety and depression.” Soon it was exam season, and she was still on a waiting list for counselling. Although she was not ready to sit the exams, she forced herself to go through with them because she was afraid that she would lose her place on her course. Unsurprisingly, she failed the exams and had to go through the stressful and lengthy process of appealing. “Hindsight is a wonderful thing, and I sometimes consider whether I’d have been better taking a leave of absence when I’d first noticed I was struggling. Realise it is okay to take a step back and say, “I need help, I need a break and I am not ready,”. Right now, I’m still waiting for support, [but] waiting lists are long for mental health support so it’s important to get on them as soon as you notice something doesn’t feel right,”. Another student I spoke to had a similar experience: “I felt like I was constantly drowning throughout the first year. Despite the good times, I severely struggled with maintaining a worklife balance due to the overwhelming volume of work. It wasn’t until the revision period when I realised how much I was struggling, not only academically, but mentally and emotionally,”. She says it developed to the point where she could no longer sit at her desk and revise, because she would become “breathless, shaky and scatty,”. “I seriously contemplated packing my bags”. My own first year experience of university was similar. After two years of continuous hard work for A-Levels, I was awarded a place for Medicine. I was ecstatic, and couldn’t wait to start studying a subject I was fascinated with. However, after the

first few weeks things started to go downhill and work started to take a backseat. I was struggling to work out how best to study independently and felt more and more isolated. I stopped going to lectures and avoided my flatmates as much as possible. I was in no fit state to work. Although I wanted to drop out before exams, or at least transfer to another course, my parents begged me to at least sit the exams. Despite walking into the hall feeling sure I was going to fail, I somehow managed to scrape a pass, and decided to stick with my course. None of us are alone in feeling like this at university - in a recent survey of nearly 48,000 American university students, conducted by the American College Health Association, 64 per cent said that they had experienced loneliness in the past year. 62 per cent of these students also reported that they had feelings of “overwhelming anxiety”, 53 per cent described their situation as “hopeless” and a shocking 12 per cent seriously contemplated suicide. In the UK, a YouGov study revealed that more than a quarter of students reported having a mental health illness while at university, the most common of which are depression and anxiety. Seeing as this is such a common issue for so many young people, who can you turn to when you’re starting to feel down, and tackle the problem before it spirals out of control? Apart from obviously turning to friends and family, there are numerous professional and confidential welfare facilities at Sheffield. If you are finding things difficult, just talk about it to someone. The earlier you catch the issue, the sooner and easier it will be to get better again. Look after yourself and your peers, as your university years should be an experience to be cherished and remembered.

Helpful links Student Access to Mental Health Support (SAMHS) A first point of contact for students requiring an appointment to talk about their situation. University Counselling Service (UCS) Free group workshop sessions with no registration. Disability and Dyslexia Support Service (DDSS)Provide additional support for students with mental health problems that prevent them from carrying out study-related tasks. University Health Service (UHS) All new students should register with UHS to have access to an oncampus GP. Big White Wall A free-to-access online support service that provides 24/7 peer and professional help to students at Sheffield.


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Opinion Opinion Editors Connie Coombs Matthew Hartill Congratulations on making it through the first week back! As your reward we’ve got a cracking issue lined up for you. From euthanasia to Drake, we’ve got it all covered. Of course, your first week may not have been all it was cracked up to be besides the return of those dreaded 9ams, if you’ve found yourself dissatisfied with what your course has had to offer you on your return, you may like to read ‘University: A rip-off?’ If you’ve got any strong opinions on anything at all, drop us an email. As you can tell by our impassioned piece on the city’s beloved trams, we’re interested in anything and everything. Happy reading!

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Is university a rip off? Jess Knee-Robinson

Six months ago, I sat down at my desk in good-old Ranmoor, ready to sift through the second-year module handbook in order to calculate exactly how I wanted the next year to unfold. Fast forward to one week before freshers’, and I received an email which notified me of a sudden module cancellation. Safe to say it was not the most reassuring situation to be in, just moments before term was to begin. Left feeling not only baffled but extremely frustrated, the fact that we are paying hugely inflated prices for this service, (the standard fee is £9,250 a year, although international students can be charged much more), is a truth which begs the question; is university a rip-off? The way I see it, we are paying for a service. If I was to place a supermarket food delivery (of course, being a student, I wouldn’t but let’s roll with it) and my favourite mango and passion fruit squash was unavailable, I would no doubt receive something along the lines of orange squash as a replacement. If

Image: Pomdu

a replacement could not be offered, I would naturally receive my money back - no problems. With regards to my experience of module cancellations, no replacement was offered. Rather, we were told to choose between two modules which were already on offer and therefore would have been our seventh or eighth preference at the time of module choice. The situation was starting to look like it belonged

on an episode of Rip-Off Britain. Degree programmes with optional modules are supposedly designed in such a way as to allow students to specialise in an area which most interests them. Departments encourage students to choose modules with varying assessment criteria, be it essays, exams or presentations. In this respect, I felt very much like the degree which I had been so confidently

promised was starting to morph into something else entirely. Now, I know what you’re thinking; the departments are not our enemies here and indeed, they do not wish to cancel modules. However, I do believe that we have every right as students to be frustrated when no appropriate replacement is offered, because that is when the sinking feeling hits us that the £9,250 we pay simply isn’t worth it.

The Cult of Celebrity: A Dangerous Imbalance Angelo Irving

Why does society give a pass to celebrities? Why do we shrug and excuse the behaviour of people because they have achieved a certain level of fame? Consider Drake for example. The 31-year-old Canadian artist is allegedly in a relationship with 18-year-old model Bella Harris. As well as this, “Stranger Things” actress Millie Bobby Brown, aged 14, revealed that Drake had been giving her relationship advice. Neither of these things are illegal, of course, but when context is factored in, the situation seems totally at odds to the time and society that we’re living in. “Celebrity dates model/singer”

isn’t a headline that would make anybody stop and pause. What about “31-year-old dates 18-yearold school leaver”? That framing

Having a hit track shouldn’t exempt you from scrutiny feels different, but it shouldn’t. Drake’s alleged penchant for dating teenagers makes me queasy and not just because of the age gap; there’s also a power imbalance. Bella Harris is a model. Drake is one

of the most famous artists on the planet. Being associated with him can launch a career. That imbalance is problematic. It is undeniable that we accept things that happen in celebrity culture that we don’t in our own society. Having a hit track shouldn’t exempt you from scrutiny when your behaviour is questionable. It is that kind of exemption that creates a disconnect between behaviour that we expect in everyday life and the kind of behaviour we tolerate from celebrities. When we turn a blind eye to aberrant behaviours, or worse, excuse them because a person is famous, we unwittingly become apologists for a whole range of

questionable actions. Drake is able to date anyone he wants who is of age, and there is no law about texting relationship advice to young girls. But equally, there is nothing wrong with asking questions where there is genuine doubt. In fact, when it comes to celebrities, history would suggest that we have a moral imperative to ask.


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Opinion

Euthanasia: Time for change? Stephanie Barker

Death is often a topic that is rarely openly discussed in society. However, countries such as the Netherlands, Germany, Switzerland and Japan have legalised euthanasia and assisted suicide. So, are we behind the times in this country? Do we need to change our policies? And do we need to be more open and frank about the inevitability of death? Welsh former teacher Gwenda Owen is petitioning the government to change their policies on euthanasia after being diagnosed with Motor Neurone Disease (MND) in 2017. Terminal illness is often one of the major factors resulting in euthanasia, as well as the patient not wanting to lose dignity or loss of function. For example, according to a peer-reviewed paper published in 2016 in the respected Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA), pain was given as the reason for euthanasia in around half of the reported cases in Belgium in 2015. Loss of dignity was also given as a reason for 61 per cent of cases in the Netherlands, and 52 per cent of cases in Belgium over the same time frame. Owen said, “I have a right to live. I have a right to choose not to live”. Owen is right: it should be down to the individual to choose and that the option should be available for everyone. Passive euthanasia, whereby the the patient can decline treatment and sustenance, is currently legal in the UK, even though this may lead

Image: Dignity in Dying

I love Sheffield’s trams and so should you Connie Coombs

If you’ve been in Sheffield for anything more than two weeks (sorry, freshers) you’ll probably have ridden the tram. It’s one of the most convenient ways to get to the station, it’s the best way to get to Meadowhell, and there’s something soothing about riding it.

So it broke my heart when I opened up the Sheffield Star website to see the announcement that the tram network could be closed forever if the council fail to secure a whopping £230 million to renew it. Sure, the tram network has its flaws. It’s pricier than the buses, and it never quite runs on time. You can’t always find a seat during peak time rides to Valley Centertainment.

Sometimes it smells weird, in a way that buses never do. But how else can you get to Ikea so effectively if none of your mates have a car? What better way is there to get to Cineworld in time for midnight premieres of movies that definitely aren’t worth staying up so late for? No other method of transport allows for befriending conductors or ticket inspectors in the same way. It’s the only good thing about having to get to Hillsborough for exams at 9am. Yeah, you have to be up hideously early to miss the busier trams, but at least you get to ride them.

To lose the tram network would, in my humble opinion, ruin this great city. I’m entering my fifth year of being in Sheffield, and it’s still the thing I brag to my parents’ friends about – “did you know Sheffield has a tram?” Middle-aged friends of parents love that. It’s a damn sight better than anything my hometown has to offer. If you feel even half as passionately about the tram as I do, there’s a survey that can be found from the Star’s article. The tram network has served me well for the last four years. May it last for many more.

to unpleasant symptoms such as prolonged pain and upset to both the patient and their family. The practice is legal in Switzerland, with organisations such as Dignitas offering assistance to end patients’ lives. According to data released earlier this year, membership figures of Australian end-of-life organisation Exit International are strong, with the number now said to be 110,391, proving there is a demand for such services. The debate is often around allowing doctors to prescribe lethal concoctions of medicine or just allowing the patient to die naturally. However, at the very least euthanasia should be an available option, whether that’s by a doctor prescribing the medication, or with the help of companies such as Dignitas. When we think of family members or loved ones experiencing horrific side effects - lack of motor skills, lying in comatose states, or suffering from terminal diseases - we surely wouldn’t want them to suffer in pain to prolong their life for our benefit? We would prefer to remember them when they were happy and healthy, and make their exit as pain-free as possible. Ultimately, the big issue regarding euthanasia comes down to suffering and not wanting to see the people that you love or care about in any pain. They should be entitled to a choice on how they depart. After all, shouldn’t we listen to our loved ones and fulfil their final wishes?

Image: Andrew Hill


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Image: Courtesy photo

Will Labour’s proposed changes for domestic abuse victims work?

Opinion

Loshana K Shagar

“Do I stay or leave?” In an ideal world, survivors of domestic violence shouldn’t need to ask this question. Sadly, the decision to walk out of an abusive relationship does not mean that the cycle of torture is over for many of them. In fact, they often find themselves transitioning from one torturous experience to another, punishing themselves instead of their abusers.Most events in the aftermath of leaving - lawyer’s meetings, court appearances, house hunting, therapy sessions, shifting children to new schools - require time and flexibility. Consider this alongside the physical and emotional recovery process, and this may partly explain why some victims choose to remain in an abusive relationship, simply because they cannot get enough time off work without losing a portion of their income. Labour’s new plans to get employers to offer paid leave to victims of domestic violence might just give thousands of people the financial support they need to break free. It follows New Zealand, which in July passed legislation allowing up to 10 days paid leave. Arguments that this was yet another burden on small and medium enterprises were clearly not popular. According to the Femicide Census Report from domestic abuse charity Women’s Aid, more than two thirds of women murdered by a man in 2016 were

killed by a partner or former partner. One of the most dangerous times for a victim, male or female, is the moment of departure as abusers can coerce them into staying. Getting time off work to move out while abusers are away will be of great benefit to victims, as well as any dependents involved. Abusers also often prevent victims from leaving by sabotaging their professional life and restricting their finances. A victim’s job therefore becomes their lifeline and the income from paid leave will help them settle into a new, safe environment without worrying about work. Many struggle to discuss domestic violence with employers, especially in unstable jobs, and this policy sends the message that a company must care for its abused employees. If Labour’s plan sees the light of day, perhaps the most powerful message to emerge will be the fact that the policy could intimidate abusers. A survivor with 10 days of paid leave will be able to maximise the resource by making court appearances and obtaining protection orders, all with workplace support. It leaves survivors with more power over abusers, and that alone is an important step forward in the battle against domestic violence.

