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Rob ert A xel rod is the Walgreen Professor for the Study of Human Understanding at the University of Michigan. He has appointments in the Department of Political Science and the Ford School of Public Policy. His areas of specialization include international security, formal models, and complex adaptive systems. Bob’s books include Harnessing Complexity (with Michael D. Cohen), Conflict of Interest, The Structure of Decision, The Evolution of Cooperation, and The Complexity of Cooperation. His work focuses on questions of how patterns of social behavior emerge. He draws on the current research in a wide range of disciplines, including biology, psychology, and computer science. He is a member of the National Academy of Sciences and former President of the American Political Science Association. He is also the winner of several national awards and was named a MacArthur Prize Fellow. He is a graduate of the University of Chicago and received his PhD from Yale University. John R . Chamberl in is a Professor of Political Science and Public Policy. His research interests include ethics and public policy, professional ethics, and methods of election and representation. He teaches the core course “Values, Ethics, and Public Policy” at the Ford School. He was the director of the Ford School’s BA in Public Policy program from 2007–11 and the director of U-M’s Center for Ethics in Public Life from 2008–11. John has a BS in Industrial Engineering from Lehigh University and a PhD in Decision Sciences from the Graduate School of Business at Stanford University. John D. Ciorc iar i is an Assistant Professor of Public Policy. His research focuses on international law and politics, particularly in the Asia-Pacific region. He is the author of The Limits of Alignment: Southeast Asia and the Great Powers since 1975 (Georgetown University Press, 2010). His current projects include a book manuscript on the Khmer Rouge tribunal and research on Chinese influence in Southeast Asia. Before coming to Michigan, he was a National Fellow at the Hoover Institution and Shorenstein Fellow at the Asia-Pacific Research Center, both at Stanford University. From 2004–07, he served as a policy official in the U.S. Treasury Department’s Office of International Affairs. He is a senior legal advisor to the Documentation Center of Cambodia, which promotes historical memory and justice for the atrocities of the Pol Pot regime. He is also a Bernard Schwartz Associate Fellow at the Asia Society and term member of the Council on Foreign Relations. He holds an AB and JD from Harvard and an M.Phil. and D.Phil. from Oxford. David K . Cohen is the John Dewey Professor of Education in the School of Education and Professor of Public Policy at the Ford School. His research focuses on the relationships between education policy and classroom practice in K–12 education, and on efforts to improve schooling. He was co-director of a national study of efforts to improve teaching and learning in high-poverty elementary schools. A nationally recognized authority on educational reform, David taught at Harvard and Michigan State before coming to the University of Michigan. At the Ford School he teaches a class in education policy. David received his PhD from the University of Rochester. Michael D. Cohen is the William D. Hamilton Collegiate Professor Emeritus of Complex Systems, Information, and Public Policy at the University of Michigan. He uses his research on theories of complex systems to study organizational learning and routines and their interactions with information technology. His research has been applied to the design of better information resources for social service, educational, and health organizations. He has a PhD in Social Science from the University of California, Irvine and a BA in History from Stanford University.

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Susan M. Col l ins is the Joan and Sanford Weill Dean of Public Policy at the Gerald R. Ford

School of Public Policy and a Professor of Public Policy and Economics. Before coming to Michigan, she was a Professor of Economics at Georgetown University and a Senior Fellow in Economic Studies at the Brookings Institution, where she retains a nonresident affiliation. Her area of expertise is international economics, including issues in both macroeconomics and trade. Her recent work explores implications of increasing international economic integration, as well as determinants of economic growth in industrial and developing countries. She has co-authored studies comparing growth experiences in China and India, and examining challenges to growth in Puerto Rico. She is a Research Associate at the National Bureau of Economic Research, and Vice President of the Association for Professional Schools of International Affairs (APSIA). She served recently as an elected member of the American Economic Association (AEA) Executive Committee, and has chaired the AEA Committee on the Status of Minority Groups. Earlier in her career, she served as a senior staff economist on the President’s Council of Economic Advisers. Collins received her BA summa cum laude in Economics from Harvard University and her PhD from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Mary E. Corcoran is a Professor of Political Science, Public Policy, and Women’s Studies. Her research focuses on the effects of gender and race discrimination on economic status and earnings and on professional women’s career trajectories. Mary has published articles on intergenerational mobility, the underclass, and sex-based and race-based inequality. She teaches seminars on poverty and inequality and on women and employment. Mary received her PhD from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.

Pau l N. Cou rant is the University Librarian and Dean of Libraries, Harold T. Shapiro Collegiate Professor of Public Policy, Arthur F. Thurnau Professor, Professor of Economics, and Professor of Information at the University of Michigan. From 2002–05 he served as Provost and Executive Vice-President for Academic Affair—the chief academic and budget officer of the University. He has also served as the Associate Provost for Academic and Budgetary Affairs, Chair of the Department of Economics, and Director of the Institute of Public Policy Studies (which is now the Ford School). In 1979–80 he was a Senior Staff Economist at the Council of Economic Advisers. Courant has authored half a dozen books, and over seventy papers covering a broad range of topics in economics and public policy. Most recently, his academic work has considered the economics of universities, the economics of libraries and archives, and the effects of new information technologies and other disruptions on scholarship, scholarly publication, and academic libraries. Courant holds a BA in History from Swarthmore College (1968), an MA in Economics from Princeton University (1973), and a PhD in Economics from Princeton University (1974). Sandra Danz iger is Professor of Social Work and Research Professor of Public Policy at the

Ford School. Her primary research interests are the effects of public programs and policies on the well-being of disadvantaged families, poverty policy and social service programs, demographic trends in child and family well-being, gender issues across the life course, program evaluation, and qualitative research methods. Her current research examines low income families’ participation in public and private nonprofit programs and their role in addressing barriers to work, especially for single mothers. She is a co-investigator on the Michigan Recession and Recovery Study, and has helped evaluate a family support program provided by Starfish Family Services. She conducted an implementation study of Michigan’s Jobs, Education, and Training pilot projects and was principal investigator on the Women’s Employment Study. Gerald R. Ford School of Public Policy


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Shel don H. Danz iger is the Henry J. Meyer Distinguished University Professor of Public

