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Contents January 2011

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{ COVER }

PINNACLE ORTHOPAEDICS

Beyond the expertise of multiple specialties, years of experience and education, and the convenience of a local facility with the needs covered, what does a patient most look for when injured or in pain? Hope for full recovery.

{ FEATURES }

{ COLUMNS }

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Community

WOODSTOCK READERS’ CHOICE BALLOT it’s that time of year again! Let your favorite Woodstock businesses know how much you appreciate them! Vote online at www.aroundwoodstock.com 36

THE WOODSTOCK COMMUNITY CELEBRATES CHRISTMAS From visiting Santa to watching the annual christmas jubilee Parade, Woodstock residents enjoyed the holiday season!

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UNDER THE GOLD DOME EDUCATING OUR CHILDREN According to the national Assessment of Economic Progress, one-third of American fourth graders and onefourth of eighth graders are functionally illiterate. Folks, it’s time for a wake-up call! 14

A GEM OF A MAGNOLIA Woodstock mayor Henriques reminds us about the annual AmE church’s annual unity Breakfast to celebrate dr. martin L. King’s birthday and two great magnolias — ms. magnolia Thomas and the magnolia Thomas restaurant. 15

WOODSTOCK CHIEF OF POLICE Personalizing Law Enforcement — uniformed officers who patrol Woodstock’s streets and neighborhoods are available to respond to emergency situations.

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AroundAbout Woodstock | january 2011

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WOODSTOCK ASSISTANT FIRE MARSHAL Becoming a Woodstock firefighter — the challenges and rewards. 19

MAIN STREET WOODSTOCK A BETTER 2011 Think about the gleam in those eyes as they survived a year that might otherwise be considered below average for business and see the opportunity to build on moderate success for a better 2011.

Healthy Living 38

CUT YOUR CANCER RISK change the way you eat and you could reduce your risk of becoming a cancer statistic. 40

STRESS MANAGEMENT i challenge you in 2011 to explore new methods of managing your stress to help create a healthier tomorrow.


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Contents January 2011

editorial & art Publisher Herb Sims Art Director Tiffany Atwood Contributing Editor cherryl greenman Copy Editor Leslie Ratliff Graphic Designer Ashley george

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FREQUENT QUESTIONS ASKED OF AN ORTHODONTIST do braces hurt? When is the best time to schedule a consultation with the orthodontist? can i get my braces off sooner? dr. Kincaid gives you the answers. 43

IS OBESE AND OVERWEIGHT THE SAME? What is the answer and how can you make changes that will help your overall health? 44

THE TOOTH FAIRY dental implants, in many circumstances, are the optimal method to restore lost function and prevent future serious jaw bone disease.

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TO BATTLE OR NOT TO BATTLE is this battle, which at times rages within us, really ours to fight? 51

MOMS AND TOTS my idea for this month centers on tracking time with your kids. obviously, kids and adults view time differently. These activities might help bridge that gap. 60

FROM THE PASTOR When we are faced with all the unknowns of 2011, it seems foolish to not redouble our efforts to make things work out. But maybe “things” working out are not what life is all about.

Life at Home

sales Senior Market Manager janet Ponichtera

contributors Photographers Wendell Webb, Kim Bates, Andrew Edwards Writers Steven Anderson, david Bores, carolyn Boucher, carol Brazier, michael Buckner, jimmy Eley, donnie Henriques, dan jape, jeff Kincaid, mike Litrel, colin morris, Billy Peppers, chip Rogers, Laurie Troublefield, cathy Wendland-colby

VoLumE 8 | iSSuE 1 655 molly Lane, Suite 140 Woodstock, gA 30189 tel. 770-924-3131 fax. 770--924-3808 woodstock@aroundtownpublishing.com www.aroundtownpublishing.com

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TV ENTERTAINMENT Are you getting all the entertainment you could from your TV — you could add a few more bells and whistles to your system without spending very much money, or any at all. 48

DON’T FORGET THE DUCT WORK Proper duct work can make a huge difference in the comfort and efficiency of your home.

Faith and Family 49

EMERGENCY SURGERY FOR A MARRIAGE Know when to offer a heartfelt apology after a heated argument. 4

AroundAbout Woodstock | january 2011

In Every Issue 6 8 10 24 24 27 31 61

PUBLISHER’S NOTE AROUND TOWN CALENDAR BIRTHDAYS NOTABLE NEIGHBORS PRAISEWORTHY PUPILS ATHLETES ADVERTISER INDEX

Directory Listings 55 56 60 62

FAITH & WORSHIP ORGANIZATIONS LOCAL OFFICIALS CLASSIFIEDS

SuBScRiPTion, cuSTomER SERVicE, And SuBmiSSion inFoRmATion: AroundAbout Woodstock, a publication of Around Woodstock, inc., is a monthly community magazine and is a franchise of AroundAbout community magazine, inc. Around About Woodstock distributes more than 15,000 copies free by mail to homes in and around Woodstock and at local businesses in the area. Subscriptions are available for $20 per year. Send check or money order to Around Woodstock, inc., 655 molly Lane, Suite 140, Woodstock, gA 30189. Reader correspondence, editorial submissions, and advertising are welcome. However, we reserve the right to reject any contributed material. Letters and submissions chosen for publication may be edited and used in all print and electronic media. The deadline for each issue is the 1st of the month prior to publication. The viewpoints of the advertisers, columnists, and submissions are not necessarily those of the publisher and the publisher makes no claims as to the validity of any charitable organizations mentioned. Around Woodstock, inc. is not responsible for errors or omissions. no part of this publication may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means without written permission from the publisher.

© 2010 All rights reserved.


More inpatient surgeries than anyone else. Even major surgery doesn’t seem so major – not when you have world-class surgeons and the most advanced technology available. Not only do WellStar surgeons perform more than 40,000 procedures every year – more than any other health system in metro Atlanta – but they also train other doctors. They’ve shared their expertise on minimally invasive procedures with leading U.S. medical centers and on spinal surgery with doctors from around the world. Put the most advanced medical technology in their hands – including the da Vinci robotic surgical system – and you have world-class surgical care. Why would you have surgery anywhere else?

We believe in life well-lived.

wellstar.org

770-956-STAR

The vision of WellStar Health System is to deliver world-class healthcare. Our not-for-profit health system includes WellStar Cobb Hospital, WellStar Douglas Hospital, WellStar Kennestone Hospital, WellStar Paulding Hospital, WellStar Windy Hill Hospital and WellStar Medical Group.


john haigwood, www.haigwoodstudios.com

Publisher’s Note

Herb and Tracy Sims are the owners of Around Town Publishing. Herb has more than 25 years business experience and has been in the ministry for over 16 years. Tracy has been an air traffic controller for more than 20 years.

Last year meant many things to different people, but I doubt you made it through without becoming closer to those around you. Going it alone is not very effective when things become difficult. In the little town of Greenville, Georgia where I grew up (population 1500+/-), it was impossible to remain unknown. This was not always a good thing — until you really needed something and it was there without even having to ask. Why? Because we knew each other. When times are difficult, we need to know each other, and I hope 2011 becomes a year in which AroundAbout Community Magazine contributes to that good, life-filled way of knowing and being known. It is Knowing what is going to happen before it happens in AroundAbout; Knowing the trends that shape our experiences locally through AroundAbout so that you have a voice in what is happening; and Knowing about the extraordinary stories that form the life that drew you to the rich and vibrant Woodstock community in Around About. These are local stories filled with adventure, meaning and humor. And as always, we will be bringing you the voices of Woodstock through our local community writers who pour themselves into your lives on a range of subjects from heating and air-conditioning to words of faith. This knowing includes knowing the journey of small businesses owned and operated by your neighbors. Pinnacle Orthopaedics began in a small office several years ago and recently moved into a new state-of-the-art medical facility on Towne Lake Pkwy. This new building, at just over 33,000 square feet, houses the Pinnacle physicians’ offices, Pinnacle Physical Therapy and Occupational Therapy, and Pinnacle Imaging Center, including MRI. There are also plans for an Outpatient Surgery Center is scheduled to open in spring 2011. “We have been looking forward to this new office to better serve our patients with better space, equipment and technology,” says Dr. Michael Kuczmanski, managing partner - Woodstock. “This is a great asset to our patients.” See Pinnacle’s journey on pages 16-17. This month you have an opportunity to voice your positive opinion for the small businesses that have impressed you with their products and services by participating in our Readers’ Choice Awards. You get to pick the Best of the Best small businesses in the Woodstock community. Take a few minutes to fill out and mail our ballot on pages 32-33 or, for much less effort, go to www.aroundwoodstock.com and complete our online ballot. It is hard to know your neighbors. Like I wrote seven years ago in the first issue of AroundAbout Woodstock, “Life is chaotic; it has become more difficult for simple conversations, the kind that reveal what is happening around us and the kind that celebrate the successes and meaning of life. That is why each month we hope you will grab a cup of coffee and pick up your copy of AroundAbout Woodstock and get to know your neighbors.” n Herb Sims

publisher

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AroundAbout Woodstock | january 2011


In the Community

AROUND TOWN

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OPEN HOUSE Dr. Hugo Ribot and Dr. Malcolm Barfield recently hosted an open house at the Georgia Advanced Surgery Center for Women (1), in Cartersville. The open house offered an opportunity to tour the new facility that specializes in laparoscopic and other highly advanced, minimally invasive surgical techniques that spare women costly hospitalization, unsightly incisions and lengthy recoveries for hysterectomies, incontinence procedures and numerous other surgeries. For more information, visit www.GA-AdvancedSurgeryCenter.

Galloway, rfield, D.O., Matt Ba olm alc M . D : ht Left to rig Jr. M.D. and Hugo D. Ribot,

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WHS teacher Paul

McClendon

DAVISVISION Towne Lake Eye Associates is now a provider for DavisVision. This plan provides eye care benefits for employees of many large businesses including Comcast, Delta, Fed Ex and GE. For more informations, call 770-926-2858.

DERMATOLOGY IN THE HOME Lori Shackleford has recently partnered with Dr. Katie Rodan and Dr. Kathy Fields, the doctors who created Proactive Solution. Rodan + Fields Dermatologist is offering dermatology in the home at affordable prices. For more information contact Lori at 404-502-7129, or visit www.Lorishack.myrandf.biz, www.bestspentminute.com. 8

AroundAbout Woodstock | january 2011

LOCAL TEACHER FASHIONS NEW INVENTION Paul McClendon (2), a social studies teacher at Woodstock High School, was on a modeling job when he discovered the idea that led him to invent the ShurtClip. “During a shoot, my stylist noticed my shirt was too baggy, so she grabbed a binder clip — the same kind I use at school. While it did the trick in making my shirt more fitted, the back was a mess,” said Paul. After much thought and a few sleepless nights, Paul created the fashion accessory, which allows people to customize their clothing without the cost of professional tailoring. It works very simply by folding the extra material of a shirt toward the back, sliding the clip over the fold, and then tucking it in, making it invisible. The clip sits on the beltline anywhere you like underneath the belt, and it’s so small you can hardly feel it.

DRESS DRIVE Lindsey Haas, founder of Fairy Tale Endings, a non-profit organization that provides girls with dresses and accessories for formal dances, will host a dress drive January 24-29. The Sixes real estate agent said the idea came to her while watching an episode of “The Ellen Degeneres Show.” It featured a woman looking for a recipient for old formal dresses, and Mrs. Haas was faced with the same dilemma. “Plus, I was looking for something to do for charity,” she said, adding the nonprofit gives her the opportunity to work around her busy schedule. Lindsey is currently storing the dresses in her basement but hopes someone will donate retail space so the girls can experience a boutique-like atmosphere. Drop-off locations are Body Plex Fitness, 8811 Hwy 92, The Shake Place, 5947 Holly Springs Pkwy, and the Remax Town & Country in Bridgemill, 3760 Sixes Road.


In the Community

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BREAKING LAND

Construction recently began on the new, locally-owned and operated Lakeside Funeral Home (3) located on Claremore Drive near Hwy 92. Lakeside Funeral Home is being developed by Cherokee Funeral Home, LLC, a company owned by Kyle Standridge, Gary Standridge and Stanley Townsend. The new facility is scheduled to open in June 2011. The new 14,000 square foot traditional brick funeral home will sit on a pristine wooded site adjacent to Lake Claremore. Designed by Mark Robillard Architects of Canton, the funeral home will feature a chapel with 280 seats, a covered entryway, ample parking, a memorial fountain, and scenic views of the lake with access to a private dock for moments of reflection. “We felt the tranquil and serene site was the perfect location for our funeral home because the views of the Architect’s re lake and woods provide an excellent backdrop for commemorating loved ndering of fu ture Lakesid ones,” said Kyle Standridge. For more information about Lakeside Funeral e Funeral H ome. Home, contact Kyle at 404-354-5953 or visit www.lakesidefuneralservices.com.

LOCAL TOWN HALL MEETINGS Senate Majority Leader Chip Rogers, R-Woodstock, announced local Town Hall meetings. Senator Rogers will listen to constituents on issues facing Georgia, as well as update constituents on the upcoming legislative session. Since 2002 Senator Rogers has held more than 120 Town Hall meetings throughout Cherokee. January 20th January 27th

6:30 – 7:30 p.m. 6:30 – 7:30 p.m.

Woodstock Library, 7735 Main Street, Woodstock, GA 30188 Hickory Flat Library 2740 E. Cherokee Drive, Canton, GA 30115

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January

Calendar Things to do in Woodstock

specialEvents On-Going • GARDENING WITH THE MASTERS BOOK

Through Mid-January •

The cherokee county master gardeners’ resource book titled, “gardening with the masters: A Planner with Proven garden Techniques for Zone 7” is available through the cherokee county master gardeners. You may obtain a copy for $15 from the ugA cooperative Extension-cherokee county office, 100 north Street, Suite g21, canton, gA 30114. 770-479-0418

CHIP & DIP Bring your christmas trees and a shovel to Rope mill Park from 8 a.m. to dusk to drop off your tree and dip into the free mulch! Program runs through mid-january. Pick up free tree seedlings at the park on january 8 during the Bring one for the chipper event sponsored by the Keep georgia Beautiful campaign.