Brexit is a shambles and May won’t last Ben Warner

Image: Annika Haas

No-one ever denied that Brexit would be difficult, but Theresa May has somehow managed to make it even harder for everyone through sheer incompetence. When David Cameron quit, he was thought to be the worst post-war Prime Minister for taking us out of the EU almost accidentally. He has since been far surpassed by his successor. Part of the issue is May’s uncompromising stance on the Chequers deal, which everyone both inside and outside of her own party utterly despises. It’s rather impressive (read: politically mindboggling that she’s sticking with it despite it being hugely unpopular); a situation reminiscent of the darkest days of the poll tax riots. She seems massively out of her depth and everyone can see it. Somehow though, it’s actually quite easy to feel sorry for May

rather than actively dislike her. When Thatcher was in power, she was hated. There’s still some of that animosity there with May, but as much as anything it’s pity that she’s so hopelessly stuck with Brexit and can’t deal with it. She’s got herself into an almost impossible situation, having already played all of her cards. The EU know that if the UK has any sense it won’t leave without a deal, and it’s no skin off the EU’s nose if the UK does. It’s baffling that May doesn’t seem to recognise this even when it’s so blindingly obvious. I can’t see a situation where she’s still the Prime Minister in a year’s time. It’s very easy to imagine that, when Brexit is done, the Conservatives will go back to their ruthless nature and get rid of May like they have done with all their ineffective leaders. As incompetent as she is, she’s also been unlucky. Her ascension was badly timed, and she was given the hardest task

If you’ve been affected by anything in this article, below are details of organisations who can help: Student Advice Centre: su.sheffield.ac.uk/studentadvice-centre 0114 222 8660 Refuge: www.refuge.org.uk Women’s Aid: www.womensaid.org.uk National Domestic Violence Helpline: 0808 2000 247

imaginable in negotiating Brexit. Regardless, the Tories will have no qualms about getting rid of a leader who isn’t of use to them. No-one knows what the relationship with the EU will be like after the UK leaves. Theresa May and the EU seem so far apart in what they want, and time’s fast running out to negotiate something that works for everyone.

She’s got herself into an almost impossible situation, having already played all of her cards... the EU will be able to cope and we won’t


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Lifestyle Lifestyle Editor Amelia Shaw Autumn is officially upon us, so of course this issue is about getting you prepared, be it with fashion or those must-have comfort foods as the days get colder. Travel blues? If you’re already missing summer, we’ve also got a piece helping you to plan the perfect interrail trip. From the first stages of organising yourself and your group, to choosing the best places to visit, we’ve got you covered. Forget Freshers’ flu and lectures for a while, and start planning next summer (only nine months to go!) If you’re still looking to do some more extra-curricular activities, there’s also a piece on a contributor’s experiences with international charity work to help you get started.

Want to be one of our Lifestyle editors? Come along to our EGM on 8th October and run for the position!

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International volunteering: shaping a better world and a better you Bethan Goodhead

Volunteering is one of the best experiences you can have. Not only does it look amazing on your CV, but it’s also excellent for personal growth. With tonnes of options out there it can seem really overwhelming, especially if it is something you have never had any experience with in the past. The best volunteering experience of mine has been with the International Citizen Service (ICS), conducting environmental work in a rural community in Nicaragua (Central America) for 12 weeks. There were eight British and local Nicaraguan volunteers and two leaders who all worked together to achieve the targets set out by the ICS, primarily involving reforestation and constructing eco-stoves and eco-ovens to help mitigate climate change. Construction is a skill which most Nicaraguan locals are familiar with ( what with building their own houses), but is completely the opposite of a typical British undergraduate’s skillset. However, they relished in teaching us how to mix cement and brick lay; unexpectedly the work was a really enjoyable experience and I have learnt new skills which I will keep forever. When you arrive in the country you will not be staying in a hotel, but somewhere far better; a host family. I stayed with the lovely Epifania and Rafael who were very kind and accommodating, at their farm in the heart of the community. After the first week you get used to the toilet arrangements, local delicacies (rice and beans) and the sheer number of bugs, lizards and snakes. Unless you travel somewhere where their first (or second) language is English, your host family won’t speak it, but the ICS are lovely enough to provide the team with a translator who teaches you the local language. You’ll get plenty of time to explore your destination after work and at the weekends. A highlight of the volunteering in Nicaragua was going into the jungle with a local guide and

exploring. We relaxed in hammocks at the top of a mountain and enjoyed the views of endless jungle and the sound of howler monkeys in the far distance. If you think this opportunity sounded great then it gets better; ICS work with many charities so there are lots of opportunities no matter what your background and interests are. They range from working in healthcare to helping children access good education. Plus, the places you could go are mainly based in Africa, India or Central America so it is great if you want to travel more. All you have to do to be eligible is be 18-25 to volunteer, or 23-35 to be a team leader. The main attraction of this volunteering, and why places on the scheme are so competitive, is that it is government funded, so all you have to do is fundraise around £800 to fund a volunteer local to the country that you are going to. Your travel, accommodation, and food costs are all covered by the British government.

For more information visit www.volunteerics.org

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Image: Bethan Goodhead


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How to plan an Interrail trip

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Useful links: www.interrail.eu/en www.interrailplanner.com www.hostelworld.com www.airbnb.co.uk www.trainline.eu

Oran Shell

Interrailling is undoubtedly the best way for a student to explore mainland Europe; it’s cost efficient and an all-round amazing experience. The premise of Interrail is that one ticket gives you access to use all trains, and selected buses, in Europe on a certain amount of days in a given time period, e.g. 10 days of travel within one month. This allows you to experience many different places in Europe, without the cost of booking individual transportation or the commitment of booking flights.

The first step in planning your trip is deciding who to travel with. It depends on what you prefer, but travelling as a group of three or four keeps a good balance. Keeping your group small will make the whole thing much easier to plan and it will also be easier to keep everyone happy in terms of cities you visit, activities you do, and so on. As well as keeping your group small, make sure that everyone has a similar idea of how much they want to spend on the whole trip; nobody wants to be roped into paying too much for a hostel or a meal just because other people have a larger budget.

The amount that you spend on Interrail varies from person to person. This largely depends on the cities you want to visit and the length of your trip. Those on a lower budget might want to focus more on eastern European cities such as Krakow, Prague and Budapest where you can find hostels for as little as under £10 per night, rather than cities such as Stockholm or Copenhagen where costs would be much higher. Another cost to consider is train reservations but these are not mandatory for any train other than those within France, Greece, Italy or Spain. Reservations may also be

required for high speed or overnight trains. If on a tight budget, it might be wise not to make any reservations unless the route is extremely popular (for example, Amsterdam to Berlin), or if they are mandatory. One of the most useful tools for planning a trip is www. interrailplanner.com. This is a great website, run by veteran Interrailers. The website helps you to visualise your planned route and from this you can book accommodation, activities and any necessary seat reservations. The website also shows an estimate of how long each leg of the journey will take, so if you

are hesitant about spending long periods of time on a train at once, you may want to arrange your route so that your journeys are as short as possible. Visiting places you wouldn’t usually think of is also recommended. Bled, in Slovenia, for example. This is the home of Lake Bled and I would rate it as highly as larger cities such as Amsterdam and Barcelona. Going to city after city can get quite tiresome so it’s always nice to take a break and visit somewhere a bit different.

Images: Oman Shell


19

Lifestyle Sheffield Mencap and Gateway: More Than Just a Charity Liv Taylor

Time is such a precious commodity in today’s society. We often find ourselves short of it, but giving back our time and investing it into society positively can be the most rewarding experience. When I quit my 8am – 5.30pm office job (sorry Dolly, 9-5 just doesn’t cut it anymore) to pursue academic ambitions, I found myself with an abundance of this precious time. I had always wanted to volunteer, so I naively googled

“places to volunteer, Sheffield”. I had no specific ideas in mind when I started looking into volunteering and placed myself into the hands of the Google results. Sheffield Mencap and Gateway was the result. They are a registered charity based in a fully accessible building at Norfolk Park. Sheffield Mencap provides training and support for people with learning disabilities in the city. Established for over 60 years, their vision is that every person with a learning disability should be valued and

given the opportunities to achieve their goals and make their own life choices. Choice is something we take for granted, but what if you were told you couldn’t do something? I certainly wouldn’t be happy. What Sheffield Mencap strives to do (and achieves) is to give people with learning disabilities a voice and the tools to reach their potential, whether that be through education, life skills or socialisation. This is done through the various services they offer, such as Gateway,where members can socialise and

undertake fun activities such as baking and crafts. Their education programme, Activity and Learning Hub, offers qualifications to members and the chance to develop skills in subjects like computers and performing arts. Volunteering for Sheffield Mencap is one of the best experiences I have ever had, and I would recommend it to anybody looking to volunteer. You don’t need previous experience, I certainly didn’t have any. Patience, respect, a willingness to learn and a sense of humour will not see you far wrong. As a volunteer you will be valued, welcomed and appreciated. You will be given excellent training and be supported by staff who are clearly passionate about their workplace. Personally, being at

Sheffield Mencap is the highlight of my week, and that includes when MasterChef is on TV. You will get to spend your time in a warm and friendly environment surrounded by some of the best people you’ll ever meet. I appreciate I’m a little biased, but if you are thinking of volunteering I would urge you to look at Sheffield Mencap’s website or give them a call. As a charity, they rely on the support of volunteers as well as donations. Everybody has their different reasons for volunteering and at Sheffield Mencap everybody is welcome. It is rewarding, fulfilling and I believe a very special charity to be involved with.

REVIEW

Their dough is proved for a minimum of 20 hours before the chefs jazz it up for your liking, and there’s so many ways to do it – if you’re a ‘less is more’ kind of person, and want to stick to what you know with a Margherita, they serve one up with gooey cheese and fresh basil to transport you back to that sunshine holiday (for less than £7!). On the other hand, if you want to be left with a little sizzle on your tongue, the meaty Diavola topped with chillies would be right up your street. Not to forget that, if you get eyes bigger than your belly, they can box up any of your leftovers to devour later on. If you’re wanting to stop by for a bit of lunch at anytime between 11:30am - 3pm (Monday - Friday), their lunchtime offer is a bargain; a choice of a pizza, salad and a drink for no more than £8. A great place to suggest to any family or friends that come to visit.There’s even a way to get this authentic pizza if you’re feeling a little bit lazy, as Deliveroo are partnered up with Proove to make sure wherever you are, you can be sure to get that taste of Italy.

Simple Mushroom Risotto Recipe Steps 1.

The

Cookbook

then wash and chop the mushrooms. 2.

1 Brown onion

250g Chestnut mushrooms 300g Arborio rice 1l Vegetable stock 120g Grated hard cheese

Make up your vegetable stock, either with a stock cube or stock pot in a pan or jug until you have about a litre of stock prepared. (If you can’t do this, the stock cube/pot can be put directly into the risotto and water added

Nicole Oshisanwo

Ingredients

Peel and chop the onion into small squares,

instead when directions say to add stock). 3.

Heat some oil on medium heat in a large saucepan and fry the onions and mushrooms

Proove

until the onions start to go translucent. 4.

Add the rice and fry for around one minute.

5.

Add all the wine and allow to simmer until the wine is absorbed into the rice.

6.

Add some stock until the rice is just covered and stir regularly to ensure no rice sticks

120ml White wine (optional)

to the bottom of the pan. Once the rice has

1tbl spoon Garlic and herb

absorbed the stock, add a little more to cover

cream cheese

the rice again. Keep doing this until the rice has cooked, making sure to regularly stir the rice to stop it from sticking and burning. If you run out of stock towards the end, feel free to add hot water. 7.

Season with salt, a little bit of black pepper and thyme or parsley as desired.

8.

Stir in the cream cheese and then around 80g of the hard cheese. The cheese should cause the rice to take on a creamy appearance and texture.

9.

Serve and sprinkle the rest of the hardcheese on top as desired.

Emily Evans

We all love a bit of Italian food, but authenticity amongst restaurants is something that is often quite difficult to find – especially with pizza. A little clue for finding somewhere that is just a bit of Italy is seeing if the restaurant has a wood fired oven; trust me, you’ll be looking out for them now! I could just save you the hassle of looking and point you in the right direction. Located at 261 Fulwood Road (opposite the Morrisons Local by Endcliffe/Ranmoor), Proove is a cosy, welcoming and independently run business that serves up a little bit of something to accommodate all types of eaters. Whether you’re visiting for a dinner date or a light lunch with friends, there’s so much on offer that you’ll feel spoilt for choice.


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Break Break Editor Robin Wilde As the nights draw in and the existential dread comes with them, Break is back to bring you the best in mildly diverting brain stimulation. In the absence of an immediately apparent theme for this issue (and reserving the best puns and page decoration for the Halloween issue) we revert to some seasonal themes for the first issue of autumn. This month, I have at last been granted access to the Forge Break email account, meaning that puzzle ideas, comics, relatable content and general shitposting can be directed to press.break@ forgetoday.com (and may even be read). I’m told that Break is the paper’s most read section (though one imagines the focus group and survey work that went into this finding was less than thorough) so I therefore feel some responsibility to my fellow editors. If you aren’t reading their articles, I’ll be very disappointed. Maybe they should try presenting them in grid format?

“Once more unto the Break, dear friends, once more, or close the wall up with our English degrees” William Shakespeare, Henry V

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Autumn Leaf Search N

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Foliage Pumpkinspice Autumnal Evergreen Deciduous Leaves

Brisk Hibernate Spooky Readingweek Vibrant Halloween

Moonlight Harvest Equinox Daylight

Relatable Content Corner

licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 2.5 License. See: https://xkcd.com/license.html


21

Solve the clues to reveal the contemporary news. As well as rhyming, this is 100% the most efficient way to consume your news stories.

