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35th Season – 2010-2011

“Old, New, Borrowed, Blue”

OLD

Music from the Renaissance, Baroque, and early Classical eras

Saturday, October 16, 2010 – 8:00 p.m. St. Matthew’s Evangelical Lutheran Church 1615 Wauwatosa Ave. Wauwatosa, WI 53213

featuring Bob Syverson and Dennis Benjamin, Trumpets Dr. Phillip Serna, Viola da Gamba Concord Chamber Orchestra www.concordorchestra.org (414) 628-6018 concordmanager@gmail.com Concord Chamber Orchestra 1


PROGR A M The Earle of Oxford’s March......................................................................................William Byrd (ca. 1543-1623) arr. by Gordon Jacob Concerto for Two Trumpets.............................................................................. Antonio Vivaldi I. Allegro (1678-1741) II. Largo III. Allegro Bob Syverson and Dennis Benjamin, trumpet soloists Concert Suite for Viola da Gamba................................................ Georg Philipp Telemann I. Ouvertüre (1681-1767) II. La Trompette III. Sarabande IV. Rondeau V. Bourée VI. Courante VII. Gigue Dr. Phillip Serna, viola da gamba soloist ~ Intermission ~ Two Antiphonal Pieces................................................................................... Giovanni Gabrieli I. Sonata Octavi Toni (ca. 1553-1612) II. Canzon a 12 arr. by Robert King Selections from The Danserye (1551)............................................................Tylmann Susato I. La Mourisque (ca. 1510-1570) II. Bransle Quatre Bransle arr. by John Iverson III. Ronde IV. Basse Danse Bergeret V. Ronde Mon Amy VI. Pavane Bataille Symphony No. 45 (“Farewell”).................................................................Franz Joseph Haydn I. Allegro assai (1732-1809) II. Adagio III. Menuet (Allegretto) IV. Finale (Presto – Adagio)

ABOUT THE ORCHESTR A The Concord Chamber Orchestra was founded in 1975 to provide classical music performances for the enjoyment of area audiences, to offer performance opportunities to talented area musicians, and, through its annual concerto competition, to give promising young musicians a venue in which to perform. Its membership consists of volunteer adult players from various professions and age groups. In 1993, the orchestra made its home in the community of Wauwatosa, where it regularly performs at St. Matthew’s Evangelical Lutheran Church. 2 Concord Chamber Orchestra


PERSONNEL FLUTES Michelle Hoffman Carole Shiraga*

FIRST VIOLINS Corinn Bonkalski Casey Driscoll Jill Fennimore Gail Kappeler Carole Kincaid Julia Ollenburg Lynn Pietsch* Junko Suzuki Kristen Tan*

PICCOLO Michelle Hoffman OBOES Rita Mitchell* Annette Perkins CLARINETS William Pietsch* Stephanie Traska

SECOND VIOLINS Luis Contreras John Gleysteen Sandra Hoffman* Courtney Nibbe Jennifer Reinke* Martin St. Maurice Katy Vandenberg

BASSOONS Keith MacGaffey* Robb Seftar* HORNS William Erbach Sara Klemm Cheryl MIracle Isaac Roang*