Policy and Director of the National Poverty Center at the Ford School, and Research Professor at the Population Studies Center. Danziger studies the effects of economic, demographic, and public policy changes on trends in poverty and inequality and the effects of social policy reforms on economic well-being. He is currently studying the effects of the great recession and the economic stimulus on workers, families, and children in Southeast Michigan. He is the co-author of America Unequal (1995) and Detroit Divided (2000) and co-editor of numerous books, including Understanding Poverty (2001), Working and Poor (2006), The Price of Independence (2007), and Changing Poverty, Changing Policies (2009). Sheldon is a Fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, a John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Foundation Fellow, the 2010 John Kenneth Galbraith Fellow of the American Academy of Political and Social Science, and Director of the Research and Training Program on Poverty and Public Policy. He received his PhD in Economics from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. K at rinel l M. Davis is a Postdoctoral Fellow at the National Poverty Center at the Ford School. She received her PhD in Sociology from the University of California, Berkeley in 2008. She is an Assistant Professor of Sociology at the University of Vermont, where she teaches Race and Ethnic Relations courses, as well as courses exploring the intersections between race, gender, and work trends within the American labor market. Her recent work explores the institutional features of the postindustrial era U.S. labor market and how these factors affect the employment opportunities available to low-skilled African American women workers. While at Michigan, Davis will develop a manuscript that explores the structure of job opportunities available to high school educated African American women employed as transit operators in the San Francisco Bay area. Mat t he w Davis , MD, MAPP, is an Associate Professor of Pediatrics and Communicable Diseases and Internal Medicine at the U-M Medical School, and Associate Professor of Public Policy at the Ford School. Dr. Davis’ current research and teaching focus on vaccination policy issues, child and family health insurance issues, and innovations and reform in health care delivery. He is the faculty lead for the MD/MPP dual degree program at the U-M. He also serves as a mentor for research fellows and graduate students, for which he was honored with the MICHR Distinguished Mentorship Award in 2012, and as an active clinician within the U-M Health System. Dr. Davis earned his MD cum laude from Harvard Medical School and an MA in Public Policy from the Harris School at the University of Chicago, as an Irving Harris Fellow in Child Policy. A l an V. De ar d orff is the Associate Dean of the Ford School, John W. Sweetland Professor of

International Economics, and Professor of Public Policy. Alan’s research focuses on international trade. With Bob Stern, he has developed the Michigan Model of World Production and Trade, which is used to estimate the effects of trade agreements. Alan is also doing theoretical work in international trade and trade policy. He has served as a consultant to the U.S. Departments of Commerce, Labor, State, and Treasury and to international organizations including the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development and the World Bank. Alan received his PhD from Cornell University.

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El ena Del b anco is a Lecturer in Expository Writing and has been teaching at the Ford School since 1987. Before that, she worked as a journalist, editor, and Associate Director of the Bennington Writing Workshops in Vermont. With a background in social work, she taught for Head Start and Mobilization for Youth in the 1960s and then directed educational programs at Phoenix House, New York City’s residential drug treatment program. At the Ford School, she joins her long-term interests in policy with her commitment to its excellent and persuasive articulation. St ephen DesJar d ins is a Professor of Education and Public Policy. He teaches courses related to public policy in higher education, economics, finances in postsecondary education, statistical methods, and institutional research and policy analysis. His research interests include student transitions from high school to college, what happens to students once they enroll in college, the economics of education, and applying statistical techniques to the study of these issues. He is on the editorial board of Economics of Education Review, is a contributing editor to Research in Higher Education, and is the methodology section editor for Higher Education: Handbook of Theory and Research. DesJardins received a BS in Economics from Northern Michigan University, an MA in Policy Analysis and Labor Economics from the Humphrey Institute of Public Affairs (University of Minnesota), and a PhD in Higher Education, also from Minnesota. John DiNardo is a Professor of Economics and Public Policy and a Visiting Professor at the

Law School. His interests include applied econometrics, labor economics, health economics, political science, and econometrics. Recently his work has included a chapter on metastatistics for the Handbook of Applied Econometrics, a chapter on program evaluation methods for the Handbook of Labor Economics, and an entry on natural experiments for the New Palgrave Dictionary of Economics. John is currently working on the relationship between body weight, health, mortality, and medical costs; the finite sample properties of average treatment effect estimators; and other projects. John received an MPP from the University of Michigan and his PhD from Princeton University. K at hryn M. Domingu ez is a Professor of Public Policy and Economics, and director of

the Ford School’s PhD program. Her research interests include topics in international financial markets and macroeconomics. She has written numerous articles on foreign exchange rate behavior and is the author of Exchange Rate Efficiency and the Behavior of International Asset Markets and Does Foreign Exchange Intervention Work? (with Jeff Frankel). She is a Research Associate at the National Bureau of Economic Research and the Federal Reserve Bank of San Francisco. She has also worked as a research consultant for USAID, the Federal Reserve System, the International Monetary Fund, the World Bank, and the Bank for International Settlements. Kathryn teaches macroeconomics, finance, and international economics at the Ford School. She received her PhD from Yale University.

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Dr . James J. Dud ers tadt is President Emeritus and University Professor of Science and

Engineering. A graduate of Yale (BSE in Electrical Engineering) and Caltech (MS and PhD in Engineering Science and Physics), Dr. Duderstadt’s teaching, research, and publishing activities include nuclear science and engineering, applied physics, computer simulation, science policy, and higher education policy. He has served on and chaired numerous National Academy and federal commissions including the National Science Board; the National Academies’ Committee on Science, Engineering, and Public Policy; the DOE’s Nuclear Energy Research Advisory Committee; the NSF’s Advisory Committee on Cyberinfrastructure; and the Intelligence Science Board. He has received numerous awards including the E. O. Lawrence Award for excellence in nuclear research, the Arthur Holly Compton Prize for outstanding teaching, the Reginald Wilson Award for national leadership in achieving diversity, and the National Medal of Technology for exemplary service to the nation. He currently teaches in the program in Science, Technology, and Public Policy at the Ford School, and conducts research in the Millennium Project, a think-tank exploring the impact of over-the-horizon technologies on society, located in the James and Anne Duderstadt Center on the University’s North Campus. Susan M. Dynarsk i is a Professor of Education and Public Policy, and Associate Professor of Economics, at the University of Michigan. Dynarski is co-director of the Ford School’s Education Policy Initiative. She is a Faculty Research Associate at the National Bureau of Economic Research and has been a Visiting Fellow at the Federal Reserve Bank of Boston and Princeton University. She has been an editor of The Journal of Labor Economics and Education Finance and Policy. Dynarski’s research focuses on charter schools, demand for private schooling, historical trends in inequality in educational attainment, and the optimal design of financial aid. Her past research explored the impact of grants and loans on educational attainment and the distributional consequences of tax incentives for college saving. Dynarski has testified to the U.S. Senate Finance Committee, the U.S. House Ways and Means Committee, and the President’s Commission on Tax Reform. She holds an AB in Social Studies, a Master of Public Policy degree from Harvard, and a PhD in Economics from MIT.

