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cast Queenie........................................................................................................................................... Kelly Cline Kate................................................................................................................................................... Sally Staats Eddie..................................................................................................................................... Chris MacGregor Black.......................................................................................................................................... Cleary Breunig Dolores..........................................................................................................................................Brittni Hesse Mae........................................................................................................................................... Ashley Purpora Nadine.........................................................................................................................................Peyton Oseth Madelaine..........................................................................................................................Sammy Goodrich Burrs...............................................................................................................................................Kyle Sternad Oscar.......................................................................................................................................... Allan Zablocki Phil............................................................................................................................................Cody Anderson Sam................................................................................................................................................... Evan Braun The Neighbor...........................................................................................................................Zachary Dean Ensemble............................................................................................. Kathryn Hausman, Peter C. Hiller, Haley Horbinski, Anna Kristine Pfefferkorn Dance Captains................................................................................................Peter C. Hiller, Sally Staats set ting The action takes place in a seedy apartment in New York City, 1926.

orchestr a Conductor/Piano......................................................................................................Kerry Hart Bieneman Trumpet................................................................................................................................... Andrew Brinza Reeds......................................................................Sara Fritchen, Nolan Thomas, Sarah Zawadiwsky Synthesizer............................................................................................................................ .Jamie Schmidt Guitar.................................................................................................................................................. Ben Davis Bass.....................................................................................................................................................Brad Karas Drums............................................................................................................................................. Colin O’Day

THE WILD PARTY is presented through special arrangement with Music Theatre International (MTI). All authorized performance materials are also supplied by MTI. 421 West 54th Street, New York, NY 10019 Phone: 212-541-4684 Fax: 212-397-4684 www.MTIShows.com

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musical numbers ACT I Opening.............................................................................................................Queenie, Burrs, Ensemble The Apartment.................................................................................................Queenie, Burrs, Ensemble Out of the Blue....................................................................................................................... Queenie, Burrs What a Party....................................................................................................................................Ensemble Raise the Roof...............................................................................................................Queenie, Ensemble Look at Me Now........................................................................................................................................ Kate Poor Child........................................................................................................Queenie, Burrs, Black, Kate An Old-Fashioned Love Story.................................................................................................... Madelaine The Juggernaut.........................................................................Queenie, Burrs, Black, Kate, Ensemble A Wild, Wild Party......................................................................Queenie, Burrs, Oscar, Phil, Ensemble Two of a Kind................................................................................................................................ Eddie, Mae Of All the Luck........................................................................................................................Queenie, Black Maybe I Like It This Way.................................................................................................................. Queenie What Is It About Her?..............................................................................................................................Burrs - 10 Minute Intermission ACT II The Life of the Party................................................................................................................................. Kate Who Is This Man................................................................................................................................ Queenie The Gal for Me.......................................................................................................................Black, Queenie I’ll Be Here..................................................................................................................................................Black Listen To Me....................................................................................................Queenie, Burrs, Black, Kate Let Me Drown..................................................................................................................... Burrs, Ensemble The Fight...........................................................................................................................................Ensemble Come With Me..................................................................................................Queenie, Black, Ensemble Make Me Happy........................................................................................................Queenie, Burrs, Black Poor Child Reprise.................................................................................................................Queenie, Black How Did We Come to This?............................................................................................................ Queenie

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d i r e c to r ’ s n o t e s Andrew Lippa’s THE WILD PARTY, based on the 1928 Joseph Moncure March poem of the same name, premiered at The Manhattan Theatre Club in 2000. It won the Drama Desk Award for Outstanding Music, the Outer Critics Circle Award for Outstanding OffBroadway Musical, three Lucille Lortel Awards, and one Obie Award. It was nominated for twelve additional Drama Desk Awards, including Outstanding New Musical. The book-length poem was completed in 1926 but not published until 1928 because of fear of the raw, explicit sexuality and drug use it portrayed. It is the story of a decadent all night party thrown by Queenie and Burrs, two vicious and reckless Vaudeville performers caught in an ill-fated relationship marked by jealousy, rage and lust. The musical structure is challenging and complex. Lippa utilizes musical styles from the jazz age as well as contemporary pop/Broadway style songs with a healthy dose of sungthrough dialogue similar to operatic writing. The ensemble act as the party guests - a mixture of people living on the fringes of society- performers, composers, boxers, whores and even a “minor” tossed in for fun. They also have an important function as the “Greek Chorus” of the story - they melt in and out of the action, commenting and joining in at will. Taking on a musical of this difficulty demonstrates the fierce commitment to the students at the UWM Musical Theatre program that I, as a guest director, have seen firsthand throughout this process. Darci Wutz and Tony Horne felt that the students were up to the challenge and that this would be a great opportunity for them to really push to the edge of their abilities in all areas - acting, dancing and singing. The story is tough, the dances are many, and the music is downright hard. They took everything Darci, Kerry and I threw at them and made it their own. Enjoy watching the next generation of musical theatre performers as they take you on a wild and raucous ride tonight. Paula Suozzi Biogr aphies Paula Suozzi (Stage Director) has been directing opera, theater and musical theatre since 1989. She has worked all over the country directing, remounting and assistant directing at such companies as the San Francisco Opera Association, Lyric Opera of Chicago, Metropolitan Opera Association, Opera Pacific, Toledo Opera, Cinncinnati Opera, Tulsa Opera, and the Lyric Opera of Cleveland. In Wisconsin, she was the Associate Artistic Director of Skylight Music Theatre from 1997-2003 and the Artistic Director of Milwaukee Shakespeare from 2003 -2008. Recently, she has guest directed with Forward Theater Company in Madison, and the Florentine Opera Company here in Milwaukee. Her teaching experience ranges from teaching the company class at First Stage to coaching the finalists for 4

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the Metropolitan Opera contestants. It was challenging to work with university students, most on the cusp of heading out into the world, and therefore she hopes there she said something useful to them. Paula’s other full time jobs are co-owner of Starting Line Athletics—a personal training company, mom to Dorothea and Carmela, and wife to Jonathan West. Kerry Hart Bieneman (Music Director/ Conductor) holds a Bachelor of Music degree (magna cum laude) in Vocal Performance from Lawrence University and a Master of Music degree in Vocal Performance from Northwestern University. She is an active pianist and singer throughout southeastern WI. Kerry has served as a private vocal coach and accompanist for Florentine Opera,


Biogr aphies

c o n t.