Through February • FAIRYTALE WEDDING SETTING FREE Barnsley gardens Resort is offering brides, who reserve six or more rooms, their dream destination wedding and reception free at the resort. 770-773-7480

January 3 • CRPA REGISTRATION Registration for February-April programs will begin monday, january 3. Participants can register online with a debit or credit card at www.crpa.net, by mail to the recreation center, or in person at the Recreation center at 7545 main Street, Bldg 200, Woodstock, gA 30188. 770-924-7865

January 11, 12 • “OUR TOWN” AUDITIONS Auditions for ages 16 through adult for “our Town”, a part of The Big Read in cherokee county, will be held from 7-10 p.m. call 678494-4251 for an appointment time. cold readings from the script. elmstreetarts.org

January 16 • BARRY SCOTT & SECOND WIND The cherokee Arts center, 94 north Street, canton, will present Barry Scott and Second Wind at 7 p.m. Tickets are $15 at the door. 770-704-0290, info@cherokeearts.org, www.barryscottonline.com

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January 21, 22, 28 and 29 • “THE SNOW QUEEN” The Elm Street Players will present “The Snow Queen” at the Woodstock community Auditorium, 8534 main Street, january 21 and 28 at 7:30 p.m., and january 22 and 29 at 11 a.m. and 3 p.m. All seats $9. 678-494-4251, www. elmstreetarts.org

church, 556 Arnold mill Road. 404-576-8817 or timothyblindoutreach@gmail.com

January 29 • BLOOD DRIVE Woodstock christian church, 7700 Hwy 92, will host an American Red cross blood drive from 9 a.m.-2 p.m. 770-926-8238

February 11, 12, 18, and 19 •

January 22 • WINTER WINE SERIES

“HELLO, DOLLY!”

The Barnsley gardens Resort winter wine series featuring Silver oak cellars offers intimate, communal style seating in the Rice House, where guests and winery experts are encouraged to interact with one another at 7 p.m. 877-773-2447

The Elm Street Players will present “Hello, dolly!” at the Woodstock community auditorium, 8534 main Street. dates/times include February 11, 12, 18, 19 at 7:30 p.m. and matinees on February 12 and 19 at 2 p.m. $11 adults, $10 seniors/students, $9 children 12 and under. 678-494-4251, www.elmstreetarts.org

January 29 • BLIND OUTREACH A community outreach center for the blind and visually impaired will have its first meeting on january 29. Transportation is available! The meeting will be held at Timothy Lutheran

AroundAbout Woodstock | january 2011

February 14 through March 26 • THE BIG READ IN CHEROKEE COUNTY Sponsored by the Elm Street cultural Arts Village and

more on page

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CALENDAR

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the Sequoyah Regional Library System. Activities, mostly free, to the community and public schools. 678-494-4152, www.elmstreetarts.org

by State Senate Majority Leader Chip Rogers

Education

February 15, 16 • “THE SECRET GARDEN” AUDITIONS Auditions for “The Secret garden” for ages 10 through adult will be held from 7-10 p.m. Prepare 32 measures of an up-tempo Broadway song and 32 measures of a Broadway ballad. cold readings from the script. call 678-494-4251 for an appointment time or visit elmstreetarts.org

February 21 • BABYSITTING WORKSHOP The cRPA will host an American Red cross workshop for ages 11-15 on how to be a prepared and responsible babysitter. 9 a.m.-3 p.m. $45. www.crpa.net

February 21-25 • CRPA NON-STOP ACTION CAMP The cRPA will offer a week of fun for children 6-12 at the recreation center from 9 a.m.-4 p.m. Early drop off from 7-9 a.m. and late pick up from 4-6 p.m. cost is $120. www.crpa.net

February 21-25 • WINTER SCHOOLBREAK WORKSHOPS A variety of theater, music and film/TV training workshops for ages 5-18. A great opportunity to build skills and learn something new from experienced metro Atlanta instructors. 678494-4251, www.elmstreetarts

February 25 • TEA WITH EMILY WEBB Enjoy a delightful tea with characters from “our Town” at Tea Leaves and on Thyme, 8990 South main Street more page 14 at 4:30 p.m. call 770-516-2609

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Twenty-seventh in math, 22nd in science and dead last— 32nd in reading. These are the literacy scale rankings for the United States among the top 32 industrialized nations according to the Organization for Economic Co-Operation and Development 2009 report. According to the National Assessment of Economic Progress, one-third of American fourth graders and one-fourth of eighth graders are functionally illiterate. Spending on education is not the problem. According to the U.S. Department of Education K-12 public education spending more than doubled from $221 billion in 1993 to $489 billion in 2007. Depending on which source you consider, U.S. spending per student ranks somewhere between first and fourth among all nations. To make matters worse, our nation is $13.8 trillion in debt and competing in a truly global innovation-economy where technology is king. Our competitors certainly understand the importance of producing educated students in a technology driven economy. As of 2004, the United States was producing about 70,000 engineers per year while China graduated 600,000 per year and India 400,000. Folks, it’s time for a wake-up call! The United States as we know it will not exist in 30 years if we do not radically change education. Yes, the United States will still be here but we will have become economic slaves to our debt-holders while our children will live in a nation with little opportunity and far less freedom. As Americans we have one major responsibility, to leave this nation better than what we were given. On this most important task, we stand at the brink of failure. So what do we do? How about a dramatic change in the way we educate children with the national goal of graduating 200,000 engineers and scientists every year by 2020? President Roosevelt challenged Americans to win a world war, and we did. President Kennedy challenged Americans to place a man on the moon, and we did. We have risen time and again to meet the challenges facing our nation. However, this challenge may require our greatest effort yet. First, let’s recognize where we are in education. Our current system was built in the 1920s to meet the demands of the emerging industrialized workplace where producing goods in a factory was the primary purpose. All students were to be educated to similar standards and the resulting high school graduates almost identical in their skills. Now some 90 years later, while most everything else has changed by quantum leaps, education has progressed only ever so slightly.

AroundAbout Woodstock | january 2011


In the Community Think about what we do. We take children based on their mailing address and send them to a brick and mortar building we call school. We divide the kids into groups of about 25 per class, based upon their age, and place them in a room. We then ask a teacher to take all 25 kids from point A to point B on the knowledge scale during the next 180 days, exactly. If our intent was to produce factory workers, this method would still be sufficient. Unfortunately this doesn’t work in a 21st century global economy. The average American classroom is filled with students from varied economic, social, and family structure backgrounds. Understandably each student has different learning interests and abilities. Asking a teacher to move each student from exactly point A to exactly point B is nearly impossible when we consider no two students are starting from the same place or have the ability to move at the same pace. Simply put, teachers need tools to reach every student on an individual basis. This can only happen with the transformation to digital learning. If we believe every student can learn, and I do, we soon realize this method of individual learning is perhaps the only chance we have to put America back on top in education. Embracing a transformation to digital learning will allow teachers to do what they do best, mentoring and coaching to the individual needs of each student. Governors Jeb Bush, R-FL and Bob Wise, D-WV recently brought together 100 national leaders from education, technology, and government to help create a set of standards for beginning this transformation to digital learning. I was honored to be chosen as one of a handful of lawmakers to take part in the Digital Learning Council. The premise is that personalizing education for each child, through the use of digital learning, allows students to learn at their own pace and style. The motto of the Florida Virtual School, America’s largest virtual school serving over 200,000 students, captures the essence of individual student centered learning “any time, any place, any path, any pace”. Whether a student is from an inner city or the most remote community in America, they deserve access to high quality and rigorous courses in every subject. With digital learning this standard of access is possible. A high achieving high school junior in downtown Chicago can learn physics from an M.I.T. professor in Boston, while the teacher of incoming first-graders in New Orleans can create an individual lesson plan to make sure every student is reading within eight weeks. Regardless of zip code, race, gender, socio-economic background, or special needs, digital learning can become the great equalizer. It can truly lift all boats and in doing so, transform American education. The time is now and the cost of inaction could be catastrophic.

chip Rogers is the State Senator for district 21. You may contact him by phone at 404-463-1378 or by e-mail at chiprogers21@comcast.net.

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CALENDAR

In the Community

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to make reservations. Ticket includes full tea, treats, tax, gratuity and a ticket to see a performance of the play in march! 678-494-4251, www.elmstreetarts

February 26 • GUNS AND HOSES 5K RUN/WALK The cherokee county fire department, “hoses,” and county Sheriff’s department, “guns,” and the cRPA will host the fifth annual 5K run/walk at Hobgood Park. 770-924-7768

February 26 • WINTER WINE SERIES The Barnsley gardens Resort winter wine series featuring the Hess Family Vineyards offers an intimate, communal style seating in the Rice House, where guests and winery experts are encouraged to interact with one another at 7 p.m. 877-773-2447

March 12 • WINTER WINE SERIES The Barnsley gardens Resort winter wine series featuring Blue Rock Vineyards offers intimate, communal style seating in the Rice House, where guests and winery experts are encouraged to interact with one another at 7 p.m. 877-773-2447

March 26 • WINTER WINE SERIES The Barnsley gardens Resort winter wine series featuring Stephen Ross Wine cellars offers intimate, communal style seating, in the Rice House, where guests and winery experts are encouraged to interact with one another at 7 p.m. 877-773-2447

by Mayor Donnie Henriques First, my annual congratulations to Pastor Carl Moore, and his AME Church on Arnold Mill. Each year, during January, to celebrate Dr. Martin L. King’s birthday, the church holds a Unity Breakfast that brings together people from all walks of life to share their commonality. In addition, money is raised for a scholarship program that has been instrumental in helping the education path many young people of Woodstock and Cherokee donnie Henriques is the mayor of County have taken. Pastor Moore, who I’ve been Woodstock. You may contact him by calling 770-592-6001 or e-mail honored to call my friend for over 10 years, and dhenriques@woodstockga.gov his congregation, put on a great show during the breakfast. I call it that because many of the voices heard singing that morning belong on a Broadway stage. Secondly, the church also has helped sponsor an educational tea at the Magnolia Thomas restaurant, which was started last year. During the tea speakers are heard expanding the knowledge of the accomplishments of our African American residents, both present and past. Last year, the honoree was Ms. Magnolia Thomas herself. It was fitting that she was honored first since it took place at the site of where her lifetime home was. Unfortunately, the original house burned down in 2007. However, the city, who owns the property, did rebuild her home to look as it did during its lifetime, at least from the outside. Inside, with the help of the Historical Society, we tried to make it appear as original as possible, while remembering that its current occupant is a fine dining restaurant. Oh, what a restaurant! If you have not been there, please treat yourself and your family to one of the finest meals in all of Metro Atlanta, if not the South. Brothers Tom and Bill have captured what was good about the old South’s food, mixed in some new and fresh ideas, and have come up with an establishment that has something for everyone. Chef Anthony, who must work at least 100 hours a week, puts out a dish that you can count on being the best you’ve ever had, no matter what the ingredients. With an extensive wine list and a hard working staff, your visit will not fail to make you want to come back. Lastly, one of the things we, the city, want to do with the restaurant, is honor Ms. Magnolia with an on-going display of memorabilia gathered throughout her lifetime. Samples of her writings, as well as personal effects will go on display and be constantly rotated so you can discover something new about this great Woodstockian who meant so much to the education of young African American ladies. Please, do yourself a favor, visit a “Gem of a Magnolia” — make that two Magnolia’s.

WANT TO SEE MORE? Visit www.aroundaboutwoodstock.com!

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AroundAbout Woodstock | january 2011


In the Community

Personalizing Law Enforcement by David Bores As I discussed last year, the most visible and active representatives of your police department are the uniformed officers who patrol Woodstock’s streets and neighborhoods, who are available to respond to emergency situations, and You may contact Woodstock Chief of who answered the nearly Police David Bores at the new City Hall Annex on Highway 92, or you may call 30,000 calls from citizens for 770-592-6012. assistance in 2010. In 2010 we not only assigned the same officers to each of the four zones in the city, we also assigned an officer to each of the major subdivisions within the city. These subdivisions are: Brookshire, Alta Ridgewalk, the Magnolias, Deer Run, the Heights, Woodlands, Alta Woods, the Cottages, Kingsgate I & II, Hedgewood, Serenade, and Weatherstone. Officers assigned to these neighborhoods have several responsibilities to provide services that are tailored to the needs of local residents. For example, officers meet with home-owner representatives or apartment managers and attend HOA and apartment meetings; are the liaison between the HOA and other city service providers; help promote the Nation of Neighbors program; coordinate the delivery of specific crime prevention programs and other classes offered by the department; and arrange for the use of our speed trailer and message boards for traffic-related issues. During the past summer, we presented the Citizens Police Academy at the Woodlands subdivision and, because of the enthusiasm of the students in attendance, we have since initiated a new Auxiliary Program of citizen volunteers to support our operations. This outreach program of uniformed officers is called PACT for Police and Citizens Together. It represents our attempt to better extend police services to law abiding citizens and to further enhance our ability to address the needs of all Woodstock residents. By assigning officers to specific neighborhoods, it is our intent to personalize our relationship with residents so that we can be more responsive to local needs. Also during 2010, we have reached out to Woodstock residents through the Nation of Neighbors program. This represents an updated, electronic version of the old Neighborhood Watch. Under this new program, neighbors are able to communicate by using their home computers with other neighbors within their subdivisions and with the police de

partment to exchange information about suspicious activity and other quality of life issues. To date, nearly 500 Woodstock families have enrolled in this free program to alert each other to matters of mutual concern. In addition, over 1,000 residents have enrolled to receive our updates on Twitter, Nixle, and Facebook. It is our hope that these outreach programs will be further expanded in 2011 as more citizens learn of the benefits of forming partnerships with their police department.

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COVER

Photos courtesy of Andrew Edwards, Andrew Edwards Photography, www.andrewedwardsphoto.com

New facility offers hope

for the hurting Hope for an active life can be hard to realize when

Woodstock Pinnacle Physicians Not Pictured: Clark H. Glass, M.D., Stanley H. Dysart, M.D., Samuel Fleming, M.D., Alan R. Swayze, M.D., John Schnars, M.D. 16

you have just suffered a painful injury. But the physicians and staff at Pinnacle Orthopaedics in Woodstock have been restoring hope in the midst of pain for over 10 years.

