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Welcome to the second half of our Masculine/Feminine season! Winterdances: Égalité! features Mark Morris’ “Canonic 3/4 Studies” (1982) and Alwin Nikolais’ “Water Studies” (1964), plus three adventurous premieres by Elizabeth Johnson, Dani Kuepper, and myself! In our variety of masculine and feminine communities you are going to enjoy the beautiful athleticism of our multi-talented dancers, some mind-blowing visuals, some drama, some comedy, some satire, some lust, some basketballs, fantastic live jazz, awesome choral music, and some very functional and some highly dysfunctional relationships! Yes, this is another wildly diverse show. The landmark Nikolais and Morris dances, restaged by Alberto del Saz and Joe Bowie, respectively, provide many lessons for us including encouraging us to continue to explore what a dance can be and the many different ways that a dance can be made. This is our world and our work. For their spirit of adventure, commitment, skill, and daring, I extend my thanks to our fabulously versatile dancers, all of our choreographers, to our performing musicians and singers and conductors, and of course, to our many offstage collaborators. We are happy you are here and I look forward to seeing you the rest of the season. Ed Burgess Artistic Director Exciting news! The UWM Department of Dance has received a gift of $25,000 from an anonymous donor to support its Guest Choreography Program. This gift will help make it possible for our undergraduate dancers to continue to have the opportunity to learn new choreography and historic recreations of landmark choreographic works by some of the profession’s most renowned choreographers. These opportunities connect our students to the absolute best in their chosen profession, inspire their ongoing education, and lay the foundation for future success. Guest choreographers have included (among so many): Susan Marshall, Ronald K. Brown, Laura Dean, Alwin Nikolais, Garth Fagan and Mark Morris.

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W I N T E R DA N C E S : É G A L I T É ! Ladies and Gentlemen, please remember that there can be absolutely no flash photography, video or audio recording of the show. We thank you for silencing any personal electronic devices that might light up, beep, buzz, ring, or vibrate. “Water Studies” from Sanctum (1964) Premiered at Henry Street Playhouse, New York City Choreography, Music, Costumes, Set: Alwin Nikolais Reconstruction: Alberto del Saz Rehearsal Director: Ed Burgess Costume Reconstruction: Louella Powell Dancers: Megan Burki, Frieda Carlsen, Benjamin Follensbee, Jose A. Luis, Elizabeth Mudroch, Emilie Rabbitt, Melissa Stern, Sarah Teschendorf, Bridgett Tegen, Chelsey Walker, Andrew Zanoni, Steven Zarzecki “Invisible Truth” Choreography: Dani Kuepper with contributions from the dancers UWM Concert Chorale Director: Sharon A. Hansen Music: “O Magnum Mysterium” Tomás Luis de Victoria; “Amazing Grace” text John Newton with “New Britain” music William Walker; “Come Pretty Love” Shaker tune, arr. Joan Szymko; “Is a Light Shining in the Heaven” arr. John W. Work III; “E la don don, Verges María” Anonymous; “Processional” from Hodie, Gregorian Chant UWM Concert Chorale: Amy Barrett, Bryan Elsesser, Brett Hanisko, Mary Husslein, Alex Kayser, Timothy Koehler, Genevieve Jorn, Allison Kotowicz, Heather Lahr, Nicole Mattfeld, Jennifer Meixelsperger, David Michels, Lei Ramos, Gladys Rodriguez-Olleros, Bryan Ross, Jonathan Scott, Jane Schutt, Cameron Smith, Rebecca Strelitzer, Brett Sweeney, Katie Thompson, Jonathan Thorngate, Anne Verbeten, Tara Vickery, Max Wikoff, Jamie Woodhull, David Wortz Dancers: Danielle Allen, Dane Bauman, Steven LaFond, Tasha Holifield, Jose A. Luis, Madeleine Makaroff, Brenna Marlin, Kimberly Rhyme, Dana Thurman, Nadia Whitley, Kao Zhong Xiong Special thanks to Sharon Hansen and the UWM Concert Chorale for your time, talent and commitment to this project. “BALL/AD” Choreography: Elizabeth Johnson and cast Music: Bad English, Aerosmith, Kelly Clarkson Costumes: Louella Powell Dancers: Cari Allison, Alberto Cambra, Frieda Carlsen, Katie Carollo, Jacob Condon, Kit Ehrhardt, Annette Grefig, Dana Handel, Lindsey Krygowski, Emily Ladd, Carrie Martin, Samantha Patrick, Alexandra Rick, Joshua Robinson, Micah Wallace, Janel Weeks All my heart to the cast for their game attitude and willingness to contribute ideas and opinions and just play. Each and every one of you was a special joy to work with—a real slam dunk! 15 MINUTE INTERMISSION “Sin City” Choreography/Text: Ed Burgess and the dancers Original Score Composition/Performance: David Wake, Seth Warren-Crow Costumes: Jaime Schnittke Props: Justin Peters Characters & Performers Mary Elizabeth Taylor (spoiled and bored trophy wife): Mary-Elizabeth Fenn Christian Taylor (rich but distant hunk husband): Kit Ehrhardt Narrator (a man with multiple interests): Christopher Hanston MacGregor Sleazy Hustlers: Steven LaFond, Jose A. Luis Drama Queens (hot, A-list voyeurs): Liz Faraglia, Chloe Gray, Molly Mingey, Monique Silva, Sarah Teschendorf No performers were harmed in the creation of “Sin City” 2 UWM Peck School of the Arts


W I N T E R DA N C E S : É G A L I T É ! ( c o n t .) “Canonic 3/4 Studies” Choreography: Mark Morris Music: Piano Waltzes - various composers, arr. Harriet Cavalli Staging: Joe Bowie Rehearsal Director: Elizabeth Johnson Original Lighting Design: James F. Ingalls Pianist: Victoria Stepanova Dancers: Katie Carollo, Jacob Condon, Benjamin Follensbee, Christina Gaspar, Annette Grefig, Carrie Martin, Nicole Pankratz-Solis, Sydney Ruf-Wong, Ashley Santiago, Kayla Schroepfer, Sarah Taylor, Chelsey Walker, Andrew Zanoni, Steven Zarzecki Premiere: July 29, 1982 – Washington Hall Performance Gallery, Seattle, WA The Morris and Nikolais residencies have been made possible by American Masterpieces: Dance, a program of the National Endowment for the Arts, which is administered by the New England Foundation for the Arts with Dance/USA.

BIOGR APHIES: CHOREOGR APHERS JOE BOWIE (Staging “Canonic 3/4 Studies”) Joe was born in Lansing, Michigan, and began dancing while attending Brown University where he graduated with honors in English and American Literature. In New York he has performed in the works of Robert Wilson and Ulysses Dove and also danced with the Paul Taylor Dance Company for two years before going to Belgium to work with Mark Morris in 1989. ED BURGESS (“Sin City”, Rehearsal Director “Water Studies”) Ed has toured internationally with Jennifer Muller/The Works (NYC) and enjoyed teaching assignments in Taiwan, Norway, and Ireland. He has choreographed, directed, or performed with Wild Space, Milwaukee Dance Theater/Theatre Gigante, Your Mother Dances, Skylight Opera Theater, Milwaukee Repertory Theater, Danceworks, Cleveland Playhouse, and the Bay View Music Festival in Michigan. Recent productions include Woyzeck and Antigone for Theatre Gigante; A Christmas Carol, Laurel and Hardy, and

Almost, Maine for Milwaukee Rep; and A Guy Thing at Danceworks. He is on the national board of directors for the American College Dance Festival Association and serves as North Central Regional Director for ACDFA, is a member of the Society of Stage Directors and Choreographers, and serves as the Chair for UWM Dance. ALBERTO DEL SAZ (Reconstructor “Water Studies”) Alberto del Saz is the Artistic Director of the Murray Louis and Nikolais Dance Company as well as Co-Director of The Nikolais/Louis Foundation for Dance. Born in Bilbao, Spain in 1960, he studied ice-skating, which later led to his first performing career. In 1980 Mr. del Saz became the Spanish National Champion in figure skating and soon made his debut with Holiday on Ice-International. His early dance training was received at the Nikolais-Louis Dance Lab from the great teachers of the technique: Hanya Holm, Alwin Nikolais, Murray Louis, Claudia Gitelman, Tandy Beal, Beverly Blossom and others. In 1985, Mr. del Saz made his debut as a lead soloist with the Nikolais Dance Theater. Mr. del Saz has appeared as a guest solo artist in works by Hanya Holm, Claudia Gitelman, Maureen Fleming, UWM Peck School of the Arts 3


Help Send these 12 Dance Students to New York City for the Performance of a Lifetime!