Skylight Music Theatre, Opera for the Young, Bel Canto Chorus, Milwaukee Rep, Waukesha Choral Union, and Northwestern University. She has sung with Florentine Opera, Skylight Music Theatre, Milwaukee Opera Theatre, and Opera for the Young. At UWM, she teaches voice lessons to classical and musical theatre singers, co-teaches an opera workshop class, teaches a vocal jazz class, and is the music director for the opera. Kerry was the recipient of two awards at the Wisconsin District Metropolitan Opera National Council Auditions. She has also received a Downbeat Award for her work as a jazz singer. She has been the Assistant Choral Director of the KIDS from Wisconsin since 2005. Kerry also enjoys serving as the music director, choir director, and pianist at Peace Lutheran Church in Burlington. Darci Brown Wutz (Choreographer; Coordinator/PSOA Inter-Arts’ BFA in Musical Theatre Performance) holds a BFA in Theatre/Dance Emphasis from the University of MN, Duluth, and an MFA in Dance Performance and Choreography from Smith College. After teaching at UMD, Smith, Mount Holyoke and Alverno College, Darci served as Director of Dance in the Dept. of Performing Arts at Marquette University before joining the Dance faculty at UWM. Choreographer of over 48 musical theatre and non-musical theatre productions, as well as an equal number of concert works, Darci has worked in regional and national theatre, including the Minnesota Repertory Theater, Milwaukee Repertory Theater and Stackner Cabaret, First Stage, Skylight Musical Theatre, Milwaukee Chamber Theatre, Theatre X, Renaissance Theaterworks, Waukesha Civic Theatre and the Sunset Playhouse. She was awarded a substantial research grant from the UWM Graduate School Research Award for her concert work, “The Memory of All That”, a historical look at American musical theatre choreography, which is the focus of her ongoing research. She also co-authored the Peck School of the Arts’ Inter Arts

BFA in Musical Theatre Performance. In addition to numerous concert dance works presented at UWM, her recent musical theatre endeavors include productions of West Side Story, Oklahoma!, Kiss Me Kate, SHOWTUNES, Hula Hoop Shaboop, and most recently UWM’s productions of No, No Nanette! and Into the Woods. She served as Artist in Residence for ProDanza Italia in Tuscany, Italy, teaching dance technique and choreographic styles in Musical Theatre. She would like to dedicate this production to her mentor, Joyce Torvund, who first introduced her to the world of dance in musical theatre. Jessica Peck (Production Manager/Stage Manager/Master Electrician) has enjoyed the opportunity to stage manage The Wild Party. It has been wonderful chance to work with such a talented cast on such a large project.  Jessica comes to UWM from working at Skylight Music Theatre as an electrician and lighting programmer but was also lucky enough to be able to stage manage their production of Things That Go Ding!.  Before that she spent a season with the Milwaukee Repertory Theater as an electrics intern for Cabaret and Bombshells, then as assistant stagehand on The 39 Steps and Bombitty of Errors.  Jessica received her BA in Theatre from Ripon College. While going to school, she was stage manager for Arcadia and Fuente Ovejuna; lighting designer on Anatomy of Gray and Eurydice; and worked on a number of other crews.  Finally, a huge thank you to her wonderful husband, supportive family, and hard working student crew who all helped to make this show happen. Noele Stollmack (Scenic and Lighting Designer) Recent projects include lighting design for the world premiere of The Meaning of Almost Everything by Jeff Daniels at the Purple Rose Theatre; Shakespeare’s Will, Skylight and Heroes at American Players Theatre; as well as Susannah, Idomeneo and Carmen at the Florentine Opera. Her scenery and lighting design includes: The February Programs

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Biogr aphies

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Rape of Lucretia at Toledo Opera; Venus and Adonis/Dido and Aeneas, Río de Sangre, The Magic Flute, Macbeth and Rigoletto for the Florentine Opera; Pagliacci at Opera Columbus; Jingle Bells, Batman Smells for First Stage Children’s Theatre; and the Milwaukee Rep’s Mirandolina. Past lighting design features: The Clarence Brown Theatre production of The Merry Wives of Windsor; numerous productions for American Players Theatre; the Florentine Opera’s Grammy Award-winning Elmer Gantry; Don Giovanni with the Cleveland Opera; I Am My Own Wife for the Rep/PTTP at the University of Delaware; Yankee Tavern at the Milwaukee Rep; and Tosca at Nashville Opera. Noele’s long collaboration with composer and choreographer Meredith Monk includes the international touring productions of mercy & impermanence (scenic realization & lighting design). Her lighting has appeared on numerous stages including The Brooklyn Academy of Music, Sydney Opera House, Houston Grand Opera, Opera Ontario, Vancouver Opera, Opera Pacific, Portland Opera, New Orleans Opera, Atlanta Opera, Madison Opera and the Alley Theatre. As Lighting Director for Houston Grand Opera, she supervised the lighting for over 50 operas and designed such productions as Andrei Serban’s Elektra, Dr. Jonathan Miller’s Der Rosenkavalier, and the world premieres of Harvey Milk, Desert of Roses and Dracula Diary. Her Wisconsin AIA award-winning residential and public space lighting is installed throughout the Midwest.