During his 26-year career, Diplomat in Residence J a m e s E lli cks o n - Brow n has served in six countries—Cyprus, Greece, Haiti, Indonesia, Malaysia, and Norway. He is the recipient of Superior Honor Awards from the Department of State for his work in Haiti and assisting foreign journalists covering the aftermath of the September 11 attacks. Mr. Ellickson-Brown holds a BS in Sociology and an MA in Education from the University of Oregon. Prior to joining the Foreign Service, he was a teacher in the public school system of his native state of Oregon. Pursuing a life-long interest in music, Mr. Ellickson-Brown has studied the musical traditions of the countries where he has served and utilized traditional and popular American music as a means of introducing foreign audiences to American history and culture. He speaks Creole, French, Greek, Hungarian, Indonesian, and Norwegian. Re ynol d s Farl e y is a Research Scientist at the Population Studies Center and the Dudley Duncan Professor Emeritus of Sociology. Dr. Farley’s research interests concern population trends in the United States, focusing on racial differences, ethnicity, and urban structure. His current work focuses upon the revitalization of Rust Belt metropolises. He maintains a website describing the history and future of Detroit (www.Detroit1701.org). He received his PhD from the University of Chicago. At the Ford School, Farley teaches a course on the history and future of Detroit.

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Larissa Fors t er is a Postdoctoral Fellow at the Gerald R. Ford School of Public Policy. Her research interests include foreign policy, national security, diplomacy, conflict resolution, military strategy, and media studies. She is currently working with Professor Robert Axelrod on a project with ARTIS Research and Risk Modeling on case-based influence in conflict management. The project researches how historical analogies are used to make sense of current situations. The goal is to develop and test a new “Theory of Case-Based Influence” that will be useful not only in understanding the past, but, through understanding how choices are actually made, will also be useful in influencing the future. Larissa received her PhD from the University of Zurich, Switzerland. El isab et h R . Gerber is a Professor of Public Policy at the Ford School. Her current research

focuses on U.S. metropolitan areas, intergovernmental cooperation, land use and economic development policy, environmental policy, local fiscal capacity, and local political accountability. She is currently working on major projects on the politics of U.S. metro areas and on adaptation to climate change in the Great Lakes region. She has written articles on direct democracy, election reform, primary elections, legislative process, voter behavior, land use policy and political representation, and is the author of The Populist Paradox: Interest Group Influence and the Promise of Direct Legislation (1999), co-author of Stealing the Initiative: How State Government Responds to Direct Democracy (2000), and co-editor of Voting at the Political Fault Line: California’s Experiment with the Blanket Primary (2001) and Michigan at the Millennium (2003). She received her PhD in Political Science from the University of Michigan. Edie N. Gol d enberg is a Professor of Political Science and Public Policy and director of the

Ford School’s BA in Public Policy program. She served as Dean of the College of Literature, Science, and the Arts from 1989–98 and is the founding Director of the Michigan in Washington Program. Her research interests include the politics of higher education; her most recent book is Off-Track Profs: Nontenured Teachers in Higher Education (MIT Press, 2009), co-authored with John Cross. She is also author of Making the Papers: The Access of Resource Poor Groups to the Metropolitan Papers and co-author of Campaigning for Congress. Edie served in the federal Office of Personnel Management. She is a member of the National Academy of Public Administration and a life member of the MIT Corporation. Edie served as Director of the Ford School from 1987–89. Rob ert Guenz el is a Lecturer at the Ford School. He is on the Board of Directors for Ann

Arbor SPARK, the public-private partnership to advance innovation-based economic development in the greater Ann Arbor region. He served as the Administrator for Washtenaw County, Michigan for 16 years and retired in 2010. Prior to that he practiced law for 27 years, in the areas of municipal law and labor law, including serving as Washtenaw Count Corporation Counsel and as a trial attorney with the National Labor Relations Board. He also served as Chair of the Washtenaw Development Council and as a board member of the Alliance for Innovation Group, the Criminal Justice Collaborative Council, and the Success by Six initiative. He serves as the Chair of the Washtenaw Housing Alliance, Co-Chair of the Washtenaw County Health Initiative, and Chair of the Ann Arbor Downtown Development Authority. At the Ford School, he teaches “Local Government Leadership in Times of Change.” Guenzel earned his BBA and JD from the University of Michigan.

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Neel Hajra is a Lecturer at the Ford School. He is currently the Chief Operating Officer and Vice President for Community Investment at the Ann Arbor Area Community Foundation. His background includes a CEO role at Nonprofit Enterprise at Work and several years as a corporate attorney at Ford Motor Company. In 2009 Neel was named as an American Express NGen Fellow, and in 2010 he was honored with an Aspen Institute Fellowship for Emerging Nonprofit Leaders. At the Ford School, he teaches about management and policy in the nonprofit sector. Neel received a BS in Physics and JD from the University of Michigan. Richar d L . Hal l is a Professor of Political Science and Public Policy. His research focuses on

American national politics. He has studied participation and representation in Congress, campaign finance reform, and congressional oversight. He is currently writing a book on interest group lobbying and political money in national policymaking and beginning a project on political issue advertising. Rick is author of Participation in Congress (1996). Prior to coming to the Ford School, he served in a staff role on Capitol Hill. At the Ford School, Rick teaches the core course on the political environment of policy analysis, policy advocacy, the politics of health policy, and the core undergraduate course in political institutions. He received his PhD from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. David Hard ing is an Associate Professor of Public Policy and Sociology and a Research

Associate Professor at the Population Studies Center and Survey Research Center at the U-M Institute for Social Research. He studies urban poverty and inequality, incarceration and prisoner reentry, education, and methods for causal inference. His book, Living the Drama: Community, Conflict, and Culture Among Inner-City Boys (University of Chicago Press, 2010), examines the role of neighborhoods in adolescent outcomes related to education and romantic and sexual behavior, focusing on exposure to violence and the cultural context of poor communities. Harding is currently working on projects on prisoner reentry, the effects of community context on adolescents and young adults, and for-profit colleges and educational inequality. He employs both quantitative and qualitative methods. St e ve Hemelt is a Postdoctoral Research Fellow at the Ford School of Public Policy. His research interests focus on questions concerning the economics of education, education policy, and labor economics. He is currently involved in a series of projects that examine the effects of different factors or programs on the college enrollment decisions of students, their success in college, and their early labor market outcomes. Prior to joining the Ford School, Hemelt was an Assistant Professor of Politics at Cornell College. He received undergraduate degrees in Economics and Spanish, a Master’s degree in Economic Policy Analysis, and a PhD in Public Policy from the University of Maryland, Baltimore County (UMBC).