VIOLAS Tom Dentici* Beth Getman* Gwenn Harmann Margo Kirchner

TRUMPETS Dennis Benjamin John Maga Stuart Malavsky Bob Syverson*

VIOLONCELLOS Joseph Crumrine Jeff Klatt* Jennifer MacGaffey Stephen Strommen*

TROMBONES Nathan Medsker Emmy Rosanski Kent Tess-Mattner*

CONTRABASSES Jacquie Crema* James Galasinski

TUBA David Carlton

KEYBOARD John Paradowski

PERCUSSION James Frets

*Principal player(s) Photo: Milwaukee Rep

Y O U R

O N L I N E

G U I D E

T O

T H E

P E R F O R M I N G

A R T S

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BIOGR APHIES Jamin Hoffman has had an extensive career as a conductor, serving for thirteen years as the Resident and Assistant Conductor for the Milwaukee Ballet (1989-2002), Conductor of the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee’s University Community Orchestra (1992-2003), and as Orchestra Director at Nicolet High School since August of 2002. In his time at Nicolet High School, Mr. Hoffman has led the orchestra on two successful international performing tours – to Russia (Moscow and St. Petersburg) in 2004, and to Austria and Germany (Vienna and Munich) in 2007 – as well as performed for Magic Music Days in Disney World in 2006. Mr. Hoffman was appointed the Conductor of the Concord Chamber Orchestra in August of 2004. As Resident Conductor of the Milwaukee Ballet, Mr. Hoffman led the Milwaukee Ballet Orchestra in performances of many great masterworks to critical acclaim. As a French horn player, Mr. Hoffman has performed regularly with the Waukesha Symphony and the Concord Chamber Orchestra since moving to Milwaukee in 1988. He is also an editor and arranger of educational music for Hal Leonard Music Publishing, with over forty published arrangements. A native of Mobile, Alabama, Mr. Hoffman received his undergraduate degree from the University of Southern Mississippi (USM). He received his Master’s degree from the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, where he studied conducting with Margery Deutsch and horn with Barry Benjamin. Currently, Mr. Hoffman lives in Milwaukee with his wife Sandra. In addition to his musical activities, Mr. Hoffman enjoys spending time with his daughter Mara, cooking, reading historical mysteries, and spoiling his pets. 4 Concord Chamber Orchestra

Bob Syverson has a Bachelor of Music degree from Concordia College, Moorhead, MN, and a Master of Music degree in Trumpet Performance from the Catholic University of America, Washington, DC. A former member of the The United States Army Band (Pershing’s Own), he has performed with the Milwaukee Symphony Orchestra and is a former member of the Waukesha Symphony Orchestra, now the Wisconsin Philharmonic. In addition to the Concord Chamber Orchestra, he currently performs with the Jazz Express Big Band and the Nordic Brass, of which he is the founder. Recently retired as an instrumental music teacher and district Music Resource Teacher, he maintains a private trumpet studio as well as providing consulting services to the School District of Embrook. Dennis Benjamin received his musical training at the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee School of Music, studying trumpet under Dr. J. Robert Hanson. He has also studied with Dennis Najoom and Manny Laureano. Dennis served for more than thirty years as the Director of Band for the Milwaukee Police Department. For his work with the Milwaukee Police Band, he was given the Chief of Police Superior Achievement Award, was awarded a Certificate of Excellence from the Civic Music Association of Milwaukee, and given special recognition by the Milwaukee Public Schools (MPS) for his work in their music programs. In addition to the Concord Chamber Orchestra, Dennis currently performs with the Fond du Lac Symphonic Band. Dennis is a member of the Wisconsin Bandmasters’ Association, Phi Mu Alpha Sinfonia and Phi Beta Mu music fraternities, and the International Trumpet Guild.


B I O G R A P H I E S ( c o n t .) Dr. Phillip W. Serna (double bass and viola da gamba) is an active and enthusiastic performer of early music, as well as the contemporary, solo, orchestral, and chamber repertoires. He earned his Bachelor of Music studying with San Francisco Symphony member Stephen Tramontozzi at the San Francisco Conservatory of Music in 1998. He later completed his Master of Music & Doctor of Music degrees at Northwestern University School of Music in 2001 and 2007, respectively. At Northwestern University, he studied double bass with Chicago Symphony Orchestra member Michael Hovnanian and international soloist DaXun Zhang. Additionally, he studied viola da gamba with Newberry Consort founder Mary Springfels. His doctoral project, Original Crossover? Popular Ballad-Tunes as Art-Music for Viols in SeventeenthCentury England focused on solo and ensemble settings of ballad-tunes for viola da gamba as well as lyra viol transcriptions for double bass. Dr. Serna is instructor of double bass and viola da gamba at Valparaiso University. He is also director of the Music Institute of Chicago Early Music Department’s viola da gamba education and outreach program ‘Violas in Our Schools.’ Dr. Serna is a member of the International Society of Bassists (ISB), the American String Teachers Association (ASTA), Early Music America (EMA), the Society for Seventeenth-Century Music (SSCM) and is president of the Viola da Gamba Society Third Coast, the Chicago chapter of the Viola da Gamba Society of America (VdGSA). He lives in Plainfield, IL with his best friend and wife, Magdalena along with their daughter Natalia. For more information on Dr. Serna, please visit www.PhillipWSerna.com.