Leslie Vaglica (Costume Designer) graduated from UW-Eau Claire and earned a post-graduate degree from Mt Mary College. She has worked on productions for Optimist Theatre, American Players Theatre, Florentine Opera, Pink Banana Theatre, and Milwaukee Repertory Theater. In her free time, Leslie teaches sewing classes for the Milwaukee Recreation Department and is the official seamstress for the Crazy 8’s roller derby team. It’s been a distinct pleasure to work with students at UWM for the first time! Seth Warren-Crow (Sound Designer) is the Musical Director of the Dance Department at the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee. He is a sound designer, sound engineer, composer, and percussionist. Seth composes music locally and nationally for dance and theater performances and regularly collaborates with performance artist Heather Warren-Crow as warrencrow+warren-crow.  Seth received a BA in English and Religious Studies from Lawrence University in Wisconsin and a MFA in Electronic Music and Recording Media from Mills College in California. At UWM. he teaches courses in sound art, music, and digital media, and is a sound engineer and composer for dance department performances.

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special thanks Milwaukee Repertory Theater; Florentine Opera; Skylight Music Theatre; Jose’s Hairapy; Cobbler Shoe Service; I. M. Salvage; Chris Conrad of Select Sound; PSOA Interim Dean Scott Emmons; PSOA Black and Gold Committee; PSOA Year of the Arts Committee and Susan Mendelson; Tony Horne; Voice Faculty from UWM Music; Simone Ferro and Kayla Premeau from UWM Dance; Diane Grace; Chris Guse, Pamela Rehberg, Steve White, LeRoy Stoner and Kristy Volbrecht from UWM Theatre; Randy Holper; Lisa Schlenker; and Joyce Torvund.

artistic and production tea m Director.........................................................................................................................................Paula Suozzi Music Director/Conductor....................................................................................Kerry Hart Bieneman Choreographer................................................................................................................ Darci Brown Wutz Production Manager/Stage Manager/Master Electrician............................................Jessica Peck Costume Designer.................................................................................................................. Leslie Vaglica Scenic/Lighting Designer............................................................................................... Noele Stollmack Sound Designer............................................................................................................. Seth Warren-Crow Sound Board Operator.....................................................................................................Ben Hohenstein Assistant Stage Manager................................................................................................Meredith L. Roat Assistant Master Electrician/Light Board Operator......................................................... John Leahy Production Crew............................................................................Colin Gawronski, Alex Grzybowski, Wil Haglund, Bonnie Watson Costume Supervisor........................................................................................................................Sari Kern Hair and Makeup Supervisor.................................................................................................. Anna Fraser Wardrobe............................................................................................................................... Heather Hirvela

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Makers in Print: International Exhibition

CELEBRATE WITH US!

INTERNATIONAL EXHIBITION JANUARY 18 – MARCH 24, 2013

March 20 – 23.

Noise of Silence

Makers in Print celebrates the global vitality of printmaking through works selected by coordinating curators from find us on THAN 450 EVENTS ALL YEAR Argentina, China, Mexico,MORE Poland, The exhibition is aLONG! central component of the 41st conference of Southern Graphics South Africa and South Korea. BOX OFFICE: 414-229-4308 arts.uwm.edu/tickets visit Council :International (SGCI) hosted byyoa.uwm.edu the Milwaukee Institute of Art & Design Curated selection of works by SGCI and the University of Wisconsinhonorees —Lesley Dill, Margo Humphrey, 8 UWM Peck School of Art Milwaukee’s Peck School of the Arts from Frances Myers, Alison Saar and

Wi Self-Portrait


progr a m Pilgrim Soul (2011).................................................................................................Augusta Read Thomas 1964Robert Morgan, oboe Ilana Setapen, violin Kathleen Brauer, violin

Trio in B-Flat for Clarinet, Cello, and Piano, Op. 11 (1797)...................... Ludwig van Beethoven Allegro Con Brio Adagio Tema Con Variazioni

1770-1827

Todd Levy, clarinet Stefan Kartman, cello Jeannie Yu, piano

- Intermission Piano Trio in E minor “Dumky�, Op. 90 (1891)............................................................Antonin Dvorak Lento Maestoso 1841-1904 Poco Adagio Andante Andante Moderato (Quasi Tempo di Marcia) Allegro Lento Maestoso Ilana Setapen, violin Barbara Haffner, cello Jeannie Yu, piano

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progr a m notes Pilgrim Soul Augusta Read Thomas Pilgrim Soul was commissioned by Matthew Kuhn as a surprise fiftieth birthday gift for his wife Alyssa Kuhn and it was premiered on her exact fiftieth birthday, 10 February, 2011 at Weill Hall in Carnegie Hall by Matthew Kuhn, English Horn; Alyssa Kuhn, Violin; and Julieta Mihai, Violin. The music of Augusta READ THOMAS is majestic, it is elegant, it is lyrical, it is “boldly considered music that celebrates the sound of the instruments and reaffirms the vitality of orchestral music. (Philadelphia Inquirer) Her deeply personal music is guided by her particular sense of musical form, rhythm, timbre, and harmony. But given the striking individuality and voice, her music is affected by history — in Thomas’ words, “Old music deserves new music and new music needs old music.” For Thomas, this means cherishing her place within the musical tradition and giving credit to those who have forged the musical paths she follows and from which she innovates. “You can hear the perfumes of my metaphorical grandparents,” Thomas states. “There is a wonderful tradition that I adore, I understand, and care about, but I also have my two feet facing forward.” Thomas’ vision toward the future, her understanding of the present, and her respect for the past is evident in her art, in her teaching, and in her citizenship. When Director of the Festival of Contemporary Music at Tanglewood last summer, Augusta’s welcome-letter started, “Music’s eternal quality is its capacity for change, transformation and renewal. No one composer, style, school of thought and practice or historical period can claim a monopoly of music’s truths.” Most striking in her music, though, is its exquisite humanity and poetry of the soul. The notion that music takes over where words cease is hardly more true than in Thomas’ nuanced and colorful musical voice. Augusta recounts that Matthew asked for a short work, he also specified its ravishingly beautiful instrumentation, and she remembers that he remarked, “that the general ‘tone’ of the music was to be introspective, soulful, passionate, showing love, and perhaps even sorrow.” Continuing on, Matthew mentioned, “I am not interested in a “ashy, millionnotes-fly-by, dazzling, fanfare-like trio for this ‘particular’ occasion.” With Matthew’s wishes in her mind and ear, she set out to compose a work of soul, melodious beauty, rich long lines, and masterful intricately-woven counterpoint. Pilgrim Soul was inspired by this beautiful and heartfelt poem by William Butler Yeats: WHEN YOU ARE OLD When you are old and grey and full of sleep, And nodding by the fire, take down this book, And slowly read, and dream of the soft look Your eyes had once, and of their shadows deep; How many loved your moments of glad grace, And loved your beauty with love false or true, But one man loved the pilgrim Soul in you, And loved the sorrows of your changing face; And bending down beside the glowing bars, Murmur, a little sadly, how Love fled And paced upon the mountains overhead And hid his face amid a crowd of stars. 10