AroundAbout Woodstock | january 2011


Y

ou can see that hope in the story of Dick Travis who was injured in a snowmobile accident while visiting his daughter in Jackson Hole, Wyoming. His wife, Tiss Travis, wrote to Pinnacle, “When we got home, the pain became so unbearable that we decided to contact a friend that worked for Pinnacle Orthopaedics, and luckily we were able to see Dr. Kuczmanski the very same day. After the examination, Dr. K — as everyone so fondly calls him — told us that Dick had a torn rotator cuff. Surgery was scheduled in April and the rotator cuff — along with a tear in his bicep — was expertly repaired; by August, Dick had recovered completely. We feel the key to his successful recovery was the excellent therapist, staff, and the surgical skills of Dr. Kuczmanski. Thank you so much for giving my husband his life back,” says Tiss Travis. Recently Pinnacle relocated to its new-state-of-the-art facility in Woodstock. The new Pinnacle Building is at 1505 Stone Bridge Parkway next to Walgreens at Towne Lake Parkway and I-575. “We have seen the area grow and we have grown with it,” states senior Pinnacle physician, Dr. Paul Payne. Originally in an upstairs office on Hwy 92, Dr. Payne relates, “We outgrew that office and have been growing ever since.” The new building, at just over 33,000 square feet, houses the Pinnacle physicians’ offices, Pinnacle Physical Therapy and Occupational Therapy, and Pinnacle Imaging Center, including MRI. There are also plans for an Outpatient Surgery Center to open in spring 2011. “We have been looking forward to this new office to better serve our patients with better space, equipment and technology,” says Dr. Michael Kuczmanski, managing partner — Woodstock. “This is a great asset to our patients.” Dr. Kuczmanski comments, “Our desire for opening new offices in the area is to offer more convenient and comprehensive care to our local community. We will be offering care for

all orthopaedic issues from head to toe and for children to the elderly. We now have on-site MRI and complete rehabilitation services right in the office, so we have everything a patient needs under one roof.” Beyond the expertise of multiple specialties, years of experience and education, and the convenience of a local facility with all needs covered, what does a patient most look for when injured or in pain? Hope for full recovery. Recently, a local high school football player was injured in the last game of his senior year. Dr. K relates the story: “He came in with a torn ACL, a pretty serious injury, and we quickly concluded he wouldn’t be playing basketball after the football season, which was a big disappointment for him and his family. But, with surgery, rehab, and some time, I was able to give him hope that he would go on to play college football,” says Dr. K. Knowing your doctor believes in what he does, and having the ability to impart that hope to you, can make all the difference in the recovery process, regardless of the type of injury or illness.

tive lifestyles,” says Dr. Payne. That’s what the Woodstock community has gained through Pinnacle’s investment in our community – long-term expert medical relationships and the hope of an active and full life. When asked what makes him most fulfilled in being an orthopaedic

Back Row: Michael L. Kuczmanski, M.D., O. Scott Swayze, M.D., Craig M. Chebuhar, M.D., John Day, M.D., Javier Reto, M.D., Front Row: Mark W. Diehl, M.D., Jessica Bilotta, M.D., William Terrell, M.D., Paul J. Payne, M.D., and James R. Malcolm, M.D.

“Our desire for opening new offices in the area is to offer more convenient and comprehensive care to our local community. We will be offering care for all orthopaedic issues from head to toe and for children to the elderly. We now have on-site MRI and complete rehabilitation services right in the office, so we have everything a patient needs under one roof.” — Dr. Kuczmanski

Being a part of the community as long as Pinnacle has, has made it possible to see multiple generations of families treated at the practice. One local family experienced the care of the doctors at Pinnacle through three members — grandfather, son and grandson — all needing surgical treatment for shoulder injuries. “They happened years apart and for various reasons, but I operated on all three of them and they all came through it able to return to their respective ac-

surgeon, Dr. K shares, “Watching patients go through the process and come out healthy on the other side makes it fulfilling and keeps me going. Being injured is tough, but coming through it healthy is what’s important.” If you find yourself in need of orthopaedic care, Pinnacle Orthopaedics is here to serve you and your family, right in your own neighborhood. You can find the practice on the Web at www.pinnacle-ortho.com or call the office at 770-926-9112. www.aroundtownpublishing.com 17


In the Community

beCOMING a Woodstock Firefighter by Jimmy Eley PART 2 — Last month we discussed a firefighter’s work schedule and pre-incident activities, this month we will talk about training and prevention activities. Training is the second category in our pre-incident activities. Emergency ser- Jimmy Eley is the assistant fire vices are, by nature, high marshal for the city of Woodstock. risk and unpredictable. The You may reach him by phone at average firefighter in the city 770-926-2017. of Woodstock spends approximately 400 hours per year in training. This training includes live fire training, emergency medical training, training on hazardous materials, rope rescue, and the list goes on. We participate in tabletop exercises and full scale drills with outside agencies like the Woodstock Police Department, Department of Public Works, Georgia Emergency Management Agency, and Cherokee County Fire Department in order to increase our ability to handle large scale emergencies like the floods in 2009. The prevention activities may be the most beneficial of all the pre-incident activities. Our fire crews make fire safety presentations to hundreds of people each year. We participate with several other agencies in events including Ghost Out, visiting high schools to demonstrate the dangers of drinking and driving, performing life safety inspections, and doing preemergency plans on all commercial buildings in the city. During our pre-planning and inspections, we look for conditions that commonly cause fires, while also looking for hazardous conditions that may hamper fire fighting operations. After the incident is over, the fire department has the responsibility to investigate and report the cause of the fire. We must use a mixture of scientific detective work to sort through the array of melted and broken artifacts to determine what caused that fire. If it was intentionally set, we will work with the police to get a conviction. The fire-cause data is reported to a national database and the information is combined with reports from all over the country in order to identity products and practices that commonly cause fires. This information is used to make safer products and is used in our fire prevention efforts. The job is not glamorous. In fact it is difficult, dangerous, and dirty at times. You will not get rich. There is a decent chance that you will be injured at some point in your career. You stay busy doing things other than running calls. You will rarely get to sleep through the night. However, after nearly 20 years in the fire service, I still love it. 18

AroundAbout Woodstock | january 2011


a better 2011

by Billy Peppers

It is so hard to remember how great times were during the late 1990s and even just a few years ago. Business success was related to number of employees, moving into bigger office spaces, and standard end-of-the-year bonuses. The dollar was strong; we assumed the banking industry was as well. Vacant properties quickly passed through the zoning process into small pocket neighborhoods with multiple homes that would range from $250,000 and up. The strength of the community was measured in the number of new commercial centers, and population growth could be gauged by the grand opening of a new retail grocer. My how things have changed! It seems that even as destitute as the economy grew in late 2008 and early 2009, when downtown Woodstock lost 12 businesses, saw a major developer lose out to foreclosure and the housing market froze, that we looked to January 1 of the upcoming year as a benchmark for something better. Businesses close the books on 2010 and for some it will be a blessing to start the new year off with a blank sheet. For some, 2010 was better than 2009, but they are quick to tell you that it was no 2006! For newer businesses, there may not be a track record . . . think about the gleam in those eyes as

they survived a year that might otherwise be considered below average for business, and see the opportunity to build on moderate success for a better 2011. With the coming of the New Year we will find many new challenges. What will the tax system be like? How will the newly-elected Congress, Georgia’s second modern Republican governor, and a new state legislature impact the bottom line? How will sagging property values and sales taxes impact the local education system, road funding and public safety? What will 2011 bring? The master of making things memorable, Mr. Walt Disney, once said that “All of our dreams can come true if we have the courage to pursue them.” I believe that 2011 will be a year for the better if we will only allow our dreams to guide us. The father of a six month-old baby, I look to him for much understanding of business and life. He, like other babies, looks to life with the simplicity that we should all use. I praise him for the small successes, such as sitting up, sleeping through the night, rolling over, eating from a spoon. We have to be willing to look at the economy the same way! Wipe clean the memory of 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, etc. January brings a new year and a new opportunity for success. Remember to pursue your dreams and you’ll find a better 2011.

www.aroundtownpublishing.com 19


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22 AroundAbout Woodstock | january 2011


A Special Valentine’s Day

Escape to Barnsley Gardens Resort Barnsley Gardens Resort’s fairytale setting and stunning scenery make it the ultimate romantic vacation this Valentine’s Day weekend. This Valentine’s Day, couples can escape to Barnsley Gardens Resort for an unforgettable weekend featuring exclusive experiences not found at other resorts. Fairy Godmother The resort is home to its very own Fairy Godmother whose sole job is to create once-in-a-lifetime romantic experiences via her Love Spells. Barnsley’s Fairy Godmother has a magical touch that can make wishes come true during a stay at the resort as she spreads joy and kindness to each and every guest. From unforgettable meals in intimate hideaways throughout the property to an exceptionally romantic in-room experience, the Fairy Godmother creates an event perfect for each guest. As an expert in helping arrange proposals, the Fairy Godmother works with couples to create the perfect setting for this life-changing question. Fireside Private Dinners Built on the basis of love, Barnsley Gardens Resort is no stranger to romance. During Valentine’s Day weekend, couples can arrange private fireside dinners in their luxury cottages. These intimate dinners provide the perfect opportunity for couples to reconnect while enjoying a cozy gourmet meal. Couples who would like a more traditional dining experience can visit the Rice House, the resort’s fine dining restaurant housed in an historic Civil War-era building. On

February 12-13, the Rice House will be featuring a special Valentine’s menu and live music by Keenan Blount and Friends. Carriage Rides After dinner, couples are invited on a romantic horse-drawn carriage ride beginning at the Rice House and traveling through Barnsley Gardens’ historic ruins from 6-10 p.m. A perfect opportunity for love birds to snuggle under a blanket while taking in the property’s breath-taking scenery and watching the night’s stars twinkle. Spa at Barnsley Gardens Resort A complete relaxation and signature spa treatment will create a most blissful state as sweethearts spend an afternoon at the spa at Barnsley Gardens Resort. Couples can opt for a couples massage or an in-room massage to enter into a blissful state of relaxation. This European spa blends modern and ancient techniques with the purest products and is known for its signature treatments, including the Barnsley Rose body treatment. The body treatment uses organically grown, old-fashioned roses to revitalize the face and body, similar to the ones found in Barnsley Resort’s many gardens. Wine Dinner This unique gift is for the couple who already has Valentine’s weekend plans. Barnsley Gardens Resort offers the perfect gift for wine-lovers. On Saturday, February 26 at 7 p.m., the resort will host a wine dinner featuring vintage wines by Hess Family Vineyards that will be expertly paired with creations from executive chef Charles Vosburgh. To add some mystery to the evening, the wine pairings won’t be announced until the day of the dinner. To take your special Valentine on a spectacular weekend visit www.barnsleyresort.com.

www.aroundtownpublishing.com 23


In the Community

Celebrations! Babies, Birthdays and Anniversaries

NotaBle NeiGhBors new motor unit deputies

Gavin Smith Age 2 on November 20 We love you, Daddy and Mommy

Four deputies with the Cherokee Sheriff’s office recently completed an 80-hour course at the Atlanta police department motor school. These new additions bring the agency’s total number of motor units on patrol to ten. Completing the course were corporal Clint Thompson, deputy Justin Messenger, deputy Randal Guite, and deputy Chris Mendel. The training challenges the students in many levels of motorcycle operation. They must successfully complete challenging obstacles, off-road riding, braking, curve negotiation, team riding and evasive maneuvers. Left to right: Chief deputy Vic West, corporal Clint Thompson, deputy Justin Messenger, deputy Randal Guite, deputy Chris Mendel and major Edward Lacey.

LocAL wAter AuthoritY LAB wins QuALitY AssurAnce AwArd

Michaela Morrison Age 11 on January 12 Happy Birthday, Michaela! We love you very much!

Cobb County-Marietta Water Authority recently announced its laboratory, which ensures safe drinking water for Metro Atlanta residents, received a quality assurance award from the Georgia Association of Water Professionals. CCMWA’s lab, responsible for ensuring that water throughout its service area meets quality requirements, competed against other drinking water labs with similar size and functionality. In addition to the written application process, a panel of judges, comprised of other water professionals throughout the state, reviewed CCMWA’s quality assurance manual and did an on-site evaluation of the laboratory. The result was a perfect score. CCMWA provides treated drinking water on a wholesale basis to Cherokee County Water and Sewerage Authority, as well as other cities and counties.

windsonG properties eArns Achievements

James Avery Peak Age 2 on January 2 We love you very much! Happy Birthday! WANT TO SEE YOUR PHOTO IN OUR CELEBRATION SECTION? See the details on page 28!

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AroundAbout Woodstock | january 2011

Leading active adult courtyard home builder, Windsong Properties was recognized for the best 50+ Community of the Year for its Somerset community in Woodstock during the 30th annual OBIE awards. Windsong was also honored with four OBIES for its achievement in building. Locally owned Windsong Properties was founded by Mark Carruth and managing partner Steve Romeyn. Call 770-516-3409 or visit www.windsonglife.com for more information. Somerset homes by Windsong Properties.


In the Community

Youth Appreciation Awards The South Cherokee Optimist Club recently hosted the annual Youth Appreciation Awards for Cherokee County High School students. Accepting an award for Outstanding Achievement was Sequoyah High School senior, Adam James. Sequoyah High School teacher, Philomena Virostek was also recognized during the ceremony. Sequoyah assistant principal, Diane Butterworth presented the Excellence in Education Award to Mrs. Virostek for her outstanding CASA Receives Donation from contribution to the education of Cherokee Days of Giving Event County students. CASA for Children, Inc. was honored by Wells Fargo with a $1,000 grant at the company’s recent Days of Giving ceremony at Roswell Founders Hall. The donation to CASA for Children, Inc. was one of 240 contributions Wells Fargo made to non-profit organizations, each receiving $1,000. “These unrestricted dollars will allow us to continue to help the foster youth in Cherokee County,” said Deidre Hollands, CASA’s executive director. “With the economy still suffering, the money couldn’t come at a better time.” Community bank president Sean Mabey said, “A hallmark of Wells Fargo is local decision-making and local involvement. Through Days of Giving, we’re connecting with local communities in a whole new way.”. Left to right: Sequoyah assistant principal Deidre Hollands, CASA’s executive director receives donation from Wells Fargo comDiane Butterworth, Philomena Virostek, munity bank president Sean Mabey. and Adam James.

New Jury Commissioner Appointments On October 21, probate judge Keith Wood swore in Amanda Jobe and Kelly Stone as Cherokee County’s two newest jury commissioners. Jury commissioners are appointed by the chief judge of the Superior Court to assist with the creation and maintenance of a list of citizens who are eligible to serve as jurors for both the grand jury and trial jury.

Left to right: Judge Wood, Amanda Jobe, Kelly Stone, and clerk of courts Patty Baker.

www.aroundtownpublishing.com 25


In the Community

Celebrations! Babies, Birthdays and Anniversaries

Ryan Jong Cloninger Age 7 on January 28 Happy 7th Birthday Ryan You are so loved by all!