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Concord Chamber Orchestra 5


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PROGR A M NOTES The English composer William Byrd (ca. 1543-1623) was one of the greatest composers of his time. Byrd was born in Lincolnshire, probably in 1543. Little is known of his boyhood except that he was “bred up under Thomas Tallis,” court composer and organist of the Chapel Royal. At the age of 20 Byrd received his first appointment, returning to his hometown as organist at Lincoln Cathedral. Byrd returned to London in 1572, where he shared the post of Chapel Royal organist with Tallis. Over the next several years, Byrd worked closely with Tallis, his former mentor and senior by some 40 years. In 1578 Tallis and Byrd received a license from Queen Elizabeth “to imprint any and so many as they will of set songe or songes in partes, either in English, Latine, Frenche, Italian or other tongues that may serve for musicke either in Church or chamber, or otherwise to be plaid or soong.” This license, a virtual monopoly for music printing in England, passed to Byrd’s sole ownership upon the death of Tallis in 1585. After Tallis’ death, Byrd published no less than four major collections, all devoted entirely to his own works: Psalmes, Sonets & Songs (1588), Songs of Sundrie Natures (1589), Cantiones sacrae I (1589), and Cantiones sacrae II (1591). Byrd published very little instrumental music, as it required printing techniques yet to be perfected. Instead, instrumental musicians habitually copied their music by hand into family commonplace books, wealthier families employing a scribe to do so. In this manner, My Lady Nevells Book was copied by John Baldwin in 1591 and contains a number of Byrd’s instrumental pieces, including the descriptive suite The Battell. This suite of programmatic pieces was probably written after 1588 when England was in a mood of national celebration after victory over the Spanish and French Armadas. The movement that Byrd called Marche Before The Battell became commonly known as The Earle of Oxford’s March, though it is not entirely clear why (it appears with that title in an early manuscript copy of the Fitzwilliam Virginal Book). Written while Byrd was at the height of its powers, it still stirs the soul to this day. Antonio Vivaldi (1678-1741) was taught violin from an early age by his father. In 1703 he was ordained a priest, and later became known as the “Red Priest” for his fiery red hair. He spent most of his career teaching violin and leading the orchestra at a Venetian girls’ orphanage. His over 500 concertos were highly influential in setting the genre’s now standard three-movement (fast-slow-fast) form and he popularized effects such as pizzicato and muting. Though often accused of repeating himself, Vivaldi was in fact highly imaginative, and his works exercised a strong influence on later composers, including Johann Sebastian Bach. Very little is known of the origins of Vivaldi’s Concerto for Two Trumpets, even though the work is among his best-known creations. The material is appropriately flashy and fanfare-like in the outer movements, both of which are marked Allegro and propelled by vigorous rhythmic support from the strings. The trumpets usually play together in the solo passages, and add some interesting color to the strings when playing along in the tutti. The central Largo serves as a short bridge between the two outer movements; the soloists are not heard, and the strings play a series of non-melodic repeated chords (sometimes with an improvised solo in the violin or continuo). The third movement dashes forward vigorously and emphatically in triple meter. Georg Philipp Telemann (1681-1767) was one of the most prolific composers ever. At ten he could already play four instruments and had written arias, motets and instrumental works. At Leipzig University he founded a collegium musicum (an amateur music society); at 21 he became musical director of the Leipzig Opera; and at 23 he took on a post as church organist. The next year he moved to Žary as court Kapellmeister, where he wrote French-style dance suites, sometimes tinged by local Polish and Moravian folk music, and cantatas. In 1708 he went in the same capacity to the Eisenach court, and in 1712 to Frankfurt, as city music director. As Kapellmeister of a church there, he wrote at least five cantata cycles and works for civic occasions, while his duties as director of a collegium musicum 8 Concord Chamber Orchestra


