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Our

Faculty


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he faculty of the Gerald R. Ford School of Public Policy are an interdisciplinary group who meet the criteria of academic excellence in the social

science disciplines, are enthusiastic teachers and mentors, and take seriously the implications of their work for policy problems. Their broad research interests are demonstrated by the wide range of units with which they hold joint appointments—including economics, political science, sociology, history, math, business, social work, education, environment and sustainability, information, and urban planning. For more information on each faculty member, please visit us online: fordschool.umich.edu.


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Core Faculty Robert Axelrod is the Walgreen Professor for the Study of Human Understanding at the University of Michigan. He has appointments in the Department of Political Science and the Gerald R. Ford School of Public Policy. His areas of specialization include international security, formal models, and complex adaptive systems. Axelrod’s books include Harnessing Complexity (with Michael D. Cohen), Conflict of Interest, The Structure of Decision, The Evolution of Cooperation, and The Complexity of Cooperation. His work focuses on questions of how patterns of social behavior emerge. He draws on the current research in a wide range of disciplines, including biology, psychology, and computer science. He is a member of the National Academy of Sciences and former president of the American Political Science Association. He is also the winner of several national awards: in 2014 he was awarded the National Medal of Science, the “nation’s highest honor for scientific achievement and leadership” and in 2015 he was awarded an honorary Doctor of Laws degree by Harvard University. Previously, Axelrod was named a MacArthur Prize Fellow. He is a graduate of the University of Chicago and received his PhD from Yale University. Michael S. Barr is the Joan and Sanford Weill Dean and the Frank Murphy Collegiate Professor of Public Policy at the Ford School, the Roy F. and Jean Humphrey Proffitt Professor of Law, and faculty director of the Center on Finance, Law, and Policy. He’s also a senior fellow at the Center for American Progress. He served from 2009-2010 as the U.S. Department of the Treasury’s Assistant Secretary for Financial Institutions, and was a key architect of the Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act of 2010. He received his JD from Yale Law School; an MPhil in international relations from Magdalen College, Oxford University, as a Rhodes Scholar; and his BA, summa cum laude, with honors in history, from Yale University. Beth Chimera is a writing instructor at the Ford School. In addition to offering individual tutorial hours to graduate and undergraduate students, she teaches the “Introduction to Policy Writing” firstyear graduate course and the “Persuasive Policy Writing” undergraduate course. A New York City native, she has worked as a senior or contributing editor for a variety of national publications, as well as for the James Beard Foundation. She received her MFA in fiction writing from the University of Michigan, where she has taught expository and creative writing, and is the recipient of a Pushcart Prize for her short fiction. John D. Ciorciari is an associate professor of public policy and director of the Ford School’s International Policy Center. His research focuses on international law and politics in the Global South. He is the author of The Limits of Alignment: Southeast Asia and the Great Powers since 1975 (Georgetown University Press 2010) and co-author of Hybrid Justice: The Extraordinary Chambers in the Courts of Cambodia (University of Michigan Press 2014). He is an Andrew Carnegie Fellow and a senior legal advisor to the Documentation Center of Cambodia, which promotes historical memory and justice. Ciorciari served as a postdoctoral fellow at Stanford (2007-09), a policy official in the U.S. Treasury Department’s Office of International Affairs (2004-07), and an associate at the international law firm of Davis Polk & Wardwell. He holds a bachelor’s and juris doctorate from Harvard and a master’s and doctorate from Oxford.

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Susan M. Collins is the Edward M. Gramlich Collegiate Professor of Public Policy, professor of economics, and former dean of the Ford School (2007–17). Before coming to Michigan, she was a professor of economics at Georgetown University and a senior fellow in economic studies at the Brookings Institution, where she retains a nonresident affiliation. She is an international economist whose research interests center on understanding and fostering economic growth in industrial, emerging market, and developing countries. She is currently a member of the Board of Directors of the Federal Reserve Bank of Chicago, a member of the Council on Foreign Relations, and a research associate at the National Bureau of Economic Research. She served a term as president of the Association for Professional Schools of International Affairs (APSIA) from 2013-15 and, earlier in her career, as a senior staff economist on the President’s Council of Economic Advisers. Collins received her bachelor’s degree, summa cum laude, in economics from Harvard University and her doctorate from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Paul Courant is the Harold T. Shapiro Collegiate Professor of Public Policy, Arthur F. Thurnau Professor of Economics and Information and a Presidential Bicentennial Professor at the University of Michigan. Courant has served as provost and executive vice president for academic affairs, as university librarian and dean of libraries, as associate provost for academic and budgetary affairs, as chair of the Department of Economics, and as director of the Institute of Public Policy Studies (predecessor of the Ford School). He served as a senior staff economist at the Council of Economic Advisers from 1979 to 1980. Courant has authored half a dozen books and more than six dozen papers covering a broad range of topics in economics and public policy. More recently, his academic work has focused on economic and policy questions relating to universities, libraries and archives, and the effects of new information technologies and other disruptions on scholarship, scholarly publication, and academic libraries. He was a founding board member of both the HathiTrust Digital Library and the Digital Public Library of America, and is a member of the advisory committee of the Authors Alliance. Courant holds a bachelor’s in history from Swarthmore College (1968), a master’s in economics from Princeton University (1973), and a doctorate in economics from Princeton University (1974). Alan V. Deardorff is the John W. Sweetland Professor of International Economics and a professor of public policy. His research focuses on international trade. With Bob Stern, he developed the Michigan Model of World Production and Trade, which has been used to estimate the effects of trade agreements. Deardorff is also doing theoretical work in international trade and trade policy. He has served as a consultant to the U.S. Departments of Commerce, Labor, State, and Treasury and to international organizations including the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development and the World Bank. Alan received his PhD from Cornell University. Kathryn M. Dominguez is a professor of public policy and economics at the Ford School. Her research interests include topics in international financial markets and macroeconomics. She has written numerous articles on foreign exchange rate behavior and is the author of Exchange Rate Efficiency and the Behavior of International Asset Markets and Does Foreign Exchange Intervention Work? (with Jeff Frankel). She is a research associate at the National Bureau of Economic Research, is a member of the Panel of Economic Advisers at the Congressional Budget Office, and is the director of the Honors Program in the Department of Economics. She has also worked as a research consultant for USAID, the Federal Reserve System, the International Monetary Fund, the World Bank, and the Bank for International Settlements. Dominguez teaches macroeconomics, finance, and international economics at the Ford School. She received her PhD from Yale University.

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James J. Duderstadt is President Emeritus and University Professor of Science and Engineering. A graduate of Yale (’64 BSE in electrical engineering) and Caltech (’65 MS and ’67 PhD in engineering science and physics), Duderstadt’s teaching, research, and publishing activities include nuclear science and engineering, applied physics, computer simulation, science policy, and higher education policy. He has served on and chaired numerous policy bodies including the National Science Board, the executive council of the National Academies, and advisory committees for various federal agencies. He currently chairs the Policy and Global Affairs Division of the National Research Council and serves as a senior scholar of the Brookings Institution. He has received numerous awards including the E. O. Lawrence Award for excellence in nuclear research, the Arthur Holly Compton Prize for outstanding teaching, the National Medal of Technology for technological innovation, and the Vannevar Bush Award for exemplary service to the nation. He currently teaches in the program in Science, Technology, and Public Policy at the Ford School, and conducts research in the Millennium Project, a think-tank exploring the impact of over-the-horizon technologies on society, located in the James and Anne Duderstadt Center on the University’s North Campus. Susan M. Dynarski is professor of economics, education and public policy at the University of Michigan, co-director of the Education Policy Initiative, faculty research associate at the National Bureau of Economic Research, non-resident senior fellow at the Brookings Institution, and president of the Association for Education Finance and Policy. A prior visiting fellow at the Federal Reserve Bank of Boston and Princeton University, she currently serves on the American Economic Journal/Economic Policy Board of Editors and is a past editor of Education Finance and Policy Analysis, Journal of Labor Economics, and Educational Evaluation and Policy Analysis. Dynarski’s research focuses on financial aid, postsecondary schooling and labor market outcomes and the effectiveness of school reform on academic achievement. She has consulted broadly on student aid reform, at the Federal Reserve Board of Governors, Consumer Financial Protection Bureau, White House, Treasury and Department of Education. She has testified to the US Senate Finance Committee, US House Ways and Means Committee and President’s Commission on Tax Reform. Elisabeth R. Gerber is the associate dean for research and policy engagement and the Jack L. Walker, Jr. Professor of Public Policy at the Ford School, as well as a research associate at the Center for Political Studies, Institute for Social Research, with a courtesy appointment as professor of political science in the University of Michigan Department of Political Science. Her current research focuses on regionalism and intergovernmental cooperation, sustainable development, urban climate adaptation, transportation policy, community and economic development, local fiscal capacity, and local political accountability. She is the author of The Populist Paradox: Interest Group Influence and the Promise of Direct Legislation (1999), co-author of Stealing the Initiative: How State Government Responds to Direct Democracy (2000), and co-editor of Voting at the Political Fault Line: California’s Experiment with the Blanket Primary (2001) and Michigan at the Millennium (2003). She currently serves as vice-chair of the Regional Transit Authority of Southeast Michigan. She received her PhD in political science from the University of Michigan.