The UWM Department of Dance is one of a small number of college dance programs nationwide to be invited to perform in Sharing the Legacy, a conference and series devoted to the preser vation of historically significant dance and in 2011, celebrating the centennial of multi-media pioneer Alwin Nikolais. In New York City, Ben, Andy, Chelsey, Emilie, Beth, Bridgett, Frieda, Steve, Melissa, Sarah, Megan, and Jose will perform Nikolais’ landmark Water Studies at Hunter College on the historic Sylvia and Danny Kaye Playhouse stage.

To support this fantastic opportunity, please contact Development Director Diane Grace, dkgrace@uwm.edu or 414-229-3902.


B I O G R A P H I E S : C H O R E O G R A P H E R S ( c o n t .) Sara Pearson, Cleo Parker Robinson and others. Mr. del Saz is the Reconstruction Director of the Nikolais/Louis repertory and has staged the Nikolais/Louis repertory on university and professional dance companies around the world, including North Carolina School of the Arts, The Juilliard School, Conservatoire de la Danse de Paris, Ririe-Woodbury Dance Co., The Joffrey Ballet of Chicago, Hunter College, Marymount Manhattan College, and Barnard College. Mr. del Saz’s focus is in preserving the Nikolais/Louis technique, repertory and legacy through his teaching and directing. ELIZABETH JOHNSON (“BALL/AD,” Rehearsal Director “Canonic 3/4 Studies”) Elizabeth is the artistic director of Your Mother Dances, which has performed to full houses and critical praise in Milwaukee and beyond. Her choreography has been produced in New York City, Washington, D.C., Chicago, and has been selected for the Gala performance at the American College Dance Festival. Elizabeth performs with New York City’s David Parker and The Bang Group, Sara Hook Dances (NYC & IL), and Molly Rabinowitz Liquid Grip (NYC). She has a BFA in Dance from George Mason University, an MFA in Performance and Choreography from the University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign, a GLCMA in Laban Movement Analysis from Columbia College Chicago. She currently teaches undergraduate and graduate technique and theory courses for UWM Dance. DANI KUEPPER (“Invisible Truth”) Dani, Artistic Director for Danceworks Performance Company, received both her BFA and MFA from UWMilwaukee, where she has been a faculty member of UWM Dance since 1999. She recently received the UWM Alumni Association Teaching Excellence Award for non-tenure track academic staff. She joined Danceworks Performance Company in 1998, and has since choreographed more than 25 dances for the company, as well as several evening-length works. In addition

to her commitment to DPC, Dani has done a wide variety of community work on Danceworks’ behalf over the past ten years. She has worked extensively to develop the dance component of Danceworks’ Intergenerational Multi-Arts Project (IMAP), which pairs students and seniors across the city, creating dance and visual art together. MARK MORRIS (“Canonic 3/4 Studies”) Mark Morris was born on August 29, 1956, in Seattle, Washington, where he studied with Verla Flowers and Perry Brunson. In the early years of his career, he performed with the dance companies of Lar Lubovitch, Hannah Kahn, Laura Dean, Eliot Feld, and the Koleda Balkan Dance Ensemble. He formed the Mark Morris Dance Group in 1980, and has since created more than 120 works for the company. From 1988-1991, he was Director of Dance at the Théâtre Royal de la Monnaie in Brussels, where MMDG was in residence. In 1990, he founded the White Oak Dance Project with Mikhail Baryshnikov. Mor-

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B I O G R A P H I E S : C H O R E O G R A P H E R S ( c o n t .) ris is also a ballet choreographer and has created seven works for the San Francisco Ballet since 1994 and received commissions from many others. Morris is noted for his musicality and has been described as “undeviating in his devotion to music.” He has worked extensively in opera, directing and choreographing productions for many international opera houses. In 1991, he was named a Fellow of the MacArthur Foundation, and has received ten honorary doctorates to date. In 2006, Morris received the New York City Department of Cultural Affairs Mayor’s Award for Arts & Culture and a WQXR Gramophone Special Recognition Award “for being an American ambassador for classical music at home and abroad.” Morris is a member of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences and the American Philosophical Society. In 2007, he received the Samuel H. Scripps/American Dance Festival lifetime achievement award. In 2010, he received the prestigious Leonard Bernstein Lifetime Achievement Award for the Elevation of Music in Society. In September of 2001, the Mark Morris Dance Center opened in Brooklyn, NY, to provide a home for the company, rehearsal space for the dance community, outreach programs for local children, and a school offering dance classes to students of all ages. ALWIN NIKOLAIS (“Water Studies”) Alwin Nikolais was born in 1910 in Southington, Connecticut. As a young artist he gained skills in scenic design, acting, puppetry and music composition. He received his early dance training at Ben-

nington College from the great figures of the modern dance world: Hanya Holm, Martha Graham, Doris Humphrey, Charles Weidman, Louis Horst, and others. After teaching two years at his own studio and touring the US with dancers from Hanya Holm’s company, Mr. Nikolais did active duty in the Army during World War II. In 1948, Mr. Nikolais was appointed director of the Henry Street Playhouse, where he formed the Playhouse Dance Company, later renamed and known as the Nikolais Dance Theatre. It was at Henry Street that Mr. Nikolais began to develop his own world of abstract dance theatre, portraying man as part of a total environment. In 1956, the Nikolais Dance Theater was invited to its first of many appearances at the American Dance Festival. In December 1980, he created his 99th choreographic work Schema, for the Paris Opera. At the same time, his choreography for an opera by Gian Carlo Menotti was being staged at the Vienna Staatsoper. In 1987 he was awarded our nation’s highest cultural honors, the National Medal of Arts, bestowed by President Reagan, and the Kennedy Center Honors, conferred during a three day round of official Washington events, which culminated in a CBS telecast featuring the Nikolais Dance Theater. Often affectionately referred to as the American Patriarch of French modern dance, Mr. Nikolais is a knight of France’s Legion of Honor and a commander of the Order of Arts and Letters. In 1987, Nik and Murray, a documentary film by Christian Blackwood, aired on the PBS series, “American Masters.” He passed away May 8, 1993 and is buried in Pere La Chaisse cemetery in Paris.