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Ya z ier Henry is a Lecturer in Public Policy at the Ford School, the Center for Afroamerican and African Studies, and the African Studies Center. He is a professional human and social rights activist and has written and published on the politics of memory, trauma, identity, sustainable peace, and Truth Commissions. He has in-depth experience in strategic communications, political strategy, and tactics. Henry is a former anti-apartheid activist and the founding director of the Direct Action Centre for Peace and Memory in Cape Town, South Africa. His research interests are in how structural and administrative violence comes to be normalized after the inauguration of the post-colonial state. At the Ford School, Henry teaches “Social Activism, Democracy, and Globalization from the Perspective of the Global South,” “Apology, Reconciliation, Reparations and Public Policy,” and the core course, “Values, Ethics and Public Policy.” John Hieft je is a Lecturer in Public Policy at the Ford School. He has been the Mayor of Ann

Arbor since 2000. John has served on the boards of numerous organizations, including the Huron River Watershed Council, the Lake Superior Conservancy, and Watershed Council. He is the Co-Chair of the Washtenaw Metro Alliance and has served as Chair of Recycle Ann Arbor and of the Urban Core Mayors of Michigan. He has received several environmental awards, including: Environmental Leadership Award from the Michigan League of Conservation Voters (2008), Local Elected Official of the Year Award from the Michigan Recreation and Parks Association (2004), and the Conservation Leadership Award from the Greater Detroit Audubon Society (2003). Ru st y Hil l s is a Lecturer in Public Policy at the Ford School. He is currently Director of Public

Affairs for Michigan Attorney General Bill Schuette, after having successfully managed Schuette’s campaign for AG. Hills has spent the better part of two decades in public service and politics. He was twice elected unanimously to serve as Chair of the Michigan Republican Party. Before that, Hills served ten years as one of Governor John Engler’s chief lieutenants. Prior to politics, Hills worked as a reporter and anchorman for CBS and NBC television affiliates in Lansing, Jackson, and Flint, Michigan. Hills has a Bachelor of Arts in Telecommunications degree from Michigan State University and a Master of Government degree from the University of Notre Dame. James S. House is the Angus Campbell Distinguished University Professor of Survey Research, Public Policy, and Sociology. His research has focused on the role of social and psychological factors in the etiology and course of health and illness, including the role of psychosocial factors in understanding and alleviating social disparities in health and the way health changes with age. He has been elected to the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, the Institute of Medicine, and the National Academy of Sciences. At the Ford School he teaches courses in health policy. Recently, Jim co-edited Social and Economic Policy as Health Policy: Rethinking America’s Approach to Improving Health (with Bob Schoeni of the Ford School and others) and A Telescope on Society: Survey Research & Social Science at the University of Michigan and Beyond. He is currently working on a book tentatively titled: Beyond Health Care Reform: Social Determinants and Disparities in Health and America’s Paradoxical Crisis of Health Care and Health. He received his PhD in Social Psychology from the University of Michigan.

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Br ian A . Jacob is the Walter H. Annenberg Professor of Education Policy and Professor of Economics at the Ford School. Jacob is co-director of the Ford School’s Education Policy Initiative. He is also a Research Associate at the National Bureau of Economic Research. Brian came to Michigan from Harvard University’s Kennedy School of Government; he previously served as a policy analyst in the NYC Mayor’s Office and taught middle school in East Harlem. His primary fields of interest are labor economics, program evaluation, and the economics of education. Brian’s current research focuses on urban school reform, with a particular emphasis on standards and accountability initiatives. At the Ford School, he teaches “Economics of Education” and classes focused on education policy. The Association for Public Policy Analysis and Management (APPAM) presented the David N. Kershaw Award to Brian in 2008 for his contributions to public policy analysis and management. He received a BA from Harvard University in 1992 and a PhD in Public Policy from the University of Chicago. Daniel Kreism an is a Postdoctoral Research Fellow with the Ford School’s Education Policy

Initiative. His research addresses topics in education policy, labor economics, education finance, and the economics of education. At the Ford School, Dan is coordinating a research team evaluating outcomes from Michigan Community Colleges using newly collected institutional data. He has worked for The National Opinion Research Center and Chapin Hall, and has received grant and fellowship awards from the American Education Research Association and the Institute of Education Sciences. He holds a PhD in Public Policy from the University of Chicago and a BA in History and Philosophy from Tulane University. Before graduate school he taught high school English in New Orleans. A shl e y Langer is an Assistant Professor of Public Policy. Her research interests are in

environmental economics, energy economics, and industrial organization. She is currently investigating consumer demand for automobiles and the implications for energy and environmental policy. She has also done research on price discrimination in the new vehicle market based on consumer demographics and the impact of congestion tolling on urban land use. Ashley teaches a core course in the graduate microeconomics sequence as well as an elective course in environmental regulation. Ashley previously worked at the Brookings Institution and received her PhD in Economics from the University of California, Berkeley. Ambassador Melv yn Le vitsky , a retired senior American diplomat, is Professor of International Policy and Practice at the Ford School; a Senior Fellow of the School’s International Policy Center; a member of the U-M’s Substance Abuse Research Center (UMSARC); a member of the Steering Committee of the University’s Weiser Center for Emerging Democracies; and a Faculty Associate of the Center for Russian and East European Studies (CREES). From 2003 to 2012, by vote of the UN Economic and Social Council, he was a member of the International Narcotics Control Board (INCB), an independent body of international drug policy experts headquartered in Vienna, Austria. During his 35-year career as an American Foreign Service Officer, Mel was Ambassador to Brazil from 1994–98 and before that held such senior positions as Assistant Secretary of State for International Narcotics Matters, Executive Secretary of the State Department, Ambassador to Bulgaria, Deputy Director of the Voice of America, and Deputy Assistant Secretary of State for Human Rights. On his retirement he received the Secretary of State’s Distinguished Service Award.

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Hel en Le v y is a Research Associate Professor at the Ford School as well as at the Institute for Social Research and the Department of Health Policy in the School of Public Health. She is a co-investigator on the Health and Retirement Study, a long-running longitudinal study of health and economic dynamics at older ages. Her research interests include the causes and consequences of lacking health insurance, evaluation of public health insurance programs, and the role of health literacy in explaining disparities in health outcomes. Before coming to the University of Michigan she was an Assistant Professor at the Harris Graduate School of Public Policy Studies at the University of Chicago. She is a Research Associate at the National Bureau of Economic Research and served as a Senior Economist to the President’s Council of Economic Advisers in 2010–11. She received a PhD in economics from Princeton. A nn Chih Lin is an Associate Professor of Public Policy and Political Science. Ann is co-principal

investigator on the Detroit Arab American Study, a landmark public opinion survey of Arab Americans in Detroit, and a co-author of a book on the study, Citizenship in Crisis: Arab Detroit after 9/11. She studies and teaches immigration policy and has a continuing interest in the design and implementation of policies to eradicate poverty and socio-economic disadvantage. With David Harris, she is the co-author of the collection, The Colors of Poverty: Why Racial and Ethnic Disparities in Poverty Continue to Exist. She is the author of Reform in the Making: The Implementation of Social Policy in Prison and the co-editor, with Sheldon Danziger, of Coping with Poverty: The Social Contexts of Neighborhood, Work, and Family in the African-American Community. Ann teaches courses on public policy implementation, gender and politics, qualitative research methods, and immigration. She serves on national and local boards and was formerly a social worker with Covenant House in New York City. Ann received her PhD in Political Science from the University of Chicago. Sharon Macc ini is a Lecturer of Public Policy. She has taught courses in public health,