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Edie N. Goldenberg is a professor of political science and public policy. She served as dean of the College of Literature, Science, and the Arts from 1989-98 and is the founding director of the Michigan in Washington Program. Her research interests include voting turnout of millennials, and in 2017 she founded a Michigan group called Turn Up Turnout (TUT). Her most recent book is Off-Track Profs: Nontenured Teachers in Higher Education (MIT Press 2009), co-authored with John Cross. She is also author of Making the Papers: The Access of Resource Poor Groups to the Metropolitan Papers and coauthor of Campaigning for Congress. Edie served in the federal Office of Personnel Management. She is a member of the National Academy of Public Administration and a life member of the MIT Corporation. Edie served as director of the Ford School from 1987–89. Richard L. Hall is a professor of political science and public policy. His research interests focus on American national politics. He has studied participation and representation in Congress, campaign finance reform, congressional oversight, issue advertising, health politics, and health policy. He is currently writing a book on interest group lobbying and the role of political money in Congressional policy making. Rick is the author of Participation in Congress (1996). He is a recipient of the Richard F. Fenno Award from the American Political Science Association, the Pi Sigma Alpha Award from the Midwest Political Science Association, and the Jack L. Walker Award from the American Political Science Review. Prior to coming to the Ford School, he served in a staff role on Capitol Hill. At the Ford School, Rick teaches courses on the politics of policy analysis, policy advocacy, campaign finance reform, and the politics of health policy. He received his PhD from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Robert C. Hampshire is an associate professor of public policy at the Ford School, a research associate professor in both the U-M Transportation Research Institute’s (UMTRI) Human Factors group and Michigan Institute for Data Science (MIDAS), and an affiliated faculty member in the Department of Industrial and Operations Engineering (IOE). He develops and applies operations research, data science and systems engineering methodologies to public and private service industries. His research focuses on the management and policy analysis of emerging innovative mobility services such as smart parking, connected vehicles, autonomous vehicles, ride-hailing, bike sharing, and car sharing. He has worked extensively with both public and private sectors partners worldwide. He is a queueing theorist that uses statistics, stochastic modeling, simulation and dynamic optimization. Hampshire received a PhD in operations research and financial engineering from Princeton University. Jonathan Hanson is a lecturer in statistics for public policy at the Ford School. As a specialist in comparative political economy and political development, his research examines the ways in which, and the channels through which, political institutions affect economic performance and human development. In recent projects, he has explored whether democracy and state capacity complement or substitute for each other when it comes to improving human development and why authoritarian regimes vary significantly in economic and social outcomes. Hanson holds an MA in economics and a PhD in political science from the University of Michigan.

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Catherine H. Hausman is an assistant professor at the Ford School and a faculty research fellow at the National Bureau of Economics Research. Her work focuses on environmental and energy economics. Recent projects have looked at the economic and environmental impacts of shale gas, the market impacts of nuclear power plant closures, and the effects of electricity market deregulation on nuclear power safety. Prior to her graduate studies, Catherine studied in Peru under a Fulbright grant. She has taught statistics, a policy seminar on energy and the environment, and a course on government regulation of industry and the environment. She holds a BA from the University of Minnesota and a PhD from the University of California, Berkeley. Josh Hausman is an assistant professor of public policy and economics. His research interests are in economic history and macroeconomics with a focus on the U.S. economy in the 1930s and the Japanese economy today. Josh is currently studying the role of agriculture in the beginning of the Great Depression, and the effect of Japanese monetary policy on the housing market and household spending. Josh holds a BA in economics from Swarthmore College and a PhD in economics from the University of California, Berkeley. From 2005 to 2007 he worked as a research assistant at the Federal Reserve Board, and in 2010 he worked as a staff economist at the Council of Economic Advisers. Yazier Henry is a lecturer at the Ford School. As a public intellectual, scholar, strategist, political analyst, and professional human rights advocate, he has written and published on the political economy of social voice, memory, trauma, identity, peace processes, Truth Commissions, and international transitional justice. His current research and writing projects focus on how structural and administrative violence come to be institutionalized during post-colonial transitions. Among the courses Henry has taught at the Ford School are “Social Activism, Democracy, and Globalization: Perspectives of the Global South” and “Facilitating Dialogue across Faultlines: Race, Identity, Leadership and Socio-Structural Difference.” Henry gained his early advocacy experience in the international anti-apartheid movement. Brian A. Jacob is the Walter H. Annenberg Professor of Education Policy and professor of economics at the Ford School, and is co-director of the Youth Policy Lab. He is also a research associate at the National Bureau of Economic Research. Brian came to Michigan from Harvard University’s Kennedy School of Government; he previously served as a policy analyst in the NYC Mayor’s Office and taught middle school in East Harlem. His primary fields of interest are labor economics, program evaluation, and the economics of education. Brian’s current research focuses on urban school reform, with a particular emphasis on standards and accountability initiatives. At the Ford School, he teaches “Economics of Education” and classes focused on education policy. In 2008, Jacob received the David N. Kershaw Prize, an award given every two years to honor persons who, at under the age of 40, have made a distinguished contribution to the field of public policy. He received a BA from Harvard University in 1992 and a PhD in public policy from the University of Chicago. Valenta Kabo is a lecturer at the Ford School. Her fields of interest are comparative law, law and economics, and property rights and development. She earned her PhD in political science and public policy from the University of Michigan. She also has an MPP and a JD from the University of Michigan, and was a postdoctoral research fellow and program director at the Center for Public Policy in Diverse Societies. Prior to beginning her doctorate program, she practiced immigration law and worked as a researcher for an employee assessment organization.

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Andrew Kerner is a faculty associate at the University of Michigan Center for Political Studies, and teaches international relations at Michigan State University, in addition to his role as a lecturer at the Ford School. He writes about the politics of corporate finance, with a primary focus on the politics of foreign direct investment and the international investment disputes that arise from it. He also writes about the politics of macroeconomic measurement, and is currently working on a book project that explores the political implications of financialized retirement savings. Kerner earned his undergraduate degree in economics, cum laude, from Connecticut College and his MA and PhD in political science from Emory University. Paula Lantz is the associate dean for academic affairs and a professor of public policy at the Ford School. She also holds an appointment as professor of health management and policy in the School of Public Health. Lantz, a social demographer, studies the role of public policy in improving population health. She currently directs the University of Michigan Policies for Action Research Hub, funded by the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, which is engaged in a number of research projects investigating public policy approaches to reducing social inequities in health. Lantz is leading a project regarding the potential for and challenges associated with using social impact bonds to fund public/ private partnerships aimed at improving population health. An elected member of the National Academy of Social Insurance and the National Academy of Medicine, Lantz received an MA in sociology from Washington University, St. Louis, and an MS in epidemiology and PhD in sociology from the University of Wisconsin. John Leahy is the Allen Sinai Professor of Macroeconomics, a joint appointment between the Ford School and the Department of Economics. Much of his work considers the psychological side of consumerism, analyzing individuated, decision-making processes. Leahy is a leading authority on macroeconomics, having served as a coeditor of the American Economic Review and a visiting scholar to the Federal Reserve Banks of New York, Philadelphia, and Kansas City. He earned a MS in Foreign Service from Georgetown University and a PhD in Economics from Princeton University.