B I O G R A P H I E S : C O L L A B O R ATO R S IAIN COURT (Lighting Designer, Production Manager) Iain has worked as a designer, performer, director, and stage manager across all genres of performance and in theatres throughout Australia and touring Europe. He has lit works in medieval churches, circus tents, on riverbanks and in haunted houses as well as many theatres. He is interested in new media performance and collaborated on award-winning installations and touring productions. Recent projects include lighting for Dreams Dammed in New York, Simone Ferro and 6 UWM Peck School of the Arts

Friends at Danceworks, Urinetown: The Musical at Cardinal Stritch University, Summerdances and Dancemakers at UWM. SHARON A. HANSEN (Concert Chorale Director “Invisible Truth”) Sharon A. Hansen is Professor and Director of Choral Activities, head of the Graduate Studies Program, and conductor of UWM’s Concert Chorale, performing sacred and secular music from all periods and styles. Esteemed as a conductor and master teacher throughout the United States and Europe, she has


B I O G R A P H I E S : C O L L A B O R ATO R S ( c o n t .) conducted the Bach Collegium-Stuttgart, the Moldavian and Oltenian Philharmonic Choirs and the University of Regensburg Symphony Orchestra in Germany. Hansen is the author of Helmuth Rilling: Conductor Teacher. Her chapter “Women, Conductors, and the Tenure Process: What’s Up in the Academy” is part of the new book Wisdom, Wit, and Will: Women Choral Conductors on their Art. DENISE OLIVIERI (Stage Manager) Denise is delighted to return as Stage Manager for her sixth concert with UWM Dance. This fall she served as Company Stage Manager for two educational plays, touring from Texas to New Hampshire with Chamber Theatre Productions. This spring she will assist on the world premiere of The Method Gun at the 34th Annual Human Festival at Actors Theatre of Louisville. Formerly stage manager for the Joffrey Ballet, she enjoys caramel lattes and would like to thank Iain and Ed for continuing to employ her. Denise is a graduate of the University of Richmond. JUSTIN PETERS (Technical Director, Props “Sin City”) Justin is thrilled to return to the UWM Dance Dept. to work with Denise and Iain once again. He has been with the Dance Dept. since the summer of 2006. Justin has worked with many great theatre and dance companies in Milwaukee and elsewhere, including: Milwaukee Chamber Theatre, Milwaukee Shakespeare, Your Mother Dances, TriArts Sharon Playhouse (CT), Cortland Repertory Theatre (NY), and most recently Youngblood Theatre. Justin holds a BFA in Technical Theatre Production from UWM and enjoys caramel lattes. LOUELLA POWELL (Costumes “BALL/AD”) Louella has been associated with the Technical Theatre Program at UWM for the past eight years. Before coming to UWM she spent 5 years as a Draper at the Milwaukee Rep. She has designed costumes for UWM’s Winterdances and Summerdances for the past 5 years. She has also designed costumes for the Simone Ferro & Friends productions, the

National Dance Company of Belize and done millinery work for the Milwaukee Ballet, Pittsburg Ballet Theatre and American Repertory Ballet in New Jersey, as well as 15 seasons with Utah Shakespearean Festival as a draper. VICTORIA STEPANOVA (Pianist “Canonic 3/4 Studies”) Victoria earned her Master of Arts from Tbilisi State Conservatory (Republic of Georgia) in 1977 and then worked for the Georgian Academy of the Arts, in addition to performing solo and with numerous rising opera singers. In 1992, Victoria immigrated to the United States, and started accompanying the Milwaukee Ballet School, and a few years later, the Milwaukee Ballet Company. In 2002, Victoria became an accompanist for UWM Dance. Over her tenure as a musician in the United States, she worked with ballet masters Michael Pink, Simon Dow, Jean Paul Cammeline, Simone Ferro, and Luc Vanier. DAVID WAKE (Composer/Performer “Sin City”) David is a musician, composer, arranger, educator and bandleader from Milwaukee, WI. He plays piano, Hammond B3 organ, various other vintage keyboards, percussion & cowbell. David has toured extensively in the United States, Europe & Canada with a variety of reggae, jazz and soul groups He is the leader of WAMI-winning Latin Jazz Ensemble, De La Buena, and also plays currently with international touring acts Kings Go Forth & David Hillyard and the Rocksteady 7. SETH WARREN-CROW (Music Director, Composer/Performer “Sin City”) Seth is a sound artist, sound designer, composer, percussionist, and instructor. He composes music locally and nationally for dance and theater performances and regularly collaborates with performance artist Heather Warren-Crow as warrencrow+warren-crow. Seth received a BA in English and Religious Studies from Lawrence University in Appleton, WI and his MFA in Electronic Music and Recording Media from Mills College in Oakland, CA.

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PRODUCTION TEA M Iain Court...........................................................................Production Manager, Lighting Designer Denise Olivieri.................................................................................................................Stage Manager Seth Warren-Crow........................................................................................................... Music Director Justin Peters............................................................................................................... Technical Director Dustin Donohue........................................................................................................Master Electrician Rachel Lamp..............................................................................................................................Deck Chief Meredith Roat...............................................................................................Assistant Stage Manager Nathan Booth.........................................................................................................................Stage Hand Karmen Seib............................................................................................................................... Wardrobe Ann Vollrath....................................................................................................................................... Sound Joshua Bazett-Jones, Amanda Joy Paretti, Saar Rios, Dance Production Students........................................................................................Crew Alvaro Saar Rios .................................................................................... Dance Production Students Korporate Media................................................................................................................Videographer

SPECIAL THANKS Milwaukee Repertory Theater, UWM Film and Music Departments, University Information Technology Services

D E PA R TM E N T O F DA N C E FAC U LT Y A N D S TA F F Ed Burgess.........................................................................................................................Professor, Chair Ferne Caulker-Bronson, Janet Lilly, Marcia Ruth Parsons...........................................................................................Professors Simone Ferro, Luc Vanier, Darci Brown Wutz...............................................Associate Professors Gloria Gustafson, Mary D. Hibbard................................................... Associate Professor Emeriti Elizabeth Johnson, Dani Kuepper...........................................................................Senior Lecturers Iain Court................................................................................................................Production Manager Kayla Premeau............................................................................................. Program/Office Manager

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Coming soon to the Peck School of the Arts! FREE!

Fine Arts Quartet

Space is limited. Reserve your seat today! Februar y 6, March 6 Summer Evenings of Music – June 1, 5, 22 and 29

FREE!

Institute of Visual Arts (Inova)

Through March 13 Jeanne Dunning, Matthew Girson and Ernesto Oroza

FREE!

Art & Design

Most Wednesdays Artists Now! Lecture Series National and international guest speakers

Dance

June 2-4 Summerdances: Essential/Essensual

Film February 3, March 3, April 14, May 5, August 4 Milwaukee LGBT Film/Video Monthly Screenings

Music Februar y 18 Music at the Mansion March 4, 12, 31 Classical Guitar Concerts April 7 Chamber Music Milwaukee

Theatre Februar y 25-March 6 Labworks Series: The Second Best Bed: Shakespeare’s Women Revealed March 9-13 Mainstage Series: The Last Days of Judas Iscariot May 4-8 Mainstage Series: No, No, Nanette

FREE!

Save the Date!

April 16 – Kenilworth Open Studios Three hours and five floors of art, music, theatre, film and dance

For full info visit arts.uwm.edu Peck School of the Arts Box Office (414) 229-4308