BAnk of north GeorGiA offers heLpinG hAnd Bank of North Georgia is very much at the heart of community life, supporting those institutions and programs that make the communities it serves desirable places to live and work. The bank’s team members recently surpassed their established $86,000 goal by raising $87,542. “As we continue to deal with a struggling local and national economy, we need to remain mindful of those less fortunate than ourselves within our local communities,” states chairman and CEO Don Howard. Recognizing that there were literally thousands of families in desperate need of assistance during the holiday season, Bank of North Georgia hosted a Holiday Toy Drive from November 26 through December 17 at all 42 branches in metro Atlanta. The Woodstock branch assisted the Cherokee County Division of Family and Children’s Services. The DFCS investigates child abuse; finds foster homes for abused and neglected children; helps low income, out-of-work parents get back on their feet; assists with childcare costs for low income parents who are working or in job training; and provides numerous support services and innovative programs to help troubled families. www.dfcs.dhr.georgia.gov Bank of North Georgia chairman and CEO Don Howard.

siX cherokee countY firefiGhters promoted Matthew V. Pair Age 9 on January 8 Love you lots, Mom, Dad & Andrew

Six Cherokee County firefighters were promoted during recent ceremonies at Station 8, located in Holly Springs. Brian Ward was promoted to the rank of captain. Barry Gibson was named as the new deputy Fire Marshal. Marc Liscio and Danny Carder were promoted to the rank of lieutenant, and Brandon Mann and Neal Caywood were both promoted to the rank of sergeant.

Jackson Cherfoli Age: 11 on January 18 Have a Happy Birthday! Mom, Dad, Macey & Calvin WANT TO SEE YOUR PHOTO IN OUR CELEBRATION SECTION? See the details on page 28!

26

AroundAbout Woodstock | january 2011

Left to right: Training chief Eddie Robinson; assistant fire chief Tim Prather; sergeant Brandon Mann; sergeant Neal Caywood; deputy fire marshal Barry Gibson; captain Brian Ward; lieutenant Danny Carder; lieutenant Marc Liscio; and Cherokee County fire chief Raymond Gunnin.


In the Community

Praiseworthy Pupils LRE Receives Teaching Gardens Little River Elementary is creating beautiful teaching gardens for its students and teachers to use. Kindergarten parent, Mario DaSilva, of Cherokee Stone Center, recently donated materials and labor to make two beautiful stone beds to be used as a centerpiece for the garden. Future beds will be added to the area to complement the existing stone beds. During Little River’s fall festival, teachers Nancy Joyner and Laura Johnson helped man a booth offering items for sale to raise additional funds for the teaching gardens. Students and staff are looking forward to watching the garden grow!

SHS Students Take third

Front row (left to right): Mario DaSilva, Tifany and Janneth Jimene. Back row: Vince Caputo, master gardener of Twin Branch nursery Kim Hupman, Nancy Joyner, Karen LaFlamme, and Laura Johnson.

Sequoyah High School sophomore Martin Stansel and freshman Trevor Cox recently placed third John Oxendine’s Fire and Safety statewide essay contest. The students received their awards at a state luncheon and participated in a VIP tour of the state capitol.

www.aroundtownpublishing.com 27


In the Community

Celebrations! Babies, Birthdays and Anniversaries

Emma Carruth Age 7 on January 25 Daughter of Danielle, Lance & Jack Carruth

Olivia Lynne Philpot Age 3 on January 22 Daughter of Josh & Abbey Philpot We love you Princie!!

WANT TO SEE YOUR PHOTO IN OUR CELEBRATION SECTION? Wedding, Birthday and Anniversary Announcements are Free! E-mail to: woodstock@aroundtownpublishing.com Deadline is January 7 for the February issue!

28

AroundAbout Woodstock | january 2011

shs refLection contest winners Sequoyah High School recently held its PTSA Reflections contest with 112 students participating. Photography and film production winners included ninth grader Ashley Rutkowski, first place; tenth grader Dakota Hughes, first place; eleventh graders: Kristin White, first place; Alexia Newman, second place; Savannah Turner, third place, and Kristin White, honorable mention. Twelfth graders: Nick Janda, first place; and Rebeka Phipps, first place-film. Visual arts winners included ninth graders: Melanie Mitchell, first place; Jordan Kohn, second place; Alicia Bland, third place, and Felipe Mejia, honorable mention. Tenth graders: Sable Newton, first place, Hailey Brower, second place, Ivan Wetherington, third place, and Taylor Wilson, honorable mention. Eleventh graders: Bradley Brower, first place; Haleigh Tewksbury, second place; Dillan Green, third place; Serveriano Alvaerez, honorable mention. Twelfth graders: Sarah Hendrix, first place; Heather Addington, second place, and Stanton Siley, third place. SHS Reflection Literature winners included ninth graders: James Knight, first place; Christian Farrar, second place; Logan Walters, third place; and Brad Roberson, honorable mention. Tenth graders: Martin Stansel, first place; Raymond Hernandez, second place; Kayla Finale, third place, and Lisa Riebauer, honorable mention. Eleventh graders: Nicole Carper, first place; Jillian Zaski, second place; and Megan Simms, third place. Twelfth graders: Alicia Rivas, first place, Shawn Wortham, 2nd place; Lizabeth Montano, third place, and John Keener, honorable mention. Sequoyah High School Reflection contest winners

hoLLY sprinGs ceLeBrAtes veterAn’s dAY On November 11, 2010, the Carroll family of Holly Springs presented an American flag to Holly Springs Elementary School. The flag was flown in LSA Armordillo, Camp Stryker, Victory Base, Iraq during Operation Iraqi Freedom. The Sequoyah High School ROTC conducted the Flag Folding Ceremony in honor of Veteran’s Day. Holly Springs principal Dr. Dianne Steinbeck with Jeff Carroll, wife Amanda Carroll, and daughters Alaina Carroll and Ansley Carroll.


In the Community

woodstock middLe schooL recoGniZes students Woodstock Middle School recently recognized its Students of the Week for encompassing the word of the week: Honor – A sense of what is right, just, and true. Students were nominated by the faculty and staff at Woodstock Middle School for exemplifying the word of the week in their daily lives. The following students were recognized: Andrew Woodyard, Calvin Favors, Cheyenne Hollowel, Jacqueline Dixon, Kaito Kawamura, Lissette Rueda, Mark Vaughn, and Mollie Medina.

WMS Students of the Week encompassing word of week Honor.

Woodstock Middle School recently recognized its Students of the Week for encompassing the word of the week: Sportsmanship – The ability to take winning and losing without gloating or complaining. Students were nominated by the faculty and staff at Woodstock Middle School for exemplifying the word of the week in their daily lives. The following students were recognized: Alex Hatcher, Anna Hayes, Coleman Landsell, Isabella Mitchell, Jacob Laconi, Lauren Michel, Makenzie Allen, Meghan Shackleford, Parth Patel, Sally Hannoush, Sam Mang, and Silvana Bravo. WMS Student of the Week encompassing word of week

Sportsmanship.

www.aroundtownpublishing.com

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In the Community

National Junior Beta Club Inductees Mountain Road Elementary School recently inducted 11 new members into the National Junior Beta Club. Front row (left to right): Mollie McNeil, Brianna Bennett, Anna Bedsole, Andrea Palese, Paul Brown, Lucas Baird, and Camryn Mullin. Back row: Guest speaker Dr. Troop, principal Tammy Sandell, Emily Feyerabend, Josie Freeman, Sydney Neubert, Griffin Pizzano, and teacher/sponsor Chris Grass.

Thanks Cherokee County Students for Caring! The Mountain Road Elementary School students collected an entire truck full of canned and boxed goods for the Cherokee County senior citizen Center.

Front row: Griffin Pizzano. Middle row: Cherokee County senior citizen center director Nathan Brandon, Brandon Shuman, Gabe Brackett, Elizabeth Guillen, Daniel Gordon, school counselor Brenda Hall, assistant principal Kim Montalbano, and senior center representative Dwight Blanton. Back row: Cole Heard, Karleigh Kaczmarowski, Sandenna McMaster, Leslie Reece, and Claire Goran.

Holly Springs Elementary School students partnered with Sequoyah AFJROTC cadets to collect food for MUST Ministries for needy families during Thanksgiving.

Arnold Mill Elementary School fourth graders raised $23.23 for the MUST Ministries with a lemonade stand. They also donated towels, tooth brushes and other needed items friends and family had gathered. Kim Loesing, program director from MUST, gratfully accepted their donation.

Left to right: Anna Kirtland, Ella Hartrampf, Jonas Johnson, Jaden Prickett, Isaac Kirtland, and Katie Brown.

Little River Elementary School collected more than 4,000 pounds of food for the 2010 FalCan Food Drive.

Front row: Delaney Parker, Madison Miller, and Kelly Popp. Back row: Kylie Doran, Kim Loesing, and Angelina Piccirilli.

The kindergarten class of Hickory Flat United Methodist Church raised $328 to help build schools in rural areas of Pakistan and Afghanistan.

LRE student council representatives with the Falcon’s mascot: Lauren Faucett, Jackie Pelfrey, Barb Owensby, assistant principal, Paula Merritt, Christine Lawley, and assistant principal, Abbey Philpot.

30 AroundAbout Woodstock | january 2011


In the Community

WES Walk to School Day Twenty-eight students and 22 parents of Woodstock Elementary School laced up their sneakers and walked to school Friday morning, November 12. The group walked from Serenade subdivision through downtown Woodstock to Woodstock Elementary, with the assistance of Woodstock police department officers Karen Thomas and Brian Keene, to promote Safe Routes to School. Safe Routes to School is a federal initiative designed to increase the number of students who walk or ride bikes to school. The program provides funding for local governments to improve conditions of routes within a two-mile radius of the school. It also supports school-based Safe Routes to School programs through partnerships with the resource center. SRTS is organized around five ideas: encouragement, education, engineering, evaluation and enforcement. The walk was the first of many headed up by parent Lynn Torres to develop an SRTS program for Woodstock Elementary School that will encourage physical fitness, pedestrian safety, driver awareness, and identify areas in need of infrastructure improvements.

athletes National Sports Signing Day Sequoyah High School senior Kaitlyn Howser recently signed a softball scholarship to the University of South Carolina.

Martial Arts Festival On Saturday, November 6, Yong In Tae Kwon Do held a Martial Arts festival in the Bridgemill shopping center. The event promoted partnership and friendship in the community and businesses in the shopping center. The students at Yong In demonstrated the martial arts to promote the school, the study of their art and, to introduce Tae Kwon Do to future students. A special thanks to Edward Jones, Funky Monkey, MC Nails, Caprissio Sales, Earth Products, XS, Lyndon Academy, Don Rice, Optimal Fitness, The Computer Guys and everyone who came out to support the school and community.

Front row (left to right): Mom Kathy Howser, Kaitlyn Howser, and dad John Howser. Back row: SHS athletic director Todd Miller, softball coach Todd Morrissey, and principal Elliott Berman.

Front row (left to right): Ben Angalet, William Grizzle, Chloe LeRoy, Madison Thomas, Allen Perez, and Blake Jaraczewski. Back row: Nicolas Angalet, Anthony Thomas, Adonis Best, Nicole Grizzle, K’anen Grizzle, Jonah Salyers, and Master Won.

www.aroundtownpublishing.com 31


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VOTE ONLINE AT WWW.AROUNDWOODSTOCK.COM

A minimum of 20 categories must be completed in order for the ballot to count. This is your opportunity to say thank you to those local businesses that have treated you well and to give them recognition for all their hard work. Please vote for your favorite small businesses, services, and places. Selections must be in the Woodstock area. A minimum number of votes must be received by a nominee in each category for them to be considered the winner. The minimum will be based on the number of ballots received. Votes can be submitted online at www.aroundwoodstock.com, or if you prefer, you may write in your choices on this ballot and mail it to our office, located at 655 Molly Lane, Suite 140, Woodstock, GA 30189.

OFFICIAL BALLOT — DEADLINE FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 11 AT 5 P.M.


Home Remodeling/Repair

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Lunch Place

Fine Dining

1.

2.

3.

4.

5.

Restaurants, Fast Food, Specialty Food, etc.:

Heating and Air Service

Home and Garden:

4.

Plastic Surgeon

13.

Fence

Physical Therapy

12.

3.

Pediatrician

11.

Electrical

Ophthalmologist/Optometrist

10.

2.

Special Interest/Hobby

13.

OB/GYN

9.

Carpet/Upholstery Cleaner

Pool/Spa Store

12.

Med Spa

8.

1.

Music Store

11.

Massage Services

Toy Store

Tire Shop

Package Store

Jeweler

Hardware Store

Grocery Store

Gift/Home Décor Store

Garden Center/Nursery

Veterinarian

Travel Agency

Realtor (specify company and agent)

Photographer

Pet Groomer

Nail Salon

Hair Salon

Cleaning Service/Maid

Caterer

Auto Repair/Mechanic

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10.

9.

8.

7.

6.

5.

4.

3.

2.

1.

General Services:

15.

14.

10.

9.

8.

7.

6.

5.

Frame Shop

7.

4.

Family Practice

Florist

6.

3.

Orthodontist

5.


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AroundAbout Woodstock | january 2011


Christmas through the Eyes of Russian Orphans Every year since 1998 The Evangelistic Association of Russia has conducted the Fantasies to Faith art contest, which is open to all children between the ages of 10-16 in orphanages throughout Russia. Designed to introduce Russian youth to the story of the birth of Jesus Christ, Fantasies to Faith requires that Unknown participants read the Christmas story from the Bible and create an original Zolotarev Anatoly’s Christmas artwork. art piece — painting, needlework or photography — depicting their understanding of the true meaning of Christmas. In addition to their work of art, the children must answer several short essay questions designed to spur thoughts of how the Bible can be applied to their own lives. The annual contest receives 30,000 to 50,000 entries every year, from all 11 time zones in Russia. From the thousands of entries, 150 semi-finalists’ pieces are displayed in the Children’s International Art Museum in Moscow. These 150 pieces will be on display at First Baptist Church Woodstock’s 13th annual Fantasies to Faith winners program, art display, and auction on April 1, 2011. Ten winners from the Moscow exhibit will receive a trip to America where they will spend almost two weeks in the homes of volunteer host families and perform at the annual winners program on-stage in traditional Russian folk attire. While in America the 10 Fantasies to Faith winners participate in the many activities the Atlanta area has to offer including local attractions, worship services, sporting events, a’s shopping malls, etc. In 2008, the young Russian guests were treated to a personal tour of aya Kristin Chelbaevsk the governor’s mansion by Georgia’s first lady, Mary Perdue. During the winners’ visit, artwork. Christmas local optometrists and dentists will volunteer their time and services to offer optical and dental exams and free correctional procedures as necessary. The public is invited to attend the annual free program and event of cultural exchange, with the 10 Fantasies to Faith winners on Friday, April 1, 2011 at 7 p.m. at First Baptist Church Woodstock. During the evening’s live auction of the children’s art segment, the highest bidder will be allowed to take home their choice of the 150 semifinalists’ pieces of original art. For more information on T.E.A.R.’s Fantasies to Faith winners program, art display and auction, email reevesvo@hotmail.com, 770592-5689. T.E.A.R. is a non-profit, 5013c, Christian organization that organizes short-term mission trips to Russia for the purpose of sharing the Gospel of Jesus Christ and strengthening and encouraging local churches. Lyubavskaya Olgas Christ mas artwork. Petrov Ruslan’s Christmas artwork.

www.aroundtownpublishing.com 35


k c o t s d o o W How Did                 Chris & Sandy Reeves 809 Randy Court Woodstock, GA 30188

 Left:15th annual apprecia tion breakfast with Woodstock Elementa ry fifth grade chorus, faculty and staff members, Partners/Friends in Educa tion.