public finance, and applied microeconomics. As a health economist, her overarching research interest is the econometric evaluation of public health policies in developing countries. Sharon’s research has focused on the impact of decentralization on health outcomes and public health, and the role of environmental conditions at birth on health and socioeconomic status in adulthood. Sharon holds a BA in Political Science from Brown University and a PhD in Health Policy from Harvard University. Jeffre y K . Mac Kie -Maso n is the U-M Dean of the School of Information and Arthur W. Burks Collegiate Professor of Information and Computer Science. He is also a Professor of Economics and a Professor of Public Policy. In his research he has answered questions related to digital information economics, information system design, information networks economics, and market structure and competition for the Internet, computing, and communications industries. He has served as a consultant to both private industry and public utilities. In 2010 he received the University of Michigan Rackham Distinguished Faculty Achievement Award. A Ford School graduate, Jeff received his PhD from MIT. He teaches courses on information economics, information networks policy, incentive-centered design, and the role of information in human choice and learning. He created and for its first eight years directed STIET, a multi-department, multi-disciplinary doctoral research and training program in incentive-centered design for information systems and technologies, which has received over $9 million in funding from the National Science Foundation, the University of Michigan, and Wayne State University.

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Br ian McC al l is a Professor of Education, Economics, and Public Policy. He is an economist whose research interests include applied econometrics, econometrics theory, economics of education and education policy, research design and quasi-experimental research, labor economics, social insurance, and health economics. He is currently studying the effects of high school course taking behavior on college outcomes, what predicts where a student attends college, the effects of financial aid on college outcomes, and the impact of unemployment insurance rules on re-employment and subsequent wages. Dr. McCall received his PhD in Economics from Princeton University. Isaac McFarl in Jr . is Assistant Research Scientist at the Ford School. A labor economist focused on education policy, McFarlin is a Research Associate with the Texas Schools Project at the University of Texas at Dallas. His work examines the efficacy of college remediation—also known as developmental education—in promoting academic performance and educational attainment. More recently, he is evaluating the consequences of across-the-board tuition subsidies offered by community colleges. McFarlin received his undergraduate degree in Economics and Mathematics from Boston University and PhD in Economics from Northwestern University. Mat t he w S. Mingu s is an Adjunct Professor of Practice at the Ford School. He is Professor

and Doctoral Director at Western Michigan University’s School of Public Affairs and Administration and Adjunct Professor in the School of Political Science and Public Administration, University of Electronic Science and Technology of China, Chengdu. He served as a Senior Governance Specialist for the U.S. Department of State in Iraq from January 2009 through February 2010 and helped train U.S. Army units deploying to Iraq for the Naval Postgraduate School’s Leadership Development and Education for a Sustained Peace program upon his return. His research focuses on comparative public administration, especially multilevel systems of governance; cross-border and intergovernmental networks; and the changing nature of borders and national sovereignty. Rowan Miranda is an Adjunct Professor in the Ford School and Associate Vice President (AVP) for Finance at the University of Michigan. He teaches courses related to budgeting, urban policy, and public management. As AVP of Finance, he is responsible for the oversight of the university’s central financial functions (accounts payable, accounts receivable, procurement, accounting, payroll, and sponsored programs), the external audited financial statements, financial analysis, internal controls, tax management, and treasury functions including cash, debt, and risk management. Rowan has served on the faculty of University of Chicago, University of Pittsburgh, Carnegie-Mellon University, and the University of Illinois at Chicago. He has also published on a broad range of topics including public budgeting, taxation, economic development finance, privatization, and enterprise systems. He holds a PhD in Public Policy Analysis from the University of Chicago. David Mors e is a Lecturer in Expository Writing at the Ford School. Before completing a master’s degree in fiction writing from the University of Michigan, he edited for an educational nonprofit organization in Washington, DC, and taught English as a Second Language in Iwakuni, Japan. His fiction has appeared in The O. Henry Prize Stories 2006, as well as magazines such as One Story, The Missouri Review, and Short Fiction. His first play was performed in collaboration with the Takács Quartet and the Colorado Shakespeare Festival in Boulder in the fall of 2010.

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A l e x andra K . Mu rphy is a Postdoctoral Fellow at the National Poverty Center. She received

her PhD in Sociology from Princeton University in 2012. Her primary research interests include urban and suburban sociology, poverty, race and ethnicity, ethnography, organizations, spatial analysis, and social interaction. Murphy has published articles on indoor sex work in New York City, disorder, suburban poverty, and urban/suburban differences in access to antipoverty organization. Currently, Murphy is completing a book that examines how and in what ways the new suburban context of poverty is changing the experience of being poor in the U.S. Her fellowship is supported by the Ford Foundation. Shobita Part hasarat hy is Associate Professor of Public Policy. Her research focuses on the governance of science and technology, particularly those technologies that have uncertain environmental, social, ethical, political, and health implications. She focuses her work on the United States, Europe, and India. She is the author of multiple articles and a book entitled Building Genetic Medicine: Breast Cancer, Technology, and the Comparative Politics of Health Care (MIT Press, 2007; paperback, 2012). Her second book explores the politics over patenting life forms in the United States and Europe. She has also started a new research project analyzing the international governance challenges posed by geoengineering. Shobita teaches courses in genetics and biotechnology policy, science and technology policy, and the policy process. She received her undergraduate degree from the University of Chicago and PhD from Cornell University. Liu Peng is a Visiting Professor of Public Policy at the Ford School and an Associate Professor

in the School of Public Administration at Renmin University of China. He received his PhD from the Chinese University of Hong Kong in 2008 after he graduated from Sun Yat-sen University in Guangzhou. He is currently a member of American Political Science Association (APSA) and American Society for Public Administration (ASPA). His research mainly focuses on Chinese politics, comparative public administration, health care policy and reform, food and drug regulation. Phil ip B. K . Pot t er is an Assistant Professor of Public Policy and Political Science at the University of Michigan. His ongoing research explores international terror networks, interdependence and international conflict, and the domestic influences on U.S. foreign policy. His first book manuscript, Elections and American Foreign Policy, explores the relationship between electoral cycles and the content and quality of American foreign policy. He is a principal investigator for a Department of Defense Minerva Initiative grant that funds a three-year project to map and analyze collaborative relationships between terrorist organizations. Professor Potter has recently published articles in International Studies Quarterly, Political Communication, The Annual Review of Political Science, and The Journal of Conflict Resolution. He has been a fellow at Harvard University and the University of Pennsylvania and holds a PhD and an MA in Political Science from the University of California, Los Angeles and a BA in Political Science and Economics from McGill University.