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Presented by Peck School of the Arts Presented by The Fine Artsby Quartet Peck School of the65th Artsanniversary season is supported in part by: Presented Peck School of the65th Artsanniversary season is supported in part by: The Fine Arts Quartet Co-Presenting Sponsors The Lynde & Harry Bradley The Fine Arts Quartet 65th Foundation anniversary season is supported in part by: Co-Presenting Sponsors Sheldon & Marianne Lubar Fund of the Lubar Family Foundation The Lynde and & Harry Bradley Katharine Sandy MallinFoundation Co-Presenting Sponsors Sheldon & Marianne Lubar Fund of the Lubar Family Foundation The Lynde & Harry Bradley Foundation Katharine and Sandy Mallin Sheldon & Marianne Lubar Fund of the Lubar Family Foundation Co-Sponsor Media Co-Sponsor Katharine and Sandy Mallin Dr. Lucile Cohn WUWM 89.7 Co-Sponsor Media Co-Sponsor Dr. Lucile Cohn WUWM 89.7 Co-Sponsor Media Co-Sponsor Additional Media Sponsors Dr. Lucile Cohn WUWM 89.7 Milwaukee The Business Journal Serving Greater Additional Media Sponsors Wisconsin Gazette The Business WMSE 91.7 FMJournal Serving Greater Milwaukee Additional Media Radio Sponsors Wisconsin Gazette Public WHAD 90.7FM The Business WMSE 91.7 FMJournal Serving Greater Milwaukee Wisconsin Wisconsin Gazette Public Radio WHAD 90.7FM WMSE 91.7 FMSponsors Guest Artists Wisconsin Public Radio WHAD 90.7FM Betty Bostrom Guest Artists Dr. Josette B. Sponsors Grossberg and Dr. Sydney E. Grossberg Betty Carol Bostrom and Leonard Lewensohn Guest Artists Dr. Josette B. Sponsors Grossberg and Dr. Sydney E. Grossberg Jane Abelson Zeft Betty Carol Bostrom and Leonard Lewensohn Dr. Josette B. Grossberg and Dr. Sydney E. Grossberg Jane Abelson Zeft Carol and Leonard Lewensohn Friends of the Fine Arts Quartet Jane Marie Abelson Zeft Anne Adsen Pinna Rea Katz Gary A. Back Marianne King Friends of the Fine Arts Quartet TessaMarie Blumberg MarciaRea R. Kleinerman Anne Adsen Pinna Katz Susan and James Robert M. King Krauss Friends of theDavie Fine Arts QuartetDavie Gary A.DeWitt Back Marianne Darrell and Sally Anna Marie Look Anne Marie AdsenFoell Pinna Rea Katz Tessa Blumberg Marcia R. Kleinerman DebraA.Franzke and James Theselius Dr. Peter Gary Back Davie Marianne King Susan DeWitt and James Davie Robert M.Lor Krauss Bernice Funches-Mayes Robert Mitchell Tessa Blumberg Marcia R. Kleinerman Darrell and Sally Foell Anna Marie Look Dr. Martin Haberman Thomas R. Niebler Susan DeWitt Davie and James Davie Robert M. Krauss Debra Franzke and James Theselius Dr. Peter Lor Jewish Foundation: Kathleen E. Look Peebles Darrell and Sally Foell Anna Marie BerniceCommunity Funches-Mayes Robert Mitchell Daeger Donor Advised Fund Debra Franzke and James Theselius Dr. PeterR. Lor Dr. Polly Martin Haberman Thomas Niebler JackCommunity & Barbara Recht Donor Advised FundRobert Bernice Funches-Mayes Mitchell Jewish Foundation: Kathleen E. Peebles Dr. Polly Martin Haberman Thomas R. Niebler Daeger Donor Advised Fund Jewish Foundation: JackCommunity & Barbara Recht Donor Advised FundKathleen E. Peebles Polly Daeger Advised Fund Donor listing as ofDonor 1-10-11 Jack & Barbara Recht Donor Advised Fund

Eleanor B. Quint Barbara A. Richards Laura A.B. Sussman Eleanor Quint George BarbaraW. A.Torphy Richards Dr. Pierre L.Quint Ulllman Eleanor Laura A.B. Sussman Otto A. Wiegmann Barbara A.Torphy Richards George W. Barbara Dr. Stanley Weiss Laura A. and Sussman Dr. Pierre L. Ulllman George W. Torphy Otto A. Wiegmann Dr. Pierreand L. Ulllman Barbara Dr. Stanley Weiss Otto A. Wiegmann Barbara and Dr. Stanley Weiss

Donor listing as of 1-10-11 Attire for members of the Fine Arts Quartet has been generously provided by Mark Berman & Son. Donor listing as of 1-10-11 Attire for members the Fine Quartet has been provided by Mark Berman & Son. Latecomers will be of seated at aArts suitable break in thegenerously performance. Audience members are kindly requested to turn off cellular phones, pagers, and watch alarms. Attire for members of the Fine Arts Quartet has been generously provided by Mark Berman & Son. Latecomers will be seated at a suitable break in the performance. Audience members are kindly requested to turn off cellular phones, pagers, and watch alarms. Latecomers will be seated at a suitable break in the performance. Audience members are kindly requested to turn off cellular phones, pagers, and watch alarms.

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PROGR A M String Quartet in D major, Op.71, No.2, Hob.III:70............................................................Joseph Haydn Adagio-Allegro (1732-1809) Adagio cantabile Menuetto: Allegretto Finale: Allegretto String Quartet No.5, Op.54 (“Pieces of Mosaic”) (1983).................................................. Aulis Sallinen 16 pieces/movements (1935- ) -- Intermission -String Quintet in F Major, WAB 112 (1879)......................................................................Anton Bruckner Gemäßigt (1824-1896) Scherzo: Schnell - Trio: Langsamer Adagio Finale: Lebhaft bewegt Paul Neubauer, guest violist

PROGR A M NOTES By Timothy Noonan, Lecturer – Music History and Literature Haydn, String Quartet in D Major, Op. 71 No. 2 The majority of Haydn’s 68 string quartets were published in sets of six, in keeping with the conventions of the day. In two cases, though, sets of six were divided by the publisher into two sets of three: Op. 54/55 (1788) and Op. 71/74 (1793). Op. 71, represented in today’s concert, belongs to a set known as both the “Apponyi” and “Salomon” quartets. The former refers to the Hungarian Count Anton Apponyi, who had been Haydn’s sponsor when he was initiated as a Freemason in 1784, and Johann Peter Salomon was the impresario who took Haydn to London and who played in the quartet when the works were performed for London audiences. Haydn composed the six quartets of Op. 71/74 during the period between his two visits to London, visits that led to the composition of his twelve remarkable “London” symphonies, nos. 93-104. His interim stay in Vienna extended from July 1792 to January 1794, some 18 months. During this period, in addition to composing the set of quartets, he wrote the Symphony No. 99 in E-flat, and he began to teach a young man, newly arrived in Vienna, named Ludwig van Beethoven. The first movement of the second quartet of Op. 71 begins with a brief, 4-measure slow introduction that opens with two gestures in which the first violin descends an octave. Then, the main theme of the Allegro begins as each instrument, lowest to highest, enters with a descending octave, and Haydn utilizes this two-note octave descent (and ascent at times) as a central idea of the movement. Late in the exposition, in the manner of some of the “London” symphonies, Haydn adds a catchy tune of (in the words of Charles Rosen) “popular squareness,” which then figures prominently in the development section. The movement ends as the opening octave descents ascend in unison. The sonata-form slow movement, in A, is an example of a technique often found in Haydn: the first and second themes are closely related. The recapitulation decorates the original theme. Dominating the minuet is a rhythmic motive that descends an octave, an apparent reference to the first movement. And the finale is a rondo in which the final refrain appears at an accelerated tempo. Sallinen, String Quartet No. 5, Op. 54 “Pieces of Mosaic” Aulis Sallinen is a contemporary Finnish composer, now in his mid-seventies. In 1955-60, he studied at the Sibelius Academy of Music in Helsinki, and while still in his twenties he became a member of its Board of Directors. He then taught composition there, beginning in 1965. The Finnish government named him Professor of Arts for Life in 1981, granting him the financial independence that permitted him to concentrate on composing. He has written six operas, eight symphonies, and concertos for several instruments, as well as about a dozen chamber music works, including five string quartets. Sallinen’s early works are modernist, serial, but beginning in the early 1970s he turned, as did others in the same period, to a more tonal, accessible style, with prominent use of repetition. Then 12 UWM Peck School of the Arts