Stephanie Leiser is a lecturer at the Ford School. Her general area of interest is in public finance, budgeting, and financial management, and she has particular expertise in state and local tax policy, tax incentives for business, and other issues related to the taxation of business. She was previously a lecturer at the Daniel J. Evans School of Public Policy and Governance at the University of Washington, where she also earned her PhD in 2014. Stephanie has taught courses in public budgeting and financial management, tax policy, nonprofit financial management, and microeconomics. A Ford School alum (MPP ’05), she has also worked as a tax policy analyst for the Michigan legislature and continues to consult with leaders in Lansing on tax policy issues. Ambassador Melvyn Levitsky, a retired senior American diplomat, is a professor of international policy and practice at the Ford School; a senior fellow of the school’s International Policy Center and a faculty associate of the Center for Russian and East European Studies (CREES). From 2003 to 2012 he was a member of the International Narcotics Control Board (INCB), an independent body of international drug policy experts headquartered in Vienna, Austria and responsible for monitoring and promoting the implementation of the three International Drug Conventions. He is also a member of the American Academy of Diplomacy and the Drug Free America Foundation. During his 35-year career as an American Foreign Service Officer, Mel was Ambassador to Brazil from 1994–98 and before that held senior positions as Assistant Secretary of State for International Narcotics Matters, Executive Secretary of the State Department, Ambassador to Bulgaria, Deputy Director of the Voice of

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America, and Deputy Assistant Secretary of State for Human Rights. Mel also served in Germany and the Soviet Union. He directed US-Soviet Bilateral Relations and UN Political Affairs at the State Department earlier in his career. On his retirement, Levitsky received the Secretary of State’s Distinguished Service Award. Ann Chih Lin is an associate professor of public policy at the Ford School. She writes on immigration policy, and is especially interested in how states can create policies to recruit immigrants under federal guidance. Ann was co-principal investigator on the Detroit Arab American Study, a landmark public opinion survey of Arab Americans in Detroit, and a co-author of a book on the study, Citizenship in Crisis: Arab Detroit after 9/11. With David Harris, she is the co-author of the collection The Colors of Poverty: Why Racial and Ethnic Disparities in Poverty Continue to Exist. She is the author of Reform in the Making: The Implementation of Social Policy in Prison and the co-editor, with Sheldon Danziger, of Coping with Poverty: The Social Contexts of Neighborhood, Work, and Family in the African-American Community. She serves on national and local boards and was formerly a social worker with Covenant House in New York City. Ann received her PhD in political science from the University of Chicago. Sharon Maccini is a lecturer of public policy and director of the Ford School’s BA program. She has taught courses in public health, public finance, and applied microeconomics to MPP and BA students. As a health economist, her overarching research interest is the econometric evaluation of public health policies. Sharon’s research has focused on the impact of decentralization on health outcomes and public health, and the role of environmental conditions at birth on health and socioeconomic status in adulthood. Sharon holds a BA in political science from Brown University and a PhD in health policy from Harvard University. Eduardo Montero is an assistant professor of public policy at the Ford School. Originally from San José, Costa Rica, his interests are in development economics, political economy, and economic history, and his research centers on how variation in institutional arrangements, such as property rights regimes, affect development in Central America and Central Africa. Montero graduated from Stanford University with a BA in economics and an MS in statistics. He earned his PhD in economics from Harvard University.

David Morse is a lecturer at the Ford School, where he teaches expository writing and an undergraduate course on utopianism. Before completing a master’s degree in fiction writing from the University of Michigan, he edited for an educational nonprofit organization in Washington, DC, and taught English as a second language in Iwakuni, Japan. His fiction has appeared in The O. Henry Prize Stories, as well as magazines such as One Story, The Missouri Review, and Short Fiction. His play, Quartet, was performed in collaboration with the Takács Quartet and the Colorado Shakespeare Festival.

Yusuf Neggers is an assistant professor of public policy at the Ford School. His research examines questions at the intersection of development economics and political economy, with a focus on state capacity and the delivery of public services. Most recently, he served as a postdoctoral fellow in international and public affairs at Brown University’s Watson Institute. Neggers earned his BA in mathematical economic analysis from Rice University, his MSc in international political economy from the London School of Economics, and his PhD in public policy from Harvard University.

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Brendan Nyhan is a professor of public policy at the Ford School. His research, which focuses on misperceptions about politics and health care, has been published the American Journal of Political Science, Journal of Politics, and the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, among other journals. Nyhan is also a contributor to “The Upshot” at The New York Times; a co-founder of Bright Line Watch, a watchdog group that monitors the status of American democracy; and a 2018 Andrew Carnegie Fellow. He first arrived at the University of Michigan as a Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Scholar in Health Policy Research before joining the faculty of Dartmouth College’s Department of Government. Previously, Nyhan co-edited the non-partisan watchdog Spinsanity, co-authored New York Times best seller All the President’s Spin, and served as a media critic for Columbia Journalism Review. He received his PhD in political science from Duke University. Shobita Parthasarathy is a professor of public policy. Her research focuses on the comparative and international politics and policy related to science and technology. She is interested in how to develop innovation, and innovation policy, to better achieve public interest and social justice goals. Much of her previous work has focused on the governance of emerging science and technology, particularly those that have uncertain environmental, social, ethical, political, and health implications. She is the author of multiple articles and two books: Building Genetic Medicine: Breast Cancer, Technology, and the Comparative Politics of Health Care (MIT Press 2007; paperback 2012); and Patent Politics: Life Forms, Markets, and the Public Interest in the United States and Europe (University of Chicago Press, 2017). Parthasarathy has participated in innovation policy discussions in both the U.S. and Europe; most notably, her work influenced the 2013 U.S. Supreme Court case challenging the patentability of human genes. Her new research project focuses on the political machineries that shape the development and decision-making related to technologies for the poor, with a focus on India. She received her undergraduate degree from the University of Chicago and master’s and PhD from Cornell University. (On leave, fall 2018-spring 2019.) Natasha Pilkauskas is an assistant professor of public policy at the Ford School. Pilkauskas’ research considers how social policy might improve the developmental and life trajectories of low-income children. Much of her research focuses on the living arrangements of low-income children, especially those who live with grandparents. Past and current projects also investigate the role of family/kin transfers in helping families make ends meet; links between maternal employment and school outcomes; the effectiveness of the Earned Income Tax Credit; and the effects of the Great Recession on low-income households. Pilkauskas received a Master of Public Policy from Harvard University and a PhD in social welfare policy from Columbia University.  (On leave, fall 2018–spring 2019.) Barry Rabe is the J. Ira and Nicki Harris Family Professor of Public Policy and the director of the Center for Local, State, and Urban Policy (CLOSUP) at the Ford School. He is also the Arthur Thurnau Professor of Environmental Policy and holds courtesy appointments in the Program in the Environment, the Department of Political Science, and the School of Environment and Sustainability. Barry was recently a Public Policy Scholar at the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars and continues to serve as a non-resident senior fellow at the Brookings Institution. His research examines climate and energy politics and his newest book, Can We Price Carbon? (MIT Press) was released in spring 2018. He has received four awards for his research from the American Political Science Association, including the 2017 Martha Derthick Award for long-standing impact in the fields of federalism and intergovernmental relations. Barry chairs the Assumable Waters Committee of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and has served on recent National Academy of Public Administration panels examining the Departments of Commerce and Interior.

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Kaitlin Raimi is an assistant professor of public policy at the Ford School. A social psychologist, her interests center on how social motivations have the potential to promote or prevent sustainable behaviors. Raimi’s research focuses on how people compare their own beliefs and behaviors to those of other people, how the desire to make a good impression can influence people to mitigate climate change, and how adopting one sustainable behavior affects subsequent environmental decisions. She completed an MA and PhD in social psychology from Duke University and a postdoctoral fellowship at the Vanderbilt Institute for Energy & Environment at Vanderbilt University. Alex L. Ralph is a lecturer in expository writing at the Ford School. For over a decade he taught in the Sweetland Center for Writing and the English Department at the University of Michigan. In 2009 he received the English Department’s Ben Prize for excellence in the teaching of writing. Alex also serves as an instructor in the Public Policy and International Affairs (PPIA) summer institute. He received his BA from Swarthmore College and an MFA in creative writing from the University of Michigan. (On leave, fall 2018-spring 2019.)

Joy Rohde is an associate professor of public policy and history at the Ford School. Her research examines the relationship between the social sciences and U.S. national security policy since World War II. Her first book, Armed with Expertise: The Militarization of American Social Research during the Cold War (Cornell, 2013), investigates the Cold War origins and contemporary consequences of military funding for social science and foreign policy research. Her current research examines how developments in computing have changed international relations scholarship and policy, from early computerized simulations of war to contemporary big data surveillance programs. Rohde earned a PhD in history and sociology of science from the University of Pennsylvania. Stephanie L. Sanders is a lecturer and diversity, equity, and inclusion officer at the Ford School. Through the lens of critical race theory, Sanders’ research agenda examines students who transition from urban environments to rural, predominantly white, college environments. Her publications have appeared in the Journal of School Leadership, the American Journal of Health Research, IGI Global and Nova Science Publishers. As a practitioner and scholar, she is interested in pipeline initiatives, urban education, and diversity in higher education. Previously, Sanders served as assistant director for diversity and inclusion at Ohio University, and was most recently the associate director of diversity initiatives at Old Dominion University. She received her doctorate in curriculum and instruction from Ohio University and her master’s and bachelor’s degrees, in speech-languagehearing science, from the University of Central Arkansas.