N

e

START

1

Are you attending lectures? Understanding the content? E=mc2

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1

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Made any friends?

g=10

3

On Tinder

Loads

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Getting enough sleep? I do shorthand

What’s 9am?

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Got enough money? I’m from the South

Yes

How’s the relationship? Secure

How are the housemates?

I fear human touch

Any drinking regrets?

No My normally high standards slipped

Best Fwiends

Fucking wash up

It’s probably fine. Go to Interval.

7

Across

1) This long-running sci-fi series had its premiere in Sheffield last month (6, 3) 2) This SU bar has recently replaced wedges on its menu and will face riots as a result (8) 3) This well known Sheffield public transport network is in trouble financially, according to recent reports (9) 4) This NHS walk-in centre was saved from closure recently (5, 4) 5) This Sheffield band returned home for four gigs after a five year break (6, 7) 6) This newspaper has recently had a major redesign - this was its name before it was Forge Press (5, 5)

7) The 52 bus has recently shortened its route. This is where it used to terminate. (12)

Down

1) Our glorious new vice chancellor, starting in November (4, 8) 2) This well-known games studio closed down in September (8)

ANSWERS: ACROSS 1) Doctor Who; 2)

Th

tm

er

How’s my degree going?

Y

News in Black and White

M

Interval; 3) Supertram; 4) Broad Lane; 5) Arctic

O-

Monkeys; 6) Steel Press; 7) Hillsborough;

k Lif e -

DOWN 1) Koen Lamberts; 2) Telltale

or

B re a e g

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Break


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What’s on

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3 Oct - 16 Oct

Casual Ice Skating

Other Highlights:

Wednesday 3 October, 7pm - 10pm Meet at the University of Sheffield Tram Stop

Head down to iceSheffield for a funfilled evening spent falling on your arse. This ice skating session is open to people of all skill levels, so don’t be discouraged if you are a total newbie. You will need to bring £10 with you to

cover a return tram ticket (£4), entry to iceSheffield (£4.25) and skate hire (£1.75). You’ll also need to pick up a free ticket from the SU box office, and bring a warm coat or you might catch a chill (I am your mother).

Is being an SU councillor for me? 3 October, 12noon-1pm View Room 4 (at the SU) Free Learn a K-pop choreography 3 October, 5:50pm-7:30pm Meet at SU Welcome Desk £3.85/£1.65 (Res Life)

Credit: Wikimedia Commons

Mean Girls Quiz

Life Drawing

Wednesday 3 October Bar One Free 5pm - 10pm

Wednesday 3 October Coffee Revolution £6.60 7pm - 9pm

Don’t pretend you’re not a fan. We all know our fair share of quotes from this movie and, at last, here comes a practical use for them. Bar One are hosting this quiz along with a screening of the movie, while even putting on a special menu of Mean Girls-themed meals. I wish I could bake a cake

Whether you’re an experienced artist or a complete beginner, all skill levels are invited to attend Coffee Revolution’s evening of life drawing. Local artist Driftedlinedesign will be attending to assist you with your artwork, while charcoal, pencils and paper will also be provided.

filled with rainbows and smiles and everyone would eat and be happy.

Introduction to Arabic 4 October, 5:45pm-8pm Hicks Building £4.40

Tickets are limited, so if you’re interested then act fast!

Friday 5 October, 10pm - 6am Bassbox, Sprig Hill £8.50 - £11

Sheffield’s iconic Boardwalk venue, made famous by local superstars the Arctic Monkeys, is re-opening with a whole new vibe. Renamed Bassbox, the club will be home to drum and bass nights, with the opening headlined by Upgrade and Mr Traumatik.

Create an authentic guacamole 6 October, 3pm-5pm View Room 5 (at the SU) £2.75/55p (Res Life) Beginners Greek 5-week Language Course 8 October, 7pm-9pm Gallery Room 3 (at the SU) £13.75/£11.55 (Res Life) Bath Bomb making with Lush Cosmetics 9 October, 6pm-8pm Meet outside the SU £5.50/£3.30 (Res Life)

Credit: Movie DB

The Boardwalk re-opens as Bassbox

Boomwhackers 4 October, 6pm-7pm No. 66 TV Studio - 66 Leavygreave Road Free (tickets from SU box office)

Post-Truth: Evan Davis 11 October, 7:30pm-9:30pm The Octagon £11.50 (general)/£9.20 (concessions)

Film Unit: Deadpool 2 Saturday 6 October, 7:30pm Nelson Mandela Auditorium One of the rare cases in which the sequel actually improves upon the first film, Deadpool 2 is well worth seeing on the big screen. Ryan Reynolds once again takes the lead role as the zany mercenary of the title, supported by fun performances from Josh Brolin and Zazie Beetz.

£3.30

Historical Crime and Murder Tour

Tuesday 9 October, 7pm - 10pm Meet outside Sheffield Cathedral £4.95/£2.75 (Res Life) Not for the faint-hearted, this historical crime and murder tour takes you on a journey through Victorian-era Sheffield, recounting true stories of murders, riots and other shady things that took place in the city over a century ago. It’s a chance to get to know your university city on a whole new level. Credit: Chris Downer

Film Unit: Game Night (15) 12 October, 7:30pm Nelson mandela Auditorium £3.30 No Bounds Festival 12-14 October, various events Multiple venues £44 (weekend pass, 2nd release)


23

Spotlight

Society Spotlight Coffee Society

David Anderson

C

offee Society is a new society set up by Alfie Robinson, a second year Journalism Studies student, to empassion students to care about good coffee. “We want to raise awareness and talk about different brewing methods, because there are so many,” he explained as we chatted about the new venture, coincidentally on International Coffee Day. “And just to teach people the more complex side of coffee. Because it’s more than just a cup of coffee. Someone asked me the other day I’m not going to name any names if, when you get coffee beans, if you just crush them up straight away, is that what instant coffee is? “So I think people don’t realise how much effort you have to go into to actually grind a coffee and make sure it’s perfect.” Alfie is also working with his new society to encourage sustainability in its production at university. “We’re working with Mel [Kee], the Sustainability Officer. We want to pressure the University to have zero waste on their coffee sales, to make sure that everything in making a cup of coffee doesn’t go to waste. “We also want to work with some charities to help fairtrade coffee farmers to make sure they’re getting

People don’t realise how much effort you have to go into to actually grind a coffee and make sure it’s perfect

the best possible opportunities themselves.” Setting up a new society might seem like a daunting task, especially with the ambitious goals which Alfie has set out, but the new Coffee Society President insisted that it isn’t too difficult. “It was quite easy,” he insisted. “It’s just a form online. You have to say what you’re planning on doing, what you’ve already done with it, what you’d spend money on, and then it just gets sent off. “I submitted it on a Saturday, the Society Committee met on Monday and I got an email on Tuesday saying it was approved.” Coffee Society are helping to implement a ‘pending coffee scheme’, so that you can buy a coffee forward for someone less fortunate than you. “If you buy a coffee, you’ll have the option of buying another coffee,” he explained. “And it just stays in a ‘cloud’ and it gets given

to a homeless person. The Officers have been working on it all summer and I’ve kind of just come in and put my foot in.” Alfie’s passion for coffee blossomed after working in Starbucks before coming to university - even though he admits to me that he now tries to avoid the big chains. “I managed a Starbucks for three years, because I started uni later. I had like four or five gap years. I didn’t like coffee at all when I started at Starbucks. But then it kind of infected me, and now I drink it every day and it has no effect on me whatsoever.” As a new society, Coffee Society are thin on the ground right now, with their numbers only just into double figures. But with membership at just £3 from the society website and plenty of perks available, it’s only a matter of time before they grow. “We’re currently getting membership cards, and we’re talking

to some local places in Sheffield who are offering us discounts. So if you get a membership card and you go into one of these places and show it, you’ll get 10 per cent off or 20 per cent off, or something like that. “We’re also planning lots of coffee tastings, with different types of coffee from around the world. We’re hopefully going to be at the World Food Festival [at the Students’ Union] as well, and have talks from people in the industry, because I know a couple of people who have set up a kind of clothing and coffee concept store. So they’ve said they’re going to come in and have a chat with us once we build our members up. “Also we want to do trips to roasters, to see actually what happens to the coffee, and we’re potentially playing with the idea of a coffee crawl, so like a bar crawl but to all different coffee places - it might be heavily caffeine induced.” But where might this coffee crawl

take place? Alfie listed some of his favourite coffee spots in Sheffield to me. “Marmadukes is really nice for coffee and cake. The obvious ones are probably Steam Yard, and Tamper’s really good. To buy actual coffee beans, Foundry Coffee Roasters were actually voted one of the best in the UK and they’re right here in Sheffield.” But if you want to find out the exact route, you’ll just have to sign up to Coffee Society and head along yourself.

Alfie Robinson learned to love coffee after working for three years in Starbucks. Image: Chelsea Burrell


24

Arts Arts editors Charly Hurrell Sophie Maxwell It’s the second week of term and the arts scene in Sheffield is already buzzing. Last week we saw the reopening of the beloved Site Gallery (see page 26 for more details) and watched Festival of the Mind 2018 celebrate the creative community and their innovative ideas. We’ve picked a handful of top artsy things to do in the coming few weeks that will feed your minds with more than just lecture content.

write for us!

THEATRE

Steel

at Studio Theatre Samuel Ross

Fundamentally, democracy is an attempt to represent the will and voice of an entire community. Nowhere is this struggle most relevant today than within the Labour Party, fraught with complex divisions between different generations and backgrounds. This clash of evolving principles forms the focal point of Chris Bush’s newest play Steel. The action alternates between two political campaigns running

30 years apart from one another: in 1988, Josie Kirkwood is encouraged by veteran Labour councillor Dai Griffiths to run for a seat in the local council; meanwhile back in 2018, the driven former MP Vanessa Gallacher endeavours to win the Mayoral seat of a northern city for Labour, advised by Deputy Council Leader Ian Darwent. What makes Bush’s play so fascinating is how both narratives are weaved together to highlight the similarities and contrasts, the most apparent of these being the treatment of women (more specifically women of colour) and their ambitions over time. For awkward and insecure Josie, she simply wants to gain a seat on the council. Vanessa on the other hand has bigger ambitions and much more outspoken

Mind Full Season

Mind Full Season begins this week in Theatre Deli. With events over all of Autumn, they aim to explore mental health and challenge the stigma surrounding it through creative expression. The programme boasts numerous shows, exhibitions, film screenings and discussions to get involved with.

Circus! Show of Shows

A major national exhibition series showing in Western Park Museum until November, celebrates a vibrant 250 years of popup entertainment in the UK. Whether you love it or you hate it, circus has a fascinating, hidden history that is now on display for all to see. This goes hand in hand with National Fairground and Circus Archive’s exhibition, Circus Performers: Extraordinary Feats from Ordinary People, showing in our very own Western Bank library until early December. Keep an eye out for all of the opportunities around you. Sheffield’s art scene has a lot to give, if only you go out and seek it.

The

Bookshelf

A showcase of student creative writing

Poem of the paper: Six O’Clock News By Thomas Parkinson Mustard mash and a Shi’ite warrior, Dead and gravied with a sausage in the gut, Tossed in the pan of civil war, Mopped up with a Warbies loaf. Two kingpins peppered and a ‘Hun Spooned from Calais’, Bloody cream marris piped through Asian steppes, And kids Kabuled from the cutlery draw, Back to you in the studio. Green beans nuked by THE LEADER OF THE FREE WORLD: Cook Island tested and Scottish fury spilled, Referended with a quick wipe of Periclean power, Left with a bygone band of carrots – loyal to Ah… Bisto.

Have you been writing haikus on your hiatus this summer? Get in touch with press.arts@forgepress.com to get involved!

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confidence. Yet both candidates have the same anxieties: that this is their one chance to actually be taken seriously in politics. Rebecca Scroggs conveys these frustrations with equal parts subtlety and sharpness in her portrayal of both women. Opposite her, the mentors depicted by Nigel Betts provide the counterpoint of the male reaction to the changing attitudes in society, whilst also distinctly highlighting those that have yet to change – we watch as the bumbling older men awkwardly attempt to negotiate their way through the new moral codes regarding race and gender. Yet the play also extends beyond these issues to pose challenging questions about representation in general. Under Rebecca Frecknall’s direction,

the regional backgrounds of the characters are highlighted as clearly as their sex or ethnicities: the constant reminders of the industrial background of the local community reaffirms the importance of relatability and belonging in local politics. It is within this context that Bush and Frecknall stage poignant debates about generational divides, political elitism and the conflict between empathy and rationality. Bush’s dialogue bristles with sharp wit which helps keep the play enthralling. The ending may be a little overlong, but the skilful interaction between the two actors keeps the audience deeply engaged regardless. It is ultimately the diverse ideas and themes which make the play resonate on both a local and national level.