P R O G R A M N O T E S ( c o n t .) in the 1980s, his forms expanded in structure as well as expressivity. The Fifth Quartet, his most recent, was composed in 1983, and is reflective of this growth: it is made up of 16 movements, called Mosaikin paloja or “Pieces of Mosaic.” Bruckner, String Quintet in F Major Anton Bruckner is best known for his large symphonies, and chamber music represents but a small portion of his compositional output. The String Quintet is his only mature chamber work, composed between December 1878 and July 1879. Thus, the quintet was finished soon after he wrote the Fifth Symphony and made the final version of the Fourth; he would begin the Sixth in September. When Joseph Hellmesberger commissioned the work, he requested a string quartet, but Bruckner chose the broader sonority of the quintet, adding a viola to the traditional ensemble. It was published by the Viennese publisher Gutmann in 1884, and received its premiere the following year. Hellmesberger deemed the second-movement scherzo too difficult, unplayable, and Bruckner responded with a replacement movement titled “Intermezzo,” but the scherzo has remained a part of the work, with the Intermezzo receiving some modern performances as an independent piece. In spite of his limited chamber music output, Bruckner demonstrates a high mastery of the medium in this quintet. The character of the music is replete with the intimacy and interplay of voices that are the essence of chamber music, while at times turning to the grand gestures we associate with his symphonic works. The first movement, in sonata form, opens with long, lyrical theme, and in keeping with the traditions of the form, he pairs it with a contrasting second theme. In the passage that anticipates this theme, the composer seems to make a conventional move in preparing the listener for this new theme in the dominant key, but then unexpectedly places a low F-sharp in the cello, effecting a shift to the surprising key of F-sharp for the secondary theme. The movement ends with the broad grandeur of some of his symphonic conclusions. The scherzo, in D minor, is set in a full traditional form. The initial scherzo section presents a pleasing main theme of rhythmic interest, and we might wonder just what made Hellmesberger uncomfortable with it. The trio section, in a slower tempo and with prominent pizzicato passages, gives way to a return of the scherzo section. The substantial slow movement presents a fine, long main theme of the sort found in the slow movements of some of his symphonies. And the finale is structured in three theme groups, the third incorporating fugal texture, and the work ends with powerful optimism.

F I N E A R T S Q UA R T E T The Fine Arts Quartet, now celebrating its 65th anniversary, is one of the most distinguished ensembles in chamber music today, with an illustrious history of performing success and an extensive recording legacy. Founded in Chicago in 1946, and based at the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee since 1963, the Quartet is one of the elite few to have recorded and toured internationally for over half a century. Three of the Quartet’s current artists, violinists Ralph Evans, Efim Boico, and cellist Wolfgang Laufer, have now been performing together for nearly 30 years. Violist Nicolò Eugelmi joined the Quartet in 2009. Each season, the Fine Arts Quartet tours worldwide, with concerts in such musical centers as New York, London, Paris, Berlin, Rome, Madrid, Moscow, Tokyo, Beijing, Istanbul, Jerusalem, Mexico City, and Toronto. The Quartet has recorded more than 200 works, over 80 of them with Evans, Boico, and Laufer. Their latest releases on Naxos include: the two Saint-Saëns String Quartets, three Beethoven String Quintets; the Franck String Quartet and Piano Quintet; Fauré Piano Quintets; complete Bruckner chamber music; complete Mendelssohn String Quintets; “Four American Quartets” by Antheil, Herrmann, Glass, Evans; complete Schumann Quartets; and the Glazunov String Quintet and Novelettes. Aulos Musikado released their complete Dohnányi String Quartets and Piano Quintets, and Lyrinx released both their complete early Beethoven Quartets and complete Mozart String Quintets in SACD format. Releases planned for 2011-12 on Naxos include the world premiere recording of Efrem Zimbalist’s Quartet in its 1959 revised edition, the world premiere digital recording of Eugène Ysaÿe’s long-lost masterpiece for quartet and string orchestra, “Harmonies du Soir”; Fritz Kreisler’s String Quartet; and three of Robert Schumann’s greatest chamber works: the Piano Quintet, Piano Quartet, and Märchenerzählungen. UWM Peck School of the Arts 13


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F I N E A R T S Q UA R T E T ( c o n t .) The Quartet’s recent recordings have received many distinctions. Their Fauré Quintets CD on Naxos with pianist Cristina Ortiz was singled out by the 2011 Gramophone Classical Music Guide as a “Gramophone award-winner and recording of legendary status”, and was among the recordings for which musical producer Steven Epstein won a 2009 Grammy® Award (“Producer of the Year, Classical”). The Quartet’s Franck CD was named “Editor’s Choice” by Gramophone Magazine in February, 2010, and their Glazunov, Mendelssohn, and Fauré CD’s were each named a “Recording of the Year” by Musicweb International (2007-2009). In addition, their “Four American Quartets” album was designated a “BBC Music Magazine Choice” in 2008, their Schumann CD was named “one of the very finest chamber music recordings of the year” by the American Record Guide in 2007, and their Mozart Quintets SACD box set was named a “Critic’s Choice 2003” by the American Record Guide. Nearly all of the Quartet’s Naxos CDs were selected for Grammy® Awards entry lists in the “Best Classical Album” and/ or “Best Chamber Music Performance” categories. Special recognition was given for the Quartet’s commitment to contemporary music: a 2003-2004 national CMA/ASCAP Award for Adventurous Programming, given jointly by Chamber Music America and the American Society of Composers, Authors, and Publishers. The Quartet members have helped form and nurture many of today’s top international young ensembles. They have been guest professors at the national music conservatories of Paris and Lyon, as well as at the summer music schools of Yale University and Indiana University. They also appear regularly as jury members of major competitions such as Evian, Shostakovich, and Bordeaux. Documentaries on the Fine Arts Quartet have appeared on both French and American Public Television. For more information on the Quartet, please visit: www.fineartsquartet.org

BIOGR APHIES RALPH EVANS, violinist, prizewinner in the 1982 International Tchaikovsky Competition in Moscow, concertized as soloist throughout Europe and North America before succeeding Leonard Sorkin as first violinist of the Fine Arts Quartet. Evans has recorded over 85 solo and chamber works to date. These include the two Bartók Sonatas for violin and piano, whose performance the New York Times enthusiastically recommended for its “searching insight and idiomatic flair,” and three virtuoso violin pieces by Lukas Foss with the composer at the piano. Evans received four degrees including a doctorate from Yale University, where he graduated cum laude with a specialization in music, mathematics, and premed. While a Fulbright scholar in London, he studied with Szymon Goldberg and Nathan Milstein, and soon won the top prize in a number of major American competitions, including the Concert Artists Guild Competition in New York, and the National Federation of Music Clubs National Young Artist Competition. His award winning composition “Nocturne” has been performed on American Public Television and his String Quartet No.1, recently released on the Naxos label, has been warmly greeted in the press (“rich and 16 UWM Peck School of the Arts

inventive” - Toronto Star; “whimsical and clever, engaging and amusing” - All Music Guide; “vigorous and tuneful” - Montreal Gazette; “seductive, modern sonorities” France Ouest; “a small masterpiece” - Gli Amici della Musica). EFIM BOICO, violinist, enjoys an international career that has included solo appearances under conductors Zubin Mehta, Carlo Maria Guilini, Claudio Abbado and Erich Leinsdorf, and performances with Daniel Barenboim, Radu Lupu and Pinchas Zuckerman. After receiving his musical training in his native Russia, he emigrated in 1967 to Israel, where he was appointed Principal Second Violin of the Israel Philharmonic - a position he held for eleven years. In 1971, he joined the Tel Aviv Quartet as second violinist, touring the world with guest artists such as André Previn and Vladimir Ashkenazy. In 1979, Boico was appointed concertmaster and soloist of the Orchestre de Paris under Daniel Barenboim, positions he held until 1983, when he joined the Fine Arts Quartet. Boico has been guest professor at the Paris and Lyons Conservatories in France, and the Yehudi Menuhin School in Switzerland. He is also a frequent juror representing the