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H. Luke Shaefer is director of Poverty Solutions at the University of Michigan, an interdisciplinary, university-level initiative that seeks to inform, identify, and test innovative strategies to prevent and alleviate poverty. He is an associate professor of social work and public policy whose research on poverty and social welfare policy in the United States has been published in top peer-reviewed academic journals such as the Journal of Policy Analysis and Management and the American Journal of Public Health. His research is supported by the National Science Foundation, the Abdul Latif Jameel Poverty Action Lab, the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation, and others. Shaefer has presented his research at the White House and before numerous federal agencies, has testified before the U.S. Senate Finance Committee, and has consulted with a number of the nation’s largest social service providers as well as numerous community-based agencies. His work has been cited in the New York Times, the Washington Post, The Atlantic, Vox, the LA Times, and many others. His recent book with Kathryn Edin, $2.00 a Day: Living on Almost Nothing in America, was named one of the 100 Notable Books of 2015 by the New York Times Book Review, and won the Hillman Prize for Book Journalism, among other awards. Charles R. Shipan is the J. Ira and Nicki Harris Professor of Social Sciences and professor of political science in the College of Literature, Science, and the Arts, with a courtesy appointment at the Ford School. Prior to joining the faculty at Michigan, Shipan served on the faculty at the University of Iowa, and he has also held positions as a research fellow at the Brookings Institution, as a visiting research fellow at Trinity College in Dublin, and as a visiting fellow at the United States Studies Centre at the University of Sydney. He is the author of Designing Judicial Review, co-author of Deliberate Discretion?, and has written numerous articles and book chapters on political institutions and public policy. He is currently engaged in a comparative study of antismoking laws in the U.S. and Switzerland and an examination of the effects of bipartisanship on public policy. Shipan received a BA in chemistry from Carleton College and an MA and PhD in political science from Stanford University. Fabiana Silva is an assistant professor at the Ford School. She studies the mechanisms that perpetuate (or mitigate) group-based inequality in the labor market, with a focus on social networks and employer discrimination. Current projects examine how employers reward the referrals of black and white job applicants, the relationship between employers’ racial attitudes and their hiring behavior, and the causal effect of an increase in social network size on the employment outcomes of Mexican immigrants. She is also working on a series of studies investigating how different ways of framing immigration affect attitudes towards immigration policy. Carl P. Simon is professor of mathematics, economics, complex systems, and public policy. He was the founding director of the U-M Center for the Study of Complex Systems and a former director of the Science, Technology, and Public Policy Program at the Ford School. His research centers on the theory and application of dynamical systems: from economic systems in search of equilibrium, to political systems in search of optimal policies, ecosystems responding to human interactions, and especially to the dynamics of the spread of contagious diseases. His current research centers on the spread of crime, the initiation of teen-age smoking, and health issues that affect SES. He was named the LSA Distinguished Senior Lecturer for 2007 and received the U-M Distinguished Faculty Achievement Award in 2012. He teaches calculus at the Ford School, including “algebraic aerobics.” He received his PhD in mathematics from Northwestern University.

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Molly Spencer is a lecturer in expository writing at the Ford School. A poet, editor, and literary critic, she has taught writing to students of all ages, and her poetry and criticism have appeared in Kenyon Review, New England Review, Ploughshares and other literary journals. Prior to her writing career, Spencer earned a master of public administration, and worked in large-scale public sector project management and legislative relations. She holds a BA in economics from the University of Notre Dame, a master of public administration from the School of International and Public Affairs at Columbia University, and a master of fine arts in poetry from the Rainier Writing Workshop. Kevin Stange is an associate professor of public policy. His research interests lie broadly in empirical labor and public economics, with a focus on education. He is currently doing research on college costs and pricing, earnings differences by college major field, vocational education and training, and the higher education market. In the past, he has studied community colleges, college dropout and persistence, college amenities and spending, the health care workforce, and unemployment insurance. At the Ford School, Stange teaches masters courses on microeconomics, program evaluation, and higher education policy. He received undergraduate degrees in mechanical engineering and economics from MIT and his PhD in economics from the University of California, Berkeley. (On leave, fall 2018– spring 2019.) Betsey Stevenson is an associate professor of public policy at the Ford School. She is also a research associate with the National Bureau of Economic Research, a research fellow at the Center for Economic Policy Research, a fellow of the Ifo Institute for Economic Research in Munich, serves on the Research Advisory Board of the Committee for Economic Development, and is a visiting associate professor at the University of Sydney. Betsey served under President Obama as a Member of the White House Council of Economic Advisers, advising President Obama on policy issues related to labor markets and social policy. She also served as the chief economist of the U.S. Department of Labor from 2010 to 2011. Stevenson is a labor economist whose research focuses on the impact of public policies on the labor market. Her research explores women’s labor market experiences, the economic forces shaping the modern family, and the potential value of subjective well-being data for public policy. David Thacher is an associate professor of public policy and urban planning. His research draws from philosophy, history, and the interpretive social sciences to develop and apply a humanistic approach to policy research. He is particularly interested in the use of case study and narrative analysis to clarify the ethical foundations of public policy. Most of his work has focused on criminal justice policy, where he has undertaken studies of order maintenance policing, the local police role in homeland security, community policing reform, the distribution of safety and security, prisoner re-entry, and the control of criminal justice discretion. He is currently studying the rise of American drug laws in the late 19th century and the transformation of police authority in the 1960s. David received his PhD from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Megan Tompkins-Stange is an assistant professor of public policy. She is the author of Policy Patrons: Philanthropy, Education Reform, and the Politics of Influence (Harvard Education Press, 2016). Her research and teaching interests center on K-12 education and nonprofit management, with a focus on the influence of private philanthropy on public education policy and reform. She received her PhD in education policy and organizationstudies from Stanford University. (On leave, fall 2018– spring 2019.)

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C o r e Fa c u l t y

Susan Waltz is a professor of public policy at the Ford School. She is a specialist in human rights and international affairs with regional expertise on North Africa. Waltz is author of Human Rights and Reform: Changing the Face of North African Politics (1995) and a series of articles on the historical origins of international human rights instruments. She also maintains the website Human Rights Advocacy and the History of International Human Rights Standards (humanrightshistory.umich.edu), hosted by the U-M. For some fifteen years she was also involved in international efforts to promote an international Arms Trade Treaty (successfully concluded in 2013). From 1993-99 Susan served on Amnesty International’s International Executive Committee and since 2000 she has served terms on the national boards of the American Friends Service Committee, Amnesty International USA and an executive committee overseeing the work of the Quaker United Nations Office, New York. Susan received her PhD in international studies from the University of Denver. Janet Weiss is the Mary C. Bromage Collegiate Professor at the Ross School of Business and a professor of public policy at the Ford School. She does research on policies to improve the leadership and management of public and nonprofit agencies. Weiss founded the Nonprofit and Public Management Center, and is currently the faculty director of the Nonprofit Board Fellowship program. She is a fellow of the National Academy of Public Administration, and has been a fellow at the Center for Advanced Study in the Behavioral Sciences.

Justin Wolfers is a professor of public policy and economics. He also serves as a member of the Congressional Budget Office Panel of Economic Advisers. Wolfers’ research interests include labor economics, macroeconomics, political economy, social policy, law and economics, and behavioral economics. Previously, Wolfers was an associate professor of business and public policy at the University of Pennsylvania and a visiting professor at Princeton University. He is a research associate with the National Bureau for Economic Research, a senior fellow of the Brookings Institution, a senior fellow of the Peterson Institute for International Economics, a research affiliate with the Centre for Economic Policy Research in London, and an international research fellow at the Kiel Institute for the World Economy in Germany. He is also a contributing columnist with the New York Times. Justin earned a bachelor’s degree in economics from the University of Sydney and his AM and PhD in economics from Harvard University. Dean Yang is a professor of public policy and economics. His research is on the economic problems of developing countries. His specific areas of interest include: international migration, microfinance, health, corruption, political economy, and the economics of disasters. Dean teaches Ford School courses in the economics of developing countries and in microeconomics, as well as a PhD course in development economics. He received his undergraduate and PhD degrees in economics from Harvard University.