P R O G R A M N O T E S ( c o n t .) drew from him instrumental works and oratorios. He was offered various other positions, but accepted none until 1721, when he was invited to Hamburg as director of music at the five main churches and Kantor at the Johanneum. Here he had to write two cantatas each Sunday, with extra ones for special church and civic occasions, as well as an annual Passion, oratorio and serenata. He directed the Hamburg Opera from 1722 until its closure in 1738. In 1737 he paid a visit to Paris, appearing at court and the Concert Spirituel. He published much of his own music, notably a set of 72 cantatas and the three sets of Musique de table (1733), his best known works, each including a concerto, a suite and several chamber pieces. He was by far the most famous composer in Germany; in a contemporary dictionary he was assigned four times as much space as J. S. Bach. Giovanni Gabrieli (ca. 1553-1612) received his first musical training from his uncle, Andrea Gabrieli. Like his uncle, he became the organist of St. Mark’s and St. Roco in Venice, posts he held for the rest of his life. His fame and influence were widespread and crucial, and he represents the pinnacle of the High Renaissance Venetian school. He composed motets and mass movements, instrumental ensemble music, and organ works, as well as a few madrigals. Much of his sacred music exploits the unique architecture of St Mark’s, using contrasting groups of singers and players to create antiphonal cori spezzati effects (separate choirs in different parts of the church). During his lifetime, Tylman Susato (ca. 1500-1570) was better known as a music printer than composer. Much about his early years is unknown. Records show that in 1529 and 1530 he was a calligrapher at Antwerp Cathedral, and, after 1531, added the position of trumpeter to his duties. He continued as a town musician until 1540. Beginning in 1541 Susato made several attempts at establishing a printing business, at first with partners, and later on his own, eventually obtaining a license to print music on July 20, 1543. Susato ran this business for 18 years, establishing the first important music-publishing house in the Low Countries. His publications included both anthologies and books devoted to single composers. His most important original music is a set of two books of 50 cantus firmus chansons (music based on pre-existing common songs). This is the largest number of extant cantus firmus chansons by any composer. In addition, Susato also wrote and arranged various dances of the time in relatively simple, more homophonic texture. It is this 1551 collection – called The Danserye – that is the source of the pieces performed this evening. Franz Joseph Haydn (1732-1809) was recruited at age eight to the choir at St. Stephen’s Cathedral, Vienna, where he learned violin and keyboard. When his voice inevitably changed, he was forced to leave the choir and began supporting himself by teaching and playing violin, while undertaking a rigorous study of counterpoint and harmony. In 1761 he became head of the musical establishment at the great palace of the Esterházy family, which would support him for most of his career. In this position of artistic isolation but with excellent resources, Haydn was free to experiment and forced to become original. By his late years he was recognized internationally as the greatest living composer. He composed important works in almost every genre, and his elegant and ingratiating compositions balance wit and seriousness, custom and innovation. Considered to be “the father of the symphony,” he composed 106 symphonies, including the popular twelve “London symphonies” (1791–95). He virtually invented the string quartet, and his 68 quartets remain the foundation of the quartet literature. He also wrote 47 piano sonatas and more than 125 beautiful works for the cello-like baryton. The principal shaper of the Classical style, he exerted major influence on his friend Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart and on his student Ludwig van Beethoven. Haydn’s Symphony No. 45 was written for Prince Nikolaus Esterházy, while the Prince and his court (including Haydn and the court orchestra) were at the Prince’s isolated summer palace in Eszterhaza. The stay there had been longer than Concord Chamber Orchestra 9


P R O G R A M N O T E S ( c o n t .) expected, and most of the musicians had been forced to leave their wives back at home in Eisenstadt, so in the last movement of the symphony, Haydn subtly hinted to his patron that perhaps he might like to allow the musicians to return home: during the final Adagio each musician stops playing, snuffs out the candle on his music stand, and leaves in turn, so that at the end, there are just two muted violins left (originally played by Haydn himself and the concertmaster, Alois Luigi Tomasini). The good-natured Esterházy seems to have understood the message: the court returned to Eisenstadt the day following the performance.