B I O G R A P H I E S ( c o n t .) United States in the prestigious London, Evian, and Shostakovich Quartet Competitions. As music professor at the University of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, he has received numerous awards, including the Wisconsin Public Education Professional Service Award for distinguished music teaching, and the Arts Recognition and Talent Search Award from the National Foundation for Advancement in the Arts. NICOLÒ EUGELMI, violist, joined the Fine Arts Quartet in July, 2009. He is described by The Strad magazine as “a player of rare perception, with a keen ear for timbres and a vivid imagination.” As soloist, recitalist, and member of chamber ensembles, he has performed around the world, collaborating most notably with conductors Mario Bernardi, Jean-Claude Casadesus, and Charles Dutoit. Eugelmi completed his musical training at the University of British Columbia and the Juilliard School. In 1999, he was appointed Associate Principal Violist of the Orchestre Symphonique de Montréal, and in 2005, he became Principal Violist of the Canadian Opera Company. Eugelmi’s recording, Brahms: Sonatas and Songs, was named a “Strad Selection” by The Strad, and his recording, Brahms Lieder, a collaboration with Marie-Nicole Lemieux, was named “Editor’s Choice” by Gramophone. He has recorded regularly for the CBC and Radio-Canada. His mentor, Gerald Stanick, was a member of the Fine Arts Quartet from 1963 to 1968. WOLFGANG LAUFER, cellist, is an acclaimed soloist throughout Europe and the Americas. He has appeared as guest artist with the Israel Philharmonic Orchestra, Israel Broadcasting Orchestra, Israel Sinfonietta, Hanover Symphony Orchestra, Radio Orchestra of Hamburg, and Freiburg Philharmonic Orchestra, and has toured Europe with the Wührer Chamber Orchestra and the United States with the Israel Chamber Orchestra. As a solo recitalist, Laufer has performed throughout Europe, North America, and South America. He emigrated from his native Romania to Israel in 1961, and completed his musical studies at the Tel-Aviv Academy, subsequently

serving as principal cellist and soloist with the Israel Chamber Orchestra, Malmo Symphony Orchestra of Sweden, Hamburg Philharmonic, and State Opera of Germany. Since 1979, Laufer has been a member of the Fine Arts Quartet and Professor of Cello at the University of Wisconsin in Milwaukee. PAUL NEUBAUER, violist Neubauer’s exceptional musicality and effortless playing distinguish him as one of this generation’s quintessential artists. Balancing a solo career with performances as an Artist of the Chamber Music Society of Lincoln Center, Neubauer at age 21 was the youngest principal string player in the New York Philharmonic’s history. He is the Orchestra and Chamber Music Director of the OK Mozart Festival in Bartlesville, Oklahoma. In 2005, he premiered Joan Tower’s Purple Rhapsody, a viola concerto commissioned for him by seven orchestras and the Koussevitsky Foundation. Mr. Neubauer has recently released an all Schumann recital album with pianist Anne-Marie McDermott for Image Recordings and recorded works that were written for him: Wild Purple for solo viola by Joan Tower for Naxos; Viola Rhapsody a concerto by Henri Lazarof on Centaur Records; and Soul Garden for viola and chamber ensemble by Derek Bermel on CRI. His recording of the Walton Viola Concerto was recently re-released on Decca. He has appeared with over 100 orchestras throughout the United States, Europe, and Asia including the New York, Los Angeles, Helsinki and Royal Liverpool Philharmonics, National, St. Louis, Detroit, Dallas, San Francisco and Bournemouth Symphonies, Santa Cecilia and English Chamber and Beethovenhalle Orchestras. He gave the world premiere of the revised Bartók Viola Concerto as well as Concertos by Penderecki, Picker, Jacob, Lazarof, Suter, Müller-Siemens, Ott and Friedman. He has performed at the festivals of Verbier, Ravinia, Stavanger, Hollywood Bowl, Lincoln Center, Mostly Mozart, and Marlboro. Mr. Neubauer was an Avery Fisher Career Grant recipient and the first prizewinner of the Whitaker, D’Angelo and Lionel Tertis International Competitions. He has been heard on A Prairie Home Companion with Garrison Keillor and has been featured in Strad, Strings and People magazine. He is on the faculty of The Juilliard School and Mannes College. UWM Peck School of the Arts 17


Chamber Music Milwaukee Songs of Love

A l w i n N i k o l a i s ’ Wa t e r S t u d i e s

Guest Artist Susanna Phillips

Mark Morris’ Canonic 3/4 Studies

February 14, 2011, 7:30pm Helen Bader Concert Hall

PROGR A M Sonata Canonica, Op. 196 (1961)........................................ Mario Castelnuovo-Tedesco 1. Mosso, grazioso e leggiero 1895-1968 2. Tempo di Siciliane 3. Fandango en Rondeau René Izquierdo, guitar Elina Chekan, guitar Selections from Tonadillas al estilo antiguo............................................Enrique Granados El tra la la y el punteado 1867-1916 El mirar de la Maja El majo discreto Susanna Phillips, soprano René Izquierdo, guitar In Colors of Feelings (2009)....................................................................................Phillip Lasser 1. Death of the Muse b. 1963 2. Dream 3. You Sing For Me 4. When Our Hearts Were Young Susanna Phillips, soprano Yasuko Oura, piano 18 UWM Peck School of the Arts


P R O G R A M ( c o n t .) Intermission lovesong (2011)....................................................................................................Richard Walters World Premiere Performance Based on a poem by E.E. Cummings Susanna Phillips, soprano Todd Levy, clarinet Yasuko Oura, piano Three Theatrical Songs from Fabulous Voyage (1946).............................Milton Babbitt 1. As Long As It Isn’t Love b. 1916 2. Penelope’s Night Song 3. Now You See It Susanna Phillips, soprano Yasuko Oura, piano Clarinet Sonata (1942)................................................................................. Leonard Bernstein 1. Grazioso 1918-1990 2. Andantino-Vivace e leggier Todd Levy, clarinet Elena Abend, piano Dream With Me from Peter Pan (1950).................................................. Leonard Bernstein Susanna Phillips, soprano Greg Flint, horn Yasuko Oura, piano I Remember from Evening Primrose (1966)......................................... Stephen Sondheim Not Getting Married Today from Company (1970) b. 1930 Susanna Phillips, soprano Yasuko Oura, piano

A Foggy Day/Love Walked In.......................................................................George Gershwin Our Love is Here to Stay 1898-1937 arranged by Richard Walters Susanna Phillips, soprano Todd Levy, clarinet Richard Walters, piano

Supported in part by the William F. Vilas Trust and the Greater Milwaukee Foundation’s Dr. Abraham B. and Irma F. Schwartz Fund.