-

ker, perform ka Ariah Ba Rudolph, a te Bank. herokee Sta ing at First C 36

AroundAbout Woodstock | january 2011

The boys’ chorus performin g at Chick-fil-A Dwarf House on Hwy 92.

horus tion of the c The bell sec kee County ro e t the Ch a g in rm rfo pe m for Dr. ict auditoriu tr is D l . o o h Sc ff members nd other sta a lo e zi u tr Pe


 David Stewart and reinde er, Snowflake David is the son of Jonath an Stewart of Woodstock, GA

 te Graves, ln Young, Lanna Ka co Lin ): ht rig to ft ey. Front row (le ch, and Ava Shipl er Glosson, Erin Ba n, an cC M Mia Abbott, Coop an fer, Ev Stevens, Travis Mau Bare. Second row: Kohl nach, and Raegan ta Ca ri To ll, we Po sh Jo r, cker, Karina Nathan Carte l Boatright, Titus Be ae ich M n, iffi Gr iss Back row: M e Olivia. n Pierce, and Briell Van der Walt, Brade

Miss Griffin’s first grade class at Cherokee Christian Schools recently purchased various gift items to present to the residents of Woodstock Estates Assisted Living Home. The students all earned their own money to purchase the items by doing various chores at home and in their neighborhoods.

 The National Art Honor Society Chapter 1203 from Sequoyah HS had fun decorating and filling stockings for the 21 orphans who reside at the Cottage House, which is an orphanage for older children and teens, ages 9 to 17. Club members then wrote personal notes of cheer, which were added to the stockings before delivery.

Abbie Hermes with

cking.

her Christmas sto

Front row (left to right): Jea nine Delgado, Robert Kol och, Nicole Shattuck, Sable Ne wton, and Brenda Sosa. Middle row: Killian Purrinos, Allie O’Hara, Mackenzie Gloeg gler, Maddie Richardson, Anna Singh, Breanna Gilstrap, and Priscilla Rojas. Back row: Alex Sanchez, Hailey Ha rt, Kevin Rauda, Sarah Erwin, Eva n Reece, Noah Huggins, and Courtney Ngkonchin.

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37


Healthy Living

cut your cancer risk One Bite at a Time By Carol Brazier, RD, CDE, Northside Hospital Diabetes and Nutrition Education Program

Change the way you eat and you could reduce your risk of becoming a cancer statistic. Each year, more than 570,000 Americans die of cancer, according to the American Cancer Society. One-third of those deaths correlate with diet and inactivity. Eating fruits, vegetables and fiber helps protect healthy cells from cancer-causing free radicals and keeps weight in check. Fruits and veggies build up your immune system with cancer-fighting antioxidants. Fiber keeps food from lingering in the intestines, where it can latch onto cancer-causing carcinogens, breaking down good cells. If visions of spinach mounds and celery stalks haunt you — here are eight ways to think outside the salad bowl 1. Morning Makeover: Top off your oatmeal or cereal with berries or sliced bananas. Making scrambled eggs? Sauté mushrooms with cancer-busting garlic for a veggie scramble. Wash it down with 100 percent fruit juice. 2. Get Saucy: Creamy pasta sauces can be loaded with fat, but you can use veggies and olive oil instead. Instead of the creamy sauce, throw in tomatoes (lycopene), spinach (magnesium), carrots (beta-carotene) and some olive oil for flavor and moisture.. 38 AroundAbout Woodstock | january 2011

3. Go Asian: Chock-full of veggies, stir fries spice up a weeknight meal. Use a small amount of canola oil with snow peas, scallions and reduced sodium soy sauce. Substitute brown rice for fried rice. 4. Meatless Monday: Replacing meat with plant-based sources of protein, such as lentils, peas and beans provides nutrients, without the fat. Nuts supply protein, too, but, with higher fat, so be mindful of serving sizes. For diehard meat lovers, stick with chicken and turkey or fish. Keep red meat to a minimum, as it can contain more carcinogens when cooked. 5. Mix it Up: Create a dried-fruit mixture with ingredients such as apricots, apples, cherries, figs and dates. Sprinkle on cinnamon or ginger and add your favorite nuts for an afternoon pick-me-up. 6. Shred It: Carrots, apples, oranges and zucchini can be grated and used in casseroles, pancakes, muffins and bread. 7. Blend a Smoothie: Blend unsweetened fruit, especially berries, with low-fat milk or yogurt. A spoonful of nut butter provides extra protein. Stock up on fruit in season and freeze for later use. 8. Add Flavor: Tempt your taste buds with antioxidant-rich seasonings such as rosemary, garlic, sage and olive oil. Pair bell peppers with hummus, roasted vegetables with herbs and balsamic vinegar, fruit with yogurt. Power up your turkey sandwich by swapping avocado for mayo.

Northside Hospital Healthcasts Northside Hospital, Atlanta’s premier hospital for women’s health, introduces Northside Healthcasts — your online health resource. Watch videos and learn more about cancer, nutrition and other healthcare topics you care about. Visit www.northside.com/healthcast.


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www.aroundtownpublishing.com 39


Healthy Living

stress

Management by Cathy Wendland-Colby, DC Happy 2011 everybody! Hopefully your holidays were enjoyed in the company of loved ones. Ideally, you found time to relax and reflect on the past year. For many people in our community, 2010 was filled with changes and challenges. Dr. Wendland-Colby is a chiropractor Most of us are aware that in private practice with her husband at Colby Family Chiropractic on Highway stress affects our bodies, but 92 in Woodstock, specializing in do you know the extent of sports and family care. She can be reached at 770-592-1915 or www. the damage stress can cause? ColbyChiropractic.com. Stress can lead to problems with digestion, obesity, sleep disorders, depression, heart disease, skin conditions and pain. Long-term exposure to stress can lead to serious health problems. Chronic stress

40 AroundAbout Woodstock | january 2011

disrupts nearly every system in your body. It can raise blood pressure, suppress the immune system, increase the risk of heart attack and stroke, contribute to infertility, and speed up the aging process. Long-term stress can even rewire the brain, leaving you more vulnerable to anxiety and depression. There are three types of stress: chemical, physical and emotional. Chemical stress can come from cigarette smoke, alcohol or drugs. But it can also be caused by prescription medications, food additives, pollution in the air, or exposure to toxic substances. Physical stress can come from an injury on the job, a car accident, or a sports injury. Physical stress can also be caused by sleeping on a worn out mattress, slouching at your desk or poor posture. Emotional stress can come from co-workers, trying to meet deadlines or juggling a tight schedule. But it can also come from worrying about your loved ones, arguing with your spouse, or fretting over finances. Your body is programmed to react to stress with the fight or flight response, and you may not necessarily distinguish between the types of stress when you are reacting. Adrenaline causes specific organs to kick into high gear, such as the heart, lungs and skeletal muscles. Think back to the days of the cavemen and what they may have experienced; when they came upon a wild animal, the caveman had to decide if he should try to kill the animal to feed his family or run to save his life. In either scenario, the heart, lungs and skeletal muscles must be working in high gear. We still possess this fight or flight response even though most of us aren’t exposed to those same stressors. So when adrenaline is released into our system, and our organs kick into high gear, but we don’t physically react by running, jumping, kicking, or fighting, what happens to the adrenaline and the organs that have been supercharged by it? In simple terms – damage. Stressing out over paying bills causes adrenaline to be released, which revs up your heart. But if you just continue sitting at your desk fuming mad and don’t effectively use up that adrenaline, the constant production of the stress hormones can have serious effects on the body. It’s important to understand that stress is the trigger, and not necessarily the cause of the problems listed above. Whether or not you become sick from stress depends on your ability to manage your stress levels. Here are the most effective and most recommended methods for managing stress: • Daily Exercise • Proper Nutrition • Chiropractic • Massage • Relaxation • Meditation • Yoga • Adequate Sleep • Positive Mental Attitude • Network of Friends I challenge you in 2011 to explore new methods of managing your stress to help create a healthier tomorrow.


Healthy Living

questions

I Am Often Asked by Jeff Kincaid, DMD, MS I thought I would start the year by sharing a few questions that I am asked a million times! Maybe by answering them in this column, the next time you see me we can discuss the weather or sports!! 1. Do braces hurt? — For Dr. Jeff Kincaid is a specialist in the most part, braces do orthodontics and owner of Kincaid Orthodontics in Woodstock and not hurt. The procedure Roswell. Visit his Website at of getting braces simply www.kincaidsmiles.com. involves gluing the braces to your teeth. The day after you get braces, your teeth may start feeling sore and may stay sore for a few days. The soreness usually peaks during days 2-3, but should start getting better by days 4-5. Future adjustments may or may not cause you discomfort depending on what is being done to your teeth. To alleviate the discomfort, you can take whatever pain medication you would normally use for a headache. Because your lips, cheeks and tongue are not accustomed to rubbing against the braces, they may experience soreness as well. The soreness may also last for several days until they get used to contacting your braces. 2. When is the best time to schedule a consultation with the orthodontist? — The American Association of Orthodontists recommends that all children see an orthodontist for an evaluation no later than age 7. There are very few orthodontic problems that need to be corrected at that age; however your orthodontist is the only one to make that determination, so a visit is necessary. If your orthodontist determines that no treatment is necessary at that time, he or she will be able to make notes and possibly take X-rays in order to monitor growth and development and offer you guidance on when to start treatment or when to bring your child back for re-evaluation. For adults, treatment can be started at almost any age as long as the gums and bone surrounding the teeth are healthy. 3. Can I get my braces off sooner? — Unfortunately, orthodontic treatment time is limited in part to how quickly or slowly your bone can remodel, thus allowing your teeth to move. In younger patients with less-developed bone, teeth tend to move faster than in older patients with more developed bone. Some patients think that if the orthodontist “tightens” the braces more, the teeth will move faster. Indeed, the teeth need force in order to move. However, there is continued on page 53 42 AroundAbout Woodstock | january 2011


Healthy Living

is oBese anD overWeiGht

the Same?

by Master Carolyn Boucher You have heard or even said to some one, “That person is overweight,” or “That person is obese.” Obesity is defined by Wikipedia as a medical condition in which excess body fat has accumulated to the extent that it may have Master Carolyn Boucher is co-owner an adverse effect on health, of Dae Han Martial Arts in Woodstock. You may contact her at 770-592-4110. leading to reduced life expectancy and/or increased health problems.[1][2] Body mass index, a measurement which compares weight and height, defines people as overweight (pre-obese) if their BMI is between 25 kg/m2 and 30 kg/m2, and obese when it is greater than 30 kg/m2.[3] Overweight is defined by Wikipedia as having more body fat than is optimally healthy. Being overweight is a common condition, especially where food supplies are plentiful and lifestyles are sedentary. As much as 64% of the United States adult population is considered either overweight or obese, and this percentage has increased over the last four decades. [1] Excess weight has reached epidemic proportions globally, with more than 1 billion adults being either overweight or obese.[2] Increases have been observed across all age groups. As you can see, they are so close that if you did not know the BMI of the person, you could not make the decision if they are overweight or obese. The following is from an article from Associated Press By Stephanie Nano, – New York – “Lugging around a few extra pounds? One of the largest studies to look at health and weight finds that you don’t have to be obese to raise your risk of premature death. Merely being overweight carries some risk, too.” This statement in the article from the AP makes the point that no matter if you are overweight or obese, the bottom line is that you have a higher chance of premature death if your BMI rate is not appropriate for your height and weight. What can you do about it? You can start by calculating your BMI and determining how far out of line you are from the recommended BMI for your height and weight. Visit www. surgeongeneral.gov/topics/obesity to help find your BMI. If your BMI is seriously out of line, then I highly recommend you put together a weight loss plan. In your weight loss plan don’t forget to include exercise or some other activity that will give your body mobility and help you lose the weight.