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progr a m notes

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Augusta said about Pilgrim Soul, “Although this music is highly notated, precise, carefully structured, thoughtfully proportioned, and so forth…and as you have 3 independent musicians elegantly working together, from the very specific and nuanced text, I like my music to have the feeling that it is organically being self-propelled – on the spot. As if we listeners, the audience, are overhearing a captured improvisation. “I like my music to be played so that the ‘inner-life’ of the different rhythmic syntaxes is specific, with characterized phrasing of many colors, characters, and harmonies, etc. – keeping it ultra alive – such that it always sounds spontaneous.” Recently, Augusta said, “The desire to make music comes from very deep inside and from profound necessity. The urge to make and share music (to communicate, if you will) is vivid, and implied in this passion to express is a recipient of the expression – someone, anyone who is a willing listener. We composers write music that craves a listener and believe that if one creates music that is honest, personal and human, and is technically and imaginatively elegrant in its articulation, it will find its audience – whoever or wherever they may be.” Trio in B-Flat for Clarinet, Cello, and Piano, Op. 11 Ludwig van Beethoven Beethoven’s output of piano trios comprises six major works, including the great “Ghost” and “Archduke” trios. Tonight’s trio, Op. 11, is one of two he wrote in which the upper part, scored for the violin in a piano trio, is played by the clarinet. (The other, by the way, is Op. 38, an arrangement of his famous Septet.) While Beethoven allowed performance of these trios with either clarinet or violin, clarinet performances are more common today. In the true sense of chamber music, the three players are complete equals here, each taking on both prominent and subordinate roles over the course of the work. The first movement opens with a bold, unison ascending and then descending idea, and the secondary material consists of a pair of themes, the first presented by the solo piano. The development section seizes upon both of these, beginning with the solo piano idea and then extensively treating the descending portion of the opening. The slow movement, in sonata form, opens with a lyrical melody in the cello, and when the clarinet and violin take it up, the piano responds with an echo-like effect. The finale is a theme and variations movement with a theme taken from a popular contemporary opera. Beethoven wrote the trio in 1798, and the opera that was Beethoven’s source, L’Amor marinaro by Joseph Weigl (1766-1846), had just premiered the previous year. The variations are on the aria “Pria ch’io l’impegno,” a popular tune, exemplifying a trend in Beethoven’s compositions in the later 1790s: during that period, he wrote several other variation sets for solo piano on popular tunes by such composers as Paisiello, Grétry, Salieri, and Süssmayr. In the trio, the first variation is for solo piano, and then the piano is silent in the second. Many sets of classical variations contain one variation in the minor, but here there are two, as both numbers 4 and 7 are minor. After the ninth variation, which begins with canonic octaves in the solo piano, the piano effects a meter shift to 6/8, one that shifts back to the original just before the work ends, as boldly as it began. Beethoven program notes written by Timothy Noonan

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Piano Trio in E minor “Dumky”, Op. 90 (1891) Antonin Dvorak Tempered by years of largely unrecognized creativity, Dvorak maintained his attitudes and work habits amid a flow of professorships and honorary doctorates that began around 1890. As his reputation blossomed throughout Europe and America, Dvorák immersed himself still more deeply in the musical heritage of his native Bohemia. In November of 1890, he launched one of his most daring and nationalistic projects, a piano trio that was constructed of a chain of six original Dumky. Derived from the Russian term duma, a Dumka (plural: dumky) was originally a Slavic narrative folk song of melancholy character. In Dvorák’s hands, the basic character of this form was often contrasted by episodes of vigorous gaiety. He first used the form in his Dumka for solo piano, Op. 35 (1876). He employed it again in the slow movements of his String Sextet (1878), his Slavonic Dance No. 2 (1878), his String Quartet in E-flat, Op. 51 (1878-79), his Piano Quintet in A, Op. 81 (1887), and most strikingly, in the present work. Here, the first three Dumky are conceived as a “first movement” unit; the constantly shifting moods of these artistically stylized dances provide many gratifying passages, particularly for the cellist. The fourth Dumka is generally reminiscent of a slow movement, while the fifth has a scherzo-like character. Containing greater contrasts within itself, the sixth Dumka completes the work with a rousing final section. Dvorak program notes by Roger Ruggeri about rembr andt cha mber pl ayers Founded in 1990, the Rembrandt Chamber Players is composed of six of the finest musicians in the Chicago area. In addition, a regular group of “Friends” appear annually with the core ensemble. The ensemble successfully maintains an unusually wide repertoire, performing Baroque music in a historically informed manner as well as 21st century compositions with eclectic instrumentations. Since its inceptions Rembrandt has commissioned thirteen new works and four arrangements by renowned composers from the Chicago area and beyond. Hailed as “one of the Chicago area’s preeminent chamber music groups” (Chicago Tribune), Rembrandt appears regularly on fine arts radio station WFMT, both live and in a series of rebroadcasts of concert highlights during the summers. Deeply committed to fostering chamber music education and appreciation, Rembrandt founded an Annual High School Chamber Music Competition in 1995, one of a few in the country. The Rembrandt Young Artists program, founded in 2006, provides performance opportunities and coaching sessions for the competition winners. In 2011 a new collaborative relationship was inaugurated with the Young Women’s Leadership Charter School in Chicago. This project enabled members of the musicians, a former winner, and an Advisory Board member to introduce chamber music to the students in preparation for a concert by the Rembrandt Young Artists. This collaboration will be continued and enhanced this season.