STORY The Freeman Diary: Chapter Two Ryan Smith

I signed those damned Commission documents too. It’d be easy to say it was a Commission document that threw my balance off. You’ve heard of the butterfly effect, haven’t you? Same sort of thing, just with my name written on the butterfly. They complained but that was nothing fresh – there wasn’t much the Commission didn’t complain

about. And that’s what I assumed the letter was. A few hours later, long after I’d gotten bored with writing my own name over and over, I looked at the post. The other letters were the usual valve companies flogging their updated catalogue, quarterly updates from company stocks and other such trivialities. The letter sat there still and dormant. It came with the seal of somewhere I didn’t recognise. Now I could draw that seal to perfection from memory alone. I sat back at my desk and broke it.

‘Dear recipient, You have been chosen by The State Government to represent a team of skilled individuals involved in a project of great importance.

Your achievements, knowledge and profound impact on your industry is well documented. The contents of this letter are top secret, and it is assumed that by breaking the sensor tagged State seal, you approve to providing your attendance as per details in the attached documents. The State Government respectfully requests you not to disclose any of this information to any other persons. Yours, The State Government’ I mean, come on? What nonsense. It had to be some environmental freak. We had it a few years ago with the work we did on the airports. The tree-hugging types again trying to sabotage our work, thinking it’ll make a rats arse worth of difference. I toyed around with the idea in my mind for a while. It was right out of a fifties B movie – ‘man gets selected by government for top secret mission’. I mean, nobody sends letters like that now. Do they? The story continues in our next issue out on 17 October


25

Arts

SHORT STORY Babylon Revisited

by F. Scott Fitzgerald Charly Hurrell

Short stories are my Sunday toad in the hole of literature, so feeling frustrated I picked up Babylon Revisited by F Scott Fitzgerald, for a lovely 50p at the local charity shop. Charlie has returned to Paris and the reader is given a warm feeling as he enters his old, extremely familiar drinking hole. We, of course, haven’t encountered the bar before but it sure feels like we have.

Charlie seems exceptionally friendly but he isn’t met with the warm overbearing welcome he seemed to be anticipating. Charlie furthers his exploration, after a brief whiskey, as to where his friends may be and finds himself at his sister-in-law’s house. This is not an accidental conclusion in anyway and it is here we meet the lovely Honoria. The warmth between Charlie and Honoria is a raw, confident, unapologetically trusting connection. We learn of Charlie’s difficult history with substances, which repeatedly stumble back into the story in the physical form of Declan and Lorraine. Their incessant, and frankly exhausted, tenacious obsession with Charlie and his downfall contrasted with Helen’s neurotic disgust presents an

excellent, chaotic feel. The characters are full, warm

Babylon Revisited is undeniably full and soft

alcoholism and separated families, without ignoring the harshness of realistic feelings. It is true to say that this short story has continued my love of short stories and reaffirmed my faith in Fitzgerald’s writing. If you have a spare hour or don’t want to delve too deep into a long novel, but still enjoy a wonderful journey, I highly recommend Babylon Revisited.

and very much accessible. The relationships are reminiscent of a real, fun (possibly too fun?) father attempting to be returned to his adoring daughter. An element I tend to enjoy most in literature is walking through a character’s habits, and perhaps that’s what makes them so real. Babylon Revisited is undeniably full and soft, whilst addressing

Talk About Change: Writing as Resistance Festival of the Mind Recap Kate Procter

In Sheffield’s city square, situated between the Town and City Hall, a carnivalesque tent has been constructed. The Spiegeltent – a returning venue for this year’s Festival of the Mind – feels an apt choice of location for Talk About Change: Writing as Resistance, not only for the intimacy it invites, but also symbolically. The internal walls are decorated with mirrors – Spiegeltent is Dutch for mirror tent – thus confronting the performers and audience alike with a literal reflection to parallel the selfreflection of the pieces performed. Last Sunday’s two-hour event, funded by the University of Sheffield as part of the Festival, showcased poems created through collaborate workshops organised by Sheffield social entrepreneurs, Our Mel, with researchers from the Linguistic DNA project. The pieces focused on the central themes of diversity, feminism, immigration and race, whilst thinking about modern

language usage and its influence on our daily lives. Featuring a mixture of individual and group readings – some accompanied by electric guitar – and an intermedial music performance

In a time when events seem ever and ever out of our control, writing is resistance – Desiree Reynolds

by Umbilica (moniker of Josephine Lewis), the pieces demand for the right to self-definition in defiance of a society in which others attempt to define us based on, for example,

our weight, gender and ethnicity. They announced unapologetically ‘we are here to disrupt’ in one group performance showing what director and anthology editor, Desiree Reynolds, states as the collective’s belief ‘that all that they are and all that they stand for is worth the struggle’. There was an echo of gratitude expressed by audience members in the Q&A session following the performance in recognition of the power expressed by the performers and their work, despite the vulnerability of the creative process. Given local funding cuts to arts and culture, such as those highlighted in a 2016 Arts Council England report, the performance felt particularly special, if only for its rarity. The event was inspirational in its proclamation that such voices must be heard. To request a copy of the anthology please visit: tiny.cc/talkresist


26

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Site Gallery reopens its doors Charly Hurrell

Site Gallery reopened its minimalist glass doors for their grand debut on 28 September, featuring exhibitions, food from Peddler Market and live performances, since closing last year for a grand refurbishment. They originally opened their much older (but I’m sure still very sleek) doors in 1978, up in Walkley, nearby John Ruskin’s own museum made for the workers. They shifted down to Brown Street, it’s current location, in 1988 and gained the named Site Gallery in 1996. We managed to head down early to grab a preview of the new and improved Site Gallery. Site Gallery have consistently prioritised providing space for artists at critical points; those just beginning their journey and those having jumped along nicely but still teetering on the brink of their success. They focus on purveying visual, moving image and performance art, while keeping up with developments in trends and technology to stay relevant with

contemporary interests. The building sits perfectly on Brown Street, opposite Rutland Arms and further west from Showroom Workstation, so it’s extremely accessible by foot or bus. The facade is covered with a variant of red brick organisation that align pleasingly with the large, copper framed feature windows, allowing a glance into their brand new shop, reception and community cafe. Their established logo, which is helpfully featured on each staff’s lanyard, is a crisp white cube with ‘SITE’ in block letters. This font is distributed at a consistent but not overbearing regularity throughout the gallery. The cafe offer a range of coffees, teas, treats and an ‘eclectic menu’ that is on offer all day. It’s run by Kollective, who provide a daily changing menu of six items, produced with local sustainable ingredients and made for one day only. The staff are a creative hive of welcoming, warm presences, so when you visit do not be hesitant to offer any questions. They

opened with the Liquid Crystal Display exhibition by Laura Banham, curated by Laura Sillars with Angelica Sule. The exhibition features an exploration of our societies dependance on technical objects that are produced by minerals and liquid crystals. They address our fixation with the end product, and our oblivion towards the journey that produced them. We will feature a follow up on the exhibition so keep an eye out. Site Gallery is definitely worth checking out, and I for one will certainly be returning for a coffee, to browse the creative literature on offer, or to check out their everchanging and developing project space. The trebling size in public space development was necessary in order to maintain an income that keeps their shiny glass doors open. Their exhibitions are free to enter. A highly recommended detailed catalogue (that explains each piece and it’s artist) costs £8, which contributes to the galleries necessary income.

Opening times: Mon - Wed, Fri, Sat: 11-6pm Thursday: 11-8pm Sunday: 11-4pm

Site Gallery opened to the general public on 28 September. Admission is free.


U S E CO D E

S H E F F U N I4 0 AT C H E C KO U T

e x p i r e s 3 1 s t D e c e m b e r , 2 0 1 8 / / * d i s c o u n t a p p l i e s t o f u ll p r i c e d i t e m s


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Music Music Editors Harriet Evans Ben Kempton Whether you were lucky enough to see the Arctic Monkeys or not we’ve got it covered and as you dust off that freshers flu we’ve provided the perfect editors picks and articles to get you through.

Editors’ Picks

Harriet: Retreat2018 Chase & Status ft. Cutty Ranks I’m a huge fan of electronic music, so when Chase and Status announced that they were returning to their jungle roots I couldn’t wait to hear their new music. ‘Retreat2018’ begins with gentle ambience and echoing vocals, luring you in before throwing you into a drop heavily influenced by 90s ragga. Their new album, Return II Jungle, is out next year.

Ben: Swimming Mac Miller The death of rapper Mac Miller in September is still looming over the music industry and the significance of this album has become so important for more than just sounding amazing. The record that came out a month before his drug overdose is all about Mac’s fight with depression after breaking up with his ex Ariana Grande. He will be sorely missed and the beautiful melancholic hip hop album will live on.

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Arctic Monkeys make their Sheffield return Ben Kempton

Off the back of their Mercury Prize shortlisted album Tranquillity Base Hotel and Casino, The Arctic Monkeys hit the road to tour the UK, including the band’s home city, Sheffield, for the first time in almost five years. They played four sold out shows at the FlyDSA Arena on the 18th, 19th, 21st and 22nd of September. Prior to the tour, the band released their album in May and launched a pop up shop in Sheffield. The album divided fans with its new, experimental sci-fi sound. Critics raved about it but fans expecting a thrashing indie band record were let down. It didn’t stop the shows from selling out though. The stage was set with a huge light-up hexagon hanging above the band (emulating the album’s cover art) , alongside an illuminated ‘Monkeys’ sign just in case anyone forgot who they were seeing. As Alex Turner walked on stage sporting a newly shaved head and wearing a suave colourful suit, he addressed his home crowd with ‘I ain’t seen you in ages’. The arena erupted. Each Sheffield show had similar

setlists guaranteed to please any Monkeys fan with songs going all the way back to 2006’s Whatever People Say I Am, That’s What I’m Not. Three of the shows opened with the new album’s anthem ‘Four Out of Five’ and despite differing opinions among fans, the whole crowd got into it and roared with chants of “Yorkshire, Yorkshire, Yorkshire!” The most played songs were from their penultimate album, AM. Hits such as ‘Snap Out Of It’, ‘Arabella’ and ‘Why’d You Only Call Me When You’re High?’ launched frontman Turner into the slick showman he is, waltzing across the stage and gracing the enormous crowd with his quirky off-beat moves. Turner presented himself as a calm and collected professional who had done this many times before. As the shows progressed, hits performed from the new album unfortunately exemplified the public feelings towards the record. ‘Star Treatment’ and ‘One Point Perspective’ were played by the band exceptionally and it sounded like listening to Alex Turner on the actual album as he sang the lyrics, but they were the only songs of the night where the crowd fell flat, stopped moshing and started to look at their

phones. However, fan of the album or not, it was a goosebumps moment when the guitar riff in ‘She Looks Like Fun’ broke through during the song and when the extended outro version of ‘Four Out of Five’ played at the end of the gig on the 21st. Unsurprisingly, the show stealers were indie rock classics from their older albums. ‘From The Ritz to the Rubble’ was an unexpected surprise for the lucky ones that got to see it and ‘Don’t Sit Down Because I Moved Your Chair’ pushed the whole crowd to the front of the arena where the mosh pits began. I wouldn’t be surprised if Rotherham could hear the crowds belting out the bands most popular tune ‘I Bet You Look Good On The Dance Floor’ and the die-hard fans were unexpectedly treated to slower classics ‘505’ and ‘Cornerstone’. The Arctic Monkeys’ emotional tributes to Sheffield, in the form of acapella versions of their classics, made national headlines. Each show had a stripped back version of the song played. One show got ‘Mardy Bum’, the others got ‘Fluorescent Adolescent’ and ‘A Certain Romance’. Amongst the crowd I heard people complaining that it wasn’t the actual version but

there were also others crying in joy over their favourite songs getting a new, emotional rendition. As a band they can’t please everyone (and don’t look to) but I thought it was an incredible gesture for fans of their home city. The Arctic Monkeys returned to Sheffield and created an atmosphere and buzz in the Steel City unlike any other band that has played here in recent history, with people from all over the country swarming in for the weekend. They also put on a complete spectacle. The band were electric and Alex Turner was looking sharp and singing perfectly. It would have been nice to hear more from Turner between songs, although we did get the odd belter of a one liner from him. When they played ‘I Bet You Look Good On The Dancefloor’ on Friday night, Turner said: “We didn’t care much for this song when we wrote it. Now we care about it even less”, then launched into it. It was also a shame about the crowd’s reaction to some of the new songs but this was overshadowed by the band putting on a more than four out of five performance.