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Healthy Living

the tooth fairy

Can Give You A Second Chance! by Steven Anderson, DMD Losing an adult tooth often has significant longterm damaging effects that many people do not realize until it is too late. If you have lost a tooth, speak to your dentist about dental implants and how they can improve Dr. Anderson practices cosmetic, family and implant dentistry at Anderson your quality of life. Dental. He may be contacted at 770Dental implants, in 384-8505 or drstevenanderson.com many circumstances, are the optimal method to restore lost function and prevent future serious jaw bone disease. They actually restore the complete tooth and allow you to chew, brush, and floss as you normally would. Dental implants also look very natural — often no one knows you have them. Generally, there are two parts to dental implants — the body and the crown. The implant body is a special surgical “screw” that is placed into your jaw bone. It replaces the root of a natural tooth. This surgical screw is made from titanium because our bone grows around and integrates nicely with titanium. The crown of the implant is similar to a traditional dental crown and essentially attaches to the implant body. The implant body and crown restores the missing tooth. Does implant surgery hurt? The short answer is “it’s not that bad of a surgery.” The dentist will certainly make your jaw numb just like you were having a filling or other treatment. You should not feel any pain during the surgery. Any post surgery pain or discomfort can be managed effectively by your dentist. There are certainly other common life events (non-dental related) that are clearly more painful. Bottom line, dental implant surgery pain is very manageable. Fear of pain should not be a limiting factor. Does implant surgery cost a lot? Cost is almost always a relative thing. What is the “cost” of non-treatment? There are significant financial costs associated with non-treatment that patients sometimes overlook. Yet all costs must be clearly understood. What is the actual cost savings by preventing gum and bone disease because you chose to replace your missing tooth with an implant? Priceless. . . and you maintain a healthy functioning mouth during your lifetime as an added benefit This year, make a resolution you can really smile about. Make 2011 the year of your teeth — a unique resolution most of us would never consider. There’s no better resolucontinued on page 53 44 AroundAbout Woodstock | january 2011


www.aroundtownpublishing.com 45


Life at Home

tv

Entertainment by Michael Buckner Why do we pay so much for our TVs? Fact is, despite the big price tag, it’s the cheapest form of entertainment out there. Almost anything you do for entertainment will cost a minimum of $10/hr per person. Sometimes it costs more. With TV, however, Michael Buckner is the owner of Audio even with a premium channel Intersection. For more information on any of his monthly columns, for package and a huge rockin’ questions or to set up an appointment, system, hourly entertainment call 770-479-1000. is more like $0.30 per hour over the life of your gear! But are you getting all of the bang for your buck? Chances are you could add a few more bells and whistles to your system without spending very much money or any at all. Here are a few tips. • Satellite Dish — If you have satellite TV, plug your receiver into an Internet connection. This will get you THOUSANDS of free on-demand titles at your fingertips, and it gives you something to watch in that rare event that a storm is severe enough to knock out your signal. • Video Connection — Make sure you’re using the best kind of video connection. Often I see people with HD equipment and because of the way they have it hooked up, it’s SD. Even if you are using the proper HDMI cable for the connection, make sure that you also have your cable box, satellite, or DVD player set to 1080p. This oversight can make a REALLY huge difference. • Blue-Ray Player — If you have a Blu-Ray player, make sure it’s connected to the Internet, and run any software and/or firmware updates that are available. This is a free thing to do, and will oftentimes add a ton of new services. Samsung has recently added an App Store to its players, complete with Netflix, Pandora, and much more. All it really takes is plugging in an Ethernet cable and the updates should pop up automatically. • Add-on to TV Services — Check into the latest add-ons to TV services. Some cost, and some are just a phone call away, but chances are that you could add some features for cheap. DirecTV has the new whole house DVR for $3 per month, and Dish just added GoogleTV. Both of these are very cool new features for very little money. If you checked off all of these items already, way to go, you are among the elite home audio/video do-it-yourselfers. I would venture to say that only 10% of people make use of all of these cheap or sometimes free items. If you were unsuccessful at any of these items, give me a call and I’ll help. 46 AroundAbout Woodstock | january 2011


Life At Home

What’s BuGGinG you This Winter? by Paul J. Pugliese Georgia will likely experience a warmer-thannormal and drier-thannormal winter and early spring, according to David Stooksbury, state climatologist at The University of Georgia. If this long-term forecast holds true, then Paul Pugliese is the Agriculture & Punxsutawney Phil shou- Natural Resources Extension Agent for Cherokee County Cooperative Extension, ldn’t see his shadow on a partnership of The University of Groundhog Day this year Georgia, The U.S. Department of and mosquitoes will likely Agriculture, and Cherokee County. For more information and free publications, return with a vengeance. call 770-479-0418, or visit Whenever we have unusu- www.ugaextension.com/cherokee ally warm, dry winter days, we also often see some interesting bugs come out in January and late winter. During those mild, winter days County Extension offices often receive a number of calls and emails from clients who have found tiny flea-like insects by the thousands covering their driveways, sidewalks, or their carports. At first glance, many people assume the colored mass is a mold or fungal growth. But, when they look more closely, they see there are actually thousands upon thousands of tiny — almost alienlike — moving insects. Although the appearance of so many insects can be unnerving, they are harmless. The culprits are strange little creatures called Springtails. Springtails are normally less than 1/16th inch in length. They are wingless and have very limited vision. Their color can range from yellow to almost purple to green or gray. There are actually about 700 species of springtails in North America. The word Springtails sounds like the title of some new Olympic gymnastics event. In fact, these insects are pretty good gymnasts in their own right. They have a specialized structure called a furcula on their abdomen that acts like a tiny spring or catapult. When the furcula is released, the insect jumps into the air traveling a distance of 3 to 4 inches — up to 100 times their body length! Because of their small size, springtails can quickly dry out, which is why you will usually find them in moist environments. Damp basements, pond edges, and areas of moist leaf litter or mulch are especially attractive to springtails. When ideal moisture and temperature conditions are met, springtail populations may skyrocket. In fact, up to 50,000 springtails can inhabit one cubic foot of topsoil. These huge numbers can sometimes be found clustering

together on rocks, sidewalks, or driveways. They can also be found covering the lower portions of garage doors or house foundations. Springtails feed primarily on dead or decaying vegetation. Other food items include fungi, pollen, algae, and lichens. Springtails help to decompose organic matter and release nutrients back into the soil. For that reason, they are generally considered beneficial and indicators of good soil health. Of course, if you have a wave of springtails inhabiting your garage they might not seem as beneficial. They seek out these moist locations when their usual habitat becomes uncomfortably dry. When they are found on sidewalks, garage doors, and similar areas, simply wash them off with a water hose. The water will disperse the insects and provide moist conditions in the surrounding soil for them to inhabit. If springtails move indoors, you can simply vacuum or sweep them up. Insecticides are not necessary and do not provide long-term control. Eliminating excess moisture in the home is the best long-term solution. Fortunately, most springtail infestations last only a few days until rainfall or a change in temperature disperses them. By the time you read this, the conditions for a springtail invasion will probably have passed. Springtails may seem like an alien encounter from another planet, but are just another fascinating part of our natural world.

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Life at Home

Don’t forGet the Ducts

by Dan Jape One of the most important aspects of your home’s heating and cooling system is the duct work. Proper duct work can make a huge difference in the comfort and efficiency of your home. I visit four or five customers’ homes each day and in the Dan Jape is the owner of Reliable vast majority of them, I find Heating and Air. You may contact him at 770-594-9096 or visit him online at duct work issues that need www.reliableair.com. to be corrected to make sure the new heating and cooling system we install will deliver what is promised in terms of comfort and efficiency. I see a number of customers who simply are talked into replacing the equipment in their homes without analyzing the distribution system and they end up with the same poor comfort level they had before they purchased a new system. One of the most frequent problems we find is lack of the proper amount of return or intake duct work. A proper operating system has to have the correct amount of return ducts to match the output of the system. Without the correct amount of intakes, many problems will arise such as lack of cooling capacity, overheating furnace heat exchangers, freezing cooling coils and reduced life of the entire system. Many homes suffer this issue and it must be corrected when upgrading your HVAC system. Many homes have duct work built out of fiberglass or duct board. This is a foil covered, glue impregnated sheet of fiberglass that is used as plenums or distribution boxes on the tops and the sides of furnaces and is a very poor choice for ducting material. This type of duct work is very porous and rough inside, collecting dirt and debris; after a few years of service it is always filthy dirty. Mold grows on the inside of this material and it is very hard to keep the corners and seams sealed up to keep air from leaking out in attics or basements. Metal ducts and plenums need to be installed to replace this inferior product when a new system is installed in your home to assure you of proper airflow, comfort, and efficiency. In some extreme cases and because of trying to save money on new home construction, I find actual splitter boxes or Y-shaped ducts made of this duct board. You can find these by looking for boxes made into triangle shapes with many ducts attached to them. These impede airflow, overwork the furnace blower, and provide inferior comfort to the entire home. They have to be replaced to make sure you are getting the full comfort and efficiency a new HVAC system can provide you. continued on page 53 48

AroundAbout Woodstock | january 2011


Faith and Family

emergency surgery For A Marriage

by Dr. Mike Litrel, MD The other day my patient Christine came in for a routine visit just before her planned surgery. She arrived with a flurry of questions plucked from Internet sites. How will you handle scar tissue? What about a Dr. Litrel practices with his fellow OB/ tumor? And what happens GYNs at Cherokee Women’s Health Specialists. Dr. Litrel lives in Woodstock if you find cancer? with his wife Ann and their two sons, “I treat all my patients Tyler and Joseph. E-mail Dr. Litrel at exactly the same way I www.cherokeewomenshealth.com. would treat my wife,” I explained. This is a guiding principle in our practice: give everyone the same care you’d give a loved one. This is what patients mostly want to hear, and I am happy to say it with confidence. But this time I felt uncomfortable. Christine noticed and raised her eyebrows questioningly. “Well, to be honest, I got into a little argument with my wife before work,” I admitted. “So in your case I’ll have to treat you even better.” Christine laughed and we finished our appointment. My next patient had not yet arrived. I finished some charts and wondered whether I should call Ann to make up. My first thought was “No way.” I had a feeling that talking to Ann would just make me angry all over again. Plus, I could sense it in my bones: this time, I was 100% right. Why apologize? Isn’t it easier to just stay angry and live forever after with glares from your spouse in a miserable home? Perhaps not. I had been called to the hospital for an emergency surgery at 2 a.m. Gathered together in the operating room in the dead of night are a team of people utterly dedicated to helping a stranger in need. But on the plus side, I’m in charge. And miraculously, everyone listens: “Hand me the knife, give me the retractor, suction here, retract there. . . move, move, MOVE!” During an emergency operation, the surgeon marshals the team through dangerous territory to safety on the other side and in the process, he or she is allowed to be bossy. Talk about your dream job! Unfortunately, the job skills used to lead surgery in the middle of the night are not the same ones required for persuading one’s wife over morning coffee. Still a bit groggy perhaps, I forgot we weren’t in the heat of a medical emergency. What I meant to say was, “Annie, I know technology isn’t your thing, but if you get a smart phone, you could email me a list of chores continued on page 53

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Faith and Family

to battle or Not to Battle

by Laurie Troublefield It’s a new year, AGAIN! I can’t believe it. Where did 2010 fly away to? I hope your holidays were not crazy and stressful and that you enjoyed time with your family and loved ones. And now, as we enter a new season of life, once again we wonder what Laurie Troublefield is the director of it will be like. . . what will training with Grace Connections. You may contact her at the days, weeks, and months laurie@graceconnectionsonline.org of 2011 hold? We left off last month talking about the reality of our being in a battle. It’s not external, it’s internal — actually inside of us and it often makes us feel like we’re going to be destroyed by it. But is that a reality? What is this battle all about and do we have any say about whether it continues? Let’s go back to Galatians 5:17-18a: “For the flesh desires what is contrary to the Spirit, and the Spirit what is contrary to the flesh. They are in conflict with each other. . . ” (NIV). Now it’s pretty clear from this verse that there is a struggle happening here; question is, “Who’s in the battle?” Is this battle, which at times rages within us, really ours to fight? It doesn’t seem so, but it certainly can feel that way. Have you ever found yourself feeling like the cartoon character with the angel on one shoulder and the devil on the other? You stand in front of your greatest temptation (money, sex, food, anger, whatever) and both voices seem to scream, “Follow ME!” And you feel paralyzed and incapable of doing anything but folding under the pressure of the “evil” inside you. I know you can relate. This passage tells us that there is a battle going on in us between what the Spirit of God desires for us and what our flesh would rather do. What is the flesh? Most simply, it’s the way we try to do life as if God doesn’t exist. It’s like Frank Sinatra sang, “I’ll do it MY way.” This flesh exists in all who are human, no one is exempt. The struggle often leads us to question, “How do I win the battle?” Wrong question. Did you see what the scripture says? “They are in conflict with each other. . . ” It’s not your battle. It feels like it, but it’s just not. So, what kind of predicament is this? A battle is going on inside of you, it’s not a battle you’re even in, but it’s so real it feels like it’s going to tear you apart. But, it’s not yours to fight. WHAT? Take some time to ask God this month about this; see what He has to tell you, and we’ll pick up our conversation from here next month!

50 AroundAbout Woodstock | january 2011


Faith and Family

moms and tots January 2011

by Colin Morris Did I just write that? 2011, really? Not fair. I once heard that time does, in fact, speed up as you get older, and that was such a comfort to me. The speaker mentioned that Colin Morris is a freelance writer who resides in when you are 5 years Woodstock with her husband and three children. old, one calendar year is one-fifth of your life — a whopping 20 percent. Time crawls by at a snail’s pace. That same 12 months when you are 20 years old is now only one-twentieth of your life, which for you non-math folks is 5%, and therefore, it feels much faster. Given that I am. . . well, not 20 years old anymore, that same year becomes a mere 2.7 percent of my life. No wonder it screams by faster than a speeding bullet. The older I get, each year represents a smaller and smaller slice of my life. Time is not accelerating, but my perception of it certainly is, alarm-

ingly so. And is it any surprise that my children and I view time so differently? My poor 11-year-old, came home with a school t-shirt that said Class of 2017, and I nearly had a stroke. 2017? That’s next week! My idea for this month centers on tracking time with your kids. Obviously, kids and adults view time differently. These activities might help bridge that gap. First, buy your child a calendar. Now that the New Year has come and gone, monthly calendars should be on sale. Choose one with cute puppies or SpongeBob and bring it home as a fun way to talk about time with your child. I am not psychic, but ten bucks says the first thing your child will turn to is his or her birthday. Everybody wants to see what day of the week their birthday will be on this year. You can write down special events on the calendar, talk about the days of the week and the months of the year. Calendars provide education carefully disguised as fun. Second, I have found that when major events approach, such as the first day of school or a family vacation or birthdays, children become restless with impatience. One way to harness some of their energy is to make a countdown chart. This can provide a framework for judging time and relieve some of the constant nagging. I learned the hard way to limit the countdown. Do not start your countdown a month before the continued on page 53

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Faith and Family

from the pastor

The Movement of Kindness by Herb Sims What are your goals for 2011? Many begin by asking questions like: What do we do to make the year better than 2010? What do we do to make our finances stable? What do we do to protect our health? What do we do to make our loved ones Herb Sims is the pastor of Gracelife Church. You may contact him at 404happy? 509-3397. There is nothing wrong with resolutions or goals unless they lead us to focus on the past or the future and as a result, miss the present. Often we spend more time measuring our failures and successes than enjoying the present tense moments of life. Jesus had an answer for approaching life that many of us are very uncomfortable with. He said, “I do nothing of Myself . . . ” and He

52 AroundAbout Woodstock | january 2011

went on to say, “I can do nothing of My own initiative . . .” Jesus defines present tense living. I want to control the different outcomes of life. Who wouldn’t? I want to control my business, control my church, and control my family. It is all in the name of avoiding pain. Goals could be just another way of control for me. But I’m not! In control, that is. So what are the options for 2011? Option one: Focus on what you need to do to be in control of and set the appropriate goals. Then manage yourself through self-condemnation or pride. Or maybe you shift the focus from your unmet goals by condemning others. Option two: Experience the miraculous life of Jesus Christ. Approach life in 2011 as Jesus approached life some 2000+ years ago. What if you did nothing of yourself? Listen . . . I am the vine, you are the branches. He who abides in Me, and I in him, bears much fruit; for without Me you can do nothing. John 15:5 When we are faced with all the unknowns of 2011, it seems foolish to not redouble our efforts to make things work out. But maybe “things” working out are not what life is all about. What if 2011 is all about a year of kindness? What if 2011 is a year of discovering a life of relationship? What if 2011 is a year of being with each other without judgment and condemnation? On the other side of control, judgment, and condemnation is kindness. Though it may appear that it is “anti-responsibility,” nothing could be further from the truth . . . for it is all about our RESPONSE to Christ who is our life and giving up the control we never had. This is a response to His kindness. Kindness is a supernatural walk in the Spirit. Christ’s kindness is what changes our lives. Remember, without Jesus you can do nothing. But through the movement of our Creator you can see His movement in your life. God is love and God is kind. As a fruit of His love and kindness you can expect the very REAL working of God in your life. You are free to be with each other without measuring successes and failures; without being defined as a failure or spending your life defining others as failures. You will discover the miracle of kindness and love not because you have resolved to be more kind but because God in, and through Christ, he has made you a kind and loving person. These supernatural fruits are an experience of the present tense life of Christ. In 2011 the movement of kindness will make an amazing difference in the lives of your children and your parents and in your marriage. This movement is past your control. It requires the very life of God. Christ in you, the hope of glory . . . and the hope of 2011.