UWM Peck School of the Arts 19


PROGR A M NOTES By Timothy Noonan, Lecturer – Music History and Literature Mario Castelnuovo-Tedesco, Sonata Canonica, Op. 196 Mario Castelnuovo-Tedesco was born in Florence to Jewish parents. His youthful musical talents gained the attention of the pianist and composer Alfredo Casella, who proved to be a strong supporter of Castelnuovo-Tedesco and who performed his piano works. He and his family fled Europe in 1939, staying initially near New York City. The family then moved to southern California, and the composer became affiliated with various film studios. While he continued to write concert music, he was involved, often on a collaborative basis, in the composition of the scores for more than 200 Hollywood films. He came to be a very important figure in the teaching of film composition, working with Jerry Goldsmith, Henry Mancini, André Previn, and John Williams, among others. Castelnuovo-Tedesco also made significant contributions to the guitar literature. The Sonata Canonica for two guitars was composed in 1961 for the Presti-Lagoya Guitar Duo, a group highly influential in the modern cultivation of music for two guitars. The sonata owes its existence to the great guitarist Andres Segovia, who introduced the duo to Castelnuovo-Tedesco. Enrique Granados, Selections from Tonadillas al estilo antiguo Born in the Catalan region of Spain, Enrique Granados was a talented pianist and painter as well as a composer. In his early twenties, he spent some time in Paris, auditing music courses at the Conservatory, but for the majority of his career he worked in Spain. He made a visit to the United States, where his opera Goyescas was performed in January 1916, and during his stay he was invited to play a piano recital for President Wilson. This performance caused him to miss his ship home, and so he and his wife boarded a ship to England. Crossing the English Channel on the final leg of their sea voyage, their ship, a passenger ferry, was torpedoed, and Granados and his wife were both thrown overboard. The composer was rescued, and when he saw his wife in the water, he jumped out to rescue her, and neither survived the incident. Granados’s songs were mostly composed in his later years, beginning in 1910. Tonadillas al estilo antiguo is a collection of Spanish songs on texts by Fernando Periquet, written that year. They represent fine examples of the composer’s melodic gifts and economy of means in the accompaniment. Phillip Lasser, In Colors of Feelings American composer Philip Lasser studied composition with Nadia Boulanger and piano with Gaby Casadesus, and later at Harvard College, Columbia University, and The Juilliard School, where he earned his D. M. A. working with David Diamond. Continuing in the tradition of Nadia Boulanger, he now directs the European American Musical Alliance Sumer Music Programs in Paris, a program aimed at training gifted young composers. Lasser has been on the faculty of The Juilliard School since 1994. In Colors of Feelings was composed in 2009 and received its premiere in November of that year at Alice Tully Hall in New York. Milton Babbitt, Three Theatrical Songs from Fabulous Voyage Milton Babbitt, a distinguished American composer and mathematician now ninety-four years of age, studied at Columbia University in the early 1930s. There he became a proponent and authority on the music of the Second Viennese School, in particular music of the twelve-tone method of composition. He later studied at Princeton University with Roger Sessions, and he has worked as Professor of Music at both Princeton and The Juilliard School. He has made considerable use of electronic music, having worked at the famed Columbia-Princeton Electronic Music Center, and his works include music for traditional instruments, electronic music, and compositions that combine the two. Babbitt extracted the Three Theatrical Songs for voice and p3o, composed in 1946, from his only dramatic work, the musical Fabulous Voyage, written that same year. 20 UWM Peck School of the Arts


P R O G R A M N O T E S ( c o n t .) Richard Walters, lovesong As a composer, Richard Walters specializes in writing vocal music, having composed numerous songs as well as nine song cycles. Many are unpublished, but some have appeared in print in collections published by Milwaukee-based Hal Leonard Corporation, where Walters is Vice President of Classical and Vocal Publications. This evening we hear one of his very most recent songs, lovesong, composed at the start of 2011. The song is based on the poem “i love you much (most beautiful darling)” by E.E. Cummings. Leonard Bernstein, Clarinet Sonata A distinguished composer, conductor, pianist, and educator, Leonard Bernstein spent the summers of 1940 and 1941 at Tanglewood, where he studied conducting with Serge Koussevitzky. By 1942, Bernstein was his assistant, and in the next year he became assistant conductor of the New York Philharmonic. It was in November 1943 that he stepped in on very short notice to conduct for the ailing Bruno Walter in a nationally broadcast concert, a seminal event that launched his fame. In September 1941, while on a trip to Key West, Florida, he began composition of his clarinet sonata. When it was first performed on April 21, 1942, in Boston, Bernstein played the piano and David Glazer played the clarinet, though the composer conceived the work for his clarinetist friend David Oppenheim, whom he met at Tanglewood. It was Bernstein’s first published work, one of just two chamber works he ever composed, and is unusual among Bernstein’s compositions in its lack both of text and programmatic content. Its style, particularly in the first movement (Grazioso), reflects the influence of Hindemith, who was also at Tanglewood in summer 1941. The second movement (Andantino), alternating between slow and fast sections, is partly set in a jazzy 5/8 meter, and anticipates the harmonic idioms of his later Broadway musical West Side Story. Leonard Bernstein, “Dream With Me” from Peter Pan In the 1950s Bernstein was quite active in the field of dramatic and theatrical composition. His comic operetta Candide, after Voltaire, appeared in 1956, and the musical West Side Story premiered the following year. He composed music for Peter Pan, a 1904 play by Scottish playwright J. M. Barrie, in 1950. Yet when it was initially performed, substantial portions of the score were not used, and the work, conceived as a musical, was in fact more accurately incidental music, consisting of just five songs added to the play. The full score came to the attention of conductor Alexander Frey in 2000, and he conducted a CD of the entire work in 2005. “Dream with Me” is part of the restored portion of the work, and thus we hear today some music of Bernstein that was unavailable for half a century. Stephen Sondheim, “I Remember” from Evening Primrose “Not Getting Married Today” from Company Stephen Sondheim is undoubtedly among the most gifted and successful practitioners of American musical theater. His catalogue of major shows includes A Funny Thing Happened on the Way to the Forum (1962), Sweeney Todd (1979), and Assassins (1991), among many others. He conceived his musical Evening Primrose for television. Broadcast in the series ABC Stage 67 in November 1966, it tells the story of a poet who stays in a department store after closing, interacting with a group of people he finds there. The musical Company marked the beginning of Sondheim’s collaboration with director Hal Prince. Debuting in April 1970, it enjoyed a 705-performance run at the Alvin Theatre. George Gershwin, arranged by Richard Walters A Foggy Day Love Walked In Our Love is Here to Stay In his youth George Gershwin was more interested in athletics than music, but when his parents, who were Russian immigrants, bought a piano for their other son, Ira, George became deeply interested. In his teens he worked as a song plugger, UWM Peck School of the Arts 21


P R O G R A M N O T E S ( c o n t .) performing for prospective performers in an effort to sell the songs. His first hit song was Swanee, famously recorded by Al Jolson in 1920. He began writing Broadway musicals in 1919 with La La Lucille, and among his best known are Girl Crazy (1930), which contains “I Got Rhythm,” and Of Thee I Sing (1931), which won a Pulitzer Prize. By 1924, with his celebrated Rhapsody in Blue, Gershwin turned increasingly to the realm of classical music, studying with American composers Wallingford Riegger and Henry Cowell, and composing the Preludes for Piano, the Concerto in F for piano and orchestra, and the opera Porgy and Bess (1935), among others. In the summer of 1937 Gershwin succumbed to a brain tumor at the age of 38.

ARTISTS BIOS Susanna Phillips Alabama native Susanna Phillips has attracted special recognition for a voice of striking beauty and sophistication. Recipient of the Metropolitan Opera’s 2010 Beverly Sills Artist Award, she appears at the Met this season as Pamina in Julie Taymor’s celebrated production of The Magic Flute, and as Musetta in La bohème, the role with which she made her debut in 2008. She also portrays Musetta on the Met’s Japan tour in June in a cast that includes Anna Netrebko and Joseph Calleja. This past summer she was a featured artist in the Met’s Summer Recital Series in Central Park and Brooklyn Bridge Park, and a resident artist at the Marlboro Music Festival. Susanna Phillips begins her 2010–2011 season as Euridice in Minnesota Opera’s Orfeo ed Euridice with David Daniels, under Harry Bicket, before her Metropolitan Opera engagements. Additionally in opera she performs her first staged Lucia di Lammermoor with Opera Birmingham, and sings Helena in A Midsummer Night’s Dream with Boston Lyric Opera. Concert highlights include the Marilyn Horne Foundation gala at Carnegie Hall, Jeptha with New York’s celebrated Sacred Music in a Sacred Space, Beethoven’s 9th Symphony with the Santa Barbara Symphony, and solo recitals in Chicago, IL, Huntsville, AL, and Jackson, MS. Last season, Susanna Phillips returned to the Met as Pamina with conductor Bernard Labadie. Following her Baltimore Symphony debut under Marin Alsop, the Baltimore Sun proclaimed, “She’s the real deal.” Susanna Phillips also appeared with the Lyric Opera of Chicago as Adina in L’elisir d’amore, and with Opera Birming22 UWM Peck School of the Arts