The Arctic Monkeys returned to Sheffield and created an atmoshere and buzz in the Steel City unlike any other band that has payed here in recent history Image: Shutterstock


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Are CDs relevant in 2018? Harriet Evans

In the age of instant digital downloads and web streaming, CDs seem to have been banished to the same realm as other musical relics such as MP3 players and Walkmans. Although other long lost formats such as micro-cassettes have recently made a comeback, it’s not often you hear someone say “I’m just popping to HMV to pick up a CD.” So, is it time we hit eject on CDs for good? In recent years some artists have opted to not produce physical copies of their albums, instead favouring a stream-only option. For instance, Kanye West’s 2016 album The Life Of Pablo was an exclusive release on streaming service Tidal. Despite this

LIVE The Blinders at HMV Sahar Ghadirian

With the recent release of their debut album Columbia, three piece alternative group The Blinders performed a seismic set at Sheffield’s HMV. Hailing from Doncaster, the trio comprising of Thomas Haywood (vocals/guitar), Charlie McGough (bass) and Matt Neale (drums), have caused quite a stir in the UK alternative music scene with their singles and 2016 EP Hidden Horror Dance. Similarly, they have achieved success on national radio with the likes of BBC Introducing, BBC Radio 6 Music and Radio X playing their tracks. The Blinders presented a punkadelic demeanour by opening their 30 minute set with a political attack on those in power with ‘Free the Slave’. The lyrics projected by Haywood’s enthralling expression may be subliminal to some, yet it’s clear that “free the aging man… and the conservative values that chain him/free the flying bird from the

it quickly became the first streamonly album to go platinum, hinting at the way that the music industry was headed. Streaming services such as Apple Play and Spotify give users instant access to an almost unlimited library of songs by simply searching and clicking on their desired track. The ability to create personalised playlists, to find new music through genre-based radios and discover the newest releases all on one app is something that the humble compact disc will unfortunately never be able to replicate. Despite CDs becoming cheaper, you can’t really compare that to £9.99 a month for a library of millions of songs. Some new cars don’t even come with a CD player, instead they’re fitted with an AUX or USB port for

you to connect your smartphone to. This is also the case with many new laptops which don’t come with a CD drive anymore. Discussions about the death of CDs have been fairly common over recent years, with many people already acting like they’ve been extinct for years. If you compare the beginning of the noughties (when they were at their peak) to 2018, the sales figures have dropped significantly. However, this is mainly because people don’t tend to buy albums anymore, regardless of whether it’s a digital download or vinyl. It turns out that CDs are still the most popular album format for consumers. There are a few reasons why this might still be the case. The process of playing a vinyl on a turntable is really satisfying,

corrupt air” is a direct retaliation against the systematic corruption inherent in modern-day politics. Following this with ‘Gotta Get Through’, the politically charged urgency of the trio showed no sign of burning out. The punk poetry erupting from Haywood during ‘L’état C’est Moi’ provided a visceral, enigmatic tone to the set, with such grit as “I’ve got divine right” being repeated. Consequently, this song in particular

The conviction exuded by the band emphasised this sentiment. Moreover, the blistering riffs of McGough and Haywood added to the dark, almost garage rock feeling The Blinders effortlessly master. The anthemic ‘Hate Song’, a highlight of the live performance , made it difficult not to move along to to its catchy, upbeat tempo. Despite being a song packed with energy, the band’s nonchalant attitude gave the in-store atmosphere a relaxed feel, contrasting with what you would expect from a rock band. Both this song and the catchy riffs in ‘Brave New World’ felt reminiscent of Sheffield locals SHEAFS, as both bands are able to create an entrancing spirit, captivating the crowd with their confident, pithy probes. Haywood did just that later on in ‘Brutus’ by asking “does my vote count for anything?” in the same way Lawrence Feenstra of SHEAFS projects himself in ‘This Is Not a Protest’. The Blinders are a band worth experiencing live. Enrapturing, politically injected lyrics enable the gig-goer to encounter an alternative to what is seen in mainstream media. Catch them on their headline tour alongside White Room and Calva Louise this October and November, you won’t be disappointed.

The Blinders presented a punkadelic demeaour by opening their 30 minute set with a political attack on those in power.

oozed a no-nonsense, confident attitude unique to bands in the neo post-punk genre; paralleling the song’s meaning - “I Am The State” as said by French Grand Monarch Louis XIV at the peak of his power.

but let’s face it, they’re not exactly portable. And unless you’ve already pre-downloaded music from a streaming service, you’re at the mercy of a strong internet connection to enable you to listen to your favourite tunes. There’s also the issue that some artists or albums aren’t actually available to listen to on streaming services and other artist catalogues appear and disappear all the time. CDs, on the other hand, are a lot more portable, reliable and convenient. Even though I rarely ever play my CDs, I can’t bear to part with them because of the nostalgia and memories attached to them. I have a huge stack of them at home which include some of my all time favourite albums which were handed down to me from my sister and parents.

The CD definitely still has its place in many people’s music collections for the moment. Retro nostalgia and what it represents will always be fashionable. People love to bring things back that were thought to be long in the past, be it flared trousers or retro games consoles. The resurgence of vinyl, which was once thought dead, shows that these once much-loved formats which were banished to a dusty box in your loft can always bounce back. Maybe this will be the case for CDs in 20 years time.


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Wolf Alice win the 2018 Mercury Prize Ben Kempton

The shortlist Arctic Monkeys – Tranquility Base Hotel & Casino Everything Everything – A Fever Dream Everything Is Recorded – Everything Is Recorded Florence & The Machine – High As Hope Jorja Smith – Lost & Found King Krule – The Ooz Lily Allen – No Shame Nadine Shah – Holiday Destination Noel Gallagher’s High Flying Birds – Who Built The Moon? Novelist – Novelist Guy Sons Of Kemet – Your Queen Is A Reptile Wolf Alice – Visions Of A Life

Love it or hate it? Why is ‘I love it’ so popular Danny Lardner

Kanye West and Lil Pump’s ‘I Love It’, released in early September, is probably the most outrageous song you’ll hear all year. Its music video is even more absurd - the two artists dance along a seemingly endless white corridor while following comedian Adele Varens, portrayed as easily 5 feet taller than the pair, who gleefully rap about their appreciation for sexual promiscuity. Oh, and they’re both wearing fucking massive Roblox costumes. Depending on who you ask, the song is either one of the most strangely enjoyable songs of the year or an archetype of possibly the most hated musical subgenre on the planet. I think it’s both, really - while the crude lyrics and irritating autotune undermine its appeal, something about the image of Kanye, dressed like a literal box and gleefully dancing to the song’s bassline, makes me love it. The video was debuted at September’s PornHub awards (which are a thing, apparently) and as much as the visuals are entertaining, without its absurdity the song really loses a lot of value. Pump’s initial refrain exemplifies the issues that I, along with many, have with so-called “mumble rap”. Simple, autotuned lyrics about

women (or “hoes” to use Mr. Pump’s term) are the calling cards of a poor song. The genre itself really lacks creativity and has been attacked for that reason. “The mass public has been dumbed down,” according to hip-hop artist Kool G Rap.

Something about the image of Kanye dressed like a literal box, gleefully dancing to the song’s bassline makes me love it

The popular mumble rap artist Lil Uzi Vert has also claimed in the past, “You just say ‘yeah’ at the end of everything and make it rhyme. It don’t matter what it is.” The appeal of mumble rap may illustrate how music and beats are becoming more popular to rap audiences than lyrics and complex rhymes. Repetition sells in the music industry and, unfortunately, new artists stick to what works: memorable hooks and similar

rhythms. Nevertheless, the single launched at number six on the Hot 100, before hitting number one on the streaming charts with almost 50 million first-week streams in the US. Why has it been such a hit? The video certainly helps, as does the appeal Kanye brings to the table. Although historically a more lyrical and poetic rap artist, the vulgarity of his refrain, “I’m a sick fuck, I like a quick fuck” is so unashamedly Kanye that it just works. However, that and his “whoop” and “scoop” ad-libs perhaps suggest one thing about the song: he’s probably having us on here. As he’s an artist capable of, in my opinion, inarguable* musical perfection, it’s fair to suggest that this revelry in beat fetishism and visual absurdity is the latest example of the rap star’s comical approach to music. Maybe the public just wants to let him enjoy himself; the guy’s made enough good music in the past.

The Mercury Prize is a prestigious award given to the album of the year as decided by a panel of judges. This year’s judges included the likes of Radio One DJ Clara Amfo, musician and songwriter Ella Eyre, jazz musician Jamie Cullum and Marcus Mumford from Mumford and Sons. On the Mercury Prize website, the judges say: “This year’s Hyundai Mercury Prize celebrates albums by musicians at all stages of their careers, but with a shared belief in the importance of music for navigating life’s challenges – whether personal or political, falling in or out of love, growing up or looking back angry or ecstatic. The music here is funny and inspiring, smart and moving. Twelve amazing albums!” The awards show took place on the 20th September at the Eventim Apollo, Hammersmith. Displaying some of the finest musical talent at the moment, there were live performances from Wolf Alice, Lily Allen, King Krule, Novelist, Everything Everything, Jorja Smith, Everything Is Recorded and Florence + The Machine.

With a shortlist full of such highquality artists, the competition this year was particularly tough. It is to huge credit that Wolf Alice won the prize for their album Visions of a Life. Ellie Rowsell received the award saying, “This means so much to pick this up with my three best friends!” Her bandmate Theo Ellis took over, reminiscing about how a record company exec knocked them back saying: “’You lot don’t look like a band at all - all your songs sound different, you don’t look like each other.’ But here we are - so fuck you!” He asked for a Jägerbomb before heading back to the stage for another rendition of Don’t Delete the Kisses. The band told Huw Stephens after the show, “We don’t really say this kind of stuff but it feels like a dream. It felt like walking out into Glastonbury, just a dream. We’re happy just to get out the house, forget winning the damn thing!” Wolf Alice’s album, along with all the other nominated albums, are available to stream and there is a Mercury Prize playlist on Spotify if you want to hear the best picks.


Should y a d s e n Wed e b s n o o aftern r o f e e r kept f student g n i e b l l e w r. a e y is h t e k a m ision you could

This is a dec

. r o l l i c n u o C U Become an S e r o f e b lf e s r u o y Nominate r. e b o t c O h t 5 y a 5pm Frid t a e r o m t u o d in F s n o i t c e l e / m o .c sheffieldsu


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Screen

Screen Editors Gethin Morgan Izzy Cridland

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NETFLIX

What better way of escaping from the stress of returning to Uni than indulging in some good old film and TV? That’s what we’ve done, all for you to know what to watch and what not to watch (we also just really enjoy it).

Maniac Season One

Editors’ Picks

Sightseers

Gethin Morgan

Ben Wheatley is one of Britain’s most punchy, provocative and creative directors, and this 2012 effort is an absolute cracker. Couple Tina (Alice Lowe) and Chris (Steve Oram) go on a caravan holiday, only Tina doesn’t realise Chris is a serial killer. Twisted, crazy and hilarious, it unravels brilliantly with the perfect blend of dark comedy and British sensibility. - Gethin

Mindhunter

Two strangers’ paths cross when they are both attracted to a mysterious pharmaceutical drug trial. Owen (Jonah Hill) is trying to cure his schizophrenic hallucinations while Annie (Emma Stone) sneaks her way into the trial in order to supplement a drug problem. From Cary Joji Fukunaga, creator of True Detective, this Netflix Original is as bold a TV show as you’re likely to see this year. Tackling psychology and mental illness head-on, it is an unflinchingly surreal, distinctly weird piece of work. With striking visuals typical of Fukunaga’s work, he flitters from clean grayscale to vivid neon glows as often as he flitters from reality to dream sequences. With around half the screen time spent in the real world trial centre, the other half is

NETFLIX Set in the 1970’s, Mindhunter follows Holden Ford, an FBI agent investigating people who commit murder multiple times. it’s based on a true story and not only is it well acted and scripted but gives a fascinating insight into the motives of serial killers. The nuanced colour pallet creates an eerie atmosphere and the dialogue is insightful in constructing both the criminals and detectives characters. A solid series from Netflix, this is one to watch!- Izzy

Bojack Horseman Season 5 Kavan Mankoo

It’s hard to know where to start with season five of Bojack Horseman. Where other shows might begin to lose their steam after five seasons, Bojack hits as hard this time around as it ever has, if not even more so. Not every episode nor every arc

spent in a whole host of fantastical locations as we are transported to the dreams of Owen and Annie. The dream-world is handled with such detail and care, mastering that normalisation of strangeness which only dreams have. They’re jam-packed with familiar locations, objects and characters, used in unfamiliar ways. As in The Sopranos, dreams are utilised to delve into the psychology of characters, revealing truths to brilliant effect. There is a slight mid-season lag as we spend more and more time dreaming. It often feels a little indulgent and lacking in purpose or direction. But the magnificent final two episodes pay-off in a way that makes up for any impatience generated in that period. Its biggest problem is probably the company Maniac either deliberately, or unavoidably shares. With the

concept of a Black Mirror episode and visuals akin to Ex-Machina, or clear similarities to Blade Runner and Inception, there are constant comparisons to other great works of filmmaking. None more so than 2001: A Space Odyssey (it’s hard to see a talking computer and not think of HAL). Counteracting that is perhaps its greatest strengths; Jonah Hill and Emma Stone. Hill is terrific, filled with pain and dread, he gets better and better throughout the season. His remarkable work very nearly gets forgotten however, thanks to the unbelievable talents of Emma Stone. Still not even 30 years old, she has established herself as one of the very best actors working today. Her versatility and range is a joy to behold as the dreamworld gives her (and Hill) the opportunity to show off with different characters,

is amazing; in particular Todd’s arc seems overly typical of his character. Although it links to his conflicting asexuality and desire for romance, it’s essentially the usual story of some wacky events unfolding and that’s about it. There are, however, much stronger storylines, particularly Princess Carolyn’s. As usual, the show successfully tackles various aspects of Hollywood society with some superb satire. One highlight is the show’s ridicule of every single book having a movie adaptation, when a greeting card is greenlighted for a movie. Of course, other serious problems are tackled too, with the very current themes

of feminism in Hollywood and the #MeToo movement addressed, with Bojack having a short-lived career as a celeb feminist. One of the things which makes Bojack such a special show is everyone who watches it relates to it in their own special way. Some people are the joyful Mr Peanutbutter, some are the bright, underutilised Diane and some are as motivated and driven as Princess Carolyn. Whatever your personal take, it provides a fascinating mirroring effect, one which no other TV show has mastered so well.

accents and worlds to fill. Not to forget the impressive supporting cast. Justin Theroux is the right kind of ridiculous as the scientist behind the drug, while Sally Field is a force to be reckoned with as his mother. Most notably though is Sonoya Mizuno; hidden under a stylish bob and funky glasses she inhabits Dr. Azumi Fujita completely. While the brilliance of Maniac is often undercut by the fact it is so reminiscent of other great works of art, its daring subject matter, unique sensibility and stunning production come through triumphantly. In isolation this is a sensational piece of writing, brought to life with stunning visuals, an outstanding ensemble and a sumptuous score. One of 2018’s very finest pieces of television.