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artist Biogr aphies Kathleen Brauer Kathleen Brauer made her solo debut with the Milwaukee Symphony Orchestra at the age of 15. She holds degrees from the University of Michigan and Yale.  She has appeared with numerous chamber ensembles, including the Ensemble Modern (Frankfurt, Germany), Rembrandt Chamber Players (Chicago), the Lyric Chamber Ensemble (Detroit), the Museum Chamber Players (Ann Arbor) and the Pintele Trio.  She is a member of the orchestras of Lyric Opera of Chicago, the Santa Fe Opera, and Music of the Baroque. Barbara Haffner Barbara Haffner, cello, is a graduate of the Eastman School of Music, Assistant Principal Cellist of the Lyric Opera of Chicago Orchestra and Principal Cellist with Chicago Philharmonic Orchestra and Chicago’s Music of the Baroque. A former member of the Philadelphia Orchestra, Ms Haffner has had solo repertoire written for her by several composers including Pulitzer Prize winner, Richard Wernick. She has been a featured soloist with the Dallas, Philadelphia, Music of the Baroque and Symphony II orchestra. Stefan Kartman Stefan Kartman is currently Associate Professor of Cello and Chamber Music at the University of Wisconsin - Milwaukee. In addition to solo performance, he has performed to critical acclaim as cellist of the Kneisel Trio and the Florestan Duo. He has given performances and masterclasses in conservatories and schools of music worldwide including the Cleveland Institute of Music (USA), the Xiamen Conservatory of Music (China), and the D’Albaco Conservatory of Music (Italy), among many others. An avid chamber music enthusiast, Dr. Kartman has served on the faculties of the Alfred University Summer Chamber Music Institute, the MidAmerica Chamber Music Festival, the Troy Youth Chamber Music

Institute, the Green Mountain Chamber Music Festival, and was artistic director of the Milwaukee Chamber Music Festival. His early training in chamber music was with his father, Myron Kartman, of the Antioch String Quartet and during his formal training as a chamber musician, he studied with members of the Guarneri and Juilliard String Quartets and the Beaux Arts Trio. Stefan Kartman received degrees from Northwestern University, The Juilliard School of Music, and his doctorate from Rutgers University. He has been teaching assistant to Harvey Shapiro and Zara Nelsova of the Juilliard School and proudly acknowledges the pedagogical heritage of his teachers Shapiro, Nelsova, Bernard Greenhouse, Alan Harris, and Anthony Cooke. Todd Levy Principal Clarinet of the MSO and The Santa Fe Opera orchestras, two-time Grammy Award winner Todd Levy has performed as a soloist at Carnegie Hall, Mostly Mozart, with the Israel Philharmonic, and at the White House; as chamber musician with members of the Guarneri, Juilliard, Orion, Miami quartets, James Levine, Christoph Eschenbach, and Mitsuko Uchida; and as guest principal clarinet with the New York Philharmonic, the Metropolitan Opera, and frequently for Seiji Ozawa and Ricardo Muti in Japan. He has performed world premiere concerti or chamber works by composers such as John Harbison, Joan Tower, Peter Schickele, Paquito D’Rivera, Morton Subotnick, and Marc Neikrug and performs on the new release of Marc Neikrug’s Through Roses chamber work with violinist Pinchas Zuckerman, actor John Rubenstein and the composer conducting. He has recorded the Brahms Clarinet Sonatas for Avie, and three educational book/CD’s of clarinet competition works for G. Schirmer/Hal Leonard, and a new edition/CD of the Bernstein Clarinet Sonata for Boosey and Hawkes/Hal Leonard. He performs exclusively on Vandoren reeds, February Programs

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mouthpieces, and ligatures, and Selmer Signature clarinets. He is also on the faculty of UW/Milwaukee and is co-director of Chamber Music Milwaukee. For a more complete biography, visit toddlevy.org. Robert Morgan Robert Morgan, oboe, is Solo English Horn and Assistant Principal Oboe of the Lyric Opera of Chicago Orchestra and Principal Oboist with Music of the Baroque and Chicago Philharmonic Orchestra. He coaches woodwind chamber music at Northwestern University and maintains a private studio.  He is a frequent soloist with numerous area orchestras and musical organizations and has performed at the White House with Music of the Baroque and with members of the Guarnieri Quartet in Maryland. He is a graduate of Indiana University and also studied with Ray Still, Marc Lifschey and John Mack. Ilana Setapen Since her solo orchestral debut at age 15 with the Amarillo Symphony, Ilana Setapen has been flourishing as a violinist with a powerful and original voice. She is the newly appointed Associate Concertmaster of the Milwaukee Symphony Orchestra and the Assistant Concertmaster of the Grant Park Festival Orchestra in Chicago. She has previously been the Concertmaster of the Riverside County Philharmonic, the Juilliard Orchestra, the Colburn Orchestra, the National Repertory Orchestra, and the USC Thornton Symphony. Solo appearances have been with the Milwaukee Symphony, the Pasadena Pops, and the National Repertory Orchestra, among others. Also an avid chamber musician, Ilana was for two years the first violinist of the award-winning Calla Quartet in New York. Ilana studied at USC, the Colburn School, and Juilliard, with world-renowned teachers such as Robert Lipsett, Donald Weilerstein, and Ronald Copes. 14