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Barry R ab e is the J. Ira and Nikki Harris Family Professor of Public Policy, Arthur Thurnau

Professor at the Ford School, and Director of the Center for Local, State, and Urban Policy (CLOSUP), with additional appointments in the Department of Political Science, the Program in the Environment, and the School of Natural Resources and Environment. He is also a non-resident Senior Fellow at the Brookings Institution. Much of his recent research examines sub-federal development of policies to reduce greenhouse gases in the United States and other federal systems. In 2006, Barry became the first social scientist to receive a Climate Protection Award from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency in recognition of his contribution to both scholarship and policymaking. Barry is a fellow of the National Academy of Public Administration in 2009 and served on the 2010 NAPA panel that advised Congress and the Commerce Department on the proposed creation of a National Climate Service. He teaches public management, environmental policy, and a seminar on climate change at the Ford School. A l e x L . R al ph is a Lecturer in Expository Writing at the Ford School. For over a decade he taught in the Sweetland Center for Writing and the English Department at the University of Michigan. In 2009 he received the English Department’s Ben Prize for excellence in the teaching of writing. Alex also serves as an instructor in the Public Policy and International Affairs summer institute. He received his BA from Swarthmore College and an MFA in Creative Writing from Michigan.

R achel Rosen is a postdoctoral fellow at the Ford School of Public Policy. Her research interests include issues in public education, including public finance, teacher labor markets, and math and science education policy. Currently she is working on a project that examines higher education outcomes associated with publicly provided scholarships for high school students. Prior to her doctoral studies, Rosen spent eight years as a researcher at WestEd. She holds an undergraduate degree from New York University, and masters’ degrees from both Trinity College in Ireland and Columbia University. She received her PhD in Education Policy from Teacher’s College, Columbia University in 2012. Craig Ru ff is a Lecturer in Public Policy. He is a Senior Policy Fellow at Public Sector Consultants, a Lansing, Michigan firm specializing in health, education, economic, and environmental policy. He was president of the firm from 1986 to 2006. Prior to joining the firm, he served for eleven years in the executive office of the governor, working primarily on human services issues and serving as chief of staff to the lieutenant governor. He is a member of the University of Michigan Alumni Association board. At the Ford School, he teaches courses on state politics and policies. Craig received his AB and MPP from the University of Michigan.

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Pat ricia A . Russ o uses her fifteen years of senior management experience in the private

sector to create unique learning opportunities for her students. She is the Associate Director for the Multidisciplinary Action Projects (MAP) Program at the Ross School of Business, University of Michigan. Patricia also teaches graduate and undergraduate courses in business communication for the Ross School and the Ford School. Prior to coming to the university, she held a variety of senior management positions at Borders Group, Inc. She holds an undergraduate degree in Film Studies and two master’s degrees in English, including an MFA in Creative Writing from George Mason University where she won the Dan Rudy Prize for fiction. Irving Sal meen is the Associate Director of the Science and Technology Policy Program (STPP). Since 2007, he has been a Research Scientist with the U-M Center for Complex Systems. His research interests are science, energy, and transportation policies. He teaches an undergraduate course on social-systems and energy, focusing on how culture and human choices shape technological systems and how the natural and human-sciences intersect to inform energy policies. In 2006 he retired, after 36 years, from the Scientific Research Laboratory of Ford Motor Company. From 1998–2006 he headed the Lab’s Systems Analytics Department, which worked on mathematical models to solve business and manufacturing problems; vehicle-software systems for interfacing drivers’ smart-phone devices; and vehicle-technology decision-problems from consumers’ perspectives. Prior to his management career, Salmeen was a staff scientist, studying aspects of air pollution science. His PhD is in Biophysics and his undergraduate degrees are in Engineering Physics and Mathematics, all from the U-M. Bob Schoeni is a Professor of Economics and Public Policy and the co-director of the Panel

Study of Income Dynamics, a national panel survey of families assessing issues of poverty, income, family formation, wealth, and health since 1968. His teaching and research interests include program evaluation, welfare policy, economics and demographics of aging, labor economics, and immigration. He worked previously at RAND, where he was Associate Director of the Labor and Population Program and also served as Senior Economist on the President’s Council of Economic Advisers in Washington, DC. Bob received his PhD in Economics from the University of Michigan. Surry Scheerer (LMSW) is a Lecturer at the Ford School, where she will teach a course

on professional development. She is a leadership and organizational culture consultant, trainer, and coach. Ms. Scheerer is a coach for custom programs at the U-M’s Ross School of Business Executive Education Program, the Tauber Institute for Global Operations, and the International Professional Fellows Exchange. Ms. Scheerer also consults with private firms on leadership development and organizational culture. Ms. Scheerer received her BS in Human Development and Social Policy from Northwestern University and her Master of Social Work from the University of Michigan.

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John J.H. “Joe ” Schwar z received his undergraduate degree in History from the University

of Michigan in 1959, and his medical degree from Wayne State University in 1964. Dr. Schwarz served his residency in otolaryngology at Harvard, finishing in 1973. He has been in private practice in Battle Creek, Michigan for 38 years. Schwarz served in Southeast Asia for five years, first with the U.S. Navy in Vietnam and as Assistant Naval Attaché in Indonesia. He then served with the Central Intelligence Agency in Laos and in Vietnam. Dr. Schwarz was a City Commissioner then Mayor of Battle Creek, from 1979 until 1986. He was in the Michigan Senate from 1987 until 2002, serving as President Pro Tempore of the Senate from 1993 until 2002. From 2005 to 2007 he was a Member of Congress. Dr. Schwarz was Chairman of the Board of Directors of the Alumni Association of the University of Michigan 2005–2007, and serves on numerous boards and commissions. He was a faculty member at Harvard for one year and holds 11 honorary degrees. In 2007, Dr. Schwarz served on the panel to investigate care at Walter Reed Army Medical Center, appointed by the Secretary of Defense, on the Governor’s Emergency Financial Advisory Panel, and chaired the successful 2008 Constitutional Amendment proposal allowing Human Embryonic Stem Cell Research in Michigan. As a lecturer at the Ford School, he teaches “Topics in Public Policy: Congress and State Legislatures.” Char l es R . Shipan is the J. Ira and Nicki Harris Professor of Social Sciences, Professor of

Political Science in the College of Literature, Science, and the Arts, and a Professor of Public Policy at the Ford School. He is also Chair of the Political Science Department. Prior to joining the faculty at Michigan, Shipan served on the faculty at the University of Iowa and held positions as a research fellow at the Brookings Institution and as a Visiting Research Fellow at Trinity College in Dublin. He is the author of Designing Judicial Review, co-author of Deliberate Discretion?, and has written numerous articles and book chapters on political institutions and public policy. He is currently engaged in a large-scale study of antismoking laws in U.S. states and cities and an examination of why some public policies have longer lives than others. Shipan received a BA in Chemistry from Carleton College and an MA and PhD in Political Science from Stanford University. C ar l P. Simon is Professor of Mathematics, Economics, Complex Systems, and Public Policy. He was the founding Director of the U-M Center for the Study of Complex Systems. He is the Director of the Science, Technology, and Public Policy Program in the Ford School. His research centers on the theory and application of dynamical systems: from economic systems in search of equilibrium, to political systems in search of optimal policies, the bio-demography of modern women, ecosystems responding to human interactions, and especially to the dynamics of the spread of contagious diseases. He was named the LSA Distinguished Senior Lecturer for 2007 and received the U-M Distinguished Faculty Achievement Award in 2012. He received his PhD in Mathematics from Northwestern University.