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Adjunct Faculty Scott Atran is an anthropologist who experiments on ways scientists and ordinary people categorise and reason about nature, on the cognitive and evolutionary psychology of religion, and on limits of rational choice in political and cultural conflict. Scott has done fieldwork around the world, where he has interviewed the leadership and members of insurgent and extremist groups. He has briefed NATO, U.S. Senate and House, National Security Council staff at the White House, UN Security Council, EU Governments, World Economic Forum and others on problems of youth and violent extremism. He is tenured as Research Director in Anthropology at France’s National Center for Scientific Research (CNRS), Institut Jean Nicod − Ecole Normale Supérieure, in Paris. He is a founding fellow of the Centre for Resolution of Intractable Conflict, Harris Manchester College and Department of Politics and International Relations University of Oxford. His work and life have been spotlighted in the popular and scientific press, including feature and cover stories of New York Times Magazine, Chronicle of Higher Education, Nature and Science News. Reynolds Farley is a research scientist at the Population Studies Center, the Dudley Duncan Professor Emeritus of Sociology, and a lecturer at the Ford School. Farley’s research interests concern population trends in the United States, focusing on racial differences, ethnicity, and urban structure. current work focuses upon the revitalization of Rust Belt metropolises. He maintains a website His describing the history and future of Detroit (www.Detroit1701.org). He received his PhD from the University of Chicago. At the Ford School, Farley teaches a course on the history and future of Detroit.

Deirdre Golden is a lecturer at the Ford School and professor of health law at The University of Detroit Mercy Law School. She holds an MD from the Royal College of Surgeons, Dublin, Ireland; a masters in neuroscience and psychiatry from Wayne State University School of Medicine; and a juris doctor (2004) and LLM (2009) in corporate and finance health care, from Wayne State University Law School. Professor Golden is a State Certified Mediator and Facilitator, and a twenty-year member of the American Bar Association.

Neel Hajra is a lecturer at the Ford School. He is currently the President & CEO at the Ann Arbor Area Community Foundation. His background includes a CEO role at Nonprofit Enterprise at Work and several years as a corporate attorney at Ford Motor Company. He currently serves as a board member for the Council of Michigan Foundations and Washtenaw Public Health. In 2009 Neel was named as an American Express NGen Fellow, and in 2010 he was honored with an Aspen Institute Fellowship for Emerging Nonprofit Leaders. At the Ford School, he teaches about management and policy in the nonprofit sector. Neel received a BS in physics and a JD from the University of Michigan. John Hieftje, Ann Arbor’s longest serving mayor (2000-14), is a lecturer at the Ford School. In 2001 he initiated a long-term drive for greater efficiency that prepared the city for the Great Recession. Hieftje championed the successful Greenbelt Campaign of 2003 and the “Mayor’s Green Energy Challenge” that established Ann Arbor as one of the nation’s leading “green” cities. He was also a leader in the successful push for the expansion of public transit, bicycle infrastructure, and pedestrian safety. He has been recognized for his service with the Greater Detroit Audubon Society Conservation Award, the Michigan League of Conservation Voters Environmental Leadership Award, and the Great Lakes Renewable Energy Association Leadership Award, among others. Currently, Hieftje is co-chair of the Washtenaw County Continuum of Care Board of Directors and continues his work with other activists on state and local environmental issues.

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A d j u n c t Fa c u l t y

Rusty Hills is a lecturer at the Ford School. He is senior advisor to Michigan Attorney General Bill Schuette and has held a leadership role in the Department of Attorney General for 13 years serving two administrations. Hills was twice elected unanimously to serve as Chair of the Michigan Republican Party, during which the concept of microtargeting was first tested on a statewide basis. He spent ten years working for the Governor of Michigan as communications director and public affairs director, and was in charge of all State of the State speeches and messaging. He has attended eight national conventions, beginning in 1976 as a delegate for Governor Reagan. Prior to politics, he worked as a reporter and anchor for CBS and NBC television and radio affiliates in Lansing, Jackson, and Flint, Michigan, and in South Bend, Indiana. Hills has a BA in telecommunications from Michigan State University and a master of government from the University of Notre Dame. Daniel Raimi is a senior research associate at Resources for the Future and a lecturer at the Ford School. He works on a range of energy policy issues with a focus on oil and gas regulation and taxation and climate change policy. He has published in academic journals including Science, Environmental Science and Technology, Energy Policy and Journal of Economic Perspectives, popular outlets including The New Republic, Newsweek, Slate, and Fortune, and presented his research for policymakers, industry and other stakeholders around the United States and internationally. The Fracking Debate (Columbia University Press), his first book, combines stories from his travels to dozens of oil and gas producing regions with a detailed examination of key policy issues. Daniel received his master’s degree in public policy from Duke University and his bachelor’s degree in music from Wesleyan University. Craig Ruff is a lecturer at the Ford School. From 1986 to 2006, he was president of Public Sector Consultants, a Lansing, Michigan firm specializing in health, education, economic, and environmental policy. Prior to joining the firm, he served for eleven years in the executive office of Governor William G. Milliken, working primarily on human services issues and serving as chief of staff to the lieutenant governor. He chaired the Michigan Council for Arts and Cultural Affairs under Governor Jennifer Granholm and twice served as Governor Rick Snyder’s senior policy adviser for education. He was the first holder of the Griffin Endowed Chair in American Government at Central Michigan University. Craig received his BA and MPP from the University of Michigan. Irving Salmeen is a lecturer at the Ford School. He was previously associate director of the Science, Technology, and Public Policy Program (2012–2014) and a research scientist with the University of Michigan’s Center for the Study of Complex Systems (2008–2012). He retired (2007) after 36 years in the Ford Motor Company Scientific Research Laboratories. At retirement he headed the lab’s Systems Analytics Department, working on mathematical models for business, manufacturing, and vehicle problems. He holds a PhD in biophysics and BS degrees in engineering physics and mathematics from the University of Michigan.

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Surry Scheerer (LMSW) is a lecturer at the Ford School, where she teaches a course on leadership development. She is a leadership and organizational culture consultant, trainer, and coach. Scheerer is a coach for custom programs at the U-M’s Ross School of Business Executive Education Program, and is the coach leader for the Executive MBA program. She is a trainer and professional development coach for international exchange programs sponsored by the U.S. State Department Bureau of Educational and Cultural Affairs. Scheerer received her BS in human development and social policy from Northwestern University and her MSW from the University of Michigan. John J.H. “Joe” Schwarz is a lecturer at the Ford School. He received his undergraduate degree in history from the University of Michigan in 1959, and his medical degree from Wayne State University in 1964. Dr. Schwarz served his residency in otolaryngology at Harvard University, finishing in 1973. He has been in private practice in Battle Creek, Michigan for 42 years. Dr. Schwarz served in Southeast Asia for five years, first with the U.S. Navy in Vietnam and as Assistant Naval Attaché in Indonesia. He then served with the Central Intelligence Agency in Laos and in Vietnam. Dr. Schwarz was a City Commissioner then Mayor of Battle Creek, from 1979 until 1986. He was in the Michigan Senate from 1987 until 2002, serving as President Pro Tempore of the Senate from 1993 until 2002. From 2005 to 2007 he was a Member of Congress. Dr. Schwarz was chairman of the board of directors of the Alumni Association of the University of Michigan 2005–2007, and serves on numerous boards and commissions. He was a faculty member at Harvard for one year and holds 11 honorary degrees. In 2007, Dr. Schwarz served on the panel to investigate care at Walter Reed Army Medical Center, appointed by the Secretary of Defense, on the Governor’s Emergency Financial Advisory Panel, and chaired the successful 2008 Constitutional Amendment proposal allowing Human Embryonic Stem Cell Research in Michigan. Dr. Schwarz is currently serving on the board of directors of “Voters Not Politicians” a statewide organization working on a ballot proposal to end gerrymandering in Michigan Congressional and Legislative elections. Conan Smith is a lecturer at the Ford School. He has served as a Washtenaw County Commissioner and Washtenaw Parks and Recreation Commissioner since 2005, chairing the county commission in 2011 and 2012. Smith specializes in developing and leading intergovernmental partnerships to support economic and social justice policies and practices. As the executive director of Metro Matters (2004–16), his work was fundamental to the creation of the Southeast Michigan Regional Energy Office, Michigan Works South East, and the Regional Transit Authority of Southeast Michigan. He currently serves on the Governor’s Talent Investment Board (appointed), Michigan Saves (founding board chair), and Michigan Works! Association (second vice chair). Smith earned his undergraduate degree at the University of Michigan and his master’s degree in dispute resolution from Wayne State University. Denise Thal is a lecturer at the Ford School and will teach a course on budgeting and financial planning for mission-based organizations in the fall 2018 semester. She is executive vice president for business operations for Planned Parenthood of Michigan. Previously, she served as vice president for business operations at The Henry Ford, a large history museum complex outside Detroit. Thal has a master of public and private management (now called an MBA) from the Yale School of Management and a master of philosophy in economics from Oxford University, where she was a Rhodes Scholar.