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Jeannie Yu Jeannie Yu, piano, a native of Korea, is an award-winning pianist. Her honors include first prize in the Frinna Awerbuch Piano Competition in New York, and first prize in the Kingsville Piano Competition in Texas. She also earned the prestigious Gina Bachauer Memorial Scholarship Award, a full scholarship to The Juilliard School of Music for both the bachelor and master’s degree programs. Yu has performed as a soloist with the Portland Symphony in Maine, the Marina del Rey-Westchester Symphony, the Flint Symphony in Michigan, the Des Moines Brandenburg Ensemble, the Des Moines Symphony, and most recently with the Xiamen Philharmonic Orchestra in China. She is in great demand as a chamber musician and soloist in the greater New York and Chicago areas, and has appeared with the Rembrandt Chamber Players and on Robert Sherman’s Young Artist Showcase on WQXR in New York and WOI radio in Des Moines, Iowa. Yu performs regularly with her husband cellist Stefan Kartman in the Florestan Duo. She has taught at the Alfred Summer Chamber Institute in New York, the Drake University Community School of Music, the Mid-America Summer Chamber Music Institute at Ohio Wesleyan University, the Milwaukee Summer Chamber Music Festival, the Troy Public Library Chamber Music Institute in Michigan, and the Wisconsin Conservatory. She has studied with Ruth V. Sitjar, Martin Canin, Susan Starr, Ilana Vered, and Ann Schein. She received her Doctor of Musical Arts degree at the Peabody Institute of Music.


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progr a m String Quartet No.1 in E Minor, Op.112 (1899).................................................Camille Saint-Saëns Allegro (1835-1921) Molto Allegro Quasi Presto Molto Adagio Allegro non troppo String Quartet No.3 (2008).....................................................................................Krzysztof Penderecki “Leaves from an Unwritten Diary” (1933- ) (in one movement) -IntermissionString Quartet in E minor (1873).....................................................................................Giuseppe Verdi Allegro (1813-1901) Andantino Prestissimo Scherzo-Fuga: Allegro assai mosso

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progr a m notes Written by Timothy Noonan, Senior Lecturer - Music History and Literature Saint-Saëns, String Quartet No. 1 in E Minor, Op. 112 By the time Camille Saint-Saëns wrote the first of his two string quartets, he was a famous and very well-traveled fellow. He made a number of visits to Algeria, including one following the death of his mother in 1888, in an effort to regain his health after the trauma of her loss. He took a concert tour, combined with leisure travel, in 1890, during which he visited parts of southern Europe, South America, the Canary Islands, Scandinavia, and East Asia. 1893 brought an honorary doctorate from Cambridge University. When he composed the first quartet in 1899, he was already in his mid-sixties. The Quartet No. 1 was dedicated to Belgian violinist Eugène Ysaÿe, a musician deeply committed to French chamber music, with the idea that Ysaÿe’s quartet would give the premiere. The first movement, after a hushed introduction, makes this clear, with its virtuosic writing and high register for the first violinist. The scherzo-like second movement is a set of variations on a popular tune that originated in Brittany. The broad, lyrical slow movement reminds us at times of the slow movements in Beethoven’s late quartets. And the finale, energetic and serious, maintains the quartet’s minor mode to the end. Penderecki, String Quartet No. 3 “Leaves of an Unwritten Diary” Born in Dębica, Poland, Krzysztof Penderecki stands as the most prominent composer the country had produced since Chopin. Already in his 20s, his compositions gained a considerable reputation for their innovative national styles and non-traditional instrumental techniques. He was composer in residence at Yale University in 1973-78, and he held the post of rector at the Kraków Academy from 1972 into the 1980s. He is also active as a conductor, having held orchestra posts and conducted recordings of his own works. His Threnody “To the Victims of Hiroshima” of 1960, scored for 52 string players, uses graphic notation and stands among the most celebrated avant-garde works of its time. To date, Penderecki has written three string quartets. The first (1960) is dominated by non-traditional playing techniques, including percussive effects made by striking parts of the instruments. While the second (1968, revised 1970) deals more directly with pitch, the sounds are again produced in highly unconventional ways. His latest contribution, which we hear today, is his third (2008), called “Leaves of an Unwritten Diary.” It was commissioned by Montclair State University (Montclair, New Jersey) and the University of Richmond, and its premiere took place at a performance in Warsaw by the Shanghai Quartet that marked the composer’s 75th birthday, late in 2008. Set in one movement that is made up of five sections, its style is more traditional than its two avant-garde predecessors. The work opens with a vivid melody for the solo viola, followed by an energetic vivace (which recurs during the work). Subsequently the styles of waltz and nocturne are evoked. As the work progresses, the composer calls for very fast tempos, in keeping with his penchant for musical extremes. And toward the end comes a gypsy melody, which Penderecki identified as a tune he heard his father play on his violin when he was a boy. The work’s climactic passage is next, in which the themes heard earlier are combined in an intense culmination. The second violin quietly brings the quartet to a close.