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Jeffre y Smit h is a Professor of Economics with a courtesy appointment in the Ford School. He received his PhD in Economics from the University of Chicago in 1996 and joined the Michigan faculty in 2005. Prior to coming to Michigan he was at the University of Maryland from 2001–2005 and the University of Western Ontario from 1994–2001. His research centers on methods for the evaluation of social programs such as job training for the disadvantaged. He has also written papers examining the labor market effects of university quality and the use of statistical treatment rules to assign persons to government programs. A l l an C . Stam is Professor of Public Policy and Political Science and director of the Interna-

tional Policy Center. His current projects include work on the 1994 Rwandan genocide, investigating leaders’ personal backgrounds and their willingness to take risks as heads of state, and modeling the effects of combat trauma on veterans’ propensity to engage in criminal behavior. He received his BA and a varsity letter in Heavyweight Crew from Cornell University, and his MA and PhD from the University of Michigan. He served as a communications specialist on an ‘A’ detachment in the U.S. Army Special Forces and later as an armor officer in the Army Reserves. He is a lifetime member of the Council on Foreign Relations. He is the recipient of the 2004 Karl Deutsch award, given by the International Studies Association to the scholar under the age of 40 who has made the greatest contribution to the study of international politics. He works as an occasional consultant to the Department of Defense. Ke vin Stange is an Assistant Professor of Public Policy. His research interests lie broadly in

empirical labor and public economics, with a focus on education and health care. He is currently doing research on college choice, changes in the health care workforce, new forms of college pricing, and K–12 funding. In the past, he has studied college dropout, fertility timing, college quality, and the determinants of participation in social insurance programs. At the Ford School, Stange teaches microeconomics, program evaluation, and higher education policy. Prior to joining the Ford School, he was a Robert Wood Johnson Scholar in Health Policy Research at the University of Michigan. He received undergraduate degrees in Mechanical Engineering and Economics from MIT and his PhD in Economics from the University of California, Berkeley. Mel St ephens is an Associate Professor of Public Policy and Economics, and a Faculty

Associate in the Population Studies Center and Survey Research Center, Institute for Social Research. His research intersects labor economics, household consumption behavior, and aging and retirement issues. His analysis of household consumption changes examines responses both to infrequent events including retirement, job loss, and loan repayment as well as to frequent income receipt including paychecks and Social Security benefits. Currently, his research projects include examining the impact of labor market activity on voter turnout, the impact of school law changes on educational outcomes, and consumption behavior in both the U.S. and Japan. He received his BA in Economics and Mathematics from the University of Maryland and his PhD in Economics from the U-M.

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Betse y St e venson is an Associate Professor of Public Policy at the Gerald R. Ford School of

Public Policy. She is also a Research Associate with the National Bureau of Economic Research, a Fellow of the Ifo Institute for Economic Research in Munich, and serves on the Board of Directors of the American Law and Economics Association. She served as the Chief Economist of the U.S. Department of Labor from 2010 to 2011. Stevenson is a labor economist whose research focuses on the impact of public policies on the labor market. Her research explores women’s labor market experiences, the economic forces shaping the modern family, and the potential value of subjective well-being data for public policy. Lu cia Tajol i is a Visiting Professor of Public Policy at the Ford School. She is an Associate

Professor of Economics at the Department of Management, Economics, and Industrial Engineering at Politecnico di Milano. She collaborates also with Bocconi University in Milan and with the University of Michigan, where she has been a visiting scholar and visiting professor many times. She is affiliated as Senior Research Fellow with Istituto di Studi di Politica Internazionale in Milan, and she is a member of the Scientific Committee of the European Trade Study Group and the Italian Trade Study Group. She graduated in Economics at Bocconi University, where she also received her PhD in Economics in 1994. Her research is mainly in the field of international trade and economic integration of countries. David Thacher is Associate Professor of Public Policy and Urban Planning. His research draws from philosophy, history, and the interpretive social sciences to develop and apply a humanistic approach to policy research. He is particularly interested in the use of case study and narrative analysis to clarify the ethical foundations of public policy. Most of his work has focused on criminal justice policy, where he has undertaken studies of order maintenance policing, the local police role in homeland security, community policing reform, the distribution of safety and security, and prisoner re-entry. Outside of criminal justice, he has also conducted research on urban planning and on adoption policy. He is currently studying the rise and evolution of the order maintenance role of the police, focusing on its origins during the rapid urbanization of the 19th century and its legal transformation during the 1960s and 1970s. David received his PhD from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Just in L . Thom as is a Lecturer in Public Policy. His general areas of interests include demography, social inequality, research methods, and statistics. His current work focuses on poverty, returns to education, and interracial marriage in South Africa. At the Ford School, Justin teaches courses in statistics and the analysis of household survey data. He received his BA from the University of Washington and is currently a doctoral candidate in Sociology at the University of Michigan.

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Meg an Tompk ins -Stang e is a Lecturer of Public Policy. Her research interests focus on the

role of private actors in the public and nonprofit sectors. Her primary research examines the role of private philanthropic foundations in influencing public policy and institutional change in the U.S., particularly in the field of public education policy. Other projects examine the rise of social entrepreneurship as an approach to social change, and the diffusion of charter school management organizations (CMOs) in California. In 2012–2013, she will be teaching “Qualitative Methods,” “Public Management of Nonprofit Organizations,” and “Values and Ethics.” She serves on the Faculty Advisory Board of the Nonprofit and Public Management Center. A l berto Trejos is a Visiting Professor at the Ford School. He holds a PhD in Economics from the University of Pennsylvania in 1994. As an academic, he has been in the faculty of Northwestern University and the INCAE Business School, where served as dean and as director of its policy think-tank. He has been published extensively in both academic technical journals and for practitioners, mostly on monetary economics, macroeconomics, international trade and development. As a policy-maker, he served as Minister of Foreign Trade of Costa Rica, and led the negotiation of DR-CAFTA, the trade agreement with the U.S. In private business, he is a senior partner at CEFSA, a leading macroeconomic consultancy firm. He also sits in the boards of various companies, including Costa Rica´s largest private bank, private equity fund, retail logistics firm, and financial newspaper. In international consultancy, he has served governments, international organizations and companies in 50 nations across the Americas, Europe, and Africa. Mar is A . Vinovskis is the Bentley Professor of History, Professor of Public Policy, and a