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A d j u n c t Fa c u l t y

Katherine Walsh is a lecturer at the Ford School. She has a joint appointment with U-M’s Office of University Development (OUD) as both the director of student engagement and director of diversity, equity, and inclusion initiatives. As part of the University of Michigan’s five year initiative for creating a more vibrant campus, Walsh heads department-wide efforts toward implementing policies aimed at diversifying and creating more equitable opportunities for OUD staff, donors, and volunteers. Walsh also oversees all student philanthropy efforts and was the program designer for the nationally award-winning Development Summer Internship Program (D-SIP), which is now in its twelfth year. Prior to her work at Michigan, Walsh worked as director of alumni, coordinator of admissions, and part-time instructor at Saint Joseph Academy in Brownsville, Texas. She received her BA in history and BA in theatre from the University of Notre Dame, her MA from the University of Michigan Center for the Study of Higher and Postsecondary Education, and her MPP from the Ford School.

Faculty Associates William Axinn is a research professor at the Institute for Social Research, professor in the Department of Sociology and a faculty affiliate at the Center for South and Southeast Asian Studies, with a courtesy appointment at the Ford School. He is a sociologist and demographer whose research interests center on fertility and family demography. Axinn’s program of research addresses the relationships among social change, the social organization of families, intergenerational relationships, marriage, cohabitation, fertility and mental health in the United States and Nepal. He also studies the interrelationships between population and the environment and new techniques for the collection of social science data. More recently in his career, Axinn’s interests have evolved to include public policy applications of his research. His teaching centers on the family, the life course, fertility and research methods. Dr. John Ayanian is the Alice Hamilton Professor of Medicine at the Medical School and professor of health management and policy at the School of Public Health, with a courtesy appointment at the Ford School. He is the director of the Institute for Healthcare Policy and Innovation at U-M. The Institute incorporates over 500 faculty members from 17 schools and colleges at U-M, including the Ford School. Dr. Ayanian has focused his career on health policy and health services research related to access to care, quality of care, and health care disparities, and has served in key health policy advisory roles to state and federal government. In addition to his medical degree from Harvard Medical School, he holds an MPP from Harvard’s Kennedy School. Sarah Burgard is an associate professor and Director of Graduate Studies at the University of Michigan Department of Sociology and an associate professor of epidemiology, with a courtesy appointment as a professor of public policy at the Ford School. Her research focuses on the way systems of stratification and inequality impact the health of people and populations. Much of her work focuses on socioeconomic, gender, and racial/ethnic disparities in working lives and the relationships between working careers and health. She studies mental and physical health, as well as health behaviors, with a particular interest in sleep. In related work, she has studied the impact of recessions on well-being. Burgard also studies adult and child health in Brazil. She holds an MS in epidemiology and PhD in sociology from the University of California at Los Angeles.

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Fa c u l t y A s s o c i a t e s

David K. Cohen is the John Dewey Professor of Education in the School of Education and professor of public policy at the Ford School. His research focuses on the relationships between education policy and classroom practice in K-12 education, and on efforts to improve schooling. He was co-director of a national study of efforts to improve teaching and learning in high-poverty elementary schools. A nationally recognized authority on educational reform, Cohen taught at Harvard and Michigan State before coming to the University of Michigan. At the Ford School he teaches a class in education policy. David received his PhD from the University of Rochester. Stephen DesJardins is a professor of education with a courtesy appointment as a professor of public policy at the Ford School. He teaches courses related to public policy in higher education, economics, and finances in postsecondary education, statistical methods, and institutional research and policy analysis. His research interests include student transitions from high school to college, what happens to students once they enroll in college, the economics of education, and applying statistical techniques to the study of these issues. He is on the editorial board of Economics of Education Review, is a contributing editor to Research in Higher Education, and is the methodology section editor for Higher Education: Handbook of Theory and Research. DesJardins received a BS in economics from Northern Michigan University, an MA in policy analysis and labor economics from the Humphrey Institute of Public Affairs (University of Minnesota), and a PhD in higher education, also from Minnesota. David Johnson is the director of the Panel Study of Income Dynamics at the U-M Institute for Social Research’s Survey Research Center, with a courtesy appointment at the Ford School. His research interests include the measurement of inequality and mobility (using income, consumption and wealth), the effects of tax rebates, equivalence scale estimation, poverty measurement, and price indexes. He also worked for many years in the Federal Statistical System, including experience in administrative data linkages.

Amanda Kowalski is the Gail Wilensky Professor of Economics and Public Policy, a joint appointment between the Ford School and the Department of Economics. A health economist, she specializes in bringing together theoretical models and econometric techniques to answer questions that inform current debates in health policy. Her recent research advances methods to analyze experiments and clinical trials with the goal of designing policies to target insurance expansions and medical treatments to individuals who will benefit from them the most. Kowalski has been honored with a CAREER Award from the National Science Foundation and the Yale Arthur Greer Memorial Prize. Her research has received the HCUP Outstanding Article of the Year Award, the Garfield Economic Impact Award, the NIH Care Management Research Award, and the Zellner Thesis Award. Kowalski has been published in the American Economic Review, the Quarterly Journal of Economics, the Journal of Health Economics, and the Journal of Public Economics, as well as The New York Times, NPR, and The Wall Street Journal. She holds a PhD in economics from MIT and an AB in economics from Harvard.

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Fa c u l t y A s s o c i a t e s

Helen Levy is a research professor at the Institute for Social Research and the School of Public Health, with a courtesy appointment as a professor of public policy at the Ford School. She is a co-investigator on the Health and Retirement Study, a long-running longitudinal study of health and economic dynamics at older ages. Her research interests include the causes and consequences of lacking health insurance, evaluation of public health insurance programs, and the role of health literacy in explaining disparities in health outcomes. Before coming to the University of Michigan she was an assistant professor at the Harris Graduate School of Public Policy Studies at the University of Chicago. She is a research associate at the National Bureau of Economic Research and served as a senior economist to the President’s Council of Economic Advisers in 2010–11. She received a PhD in economics from Princeton. Daniel Little was chancellor of UM-Dearborn from 2000 to 2018, where he is also a professor of philosophy. He is a professor of sociology at UM-Ann Arbor with a courtesy appointment at the Ford School and research appointments in the Center for Chinese Studies, ICPSR, and the Center for Complex Systems. Little received his undergraduate degrees in mathematics and philosophy from University of Illinois in 1971 and his PhD in philosophy from Harvard University in 1977. He has written and lectured extensively on the foundations of the social sciences. His most recent book, New Directions in the Philosophy of Social Science (Rowman & Littlefield), was published in 2016. Kenneth Lowande is an assistant professor of political science, with a courtesy appointment at the Ford School. Lowande studies American political institutions and policymaking, and his published research includes congressional oversight, presidential power, and policy implementation. Lowande previously held research fellowships at Washington University in St. Louis and the Center for the Study of Democratic Politics at Princeton University. He earned his PhD and MA in government from the University of Virginia.

Brian McCall is a professor of education and economics, with a courtesy appointment as a professor of public policy at the Ford School. He is an economist whose research interests include applied econometrics, econometrics theory, economics of education and education policy, research design and quasi-experimental research, labor economics, social insurance, and health economics. McCall studies problems in both K-12 and higher education, including using econometric methods to model and evaluate intervention program effects. He is currently studying the effects of tuition subsidies on college outcomes, the determinants of college choice, and the impact of unemployment insurance receipt on re-employment and future labor market outcomes. McCall received his PhD in economics from Princeton University. Jeffrey D. Morenoff is a professor of sociology and a research professor at the Institute for Social Research (ISR), with a courtesy appointment at the Ford School. He is also director of the ISR Population Studies Center. Professor Morenoff’s research interests include neighborhood environments, inequality, crime and criminal justice, the social determinants of health, racial/ethnic/ immigrant disparities in health and antisocial behavior, and methods for analyzing multilevel and spatial data. In 2004, Morenoff won the Ruth Shonle Cavan Young Scholar Award from the American Society of Criminology for “outstanding contributions to the discipline of criminology.” He earned an MA and PhD in sociology from The University of Chicago.