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Verdi, String Quartet in E minor Hailed as among the greatest operatic composers in history, Giuseppe Verdi had already composed all but two of his operas when he wrote his only string quartet. He had recently completed Aida (1871) and announced that he would now retire from composition. But he did not, though it would be sixteen years until he wrote another opera; Otello followed in 1887, and his final opera, Falstaff, dates from 1893, premiered at La Scala when he was 79 years old. During this long interim, he composed both the quartet and the great Requiem (1874). He wrote the quartet in March 1873 while he was in Naples to supervise performances of Aida. Initially, Verdi planned the work as a private one, and it was first performed for friends in April, but he decided to publish it in 1876. Though the opening theme of the first movement is derived from a motive from Aida, the quartet is not operatic, but rather shows Verdi as a composer quite capable of inventing instrumentally-based themes and developing them in the manner of the quartet composers who came before him. In the second movement, constructed in an ABA shape with a coda, the opening theme is in a style reminiscent of a mazurka. The Prestissimo third movement, essentially a scherzo, features a folk-like trio section opened delicately by the cello. And the finale is marked “Scherzo-Fuga,” treating a subject made almost entirely of staccato eighth notes with such traditional fugal techniques as stretto, canon, and inversion. T h e F i n e a r t s q ua r t e t The Fine Arts Quartet, “one of the gold-plated names in chamber music” (Washington Post), ranks among the most distinguished ensembles of our time, with an illustrious history of performing success and an extensive recording legacy. Founded in Chicago in 1946, and based at the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee since 1963, the Quartet is one of the elite few to have recorded and toured internationally for over half a century. Each season, violinists Ralph Evans and Efim Boico (who have been playing together nearly 30 years), violist Nicolò Eugelmi, and cellist Robert Cohen perform worldwide in such cities as New York, London, Paris, Berlin, Rome, Madrid, Moscow, Tokyo, Beijing, Istanbul, Jerusalem, Mexico City, and Toronto. The Quartet has recorded more than 200 works. Their latest releases on Naxos include: chamber masterpieces by Schumann, the world premiere recording of Efrem Zimbalist’s Quartet in its 1959 revised edition, the world premiere digital recording of Eugène Ysaÿe’s long-lost masterpiece for quartet and string orchestra, “Harmonies du Soir”; Fritz Kreisler’s String Quartet, the two Saint-Saëns String Quartets, three Beethoven String Quintets; the Franck String Quartet and Piano Quintet; Fauré Piano Quintets; complete Bruckner chamber music; complete Mendelssohn String Quintets; “Four American Quartets” by Antheil, Herrmann, Glass, Evans; complete Schumann Quartets; and the Glazunov String Quintet and Novelettes. Aulos Musikado released their complete Dohnányi String Quartets and Piano Quintets, and Lyrinx released both their complete early Beethoven Quartets and complete Mozart String Quintets in SACD format. In 2013, Naxos plans to release their recording of Saint-Saëns’s brilliant piano quintet and piano quartets. The Quartet’s recent recordings have received many distinctions. Their Fauré Quintets CD on Naxos with pianist Cristina Ortiz was singled out by the 2012 Gramophone Classical Music Guide  as a “Gramophone award-winner and recording of legendary status”, and was among the recordings for which musical producer Steven Epstein February Programs

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won a 2009 Grammy® Award (“Producer of the Year, Classical”).  The Quartet’s Franck CD was named “Editor’s Choice” by Gramophone Magazine in February, 2010, and their Glazunov, Mendelssohn, and Fauré CD’s were each named a “Recording of the Year” by Musicweb International (2007-2009). In addition, their “Four American Quartets” album was designated a “BBC Music Magazine Choice” in 2008, their Schumann CD was named “one of the very finest chamber music recordings of the year” by the American Record Guide in 2007, and their Mozart Quintets SACD box set was named a “Critic’s Choice 2003” by the American Record Guide. Nearly all of the Quartet’s Naxos CDs were selected for Grammy® Awards entry lists in the “Best Classical Album” and/or “Best Chamber Music Performance” categories. Special recognition was given for the Quartet’s commitment to contemporary music: a 2003-2004 national CMA/ASCAP Award for Adventurous Programming, given jointly by Chamber Music America and the American Society of Composers, Authors, and Publishers. The Quartet members have helped form and nurture many of today’s top international young ensembles. They have been guest professors at the national music conservatories of Paris and Lyon, as well as at the summer music schools of Yale University and Indiana University. They also appear regularly as jury members of major competitions such as Evian, Shostakovich, and Bordeaux. Documentaries on the Fine Arts Quartet have appeared on both French and American Public Television. For more information, please visit: www.fineartsquartet.com. Biogr aphies RALPH EVANS, violinist, prizewinner in the 1982 International Tchaikovsky Competition in Moscow, concertized as soloist throughout Europe and North America before succeeding Leonard Sorkin as first violinist of the Fine Arts Quartet. Evans has recorded over 85 solo and chamber works to date. These include the two Bartók Sonatas for violin and piano, whose performance the New York Times enthusiastically recommended for its “searching insight and idiomatic flair,” and three virtuoso violin pieces by Lukas Foss with the composer at the piano. Evans graduated cum laude from Yale University, where he also received a doctorate. While a Fulbright scholar in London, he studied with Szymon Goldberg and Nathan Milstein, and soon won the top prize in a number of major American competitions, including the Concert Artists Guild Competition in New York, and the National 20

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Federation of Music Clubs National Young Artist Competition. Evans has also received recognition for his work as a composer. His award winning composition “Nocturne” has been performed on American Public Television and his String Quartet No.1, recently released on the Naxos label, has been warmly greeted in the press (“rich and inventive” - Toronto Star; “whimsical and clever, engaging and amusing” - All Music Guide; “vigorous and tuneful” - Montreal Gazette; “seductive, modern sonorities” - France Ouest; “a small masterpiece” - Gli Amici della Musica). EFIM BOICO,  violinist, enjoys an international career that has included solo appearances under conductors Zubin Mehta, Carlo Maria Guilini, Claudio Abbado and Erich Leinsdorf, and performances with Daniel Barenboim, Radu Lupu and Pinchas Zuckerman. After receiving his


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musical training in his native Russia, he emigrated in 1967 to Israel, where he was appointed Principal Second Violin of the Israel Philharmonic - a position he held for eleven years. In 1971, he joined the Tel Aviv Quartet as second violinist, touring the world with guest artists such as André Previn and Vladimir Ashkenazy. In 1979, Boico was appointed concertmaster and soloist of the Orchestre de Paris under Daniel Barenboim, positions he held until 1983, when he joined the Fine Arts Quartet. Boico has been guest professor at the Paris and Lyons Conservatories in France, and the Yehudi Menuhin School in Switzerland. He is also a frequent juror representing the United States in the prestigious London, Evian, and Shostakovich Quartet Competitions. As music professor at the University of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, he has received numerous awards, including the Wisconsin Public Education Professional Service Award for distinguished music teaching, and the Arts Recognition and Talent Search Award from the National Foundation for Advancement in the Arts. NICOLÒ EUGELMI, violist, joined the Fine Arts Quartet in July, 2009. He is described by The Strad magazine as ‘“a player of rare perception, with a keen ear for timbres and a vivid imagination.” As soloist, recitalist, and member of chamber ensembles, he has performed around the world, collaborating most notably with conductors Mario Bernardi, Jean-Claude Casadesus, and Charles Dutoit. Eugelmi completed his musical training at the University of British Columbia and the Juilliard School. In 1999, he was appointed Associate Principal Violist of the Orchestre Symphonique de Montréal, and in 2005, he became Principal