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BIG SCREEN

Crazy Rich Asians Ingrid Monavar

BIG SCREEN

King of

Thieves Rosie Boon

The Hatton Garden Heist is probably the most notorious burglary of recent times. While the heist wasn’t successful, the infamous tale has been turned into a mini-series and three films. Just like the crime itself,

£25million was the estimated value of goods stolen in the Hatton Garden Heist in 2015

King of Thieves crumbled under the pressure and completely missed the mark. The film tells the story of four elderly criminals who battle their own demons whilst attempting ‘one final job’, the biggest job of them all, stealing £14m from a vault in Hatton Garden. The allstar cast cannot be accused of poor delivery, as their performances were gripping. Particularly Michael Caine as Brian Reader and Jim Broadbent as Terry Perkins;

the power struggle between the two is captured perfectly by their chemistry. Michael Gambon, Ray Winstone, Paul Whitehouse and Tom Courtenay play the rest of the elderly criminal gang, all of whom have an axe to grind about something. Stereotypically, the role of group ‘techie’ Basil falls to youngster Charlie Cox. All of the characters fit to stereotypes of the young and old. The elderly gang have eyesight problems, memory loss, diarrhoea and struggle to grasp the internet. Meanwhile Basil, the youngest accomplice, is the tech-driven kid who ‘doesn’t know what he’s doing’ in regard to committing a crime, especially in comparison to his elder counterparts. Playing on the criminals’ ages is something the film relies heavily upon; while some jokes land and will leave you laughing out loud, the drama of the crime should have been focused on more. Additionally, homophobic comments surrounding Cox’s character were unnecessary, offensive and didn’t aid to the storytelling. The pace of the film begins relatively slow, giving some much-needed backstory to the characters. However, it loses its drive around the middle of the film. When everything seems to go wrong for the gang, the pressure does drive out some great performance from Winstone and Broadbent, who within seconds begin to combust with panic in the days leading to their eventual arrest. Retro shots in black and

white of the older actors from previous films is a nice touch to portray their characters’ previous criminal past. Clips are immediately recognisable to those who have seen the films, but even for those who haven’t it rounds the film nicely. Golden Globe, Emmy and Ivor Novello award winner Benjamin

Homophobic comments surrounding Cox’s character were unnecessary, offensive and didn’t aid to the storytelling

Wallfisch produces an amazing score to the movie. Wallfisch hits all the right notes and perfectly captures the tension and emotion in different scenes. It could be argued that without Wallfisch’s score, the film might have flopped completely. King of Thieves is a good watch but lowering your expectations is required. With such big names and a big crime, you would expect this film to make much more of an impact than it does.

Funny, charming and heartwarming. If you’re a fan of a good rom-com, you’ll love Crazy Rich Asians. In between all the family drama and quirky comedy, it’s an emotional rollercoaster from start to finish. Based on a novel of the same name by Kevin Kwan, it’s a feelgood story to say the least. The protagonist, Rachel Chu (Constance Wu), is an Economics professor at NYU who earns a comfortable living. When her boyfriend Nick (Henry Golding) invites her on a trip to Singapore to meet his family at a friend’s wedding, she happily accepts, though she has no idea what she’s getting herself into. It turns out his family are rich. Like, filthy rich, and suddenly Rachel finds herself searching for her space in a world foreign to her. His mother Eleanor’s (Michelle Yeoh) approval isn’t easy to win, and the family may be bringing their own hoops for Rachel to jump through. The film has Asian actors in all the main roles, making it the first Hollywood film to do so since The Joy Luck Club in 1993. The presence of this underrepresented demographic on the big screen has led to a great deal of excitement and rightly so. Kevin Kwan once mentioned that he wrote this story to give Western audiences the chance to experience stories of contemporary Asia, and the response from audiences has shown definite signs of success.

Though all the actors perform brilliantly throughout, the comic relief characters are a particular strength, adding layers of laughter to the show, putting a quirky and light-hearted spin on a film with a lot of family drama. Rachel’s best friend Goh Peik Lin (Awkwafina) is a lovable loudmouth with no filter and a fondness for tagging along to fancy soirees. Her performance is brilliant and evoked a good deal of laughter from the audience. Other notable comedic characters include Peik Lin’s father (Ken Jeong) and Oliver (Nico Santos), a stylist who helps Rachel throughout the film in a soul-searchy kind of way. Though this film may not exactly be passing the Bechdel test, it is refreshing to follow a strong female character throughout the story. Rachel is a young woman whose positive self-image and complex character becomes increasingly apparent throughout the film. She is faced with questions regarding where she comes from, what she values and who she wants to be. This is exciting, and she’s a relatable character, even to those who aren’t ‘crazy rich’ or Asian. Though issues surrounding the family’s wealth and social class are somewhat explored in the main storyline, there are also a few interesting family dynamics that get glossed over. The story could have explored the relationship between Nick’s cousin Astrid (Gemma Chan) and her husband more deeply, as it touches on some very interesting issues surrounding masculinity and the impact of wealth in relationships. Although that is something which could be addressed in the sequels Warner Bros. have already confirmed. In a nutshell, Crazy Rich Asians is really fun. It is touching, sweet, empowering at times and overall a very enjoyable 2 hours.


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Film Unit Autumn Semester Picks Gethin’s Top Five

Suspiria (Wednesday Oct 31 7.30pm) Dario Argento’s classic horror from 1977, which is being remade by Luca Guadagnino, is famed for its striking imagery and intense red and blue colour palette. It looks beautiful, some say it’s a masterpiece, others absolutely hate it. One thing’s for sure, I can’t think of a better way to spend my Halloween.

Paris, Texas (Wednesday Nov 21 7.30pm) Another classic, this 1984 Wim Wenders picture won the Palme d’Or at Cannes. Having recently seen the wonderful Lucky, which is Harry Dean Stanton’s final lead role (having passed away aged 91 last year), I’m eager to see the character-actor supreme’s most iconic performance on the big screen.

Film Unit have already screened a bunch of great films since Freshers’ Week, but there’s a whole lot more to come. So your dearest Screen Editors have decided to choose the five movies we’re most looking forward to seeing at the UK’s number one student cinema.

Izzy’s Top Five Thoroughbreds (Sunday Oct 14 3.30pm & 7.30pm) This has been on my radar since long before its UK release in April, partly because Olivia Cooke and Anya Taylor-Joy are two of the most exciting young actors around. They both earned high praise for their performances in this dynamic, dark teen comedy.

BlacKkKlansman (Saturday Oct 20 - 3.30pm & 7.30pm) Based on the incredible true story of Ron Stallworth, who infiltrates the Klu Klux Klan during the 70s civil rights movement. Spike Lee brings us an insightful exploration into race relations in the US, which feels particularly relevant due to Trump’s presidency.

Tyrannosaur (Wednesday Nov 14 7.30pm) Ever since I was reduced to bits by Paddy Considine’s second feature, Journeyman, earlier this year, I’ve been itching to check out his critically acclaimed 2011 debut. One of the finest British character actors of the past decade, it’s wonderful to see him make the transition to standing behind the camera so seamlessly.

Tully (Sunday Nov 18 - 3.30pm & 7.30pm) Marlo (Charlize Theron) is a mother of three struggling to cope. When her brother gifts her a nanny, Marlo is taken aback by her bond with Tully (Mackenzie Davis). From Jason Reitman (Juno), I’m expecting a quirky and heart-warming film, with a realistic look at motherhood and post-partum depression.

American Animals (Saturday Dec 8 3.30pm & 7.30pm) This unique heist movie tells the true story of a library heist (yep) in Kentucky. The book being stolen is a rare edition of The Birds of America, apparently worth millions. Nominated for a Grand Jury Prize at Sundance, it looks like a flashy, entertaining bit of pulp.

The Breadwinner (Sunday Dec 2 - 3.30pm & 7.30pm) This animation of Deborah Ellis’ bestselling novel follows Parvana, a young girl growing up in Afghanistan whilst under Taliban regime. Following her father’s wrongful arrest, Parvana dresses like a boy in order to support her family. It’s a fascinating story and it looks beautifully animated.

Find Film Unit’s full Autumn Schedule on their Facebook page or on Twitter

Western (Friday Nov 2 - 7.30pm) Set in rural Bulgaria, the cinematography looks beautiful and the film looks like an insightful portrait into masculinity, adopted through the western genre. It also doesn’t use professional actors, perhaps to give a more realistic insight into the fragility of masculinity and an exploration into work as a labouring man in rural areas.

120 BPM (Saturday Dec 1 3.30pm & 7.30pm) Set during the early 90’s, the AIDS epidemic having claimed lives for nearly ten years, this film follows a group of activists in Paris striving for better pharmaceutical investment. I’m hoping for the emotional storytelling of Pride combined with the insightfulness of AIDS documentary How to Survive a Plague.

Tickets are just £3 and can be found online or at the Students Union


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Games Games Editors Tom Buckland Luke Baldwin Hello Games Gang! This issue we’ll be mourning the untimely passing of Telltale Games. But it’s not all doom and gloom because we also went to EGX and had an amazing time.

Editors’ Picks

Tom - Dragon Age: Origins

An oldie but a goodie, I delved back into the world of Ferelden and I’m not really looking back. The game still retains its difficulty and charm despite nearing its 10-year anniversary, and the gameplay is perfect for any RPG addict. Each playthrough allows me to notice new things and explore different parts of the world I previously missed - like this time, I’ve decided to assume the role of a sassy royal dwarf who refuses to be told what to do. She’s pretty great. The game’s available on Xbox 360, PS3, PC, and Mac.

Luke - Simpsons: Hit & Run Continuing the anniversary theme of this issues Editors’ Picks I’ve picked a game which recently celebrated its 15 year jubilee. What happens when you combine the sandbox vehicular mayhem of GTA and the simple yet fun gameplay of a 3D platformer? You’d probably get a pretty average game with a lot of identity issues, but set that game in the world of Americas’ favourite dysfunctional family and you’re looking at an instant classic. The game’s available on PC, Xbox and PS2 but decent copies are sadly as rare as Aurora Borealis localized entirely in Skinners kitchen.

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A tribute to...

Sam & Max

The Walking Dead

The Wolf Among Us

Game of Thrones

Robin Wilde

Arya Damavandy

Harry Cottle

Mia Edward

Whilst most Telltale games build upon already established IP’s, The Wolf Among Us is unique in that it acts as an introduction to the bizarre world of Fables based on the cult comic series. The game sees the player control Bigby, the sheriff of Fabletown, a small community of mythical characters living in 1980s America. Formerly the Big Bad Wolf, Bigby now seeks forgiveness for the sins of his past. Whilst the concept is clearly nuts, Telltale are able to perfectly balance the absurd humour with some genuine darkness and pathos. This is achieved primarily through Bigby, one of my favourite characters in any game. His desire to be a better person is hampered by his infamous history and his violent nature. The player choice system highlights this perfectly. Often you’ll find yourself questioning a rash decision you made in the heat of the moment as people start to see you once again as the ‘Big Bad Wolf’. As the pressure ramps up you’ll find yourself tempted to live up to your reputation to get closer to the truth.This all culminates in a stunning conclusion which wraps up everything in an immensely satisfying way. The Wolf Among Us was Telltale at their best.

As a fan of Game of Thrones I was excited to hear that Telltale, a gaming studio revered for its highly emotional, narratively focused games, was going to be taking on the TV and literature giant. Telltale has been praised for their attention to detail and sense of continuity with the intellectual property that they base their games upon. So, the decision to cast House Forrester as the protagonists, who had a brief mention in one of the A Song of Ice and Fire novels, upheld Telltale’s scrupulous nature. Their characterisation of and ability to weave fan favourites like Daenerys Targaryen into the Telltale story was incredible. Telltale have always been masters at making you care about their characters, and in this game a sense of family and duty is paramount, so that choice was very tough and thought-provoking. I played this game due to my interest in Game of Thrones but walked away with a far greater appreciation for Telltale’s writing and art style. It’s a shame that the second season is now cancelled but it won’t take away from the hours of entertainment I gained from the first.