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Alexandra K. Murphy is an assistant professor of sociology and a faculty associate of the Population Studies Center at the Institute for Social Research, with a courtesy appointment as a professor of public policy at the Ford School. In her research, she uses ethnographic methods to examine how poverty and inequality are experienced, structured, and reproduced across and within multiple domains of social life, including neighborhoods, social networks, and the state. Murphy is currently working on her book, When the Sidewalks End: Poverty in an American Suburb (Oxford University Press), an ethnographic study of the social organization of poverty in one suburb. Another line of research examines the causes and consequences of transportation insecurity. She received her PhD in sociology and social policy from Princeton University. Jason Owen-Smith is a professor of sociology, with an additional appointment as a research professor in the U-M Institute for Social Research and a courtesy appointment at the Ford School. Owen-Smith uses dynamic network methods with large scale data sets to examine topics relevant science policy, innovation, higher education, regional economic development and medical care. to He is the executive director of the Institute for Research on Innovation and Science (IRIS). In 2008, he received the University of Michigan’s Henry Russel Award, which recognizes mid-career faculty for exceptional scholarship and conspicuous teaching ability. He received his MA and PhD in sociology at the University of Arizona. Bob Schoeni is a research professor at the Institute for Social Research and professor of economics with a courtesy appointment as a professor of public policy at the Ford School. He is also the coinvestigator of the Panel Study of Income Dynamics, a national panel survey of families assessing issues of poverty, income, family formation, wealth, and health since 1968. His teaching and research interests include program evaluation, welfare policy, economics and demographics of aging, labor economics, and immigration. He worked previously at RAND, where he was associate director of the Labor and Population Program and also served as senior economist on the President’s Council of Economic Advisers in Washington, DC. Bob received his PhD in economics from the University of Michigan. Kristin S. Seefeldt is an associate professor of social work with a courtesy appointment at the Ford School. Her primary research interests lie in exploring how low-income individuals understand their situations, particularly around issues related to work and economic well-being. She is the author of Abandoned Families: Social Isolation in the 21st Century (Russell Sage Foundation, Working After Welfare (W.E. Upjohn Institute Press), America’s Poor and the Great Recession (Indiana University Press), as well as numerous journal articles. Currently, she is conducting research to understand how the decline of unionized jobs has affected the intergenerational well-being of families. Previously, Seefeldt was the assistant director of the National Poverty Center. Seefeldt holds a PhD in sociology and public policy from the University of Michigan and an MPP from the Ford School.   Mel Stephens is professor of economics, with a courtesy appointment as a professor of public policy at the Ford School. He serves as a research affiliate at the Population Studies Center and a faculty associate at the Survey Research Center, both within the Institute for Social Research. Stephens is also affiliated with the National Bureau of Economic Research where he is currently a research associate. He also is a member of the Academic Research Council at the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau. Stephens is a labor economist whose current research interests include consumption and savings, aging and retirement, education, the impact of local labor market fluctuations on household outcomes, and applied econometrics. He received his BA in economics and mathematics from the University of Maryland and his PhD in economics from the University of Michigan.

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Maris A. Vinovskis is the Bentley Professor of History and a research professor at the Center for Political Studies in the Institute for Social Research, with a courtesy appointment at the Ford School. He has authored or co-authored ten books, the most recent being From a Nation at Risk to No Child Left Behind: National Education Goals and the Creation of Federal Education Policy as well as edited or co-edited seven books. Maris was the research advisor to the assistant secretary of the Office of Educational Research and Improvement (OERI) in both the Bush and Clinton Administrations in 1992 and 1993. He was a member of the congressionally mandated independent review panel for the U.S. Department of Education for Goals 2000, as well as No Child Left Behind. Maris is an elected member of the National Academy of Education, the International Academy of Education, the American Educational Research Association, and former president of the History of Education Society. He received his PhD in history from Harvard University. Alford A. Young, Jr. is the Arthur F. Thurnau Professor in the Department of Sociology and a professor of African and African American studies, with a courtesy appointment at the Ford School. He has pursued research on low-income, urban-based African Americans, employees at an automobile manufacturing plant, African American scholars and intellectuals, and the classroom-based experiences of higher-education faculty as they pertain to diversity and multiculturalism. He employs ethnographic interviewing as his primary data collection method. His objective in research on low-income African American men, his primary area of research, has been to argue for a renewed cultural sociology of the African American urban poor. Young received an MA and PhD in sociology from the University of Chicago.

Postdoctoral Fellows Thomas Goldring is a postdoctoral fellow with the Ford School’s Education Policy Initiative. His research interests include school finance, educational accountability, career and technical education, and postsecondary achievement. Prior to his doctoral studies, Thomas conducted program evaluation studies for Berkeley Policy Associates (now IMPAQ International) and worked in technology consulting for Accenture. He received a bachelor’s degree in economics from the University of Cambridge and a master’s and doctorate in public policy and management from Carnegie Mellon University. Silvia Robles is a postdoctoral fellow with the Ford School’s Education Policy Initiative. Her research interests include the economics of education and labor studies. Her work focuses on the transition between high school and college and on barriers to higher education among under-represented minority and low-income students in the U.S. Silvia received a PhD in economics from Harvard University. Prior to her doctoral studies, she worked for two years for Innovations for Poverty Action, implementing large-scale randomized trials of microcredit interventions in Peru. She is currently researching summer programs for under-represented students in STEM and for-profit charter schools in Michigan.

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P o s t d o c t o ra l F e l l o w s

Richard Rodems is a postdoctoral fellow with Poverty Solutions, a University of Michigan-wide center housed at the Ford School. His research interests center on poverty, inequality, material hardship, social policy, racial disparities, and the welfare state. He completed his undergraduate degree at Vassar College, and earned his MSW and a joint PhD in social work and sociology from the University of Michigan.

Gloria Yeomans-Maldonado is a postdoctoral fellow with the Ford School’s Education Policy Initiative. Her research interests include early childhood, child development, and the contextual factors that accompany these experiences (i.e., the home, the community, and the classroom), especially for Latino families and children from disadvantaged backgrounds. Gloria is also interested in how advances in quantitative methodology can be applied to better understand these experiences. Most recently, she served as the senior research fellow for Strive Partnership, where she also worked with the Cincinnati Public Schools’ Performance and Accountability team on various projects that spanned PK-12. She was also part of the evaluation team of a quality preschool expansion program in Cincinnati, Ohio. Yeomans-Maldonado graduated with a BA in economics and math from the University of Arizona; an MS in economics from Louisiana State University; and a PhD in quantitative research, evaluation, and measurement from The Ohio State University.

Visiting Faculty Javed Ali is a Harry A. and Margaret D. Towsley Policymaker in Residence at the Ford School for the fall 2018 semester and a former Senior Director for Counterterrorism at the National Security Council (NSC). He has over twenty years of professional experience in national security and intelligence issues in Washington, D.C., and began his federal government career in 2002. During that time, Ali worked in the Defense Intelligence Agency, the Department of Homeland Security, and the Federal Bureau of Investigation. In addition to his role at the NSC, while at the FBI he also held senior positions while on joint duty assignments at the National Intelligence Council and the National Counterterrorism Center. Ali holds a BA in political science from the University of Michigan, a JD from the University of Detroit School of Law, and a MA in international relations from American University. Dudley Benoit (MPP ‘95) is a Harry A. and Margaret D. Towsley Policymaker in Residence at the Ford School for the fall 2018 semester. As the director of community development finance at Santander Bank, he is responsible for Santander’s Community Reinvestment Act (CRA) qualifying lending and equity investing. Previously, Dudley served as a senior vice president leading JPMorgan Chase’s commercial real-estate multifamily lending business. Early in his career, Dudley worked as a program manager at Seedco and MDRC. He currently serves as board chair and loan committee chair of New Jersey Community Capital, and as a board member with the Primary Care Development Corporation. Dudley holds a master of public policy from the Ford School and a master of business administration from Columbia University.

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V i s i t i n g Fa c u l t y