Violist of the Canadian Opera Company. Eugelmi’s recording, Brahms: Sonatas and Songs, was named a “Strad Selection” by The Strad, and his recording, Brahms Lieder, a collaboration with Marie-Nicole Lemieux, was named “Editor’s Choice” by Gramophone. He has recorded regularly for the CBC and Radio-Canada. His mentor, Gerald Stanick, was a member of the Fine Arts Quartet from 1963 to 1968. ROBERT COHEN, cellist, made his concerto debut at the age of twelve at the Royal Festival Hall London and throughout his distinguished international career, he has been hailed as one of the foremost cellists of our time. “It is easy to hear what the fuss is about, he plays like a God” (New York Stereo Review). “Cohen can hold an audience in the palm of his hand” (The Guardian). Invited to perform concertos world-wide by conductors Claudio Abbado, Kurt Masur, Riccardo Muti, and Sir Simon Rattle, Cohen has also collaborated in chamber music with many eminent artists such as Yehudi Menuhin and the Amadeus String Quartet, with whom he recorded the Schubert Cello Quintet on Deutsche Grammophon. At age nineteen, Cohen recorded the Elgar Concerto with the London Philharmonic Orchestra for the EMI label, and since then, he has recorded much of the cello repertoire for Sony, Decca, DGG, EMI, and BIS. Cohen, who studied with the legendary artists William Pleeth, Jacqueline du Pré, and Mstislav Rostropovich, is an inspirational teacher who has given master classes all over the world. He is a Professor at the Royal Academy of Music in London and is director of the Charleston Manor Festival in the south of England. He joined the Fine Arts Quartet in January 2012.

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d e pa r tm e n t o f m u s i c Ensembles John Climer, Band Scott Corley, Bands Margery Deutsch, Community Orchestra Curt Hanrahan, Jazz Band Gloria Hansen, Choirs Sharon Hansen, Choirs Jun Kim, Orchestras David Nunley, Choirs Paul Thompson, Choirs Guitar Peter Baime Beverly Belfer Pete Billmann Elina Chekan René Izquierdo Andrew Lardner Don Linke John Stropes Harp Ann Lobotzke+ Jazz Studies Curt Hanrahan, Jazz Ensemble/Jazz Arranging Steve Nelson-Raney, Jazz Theory and History Randall Ruback Music Education Jill Kuespert Anderson Wolfgang Calnin Scott Emmons Sheila Feay-Shaw Jeffrey Garthee Catherine Robertson Beth Sacharski Bonnie Scholz

Musicology and Ethnomusicology Mitchell Brauner Judith Kuhn Timothy Noonan Gillian Rodger Martin Jack Rosenblum Music Theory, Composition and Technology James Burmeister Christopher Burns Lou Cucunato William Heinrichs Jonathan Monhardt Steve Nelson-Raney Kevin Schlei Stephen Schlei Amanda Schoofs Jon Welstead* Piano Elena Abend Judit Jaimes Leslie Krueger Peggy Otwell Jeffry Peterson María Valentina Schlei Strings Scott Cook, String Pedagogy^ Darcy Drexler, String Pedagogy^ Stefan Kartman, Cello Thomas McGirr, Jazz Bass Lewis Rosove, Viola Laura Snyder, String Bass+ Bernard Zinck, Violin

Fine Arts Quartet Ralph Evans, Violin Efim Boico, Violin Nicolò Eugelmi, Viola Robert Cohen, Cello Voice Kerry Bieneman Valerie Errante Jenny Gettel Tanya Kruse Ruck Kurt Ollmann Winds, Brass and Percussion Dave Bayles, Percussion Dean Borghesani, Percussion+ Margaret Butler, Oboe+ Jennifer Clippert, Flute Gregory Flint, Horn Matthew Gaunt, Tuba/ Euphonium Beth Giacobassi, Bassoon+ Curt Hanrahan, Saxophone Kevin Hartman, Trumpet Mark Hoelscher, Trombone Todd Levy, Clarinet+ Ted Soluri, Bassoon+ Carl Storniolo, Percussion Thomas Wetzel, Percussion+ *Department Chair +Milwaukee Symphony Orchestra ^String Academy of Wisconsin

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peck school of the arts Scott Emmons.......................................................................................................................... Interim Dean Kim Cosier.............................................................................................................. Interim Associate Dean a d m i n i s t r at i v e s ta ff Mary McCoy............................................................................................................... Assistant to the Dean Sue Thomas..............................................................................................................Administrative Officer Randall Trumbull-Holper.............................................................................................Facilities Manager m a r k e t i n g a n d d e v e l o p m e n t s ta ff Ellen Friebert Schupper................................................Director, Marketing and Communications Diane Grace.............................................................................................................Development Director Nicole Schanen.......................................................................................................... Marketing Specialist Justin Kunesh........................................................................................... Graphic Designer/Webmaster Chelsey Porth..........................................................................................................................Student Intern b o x o ff i c e Christine Barclay..........................................................................................Interim Box Office Manager Aryel Beck, Maria Corpus,................................................................................................. Box Office Staff Mike Gold, Tom Gray, Brianna Husman, Garrett Nei, Nick Ouchie, Anna Pfefferkorn, Bob Schaab

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