Questions Often Asked

continued from page 42

an optimal force that moves teeth, and increasing the force level after the optimal level has been reached may actually cause damage to the bone and surrounding tissues, and may slow down tooth movement. The best way to ensure that your braces come off on time is to not break anything, wear your elastics as prescribed, and keep your teeth and gums healthy. 4. Do I need shots? — Shots are not generally needed for orthodontic treatment. However, if your orthodontist refers you out for other procedures such as extractions, surgical exposure of teeth, or mini-screws, you may need a local anesthetic. Thanks for listening and Go Bulldawgs.

Emergency Surgery

continued from page 49

and I could text you back how much I love you.” What came out instead was: “I am sick of your lousy phone losing reception and not taking e-mails. Get a new one already!” She did not respond in quite the same cooperative way as my hospital crew. “I can’t believe you can be such a jerk, Michael!” Well, I KNEW this couldn’t be true. Ann and I have been married 23 years. She knows EXACTLY how much of a jerk I can be. But truthfully, I really had been worried about Ann using that old cell phone for quite some time, especially when she was driving alone at night, with the phone reception hit or miss. In the operating room, a surgery can sometimes become challenging. But nothing like repairing a marital disagreement. Having gotten into heavy bleeding, I had no choice but to reach for the never-fail band-aid: A heartfelt apology. I called Ann and told her I was sorry for being a jerk. Falling back on surgical tactics, I changed my approach as well: “I’m just concerned about your safety,” I truthfully explained. “And sometimes,” I admitted, “I just want to hear your voice.” Ann bought a new phone the next day.

The Ducts

continued from page 48

The last and one of the most important aspects of your ducts is making sure they are sized properly to deliver the correct amount of airflow to each room in your home. Almost every homeowner I visit complains about the comfort in their bonus room or the room over their garage in a two story home. This discomfort is caused by lack of airflow. To make this room comfortable, additional air flow is needed to overcome the heat loss or heat gain. This problem is easily corrected when replacing your comfort system and should not be overlooked and if it is, the problem will still be there after the new system is installed. One should never purchase a new HVAC system without having a competent contractor inspect the duct system to assure you that your new heating and cooling system will actually deliver the promise of comfort and efficiency that you should demand from this purchase.

The Tooth Fairy

continued from page 44

tion you could make than one that will do wonders for your overall health, and give your self-confidence a serious boost as well. You owe it to yourself to have a healthy mouth your whole life. Your dental care should be all about you and no one else. It should be personalized care that meets your needs and exceeds your expectations. Make time to talk with your dentist about your New Year’s resolution and collectively come up with a plan to ensure your resolution’s success. Get ready to enjoy your new happy, healthy mouth in 2011. After all, you deserve the best, and great dentistry is all about you.

January 2011

continued from page 51

event unless your child has the patience of a saint, in which case a countdown calendar may be unnecessary. Two weeks is plenty of countdown time. If your child is old enough, he or she can make the chart and decorate it. Then post it on the fridge and set a certain time to mark off each day. I like bedtime because the day is officially over. Where do the days go? William Wordsworth sums it up much better than I, “Sweet childish days, that were as long, as twenty days are now.”

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54 AroundAbout Woodstock | january 2011


Woodstock Directory Listings Faith & Worship Baptist Calvary Baptist 137 Hightower Road, 770-887-6982 www.calvarybaptistweb.com Cherokee Baptist Church 7770 Hickory Flat Highway, 770-720-3399 www.cherokeebaptistchurch.org Faith Community Church 659 Arnold Mill Road, 770-516-1996 www.faithcommunitychurch.org First Baptist Church of Woodstock 11905 Highway 92, 770-926-4428 www.fbcw.org Mt. Olive Baptist Church 131 Mill Street, 770-928-1334 New Victoria Baptist Church 6659 Bells Ferry Road, 770-926-8448 www.newvicbaptist.org North Arnold Mill Baptist Church 4206 N. Arnold Mill Road, 770-926-8087 South Cherokee Baptist Church 7504 Highway 92, 770-926-0422 Stonecrest Baptist Church 485 Arnold Mill Road, 770-926-8820 Toonigh Baptist Church 4999 Old Highway 5, Lebanon 770-928-2491 Welcome All Baptist Church 545 Stell Road, 770-928-0555

Episcopal

Roman Catholic

Christ The Redeemer 6488 Hickory Flat Highway, 404-395-5003

Our Lady of LaSalette Catholic Church 2941 Sam Nelson Road, 770-479-8923

Episcopal Church of the Annunciation 1673 Jamerson Road, 770-928-7916 www.annunciationepiscopal.org Saint Clement’s Episcopal Church 2795 Ridge Road, Canton, 770-345-6722

jEWISH Chabad Jewish Center 1635 Old US Highway 41, 770-771-9952 www.jewishwoodstock.com

Lutheran Timothy Lutheran Church, LC-MS 556 Arnold Mill Road, 770-928-2812

Orthodox St. Elizabeth Orthodox Church Woodstock Funeral Home Chapel 8855 Main Street, 770-485-0504 www.stelizabethga.org

Presbyterian Cherokee Presbyterian Church, PCA 1498 Johnson Brady Road, 770-704-9594 www.cherokee-pca.org Geneva Orthodox Presbyterian Church 471 Arnold Mill Road, 770-833-3797 www.genevaopc.org Woodstock Presbyterian Church 345 Arnold Mill Road, 770-926-0074

St. Michael the Archangel 490 Arnold Mill Road, 770-516-0009

Seventh Day Adventist Cherokee Seventh Day Adventist 101 Rope Mill Road, 770-591-7304 www. cherokee.netadvent.org

United Methodist Big Springs United Methodist Church 2066 Sugar Pike Road, 770-475-1796 City On A Hill - A New United Methodist Church Worshipping at Johnston Elementary School 2031 East Cherokee Drive, 404-862-7850 www.cityonahillumc.org Little River United Methodist Church 12455 Highway 92, 770-926-2495 Mount Gilead United Methodist Church 889 Arnold Mill Road, 770-591-0837 Mountain View United Methodist Church 2300 Jamerson Road, 770-928-0050 www.mvumc.org Woodstock united methodist church 109 Towne Lake Parkway, 770-516-0371 www.woodstockumc.org

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FAITH & WORSHIP Other Churches Allen Temple, AME Church 232 Arnold Mill Road, 770-926-6348 www.allentempleame.org Allpoints Community Church 6488 Hickory Flat Highway, 678-493-3430 www.allpointschurch.com Bells Ferry Church of God 6718 Bells Ferry Road, 770-592-2956 www.bellsferry.com BridgePointe Church Meeting at Woodstock High School 770-517-2977 www.bridgepointechurch.org

Hickory Flat Church of God 947 Bailey Road, 770-475-4321 The Lighthouse Church 18271 Union Hill Road, 770-664-3644 Momentum Church 110 Londonderry Court, Suite 130 678-384-4919 www.MomentumChurch.tv Resurrection Anglican Church 231 Arnold Mill Road, Suite 400 770-591-0040 www.resurrectionwoodstock.org

Woodstock Community Business Association Meeting: Second Monday at noon Contact: info@woodstockcba.com

Charitable Organizations Cherokee Child Advocacy Council Contact: Mary Migliaro, 770-345-8100 Website: www.cherokeechildadvocates.org Cherokee County Family Child Care Association Contact: 770-926-8055

Christ the King Church of Greater Atlanta 6464 Highway 92, 770-924-9161 www.ctkatlanta.com

Towne Lake Community Church 132 N. Medical Parkway, 678-445-8766 www.tlcchurch.com

Cherokee County Humane Society Contact: 770-928-5115 Website: www.cchumanesociety.org

Woodstock Christian Church 7700 Highway 92, 770-926-8238 www.woodstockchristian.org

Cherokee County Special Olympics Meeting: First Monday at 7 p.m. Contact: Colleene Konwick, 770-517-7101

Church at North Gate 9876 Main Street, 678-494-2193 www.ngca.org

Woodstock Church of Christ 219 Rope Mill Road, 770-926-8838 Servico En Espanol Domingo, 770-926-8271

Companion Animal Connection Contact: 678-493-9847 Website: www.cacadopt.petfinder.com

Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints Woodstock Ward, 770-926-7230 www.lds.org

Woodstock Church of the Nazarene 874 Arnold Mill Road, 770-924-4499 www.wcnga.com

Feed My Lambs, Inc. Contact: 770-795-9349 Website: www.feedmylambs.net

Woodstock Community Church 8534 Main Street, 770-926-8990

Genesis Adoptions Contact: 770-517-0043 Website: www.genesis-adoptions.org

Church of the Messiah 415 Charles Cox Drive, 770-479-5280 www.churchofthemessiah.net Cornerstone Community Church 503 Hickory Ridge Trail, Suite 160 www.ccchurchonline.org Covenant Christian Center Worship Annex 330 Adam Jenkins Memorial Boulevard 2463 Holly Springs Parkway 770-345-0307 www.cityofcovenant.org

Organizations Business Organizations American Business Women’s Association Meeting: Third Tuesday at 6:30 p.m. Contact: Lori Matthewson, 770-720-6274 Cherokee Area Business Connection Meeting: Every Wednesday at 7:15 a.m. Contact: Marci Zied, 770-345-8687

Covenant of Peace Ministries 604 Industrial Court, 770-821-8972 www.covenantofpeace.org

Cherokee Toastmasters Meeting: Every Wednesday at noon Contact: 678-361-3553

Dayspring Church 6835 Victory Drive, 770-516-5733

Main Street Woodstock Meeting: First Friday at 8 a.m. Website: www.mainstreetwoodstock.org

Empowerment Tabernacle Christian Church 507 Industrial Drive, 770-928-7478 Grace Life Church 655 Molly Lane, Suite 140, 404-509-3397 www.gracelifeonline.org Greater Bethel Community Church 211 Arnold Mill Road, 770-592-9900 revfreeman@yahoo.com

North Georgia Referral Network Meeting: Tuesdays at 7:30 a.m. Contact: 678-361-3553 Together We Rise Meeting: Second and fourth Tuesdays Contact: Pat Snipes, 404-569-5280 Women of Woodstock Meeting: First and third Wednesdays Contact: 770-928-2700

56 AroundAbout Woodstock | january 2011

Girl Scouts of Greater Atlanta Contact: 404-862-6180 lmartin@gsgatl.org Website: www.gsgatl.org Habitat for Humanity Contact: 770-345-1024 Website: www.habitat-ncg.org The Hope Center Contact: 770-924-0864 Website: www.hopectr.com Hospice Advantage Contact: 770-218-1997 Website: www.hospiceadvantage.com ICOR Contact: 404-992-8155 Website: www.iCORorphans.com Meals Fur Pets Contact: Steve, 770-712-4077 steve@mealsfurpets.com Website: www.mealsfurpets.com MUST Ministries Contact: Kim Loesing, 770-479-5397 Website: www.mustministries.org Papa’s Pantry Contact: Lynne Saunders, 770-591-4730 Website: www.papaspantry.org


Organizations Safe Kids Cherokee County Contact: Chad Arp, 678-493-4343 Website: www.cherokeesafekids.org Volunteer Aging Council of Cherokee County 678-269-6677 www.VAC-cherokeega.org

Civic Organizations AARP Woodstock Chapter Meeting: Second Tuesday at 11:30 a.m. Contact: Rich, 770-926-1944

Political Organizations Cherokee County Democratic Party Meeting: Third Monday at 7 p.m. Contact: Judy Hamilton, 770-380-7071 Website: www.cherokeedems.com Cherokee County Republican Party Meeting: Fourth Monday at 7 p.m. Breakfast first Saturday at 8 a.m. Contact: Conrad Quagliaroli, 770-592-6545

Cherokee County Republican Women Meeting: Third Thursday at 6 p.m. Contact: 678-520-2236 Website: www.ccrwcga.com

Recreation & Hobbies Allatoona Gold Panners Contact: Rob Kelly, 770-516-7044 Arts Alliance of Georgia, Inc. Meeting: Second Saturday at 9:30 a.m. Contact: Madeline Hall, 678-754-8482 woodstockartcenter@comcast.net

American Legion & Auxiliary, Post 316 Meeting: Third Thursday at 7:30 p.m. Contact: George Wallace, 770-354-6454 Website: www.alpost316.org Hickory Flat Optimist Club Meeting: First and third Tuesdays Contact: Alan Flint, 770-720-9056 Junior Service League of Woodstock 24-hour information line: 770-592-3535 Kiwanis Club of Woodstock Meeting: Every Tuesday at 12:30 p.m. Contact: 678-494-4841 Website: www.woodstockkiwanis.org Lions Club of Woodstock Meeting: Second and fourth Tues. at 7 p.m. Contact: Ed Cook, 770-906-2958 Rotary Club of Woodstock Meeting: Every Tuesday at 7:30 a.m. Contact: 404-506-6878 Sewrifics of Cherokee Meeting: Third Tuesday at 7 p.m. Contact: Sheri Torch, 770-591-8335 Sons of the American Legion Meeting: Third Tuesday at 6:30 p.m. Contact: Charles Tucker, 678-643-0794 South Cherokee Optimist Club Meeting: Every Friday at 7:30 a.m. Contact: 770-926-3522 Woodstock Jaycees Meeting: First Tues. and third Thurs. at 7 p.m. Contact: 770-926-8336 Woodstock Masons Masonic Lodge #246 F. & A. M., Inc. Meeting: Second and fourth Thurs. at 7:30 p.m. Contact: Charles Sharp, 770-928-6140 Woodstock Midday Optimist Club Meeting: Every Wednesday at noon Contact: Johnny Young, 770-345-6158