After a well-received LucasArts adventure game in 1994, nothing more materialised for Sam and Max until Telltale delivered the goods 12 years later with their reboot. The game’s first series set the standard for Telltale games down the years – cartoony graphics, simple adventure gameplay set in small, walkable arenas, and a sharp wit on its large cast of recurring characters. Across that and two more series Sam and Max explored tropical islands, Santa’s grotto, and a sinister simian threat from space. Throughout, the irreverent weirdness never quite strayed into tiresome random humour, and the third series, The Devil’s Playhouse, contains some truly standout moments in dark humour and witty writing. While it was their adaptation of The Walking Dead in 2012 which helped Telltale break out into mainstream gaming culture, it was Sam & Max which gave them their foothold in the small but loyal adventure gaming niche.

The Walking Dead Season 1 marked Telltale’s first modern explosion in popularity and inauguration into the mainstream of video games. I vividly remember watching multiple playthroughs over and over again of the game on YouTube back in 2012; at the time, it was more compelling to me than any show airing on TV. The characters were so brilliantly realistic and likable, the cel shaded art style did an amazing job of bringing the comic to life, the music and ambient sound made the experience dramatic and immersive. Tying it all together was simple but fun point and click adventure gameplay. It blew my 13-year-old mind. As I got older and more installments were released, my obsession only grew, and in many ways it helped form my tastes and own style for writing characters. I and many other fans grew up as the series’ protagonist Clementine did; I’m sure lots of current fans started the series through the same means as me, at the same age, and are adults now, looking back fondly.


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ROUND-UP

EGX was a parade of every new release imaginable and there was a lot to play and we did get to play a lot of it! So do not fret if one of the games you were anticipating hearing more about hasn’t been included in this piece, because we can guarantee that the game you’re looking for is more than likely going to appear in the online version of our EGX roundup, so keep your eyes peeled for that!

Luke Baldwin Tom Buckland

This game wasn’t designed for a convention floor - nor is any horror game, really. The world can’t be as immersive or suspenseful as intended when there’s other convention-goers walking by you and conversations all around. Whilst playing the game I wasn’t disappointed, but my hunger to know what was in store with this game wasn’t sated either. They haven’t steered far away from how their games

Image: Man of Medan / Supermassive Games

It only seemed fitting that a game as tense and atmospheric as Metro had it’s demo within a dark and dingy bunker, replicating the games ominous post-apocalyptic environment. Players were plunged right into the heart of the open world with very little in the way of hand holding or sign posting. Combine this with a deep and interesting crafting system and it’s easy to see that 4A have developed a survival horror game that truly embodies

the spirit of the franchise. But it’s also worth noting that some of these thematic successes’ come at the cost of gameplay. A lack of HUD and minimalist map means that exploration, whilst immersive, is at times confusing. Goals and objectives can easily be lost amongst the dull browns and saturated greens of the wasteland. Likewise shooting feels simple and clunky, perhaps in an effort to reflect the savage nature of the setting,

normally play and the gameplay was reminiscent of Until Dawn, Supermassive Games’ previous iteration, which isn’t a bad thing. The demo was short, but as previously mentioned, this game is going to pride itself and succeed proficiently in its horror, which is something they can’t execute very well in a convention environment. I made very few choices in the game and also saw very few consequences to the ones I made, but it’s tricky to

but in reality it simply isn’t up to scratch in a major FPS. Metro Exodus is a game which certainly hits all the right notes in terms of vision, but deludes fails that vision when it comes down to basic mechanics. However, better that way than vice versa; with almost four months until release there’s still plenty of time to deliver that extra bit polish the game desperately needs. Image: Metro Exodus / 4A Games

show choice and consequence in a short demo of a horror game. I must say I am eager to see more and this hasn’t put me off the game in the slightest. There was enough there to keep me engaged, but not enough to be a demo that I’m really going to remember. There’s no official release date for Man of Medan, which may be why the demo was lacking, but we do know that the game will be available at some point in 2019.


Games

With a game that many have been waiting what feels like forever for, EGX granted us the pleasure of two different demos to choose from. Whether you took a trip into Olympus (the Herculesinspired world) or the Toy Box (the Toy Story-inspired world), the demos did an excellent job at leaving us anticipating the release of what we can assume is the conclusion of this excellent franchise. The game has refined every single criticism people can hurl

Image: Assassin’s Creed Odyssey / Ubisoft

at the previous iterations and everything feels natural. No longer do Goofy and Donald look like stiff robots with dialogue written for them by people that had never watched anything Disney; instead these characters and the others (such as Woody and Buzz Lightyear) are instantly recognisable, not only by character model. The combat and the general gameplay is nothing new, but has clearly fixed the issues that the combat had before. The level design is

fantastic; the world felt truly expansive I was truly astounded at how expansive the world felt. As I clambered out of the window of Andy’s house in the Toy Story world, it genuinely seems like you could go anywhere on the street, and if not for a time restricted demo, I surely would’ve. Honestly, Square Enix have satisfied everything I wanted from this game and other fans will be pleased when the game is finally released on the 25th January 2019.

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Images: Kingdom Hearts 3 / Square Enix

When AC: Origins released last year to critical acclaim, it seemed Ubisoft had finally buried ghosts of their past and embraced the franchises new RPG-esque direction. Odyssey seems to be a chance to further this success, learning from Origins shortcomings, improving on them and delivering them in a new and exciting package. Onwards and upwards right? Well apparently it’s not that simple because the best way to describe Odyssey is one word: disappointing. The demo was the same as what we’ve been shown at E3 and other press conferences. But getting a hands on, you quickly realise the slick footage shown on stage is not a clear portrayal of the final product. Combat and parkour feels

like a chore, over complicated and poorly animated. It’s hardly the smooth and simple AC gameplay synonymous with the series. Maybe the game will lend itself more to the long play format as opposed to a 20 minute demo, but right now I don’t have high hopes. It seems the most important lesson Ubisoft has to learn is that their yearly release cycle means a significant drop in quality. Fingers crossed the inevitable backlash they receive on Odyssey’s release will hit home just how significant this decision is because the future of Assassin’s Creed could depend on it.


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Science & Tech Science & Tech Editors Jade Le Marquand Aidan Hughes Hello and welcome to the second ever Science and Tech section of Forge Press. This week we present the latest iPhone news from Cupertino, California and give a summary of Sheffield’s Soapbox Science - a science in the community event organised by some of the UK’s leading female scientists.

Aidan’s Pick AIQ by Nick Polson and James Scott

Apple’s Xciting new phones Lucas Mentken

Apple revealed a fresh trio of iPhones at a special event in the Steve Jobs Theater on September 12, taking us by surprise with a rather unusual naming scheme for its new flagship models: the iPhone Xs, iPhone Xs Max and iPhone XR. It was the company’s first launch event to be live streamed on Twitter, in addition to Apple’s own website, and was watched by thousands of fans around the world. The upgrade from the 2017 ‘iPhone X’ is called the ‘iPhone Xs’, with many associating the ‘s’ with the word ‘speed’ - a trend started in 2009 with the iPhone 3Gs. The

AIQ provides an uplifting view of probability, data science and artificial intelligence (AI) and compares the recent explosion of intelligent machines to the industrial revolution of the 19th century. An ideal book for nonexperts with a keen interest in AI and the future.

Jade’s Pick

Whenever I feel like being lazy I tend to watch a documentary on Netflix and try to pass it off as ‘extra reading’ - mainly because it is a cornocopia of some of the best science documentaries of the last 20 years. Some of my personal favourites include Walking with Dinosaurs and Frozen Planet. If you’re looking for something new to watch on Netflix I thoroughly reccomend a rummage through their science documentary section.

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Apple has unveiled its latest iPhone Xs - claiming it to be their ‘most powerful’ yet

iPhone Xs remains the only familiar naming choice in the 2018 iPhone line up. The iPhone Xs keeps the revolutionary design of its predecessor, which will now be discontinued, featuring the same 5.8-inch screen with the iconic ‘notch’ on the top, which is now ubiquitous in the smartphone market. Apple claims that its new A12 Bionic chip is the ‘smartest and most powerful chip in a smartphone’, launching apps even faster, making the iPhone Xs more energy efficient and enabling higher storage of up to 512GB. The iPhone Xs’s Super Retina HD OLED display is more durable, has

a 60% greater dynamic range from the iPhone X and is now protected by IP68 water and dust resistance.

The iPhone Xs keeps the revolutionary design of its predecessor, which will now be discontinued

However, the biggest new feature

seemingly revolves around the camera as users are given the ability to alter the depth of field in their pictures to create stunning portraits and landscape pictures as part of an expanded photo-editing toolbox. The 12MP dual camera system also features 2x optical zoom and dual optical image stabilization to create state-of-the-art photography. Video quality has been improved as well with better low light performance and stereo sound recording using the four built in mics. Everyone who is worried about power consumption because of all these new features can rest assured - Apple says that the iPhone Xs delivers up to 30 minutes longer battery life than the iPhone X, but didn’t go into any further detail. The iPhone Xs also comes in a bigger size, with a 6.5 inch screen and longer battery life. Announced as the iPhone Xs Max, the model discontinues the previous trend of adding a ‘Plus’ to larger models. Alongside the enhanced camera, both versions of the iPhone Xs now include a dual SIM card capability, using technology known as eSIM, a feature that has been common in many Android phones for years. In addition to the Xs and Xs Max, Apple included a third option by introducing the iPhone XR. It ships in six new colourful finishes: white, black, blue, yellow, coral and special

edition (PRODUCT)RED. Starting at $749, it acts as an “entry level” phone for anyone who is not willing to pay $999 or more for the more premium iPhone Xs. This emulates the time Apple introduced a similar “budget” phone with the iPhone 5C alongside the iPhone 5s in 2013. Similarly, it also came in more colours but lacked features such as Touch ID. At first glance, the iPhone XR has a very similar screen design to the iPhone Xs, creating more coherence across the line up. Diving deeper, the iPhone XR features a 6.1 inch LCD screen which Apple calls a ‘Liquid Retina’ display, giving the phone a lower resolution and slightly thicker bezels along the sides.

Starting at $749, it acts as an “entry level” phone for anyone who is not willing to pay $999 or more

This might seem like a downgrade from the iPhone X’s and the iPhone Xs’s OLED displays, especially since the pixels-per-inch (PPI) count lies at 326, which is the same as the eight year old iPhone 4’s PPI. The iPhone XR will therefore not be able to play video at Full HD (1080p), which has established itself as an industry standard, even among cheaper phones. The ‘Liquid Retina’ LCD screen also lacks pressure sensitivity and the 3D Touch feature which has been introduced in the iPhone 6s three years ago. Nevertheless, Apple still claims that its wide colour range, advanced pixel masking and True Tone display make the iPhone XR’s LCD the most advanced in the industry.


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The screen is wrapped in a 7000 series aerospace-grade aluminium band and protected by IP67 splashand water resistance, not IP68 like the other two new models. The iPhone XR lacks a telephoto lens and only features a single 12 MP rear camera unlike the dual camera set up of the Xs and Xs Max. However, it offers similar editing tools for depth control after taking

the photo and still remains a very capable high-end smartphone camera. Apple fans remain divided about the decision to kill off the home button for good in all three new iPhone models and rely solely on Face ID. Moreover, an earphone to lightning adapter will no longer ship with the new iPhones, forcing

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consumers to buy adapters and amping up the pressure to buy wireless alternatives like AirPods instead. The iPhone Xs and Xs Max have been released on September 21st while the iPhone XR will be available from October 26th with pre-orders starting on October 19th.