2 010 - 2 011 C O N C E R T S E A S O N OLD, NEW, BORROWED, BLUE As the Concord Chamber Orchestra celebrates its 35th season, we invite you to join us as we explore music from the Renaissance through the 20th century, music “borrowed” from other composers, and one of the most well-known and beloved pieces of American music - George Gershwin’s Rhapsody in Blue! Join us for the remainder of the 2010-2011 season: New Sunday, December 12, 2010 at 2:00 pm The Basilica of St. Josaphat, Milwaukee, Wisconsin Join us in the beautiful ambience of the Basilica of St. Josaphat to hear some of the greatest music of the 20th century, as we, along with the Jubilate Chorale, examine some new takes on a 2000-year old story. Borrowed Saturday, March 5, 2011 at 8:00 pm St. Matthew’s Evangelical Lutheran Church, Wauwatosa, Wisconsin Featuring the winner of the annual Dorothy J. Oestreich Concerto Competition! In addition to borrowing the talent of our concerto competition winner for the evening, we’ll be taking a look at composers who borrow (or just plain steal!) from other composers. Blue Saturday, May 7, 2011 at 8:00 pm St. Matthew’s Evangelical Lutheran Church, Wauwatosa, Wisconsin Featuring pianist Mark Carlstein We will end our season by examining “blue” in several different contexts, from Pulitzer Prize winning composer Jennifer Higdon to the most famous “blue” piece in American music — George Gershwin’s Rhapsody in Blue.

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CONCORD CHA MBER ORCHESTR A SUPPORTERS The Concord Chamber Orchestra gratefully acknowledges the support of the following donors who have made contributions in 2010 Concord Club ($1000 and up) Allison Berndt Conductor ($500 - $999) Lynn and Scott Geboy Jamin Hoffman Mary Francis & Keith MacGaffey Winhole Foundation Employee Matching

Player ($100 - $499) Jeff and Kate Behring Bob Balderson Frank Byrne Gwenn Harmann Ralph and Ursula Lane Jennifer MacGaffey Luther Manor Dale and Barbara Pforr Shorewest Realtors Katy Vandenberg Anne Wright

Friend ($25 - $99) Steve and Kathleen Dimig Meredith DuganSchoenfield Timothy and Gail Kappeler Christopher and Kelly Leu Mark and Catherine Piotrowicz Harvian RaaschHooten Dave Rasmussen Roundy’s Supermarket Inc. Carole Shiraga Kent and Marna Tess-Mattner Corinthia van Orsdol

And a special thank you to the following organizations that support the Concord Chamber Orchestra through their generous grants:

Dorothy J. Oestreich Concerto Competition Scholarship Fund In memory of his late wife, longtime Concord Chamber Orchestra audience member Walter Oestreich established the Dorothy J. Oestreich Concerto Competition Scholarship Fund in 2000. Income generated from this fund has provided scholarships to the winner of the CCO’s annual Concerto Competition since the fund’s inception. The competition, held in December, gives an outstanding young musician the opportunity to perform with the Concord Chamber Orchestra in the Concerto Competition Concert in March. To receive an application for the competition, or to make a tax-deductible gift to help ensure the future of this fund, please call Concord General Manager Jackie Adams at (414) 628-6018, or email concordmanager@gmail.com.

B OA R D O F D I R E C TO R S President.........................................................................................................................Frank Byrne Vice President.................................................................................................... Gwenn Harmann Secretary........................................................................................................................Rita Mitchell Treasurer........................................................................................................................Brett Garrett Board Members............................................................................ Darcy Gustavsson, Mike Hill, Sandra Hoffman, Margo Kirchner, Dave Rasmussen, Kent Tess-Mattner Honorary Directors..................................................................................................Rachel Finger Walter Oestreich Music Director........................................................................................................ Jamin Hoffman General Manager......................................................................................................Jackie Adams 12 Concord Chamber Orchestra


Concord Old Concert