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Organizations Blue Skies Laughter Club Meeting: Wednesdays, 7 p.m. Contact: Craig Whitley, 404-520-0221 Website: www.addlaughter.com Cherokee Amateur Radio Society Meeting: First Saturday at 10 a.m. Contact: Jim Millsap, 770-928-8590 Cherokee County Arts Center Meeting: Fourth Friday at 10 a.m. Contact: 770-704-6244 Website: www.CherokeeArts.org Cherokee County Saddle Club Meeting: Third Wednesday at 6:30 p.m. Contact: Tamma Trump, 770-655-0819 Website: www.cherokeesaddleclub.com Cherokee Fencing Club Meeting: Beginners, Wednesday at 5 p.m. Club, Wednesday at 6 p.m. Contact: Andy McCann, 678-494-9750 Website: www.cherokeefencingclub.com Cherokee Music Teachers Association Contact: Suzanne Hosea, 404-667-4733 Website: www.cherokeemta.org

Cherokee Outdoor YMCA Contact: 770-591-5820 Dog Hikers of Georgia Meeting: Sundays at 10 a.m. Contact: Dr. Daniel C. Batchelor, 770-992-2362 Website: home.aol.com/DrBatch Foothills Running Club Contact: John McCusker, 770-924-9504 Les Marmitons Meeting: Third Tuesday at 6:30 p.m. Contact: Larry Lodisio, 770-516-5197 North Atlanta Soccer Association Contact: Michele Fox, 770-926-4175 Website: www.nasa-ga.org Wildlife Action, Inc. Meeting: Third Sunday at 1 p.m. Contact: WLA Office, 1-800-753-2264 Woodstock Youth Track Club Practice: Mon., Tues., and Thurs. at 6 p.m. Contact: Michael Dahlhauser, 404-654-0093 Zack Walk Singles Mixer Contact: Karen Sacandy, 404-452-9980 Website: www.Zachwalk.com

58 AroundAbout Woodstock | january 2011

Support Organizations Adoption/Infertility Support Group Meeting: First Wednesday at 7 p.m. Contact: Cindy Braddock, 678-445-3131 Alzheimer/Dementia Support Group Meeting: First Thursday at 7 p.m. Contact: 770-926-0119 American Cancer Society 24/7 information line: 1-800-227-2345 Autism Parent Support Group Meeting: Second Tuesday at 6:30 p.m. Contact: Sharon Jones, 770-345-6551 Breast Cancer Support Group Meeting: First Thursday Contact: 404-843-1880 Canadian Women’s Club Meeting: Third Wednesday Contact: Lesley Frappier cwcatlanta@yahoo.com CASA for Children, Inc. Contact: Deidre Hollands, 770-345-3274 Website: www.casaforchildren.org


Organizations Celebrate Recovery Meeting: Fridays at 6 p.m. Contact: Debbie Anthros, 770-331-6685 ganthros@windstream.net Cherokee Autism Spectrum Support Group Contact: Heidi, hcf67@comcast.net Renee, mrjperrelli@yahoo.com C.H.O.O.S.E. of Woodstock Meeting: First Monday at 7 p.m. 24-hour information line: 770-517-3043 Depression and Bipolar Support Group Meeting: Second and fourth Tues. at 7:30 p.m. Contact: 770-560-7112 Diabetes Support Group Meeting: Fourth Tuesday at 6 p.m. Contact: 678-493-1503 Emotions Anonymous Meeting: Tuesdays at 7 p.m. Contact: Cindy, 770-928-6554 Fellowship of Companies for Christ International Meeting: Second and fourth Thurs. at 7 a.m. Contact: Randall Hill, 770-516-5887

GRANDparents Raising GRANDchildren Meeting: Second and fourth Tuesdays at 7 p.m. Contact: 678-699-3400

National Alliance for Mental Illness Support Group Meeting: Second and fourth Tues. at 7 p.m. Contact: Jill, 404-394-1229 Website: www.nami.org

Hearing loss association of America Chapter meeting information: 770-517-2941 Contact: marlenephillips15@yahoo.com

National Psoriasis Foundation Support Group Meeting: First Tuesday at 7 p.m. Contact: Scott Bell, 404-218-6626

Jewish Havurah Contact: Marcia, 770-345-8687 La Leche League of South Cherokee Meeting: First Tuesday at 10 a.m. Contact: Marguerite, 770-926-2791 Miracle Mothers Contact: Melissa, 770-516-1078 Website: www.miraclemothers.org MOMS Club Woodstock — 30188 Contact: momsclubwoodstockn@yahoo.com Mothers & More Meeting: First and third Tuesdays at 7 p.m. Contact: Michelle Wise, 770-720-8834 Website: www.woodstockmm.com Nar-Anon Meeting Meeting: Every Monday at 8 p.m. Contact: 404-218-0246

Over-eaters Anonymous Meeting: Every Wednesday at 10:30 a.m. Contact: Lois, 770-592-6421 S.N.A.P — Special Needs Awareness Program Meeting: Second Monday at 10 a.m. Contact: 770-720-4068 Tender Hearts Caregivers Support Group Meeting: Second and fourth Wednesdays at 10 a.m. Contact: Robin Galloway, 770-517-5899 The Way Group, AA Meeting: Monday - Friday at 11 a.m. Contact: Hillside UMC

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LOCAL OFFICIALS

Local Officials United States Government President Barack Obama, D 202-456-1414 fax: 202-456-2461 president@whitehouse.gov www.whitehouse.gov Senator Saxby Chambliss, R 202-224-3521 fax: 202-224-0103 http://chambliss.senate.gov Senator Johnny Isakson, R 202-224-3643 fax: 770-661-0768 GA: 770-661-0999 http://isakson.senate.gov Rep. Tom Price, R, District 6 202-225-4501 fax: 770-565-7570 GA: 770-565-4990 http://tom.house.gov Rep. John Linder, R, District 7 202-225-4272 fax: 770-479-2999 GA: 770-479-1888 www.linder.house.gov

State Government www.legis.state.ga.us Governor Sonny Perdue, R 404-652-7003 fax: 404-652-7123 State Capitol, Room 111 Atlanta, GA 30334 Sen. Chip Rogers, R, District 21 404-463-1378 fax: 404-657-9887 chip@SenatorChipRogers.com Sen. Jack Murphy, R, District 27 770-887-1960 fax: 770-205-0602 jack.murphy@senate.ga.gov Rep. Charlice Byrd, R, District 20 404-656-0126 fax: 404-463-2793 charlice.byrd@house.ga.gov Rep. Calvin Hill, R, District 21 404-656-0129 fax: 770-645-2394 chill@gilainc.com Rep. Sean Jerguson, R, District 22 404-656-0287 sean.jerguson@house.ga.gov

Courts Superior Court Chief Judge Frank C. Mills, III Judge Jackson Harris Judge Ellen McElyea www.blueridgecircuit.com

Coroner 678-493-6270 678-493-6260 678-493-6240

State Court Judge Clyde J. Gober, Jr. Judge W. Alan Jordan

678-493-6480 678-493-6490

Magistrate Court Judge James E. Drane III, R

678-493-6431

Probate Court Judge Keith Wood, R

678-493-6160

Juvenile Court Judge John B. Sumner Judge M. Anthony Baker

678-493-6250 678-493-6280

Clerk of Courts Patty Baker

678-493-6511

Board of Commissioners 678-493-6000 fax: 678-493-6013 90 North Street, Suite 310, Canton, GA 30114 www.cherokeega.com Buzz Ahrens, R, Chair 678-493-6001 lbahrens@cherokeega.com

Earl W. Darby 404-362-1600 90 North Street, Suite 310, Canton, GA 30114

Sheriff’s Office Sheriff Roger Garrison, R 678-493-4200 fax: 678-493-4228 498 Chattin Drive, Canton, GA 30115 rdgarrison@cherokeega.com www.cherokeega-sheriff.org

Tax Commissioner David Fields 678-493-6400 fax: 678-493-6420 100 North Street, Canton, GA 30114 dfields@cherokeega.com

Board of Education Stephen Bentley, R, Post 1 770-704-4398 x4374 me@stephenbentley.com Mike Chapman, R, Post 2 770-704-4398 x4372 mike.chapman@cherokee.k12.ga.us Gary Puckett, R, Post 3 770-928-3315 puckett@bellsouth.net Janet Read, R, Post 4, Chair 770-516-1444 janet.read@cherokee.k12.ga.us

Harry Johnston, R, Post 1 hjohnston@cherokeega.com

Rick Steiner, R, Post 5 770-704-4398, x4370 rick.steiner@cherokee.k12.ga.us

Jim Hubbard, R, Post 2 jhubbard@cherokeega.com Karen Bosch, R, Post 3 kbosch@cherokeega.com

Debi Radcliff, R, Post 6, V-Chair 770-592-7864 Radfam5@bellsouth.net

Derek Good, R, Post 4 678-493-6000 dvgood@cherokeega.com

Kim Cochran, R, Post 7 kimgcochran@gmail.com

School System Superintendent Dr. Frank Petruzielo 770-479-1871 fax: 770-479-1236 110 Academy Street, Canton, GA 30114 drp@cherokee.k12.ga.us www.cherokee.k12.ga.us

City of Woodstock Mayor Donnie Henriques 770-592-6017 dhenriques@progressiveaudiology.com

Call today for a free, in-home consultation and estimate.

SAVE $25

A clean you can trust.

visit mollymaid.com.

60 AroundAbout Woodstock | january 2011

$10 off the first and $15 off the fourth regularly scheduled cleaning. Molly Maid of Cherokee County, Kennesaw, and Acworth

Offer valid one time per household. Offer Expires: 01/31/11

call 770-926-0036


Index of

advertisers

Support the Advertisers that support your community!

C&T Auto

44

My Mechanic Joe

3

Jyl Craven Hair Colour Studio

51

Salon & Spa Venessa

49

HOME IMPROVEMENT / REPAIR / SERVICES

BANKING / FINANCIAL / INSURANCE SERVICES / ATTORNEYS Cherokee Bank

BC

Lge Community Credit union Payroll Professionals

1 52

CARPET & UPHOLSTERY CLEANING / RESTORATION Carpet Dry-Tech

13

Audio intersection

62

Dr Fixit PhD

50

Mr. Junk

43

The Mad Hatter Service Co.

59

Pied Piper

62

Reliable Heating and Air

11

Tradition in Stone

25

LAWN CARE

CLEANING SERVICES Molly Maid

RECREATION & FITNESS

HEALTH & BEAUTY

AUTOMOTIVE

39, 60

CHIROPRACTORS Colby Family Chiropractic

20

CHURCHES grace Life

54

Deep green Lawn

54

earth Stone & Water

34

Pike Nurseries

42

Thomas eye group

20

Towne Lake eye Associates

45

iFC

Photography

22

46

C&W Photography

3

Kincaid orthodontics

18

Kim Bates Photography

Roswell Pediatric Dentist

47

Yours Forever Portraits

Townelake Dentistry & The Art of Cosmetic Dentistry Williams orthodontics

iBC 48

EDUCATION / CHILDCARE

49

Mi Casa Mexican Restaurant

43

SERVICES / RETAILERS / MISCELLANEOUS Cherokee Reprographics, inc.

46

east Cherokee Storage / one Hour Signs

15

eiRiS Marketing

62

ghost Net

41

Main Street Woodstock

19

Man’s Best Friend

45

Nuclear Cowboyz Freestyle Chaos

64 50

Ringling Bros. and Barnum & Baileys presents Barnum’s FuNundrum

64

Woodstock Furniture outlet

43

58

PHYSICIANS & MEDICAL SERVICES Cherokee Women’s Health

22

Foot and Ankle Clinic

13

Pinnacle orthopaedics 34

Kennesaw State university Continuing & Professional education

40

good Measure Meals

iFC

Northside Hospital - Cherokee

American Heritage Academy

Bub-Ba-Que

Andrew edwards

Jerry Smith, Dr

Anderson Dental Practice

29

RESTAURANTS / SERVICES

Pineapple Park

OPTOMETRISTS / EYE CARE

PHOTOGRAPHERS

DENTISTS / ORTHODONTISTS / ORAL SURGEONS

Dae Han Martial Arts

21

St. Joseph Catholic School

29

The Walker School

27

7

C, 16, 17

Progressive Audiology Center

48

Rausch Family Practice

39

The Wellpath Center

44

WellStar Health Systems / TowneLake urgent Care

FROM YOUR FRIENDS AT

5

Woodstock Family & urgent Care

HaPPy nEW yEar!

3

AROUNDABOUT WOODSTOCK www.aroundtownpublishing.com

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Woodstock Community Business Association The Woodstock Community Business Association is open to all businesses located in or serving the residents of the city of Woodstock. In recognition of the importance of small business to a strong economy, WCBA aims to help local business owners, non-profits, sales reps, and managers interact with each other. With over 1,500 businesses within the city limits, it is essential to develop relationships that will continue to grow as our city grows. In addition to businessto-business relationships, WCBA strives to fosters an atmosphere of involvement and pride in our community. For additional information, contact Cathy Wendland-Colby, DC at 678-386-6290, Dee Roberts at 770-596-9944, e-mail wcbusinessassoc@aol.com, or visit the Website at www.woodstockcba.com.

WCBA News The Woodstock Community Business Association had a fabulous turnout at its WCBA Fun Day in the Park in November and the members wish to thank all of the businesses who sponsored a booth; the performers who provided outstanding entertainment; and the community for coming out to support WCBA! While the weather was a little on the chilly side, the event had a record attendance. THANK YOU! Coming up in January, WCBA looks forward to its annual presentation by Senate Majority Leader Chip Rogers at the monthly lunch meeting on Monday, January 10. Please plan to arrive a little early to mingle with fellow WCBA members and get to know a little more about what they do. Members and guests learn a lot from each presentation by selected members or a special guest from the community. Members say they develop several new contacts and clients through the NETWORKING which occurs before lunch and after lunch; at the one-on-one meetings scheduled; the Business After Hours events; and the Breakfast Networking Meetings. Members: if you have a friend or know of a business that would benefit from networking with WCBA, please invite them to attend our first meeting of 2011. For just $15, they’ll enjoy a delicious lunch, learn from a professional presentation and have the opportunity to meet other business people who live and work in Woodstock. The WCBA meets in the Chattahoochee Technical College-Woodstock Campus cafeteria at noon on the second Monday of each month. Come see what you have been missing!

Next WCBA Business Luncheon: Monday, January 10, 2011 12 P.m. at Chattahoochee Technical College

www.woodstockcba.com

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01/11 Woodstock