Take your best ever pictures and videos with the 12MP dual camera system. All images courtesy of Apple

iPhone Xs Tech Specs

Which colour is your favourite? Apple offers up its lowcost Xr in 6 dazzling colours (black edition not shown)

Capacity: 64/256/512GB Display: 5.8” or 6.5” Super Retina HD OLED HDR display - 458 ppi Waterproofing: IP68 rating Processor: A12 Bionic Chip RAM: 4GB Battery: 2,658 or 3,174 mAh Back Camera: Dual 12MP wide-angle and 2x optical zoom telephoto cameras capable of 4K video recording. Front Camera: 7MP camera with infrared sensor for Face ID. Software: iOS 12 Ports: Lightning connector

iPhone Xr Tech Specs Capacity: 64/128/256GB Display: 6.1” Liquid Retina HD LCD display - 326 ppi Waterproofing: IP67 Processor: A12 Bionic Chip RAM: 3GB Battery: 2942mAh Back Camera: 12 MP wide-angle camera capable of 4K video recording. Front Camera: 7MP camera with infrared sensor for Face ID. Software: iOS 12 Ports: Lightning connector


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Science & Tech

SOAPing up Sheffield Jade Le Marquand

On any normal day, if you walk down towards the Moor with the intention of seeing the latest blockbuster or browsing the depths of Primark, you may do your best to ignore the people trying to force a leaflet into your hand. Or you may even stop for a brief second to admire the musical talents that Sheffield’s finest buskers have to offer. But last Saturday you would have seen something very different as the Moor became a real-life arena for some of the leading female scientists to showcase their work to the public. Soapbox Science’s elegance is in its simplicity: great women discussing their great work with the Great British public. Without fireworks and without glory, these scientists let their work speak for itself as their spectators listened with intrigue and an open mind. Together, they created a hub of intellectual thought and conversation where anyone from anywhere could contribute and learn - something that can seem quite foreign in this day and age. As I navigated between each station I was amazed at how much I learnt; did you know that the weird fish in Finding Nemo with the light coming out of its head is an Anglerfish? Did you also know that that fish is actually the female of the species and the male is tiny in comparison? Did you also know that the male fuses with and burrows into the female’s body, melts into its reproductive organs and that’s how this species reproduces? I didn’t, and quite frankly I doubt I ever would have known if I hadn’t attended. As each talk progressed, I found myself becoming more invested and inspired; I couldn’t help but admire the dedication and hard work it must have taken to bring them there. Being an individual who tries to shop ethically, I was particularly drawn in by the very first speaker I saw, Dr Lydia Cole, and her fascinating talk on the palm oil industry and the environmental impact that the

Dr Alison Wright, talking about the seemingly unusual mating habits of turkeys. Image: Dr Alison Wright. Art: Clara Lacy @Claralacy; claralacy.com

Speakers at Soapbox Science consistently attract crowds of captivated people Images: Soapbox Science

plantations have. Suffice to say, from now on I will be checking my labels for palm oil and doing my best to only use the products which are certified to have been sustainably produced. From stem cells to peanut butter, each Soapbox provided new knowledge and sparked unique conversation, evoking such questions as ‘how different actually are we to animals?’ and ‘should we avoid ever buying palm oil products again?’. After speaking to several of them, it appeared clear that they all shared the same goals to engage, educate and inspire, which they definitely succeeded in. When asked

Together, they created a hub of intellectual thought and conversation where anyone from anywhere could contribute and learn

about the future of this already international event, Dr Alison Wright said that she hoped it would “increase in popularity, as it has since 2011” and that she hoped that rather than moving on to arenas, it would keep to its simple format to preserve its connection to the general public. During the few hours I was there I came across people of all races, ages and genders (I even saw one of my lecturers!), all of whom were united by these women and their passion for what they do. Around these women I felt truly proud to be able to say that I, like them, am a woman in science.

Want to find out more about Soapbox Science? Check them out here: soapboxscience@gmail.com facebook.com/soapboxscience/ @SoapboxScience www.soapboxscience.org


C

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N A H G

L A B

TRAIN TO CHANGE THE WORLD Change Lab is a unique a year-long programme of training and action connecting you with like-minded students and experts to make positive change happen. For your chance to take one of our limited places, apply before Wednesday Oct 10 at: sheffieldsu.com/changelab


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Sport Thoughts

@ForgeSport

Forge_Sport

Young players to watch in PL Nicole Oshisanwo

The Premier League is full of young, exciting talents. In this piece, we take a look at some of those plying their trade at clubs outside the top six who have the ability to make a splash this season. David Brooks Recently signed from Sheffield United for £11m, Brooks could make a name for himself this season at Bournemouth. Capable of playing either behind the striker or on the wing, he loves to dribble past opponents before producing a through ball or taking the shot on. Last season in the Championship he managed three goals and five assists, so he’ll be looking to build on that for the Cherries this time around and, at 21, he has plenty of time to grow. James Maddison Another player who has made the step up from the Championship is James Maddison. Leicester spent around £20m on a player who was arguably the stand out number 10 in the league, racking up an impressive

fourteen goals and eight assists last term. He has carried that excellent form into this season, scoring two and assisting one in just five games. Maddison is already a key part of the Foxes’ attack, and whilst consistency will be an important factor, City may have themselves a bargain if he can continue to perform as he has so far. Will Hughes A technically gifted midfield operator, Hughes signed for Watford from Derby last season for around £8m. However, injuries and a wealth of alternative options in his position counted against him, and he made just 15 appearances in 2017/18. This year, he has started every game and offers extra solidity to the Hornets’ already robust midfield, averaging 4.2 tackles a game whilst still being able to express himself going forward with 1.2 key passes per match and a delightful goal against Burnley. If this form continues, perhaps Hughes, once a key part of the England U21s, could force himself into the Gareth Southgate’s senior set-up by the end of the season.

Yves Bissouma Joining Brighton this summer from Lille for around £15m, he made made 24 appearances last season in Ligue 1 and racked up some very good defensive numbers, averaging 2.8 tackles and 1.3 interceptions each game. He is also a reliable passer, with an 85.2% completion rate last year, and 90.2% this year in his four appearances for his new club. Bissouma is a competitive defensive midfielder who can dribble, pass and bully opponents with his powerful physique; if the Frenchman continues his development under Chris Hughton, then the Seagulls may have grabbed themselves a future star. Aaron Wan-Bissaka A converted winger, English defender Wan-Bissaka came through the youth ranks at Crystal Palace, and so far this season has started every game possible for the Eagles. Alongside some excellent defending, he has provided one assist. Pacey, powerful and technically gifted, he could be Palace’s right-back for years.

Bissouma is destined for great things Image: James Boyes

Is Woods back to his best after 80th PGA Tour win? Michael Ekman

A day that many golf fanatics thought they would never see has finally come. After five long years of defeats, Tiger Woods achieved his 80th PGA Tour win in the 2018 Tour Championships. While Woods has obtained a huge variety of titles throughout his career, this latest victory can definitely be seen as his greatest personal triumph. When Woods first came under the spotlight in the late nineties, he was winning tournaments and awards almost every year. He looked unstoppable and few could have predicted his subsequent fall from grace. What started in 2010, when he admitted to infidelity and divorced his wife, would turn out to be only

the tip of the iceberg. After coming back from his hiatus from golf to try to solve his marital issues, injuries plagued him whenever he played.

This may not be Woods’ most prestigious title, but it’s without a doubt one of his greatest personal victories

Prior to his divorce scandal, Woods had consistently been ranked in the top 10 of the world’s male golfers.

He even set the record for most consecutive weeks being ranked as number one at 281. Ever since then, Woods has suffered a whole host of injury problems, the most prominent issue being his back, on which he has had surgery four times in the last four years. As a result, he had to pull out of several tournaments and his ranking tumbled significantly compared to pre-2010, as symbolized in 2017 when Woods was at one point ranked 1199th; a career low. To come back from all of his setbacks and issues to enter the winners’ circle yet again can be described as nothing other than true grit. At this time last year, Woods told journalists at the President’s Cup press conference: “I don’t know what my future holds for me”, so it

is a spectacular feat to see him come back against the odds to finally claim this 80th PGA Tour win. Out of all the titles that Woods

Image: Keith Allison Flickr

has won, is this the most prestigious one? Not at all. However, is it one of his greatest personal victories? Without a doubt.


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Sport Sport

Tong: Just because you have a record doesn’t mean you’re the best Adam May

Continued from back page... “Managing my time around training while trying to set-up my own business isn’t the easiest thing to do. “Weightlifting is unfunded so it means I don’t get paid for training, unlike a lot of athletes. It means I have to find my own time to do it. “I’ve got to be as consistent at that as possible. I’ve been doing the Inspired Through Sport programme, I’m working at Hallam University and a lot of coaching there. “It’s about making sure that I’m making time for my own wellbeing not just putting all my eggs into one unfunded basket.” It’s fair to say that Tong’s teenage years weren’t all plain sailing, with her often running into trouble with the law.

Sport, as is often the case with numerous sportsmen and women, gave a new focus and an unfounded drive. It’s undoubtedly benefited Tong, who was part of the University’s Elite Sports Performance Scheme. “I was a bit of a bad kid growing up. I think that’s a great way to describe it. Troublesome would be better, actually. I got in trouble with the police a lot, I did a small stint with young offenders and I think I just lost my way a bit in my teens and it took me a while to really find myself,” she said. Due to weight classes changing, Tong will have a legacy record after notching a 78kg snatch – it’ll be hers forever. “Just because you have a record doesn’t mean that you’re better than anyone else,” she said. “I’m still currently ranked fourth so it doesn’t matter that

I have a record or that I’ve lifted internationally. You’ve got six lifts to make it happen.” And now her eyes are firmly set on the 2022 Commonwealth Games in Birmingham.

“What more could you want than a home games? If I can get myself there and lift in front of a home crowd then I’ll be forever happy.”

Image: Juliet Cookson

Sheffield Sport ready to tackle new BUCS season Josh Taylor

The British and University Collegiate Sport championships begin next week and the University of Sheffield sport clubs are gearing themselves up for what is hopefully a successful year. BUCS is the governing body of university sports around the UK, and different establishments compete week to week in over 50 sports. These vary from football to water polo to cycling. Over 5800 teams compete in different divisions that adhere to the promotion and relegation format, some even adopt a playoff format after the regular season is finished. Ahead of the new season Forge Sport have interviewed the captains of three separate clubs from the University of Sheffield to get their thoughts on the upcoming season.

The first captain is Tim Denby from table tennis and the second

skipper is Alex Wood from tennis. How did the club do last year, any highlights? TD: “Last season we had a lot of success, earning 171 BUCS points, the most in the university, for the third year in a row. Our Men’s and Women’s Firsts held their positions in the top divisions in the country, while our Men’s Third team managed to reach the Conference Cup final as well as the Women’s Firsts in the BUCS Trophy.” AW: “Last year was a solid year for tennis, the men’s 1’s held their place in Division 2, as did the 2’s in Division 3. The women’s 1’s were very close to being promoted into Division 1 and were unlucky to miss out. The women’s 2’s competed in the same league as the 1’s, but were unfortunately relegated. The women’s 1’s did very well to reach

the semi-finals of the BUCS cup and just lost out in a deciding shootout.”

What are your goals for this year? TD: “Our main goal for this season is to continue to make the club appeal to everybody of all abilities, as we are a sport that everyone can take part in. On the table our aims are to get our Men’s Third team promoted to Northern 1a, and all other teams to stay in their respective divisions.” AW: “The main BUCS aim for the men’s team this year is to maintain our current divisions after a number of our key players graduated this year. Additionally we want to try and recreate the successful cup run we had two years ago when we reached the final. For the women we’re hoping that the 2’s can bounce back and get promoted.” What’s your favourite part about BUCS, what makes it so special? TD: “My favourite part of competing in BUCS is getting the

opportunity to play all over the country and play against top class

universities. My highlight of uni is winning the BUCS Trophy at Big BUCS Wednesday. The atmosphere was incredible as this event lets you share your passion for sport with people across a variety of clubs.” AW: “It has to be the team atmosphere at the matches. Having your friends cheer you on from the balcony and the sense of pride you get for competing for your team and your uni is incredible.” A few teams have already commenced their BUCS season yesterday, with the majority starting October 10th. You can read all about how your University clubs do in future editions of Forge Press.

Head of Sport Adam May Hello and welcome to the latest edition of Forge Press. We hope you’re settling into Sheffield if it’s your first year in the city. For those returning, it’s good to be back, isn’t it? Over the summer the sport team have vowed to give greater coverage to niche sports and the incredible achievements that are made within them. That’s why it’s been refreshing to be able to talk to Jenny Tong, our back-page star. She’s a weightlifter who has competed for Great Britain and her story is inspiring while her drive is unquestionable. We urge members of all clubs to get in contact with us and share any stories or achievements they have to help us give the greatest coverage possible. Success should be celebrated and there are so many wonderful things that go on within the student world. But also reflecting the current sporting mood across the globe, Michael Ekman takes a look at Tiger Woods’ return to form, and we have a piece on some wonderkids to look out for in the Premier League. We’re big on BUCS coverage, so Josh Taylor breaks down exactly what the competition is and speaks to a couple of captains that are involved this year. As ever, please drop me a message on press.sport@forgetoday.com if you’d like to get involved. Have a good one.


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Eyes on the prize

Jenny Tong sets her sights on Birmingham 2022 after going full-time Adam May

Fresh off the back of representing Great Britain at the University World Championships, weightlifter Jenny Tong is turning her attention to the U23 Europeans. While Tong admits her seventhplace finish at the World Champs in the 53kg category wasn’t her best performance, it has made her more

eager to scoop a medal when she flies out to Poland for the start of the Europeans on 20 October. “I’m really excited and fired up for it,” she said with a gleam in her eye and a sense of real hunger and enthusiasm, when Forge Press met with her at Goodwin Sports Centre. “With the World University Championships not really going as I’d hoped, this is a chance to show my metal. Some small mistakes

meant I went from gold medal position straight down to seventh at the recent competition. “That’s my own wrongdoing but I was lucky enough to even be in medal contention anyway. I’ve got the opportunity to right my wrongs and I’m looking forward to showing people what I’m made of.” Growing up in the small village of Lecrin in Granada, south Spain, just “half an hour from the ski resort and

half hour from the beach”, Tong is no stranger to travelling, often going backwards and forwards from the beautiful valleys and the UK. But, since finishing her degree in politics and international relations, she has gone full-time into training which, she says, presents its own challenges.

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Profile for Forge Press

Forge Press #124  

Forge Press #124