Research Professor at the Center for Political Studies in the Institute for Social Research. He has authored or co-authored ten books, the most recent being From a Nation at Risk to No Child Left Behind: National Education Goals and the Creation of Federal Education Policy as well as edited or co-edited seven books. Maris was the Research Advisor to the Assistant Secretary of the Office of Educational Research and Improvement (OERI) in both the Bush and Clinton Administrations in 1992 and 1993. He was a member of the congressionally-mandated Independent Review Panel for the U.S. Department of Education for Goals 2000 as well as No Child Left Behind. Maris is an elected member of the National Academy of Education, the International Academy of Education, the American Educational Research Association, and former President of the History of Education Society. He received his PhD in History from Harvard University. Susan Walt z is a Professor of Public Policy and was the 2008–09 Human Rights Fellow at University of Michigan. She is a specialist in human rights and international affairs with regional expertise on North Africa. Susan is author of Human Rights and Reform: Changing the Face of North African Politics (1995) and a series of articles on the historical origins of international human rights instruments and the political processes that produced them. From 1993–99 Susan served on Amnesty International’s International Executive Committee and from 2000–08 served on the national board of the American Friends Service Committee. Since 2009 she has served on the board of Amnesty International-USA. For several years she has been involved with international efforts to promote an Arms Trade Treaty regulating the small arms trade. Susan received her PhD in International Studies from the University of Denver.

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Janet Weiss is the Mary C. Bromage Collegiate Professor of Business and Public Policy and was founder and director of the Nonprofit and Public Management Center. She now serves full time as Vice Provost for Academic Affairs and Dean of the Rackham Graduate School. Her research interests focus on the management of public and nonprofit organizations and education reform. Janet has served as consultant to local, state, and federal agencies on policy design and evaluation in the fields of policies for children, education, mental health, and social services. She received her PhD from Harvard University. Mar ina v.N. Whitm an is Professor of Business Administration and Public Policy at the

University of Michigan. From 1979 until 1992 she was an officer of the General Motors Corporation, first as Vice President and Chief Economist and later as Vice President and Group Executive for Public Affairs. Prior to her appointment at GM, Marina was a Professor of Economics at the University of Pittsburgh. She served as a member of the President’s Council of Economic Advisers in 1972–73, and has been an independent director of several major multinational corporations. Marina received a BA in Government from Radcliffe College (now Harvard University) and her MA and PhD degrees in Economics from Columbia University. She is the recipient of numerous fellowships, honors and awards, and holds honorary degrees from over twenty colleges and universities. Her research interests include management of international trade and investment, and the changing role of multinational corporations, including the evolving concept of global corporate social responsibility (CSR). Her book-length memoir, The Martian’s Daughter, will be published in September 2012 by the U-M Press. Just in Wol fers will join the University of Michigan as a Professor of Public Policy and a

Professor of Economics in January 2013. Wolfers’ research interests include labor economics, macroeconomics, political economy, economics of the family, social policy, law and economics, public economics, and behavioral economics. Most recently, Wolfers was an Associate Professor of Business and Public Policy at the University of Pennsylvania and a Visiting Associate Professor at Princeton University. He is a Research Associate with the National Bureau for Economic Research, a Research Affiliate with the Centre for Economic Policy Research in London, and an International Research Fellow at the Kiel Institute for the World Economy in Germany. Justin earned a bachelors degree in Economics from the University of Sydney and his AM and PhD in Economics from Harvard University. Yu Xie is the Otis Dudley Duncan Distinguished University Professor of Sociology, Statistics,

and Public Policy at the University of Michigan. He is also a Research Professor at the Population Studies Center and the Survey Research Center of the Institute for Social Research, and a Faculty Associate at the Center for Chinese Studies. His main areas of interest are social stratification, demography, statistical methods, Chinese studies, and sociology of science. His recently published works include: Women in Science: Career Processes and Outcomes (Harvard University Press, 2003) with Kimberlee Shauman, A Demographic Portrait of Asian Americans (Russell Sage Foundation and Population Reference Bureau, 2004) with Kimberly Goyette, Marriage and Cohabitation (University of Chicago Press, 2007) with Arland Thornton and William Axinn, Statistical Methods for Categorical Data Analysis with Daniel Powers (Emerald 2008, second edition), and Is American Science in Decline? (Harvard University Press, 2012) with Alexandra Killewald.

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Guangjian Xu is a Visiting Professor at the Ford School. He is Professor of Economics and Vice Dean of the School of Public Administration and Policy at Renmin University of China. Xu’s research interests include macroeconomic theory and policy, public budget and taxation, and government regulation economics. He has published several books and about 60 papers and essays on economics and public management in academic journals and international conferences. Xu received his PhD in Economics from Renmin University of China. De an Ya ng is an Associate Professor of Public Policy and Economics. His research is on the economic problems of developing countries. His specific areas of interest include: international migration, microfinance, health, corruption, and the economics of disasters. Dean teaches Ford School courses in the economics of developing countries and in microeconomics, as well as a PhD course in development economics. He received his undergraduate and PhD degrees in Economics from Harvard University.

Gerald R. Ford School of Public Policy


E xc e l l e nce in so cia l scie nce r ese a rch, te aching , and po l icy e ng ag e me nt

sh el don H. Danz ig er Henry J. Meyer Distinguished University Professor of Public Policy, Director of the National Poverty Center, and Research Professor, Population Studies Center, Institute for Social Research

Research: Social welfare policies and the

Graduate courses taught: Social Welfare Policy

effects of economic, demographic, and

(PubPol 746) and Policy Research Seminar

public policy changes on trends in poverty

(PubPol 810). Undergraduate: Poverty and

and inequality.

Social Welfare Policy in the U.S. (PubPol 495).

Professor Danziger is one of the nation’s most respected researchers, mentors, and teachers on the causes and consequences of poverty, with a reputation for the careful application of social science research methods to pressing social problems. Danziger is the author and co-editor of numerous books and articles including: America Unequal;

Detroit Divided; Working and Poor; and Changing Poverty, Changing Policies. He is an elected fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, the 2010 J.K. Galbraith Fellow of the American Academy of Political and Social Science, and a John Simon Guggenheim Foundation Fellow. As Director of the Research and Training Program on Poverty and Public Policy, he teaches and mentors postdoctoral fellows from backgrounds underrepresented in the social sciences. He is currently studying the effects of the Great Recession on workers and families.

Ford School faculty profiles (2012-13)  

Ford School faculty profiles, 2012-2013. Learn more about Ford School faculty, including related videos, news items, and events: http://ford...

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