Celeste Carruthers is a visiting professor with the Ford School’s Education Policy Initiative. She is an associate professor in the Haslam College of Business at the University of Tennessee with a joint appointment in the Department of Economics and the Boyd Center for Business and Economic Research. Her research centers on education policy with crossovers into public economics, labor economics, and economic history. Through her recent and ongoing projects, she examines the effect of financial aid on college choices, career and technical education at secondary and post-secondary levels, and the conditional black-white wage gap as of 1940. She is a co-editor of Economics of Education Review, a member of the Association for Education Finance and Policy Board of Directors, and an affiliated researcher with the National Center for Analysis of Longitudinal Data in Education Research (CALDER). Carruthers earned a PhD in economics from the University of Florida. Louis (Lou) Fintor is a U.S. State Department Diplomat in Residence at the Ford School. He returns to the United States, having most recently served as spokesperson at the U.S. Embassy in Kabul, Afghanistan. Fintor joined the State Department in 2002 as a press officer in the Bureau of Public Affairs’ Office of Press Relations. He subsequently served as embassy spokesperson in Kabul (2005-06), Baghdad (2006-07), Islamabad (2007-08), and Sana’a, Yemen (2012-14). He also completed press officer assignments at Embassy Paris (2011); Consulate-General Istanbul (2011); Embassy Dhaka, Bangladesh (2008); the former U.S. Office Pristina, Kosovo (2008); U.S. Mission to NATO (2007); and U.S. Embassy Budapest (2003 and 2004). Fintor holds degrees in journalism from both the University of Michigan and American University. Broderick Johnson is a Harry A. and Margaret D. Towsley Policymaker in Residence at the Ford School for the winter 2019 semester and a partner in the Washington office of Bryan Cave. With over three decades of leadership at the highest levels of government, he served most recently as assistant to the president and cabinet secretary under President Obama. There, Johnson also was appointed chair of the White House’s My Brother’s Keeper Task Force. Earlier, he was deputy assistant for legislative affairs in the Clinton White House and previously held senior positions on Capitol Hill, during which time he drafted landmark legislation including the Family and Medical Leave Act and the Immigration Reform and Control Act of 1986. Johnson received his undergraduate degree from the College of the Holy Cross and his JD from the University of Michigan Law School. The Honorable Sander “Sandy” Levin is a Distinguished Policymaker in Residence at the Ford School in the winter 2019 semester, with support from the Harry A. and Margaret D. Towsley Policymaker in Residence Program. He comes to the Ford School having represented residents of Southeast Michigan in Congress for over 35 years. In that time, Levin was actively involved in the major debates confronting our nation including welfare reform, the auto industry rescue, China’s entry into the World Trade Organization, the Iran Nuclear Agreement and every critical economic policy issue. He chaired the House Ways and Means Committee including during passage of the Affordable Care Act, drafted the language to add enforceable labor and environmental standards in trade agreements for the first time, and successfully fought the privatization of Social Security. Born in Detroit, Levin earned a bachelor’s degree from the University of Chicago, a master’s degree in international relations from Columbia University, and a law degree from Harvard University. He developed a private law practice, served two terms in the Michigan State Senate, ran for Governor and served as an assistant administrator at the Agency for International Development before his election to Congress.

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2 018 –2 019 Fa c u l t y P r o f i l e s

V i s i t i n g Fa c u l t y

Phyllis Meadows is a Harry A. and Margaret D. Towsley Policymaker in Residence at the Ford School for the winter 2019 semester and a senior fellow in The Kresge Foundation’s health program. Since joining the foundation in 2009, Meadows has advised on her team’s strategic direction, provided leadership in the design and implementation of grantmaking initiatives and projects at all levels, and linked national organizations with experts in the health field. In addition, she has led the foundation’s Emerging Leaders and Public Health Program and advises and supports a variety of cross-team programming. A former public health officer for the City of Detroit, Meadows’ 30-year career has included serving as associate dean for practice at the University of Michigan School of Public Health, as adjunct faculty at the Wayne State University and Oakland University schools of nursing, and as a program director with the W.K. Kellogg Foundation. Yang Song is a visiting professor with the Ford School’s Education Policy Initiative. She is an assistant professor of economics at Colgate University, where she teaches on the economics of education, the Chinese economy, and introductory economics. She also specializes in development and behavioral economics, and has been published in Research in Economics and China Economic Review. Using empirical and experimental methods, her current work centers on evaluating education programs and policies and understanding how to improve educational equity, work efficiency, and learning outcomes. Song earned her BA in international economics and trade from Renmin University of China and her MA and PhD in economics from the University of Pittsburgh.

Emeritus Faculty John R. Chamberlin is a professor emeritus of political science and public policy. His research interests include ethics and public policy, professional ethics, and methods of election and representation. He taught the core course “Values, Ethics, and Public Policy” at the Ford School. He was the founding director of the Ford School’s BA in Public Policy program from 2007-2011 and the director of U-M’s Center for Ethics in Public Life from 2008-2011. John has a BS in industrial engineering from Lehigh University and a PhD in decision sciences from the Graduate School of Business at Stanford University.

Mary E. Corcoran is a professor emerita of public policy, political science, and women’s studies. Her research focuses on the effects of gender and race discrimination on economic status and earnings, and on professional women’s career trajectories. Mary has published articles on intergenerational mobility, the underclass, and sex-based and race-based inequality. She taught seminars on poverty and inequality and on women and employment. Mary received her PhD from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Sandra Danziger is the Edith A. Lewis professor emerita of social work and research professor emerita of public policy. Her primary research interests are the effects of public programs and policies on the wellbeing of disadvantaged families, poverty policy and social service programs, demographic trends in child and family wellbeing, gender issues across the life course, program evaluation, and qualitative research methods. Her research examines low-income families’ participation in public and private nonprofit programs and the role these programs play in addressing barriers to work and parenting, especially for single mothers. She was principal investigator on the Women’s Employment Study.

T he Fo r d S ch o o l a t Mi chi gan

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2 018 –2 019 Fa c u l t y P r o f i l e s

E m e r i t u s Fa c u l t y

Sheldon Danziger is president of the Russell Sage Foundation, which supports research to “improve social and living conditions in the United States.” He is also the Henry J. Meyer Distinguished University Professor Emeritus of Public Policy at the Ford School. He was director of the National Poverty Center and director of the Research and Training Program on Poverty and Public Policy at the Ford School. Danziger is a fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, a 2008 John Simon Guggenheim Foundation Fellow, and the 2010 John Kenneth Galbraith fellow of the American Academy of Political and Social Science. Among his publications, he is the co-author of America Unequal (with Peter Gottschalk, 1995), Detroit Divided (with Reynolds Farley and Harry Holzer, 2001) and co-editor of Legacies of the War on Poverty (with Martha J. Bailey, 2013). Danziger received his PhD in economics from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. James S. House is the Angus Campbell Distinguished University Professor Emeritus of Survey Research, Public Policy, and Sociology. His research has focused on the role of social and psychological factors in the etiology and course of health and illness, including the role of psychosocial factors in under standing and alleviating social disparities in health and the way health changes with age. He has been elected to the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, the National Academy of Medicine, and the National Academy of Sciences. At the Ford School he has taught courses on the relation between socioeconomic policy and health policy. Jim has co-edited Making Americans Healthier: Social and Economic Policy as Health Policy (with Bob Schoeni of the Ford School and others) and A Telescope on Society: Survey Research & Social Science at the University of Michigan and Beyond. He recently published Beyond Obamacare: Life, Death, and Social Policy (Russell Sage Foundation, June 2015). He received his PhD in social psychology from the University of Michigan. Marina v.N. Whitman is professor emerita of business administration and public policy. From 1979 until 1992 she was an officer of the General Motors Corporation, first as vice president and chief economist and later as vice president and group executive for public affairs. Prior to her appointment at GM, Whitman was a professor of economics at the University of Pittsburgh. She served as a member of the President’s Council of Economic Advisers (1972-73), and as an independent director of several major multinational corporations. Marina received a bachelor’s degree in government from Radcliffe College (now Harvard University) and master’s and doctorate in economics from Columbia University. She is the recipient of numerous fellowships, honors, and awards, and holds honorary degrees from more than twenty colleges and universities. Her research interests include management of international trade and investment, and the changing role of multinational corporations, including the evolving concept of global corporate social responsibility (CSR). She is the author of The Martian’s Daughter, a memoir, published by the University of Michigan Press in 2012.

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C ont a c t us Gerald R. Ford School of Public Policy University of Michigan Joan and Sanford Weill Hall 735 South State Street Ann Arbor, MI 48109-3091 Student and Academic Services: 734 764 0453 Graduate Career Services: 734 615 9557 Development: 734 615 3892 Alumni Relations: 734 615 5760 Communications and Outreach: 734 615 9691

Regents of the University of Michigan Michael J. Behm, Grand Blanc Mark J. Bernstein, Ann Arbor Shauna Ryder Diggs, Grosse Pointe Denise Ilitch, Bingham Farms Andrea Fischer Newman, Ann Arbor Andrew C. Richner, Grosse Pointe Park Ron Weiser, Ann Arbor Katherine E. White, Ann Arbor Mark S. Schlissel (ex officio) Š 2018 The Regents of the University of Michigan The University of Michigan, as an equal opportunity/ affirmative action employer, complies with all applicable federal and state laws regarding nondiscrimination and affirmative action. The University of Michigan is committed to a policy of equal opportunity for all persons and does not discriminate on the basis of race, color, national origin, age, marital status, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, gender expression, disability, religion, height, weight, or veteran status in employment, educational programs and activities, and admissions. Inquiries or complaints may be addressed to the Senior Director for Institutional Equity, and Title IX/Section 504/ADA Coordinator, Office for Institutional Equity, 2072 Administrative Services Building, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109-1432, 734-763-0235, TTY 734-647-1388, institutional.equity@ umich.edu. For other University of Michigan information call 734-764-1817.

Profile for Gerald R. Ford School of Public Policy

Faculty Profiles 2018-2019  

Poverty and economic development. Health and human security. Energy and the environment. Alongside their critical work as teachers and mento...

Faculty Profiles 2018-2019  

Poverty and economic development. Health and human security. Energy and the environment. Alongside their critical work as teachers and mento...

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