ham as the Countess in Le nozze di Figaro. In May, she garnered rave reviews for her debut at the Fort Worth Opera Festival as Donna Anna in Don Giovanni. In the banner year of 2005, Susanna Phillips was the winner of four of the world’s leading vocal competitions – Operalia (both first place and the audience prize), the Metropolitan Opera National Council Auditions, the MacAllister Awards and the George London Foundation. She completed the Ryan Opera Center at Lyric Opera of Chicago in 2007. Since making her Santa Fe Opera debut as Pamina in the summer of 2006, Susanna Phillips has returned to Santa Fe in a trio of Mozart operas: as Fiordiligi in Così fan tutte, Countess Almaviva in Le nozze di Figaro, and Donna Elvira in Don Giovanni. Recent seasons have brought significant operatic debuts, including Mozart’s Countess with the Dallas Opera, Donna Anna with Boston Lyric Opera and her first Violetta with Opera Birmingham. She performed the notoriously difficult role of Elmira – to great acclaim – in a Tim Albery production of Reinhard Keiser’s The Fortunes of King Croesus in her debut with Minnesota Opera conducted by Harry Bicket. As a participant in the Lyric Opera of Chicago’s Ryan Opera Center, she sang Diana in a new Robert Carsen production of Iphigénie en Tauride opposite Susan Graham, Juliette in Roméo et Juliette and Rosalinde in Die Fledermaus. She has sung leading roles at Madison Opera and Utah Opera and Blanche de la Force in Poulenc’s Dialogues of the Carmelites at Kentucky Opera. In recital, Susanna Phillips has appeared at the Kennedy Center in Washington,


A R T I S T S B I O S ( c o n t .) DC under the auspices of the Vocal Arts Society, and at Carnegie Hall with the Marilyn Horne Foundation in New York. An alumnus of The Juilliard School, she made her New York solo recital debut at Lincoln Center’s Alice Tully Hall as recipient of the Alice Tully Vocal Arts Debut Recital Award last November. Her continually expanding concert repertoire has been showcased with many different prestigious organizations. She has performed with the Royal Stockholm Philharmonic as part of their annual “Composer’s Festival” under Alan Gilbert, Mozart’s Mass in C minor with the Chicago Symphony, and Beethoven’s Mass in C and Choral Fantasy for her Mostly Mozart Festival debut at Lincoln Center and at Carnegie Hall with the Oratorio Society of New York under Kent Tritle. She has also sung Dvorak’s Stabat mater with the Santa Fe Symphony, Brahms’ Deutsches Requiem with the Santa Barbara Symphony, and appeared opposite baritone Wolfgang Holzmair in Wolf’s Spanisches Liederbuch at New York’s Weill Recital Hall. Other recent concert and oratorio engagements include Carmina burana, Beethoven’s Symphony No. 9, Mahler’s Symphony No. 4, Mozart’s Coronation Mass, the Fauré and Mozart Requiems, and Handel’s Messiah. She made her Carnegie Hall debut with Skitch Henderson and Rob Fisher with the New York Pops. Susanna Phillips is a winner of the Marilyn Horne Foundation Competition, and was awarded grants from the Santa Fe Opera and the Sullivan Foundation. Additionally, she was the first prize winner of the American Opera Society Competition and the Musicians Club of Women in Chicago. Raised in Huntsville, Susanna Phillips is grateful for the ongoing support of her community in her career. She sang Strauss’ Vier Letzte Lieder, Carmina Burana, Mozart’s C minor Mass, and her first performances of the title role in Lucia di Lammermoor in a concert version with the Huntsville Symphony. She returns frequently to her native state for recitals and orchestral appearances. This August, Susanna teamed up with bassoonist Matthew McDonald to start

Twickenham Fest, a summer chamber music festival in Huntsville, AL. Elena Abend Elena Abend has performed at Avery Fisher Hall at Lincoln Center, Weill Recital Hall at Carnegie Hall, Merkin Concert Hall, The United Nations, The Corcoran Gallery and the Embassy Series in Washington D.C, The Purcell Room and Wigmore Hall in London, The Academy of Music with the Philadelphia Orchestra, the Tolouse Conservatoire, the Teresa Carreno Complex in Venezuela, the Pabst Theater and the Chicago Cultural Center. She has collaborated in numerous chamber music concerts at the Marlboro, Ravinia, and Milwaukee Chamber Music Festivals, the Villa Terrace Chamber Music series, the Piano Chamber Series and the Milwaukee Chamber Orchestra series. Elina Chekan Born in Caracas, Venezuela, pianist Elena Abend is well known as a soloist and chamber musician. She has performed with all the major orchestras of her country and has recorded with the National Philharmonic Orchestra of Venezuela. As the recipient of a scholarship from the Venezuelan Council for the Arts, Ms Abend studied at the Juilliard School, where she received her Bachelor and Master degrees. She was awarded the William Schuman Prize for outstanding achievement given to a single graduate student of her class. She has performed at the Purcell Room in London’s Royal Festival Hall, Avery Fisher Hall in New York’s Lincoln Center, Weill Recital Hall at Carnegie Hall and the Academy of Music with the Philadelphia Orchestra. Other engagements have included the Wigmore Hall in London, the Toulouse Conservatoire and the Theatre Luxembourg in France, the Corcoran Gallery in Washington D.C., the United Nations, Merkin Concert Hall in New York, Chicago Cultural Center, Pabst Theater in Milwaukee, Atlanta Historical Society, and the Teresa Carreno Cultural Center in Caracas. Other chamber music collaborations include, performances at the Ravinia and Marlboro Music Festivals, as well as live broadcasts on Philadelphia’s WFLN, The Dame Myra Hess Concert Series on ChiUWM Peck School of the Arts 23


A R T I S T S B I O S ( c o n t .) cago’s WFMT and Wisconsin Public Radio at the Elvehjem Museum in Madison. Ms Abend has been on the Faculty of the Wisconsin Conservatory of Music, Indiana University’s String Academy summer program and the Milwaukee Chamber Music Festival. An active performer in the Milwaukee area, Ms Abend has performed on the Milwaukee Chamber Orchestra Series at Schwan Concert Hall, Piano Chamber, New Generations, Music from almost Yesterday, and the Yolanda Marculescu Vocal Art Series at the UWM. She has performed with “Present Music Now” and the “Frankly Music” Series, as well as being an invited guest on several occasions to perform with the Fine Arts Quartet. She recorded a CD with clarinetist Todd Levy performing music of Brahms and Schumann for the Avie Label, as well as numerous CD projects for the Hal Leonard Corporation. She is currently on the Faculty at the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee where she teaches piano and chamber music. Gregory Flint Gregory Flint is associate professor of horn at the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee and co-director of the Chamber Music Milwaukee concert series. As a performer, he is currently principal horn with the Elgin Symphony, the Chicago Jazz Orchestra, Present Music of Milwaukee and the Fulcrum Point New Music Project. He often performs with the Milwaukee Symphony, and has also appeared with the Chicago Symphony, Colorado Symphony Orchestra, Lyric Opera of Chicago, Honolulu Symphony, the Florida Orchestra, and the Ravinia Festival Orchestra. A busy chamber musician, Flint is a founding member of the critically acclaimed Asbury Brass Quintet, hornist with the Tower Brass of Chicago, and has also toured regularly with the Prairie Winds and the Chicago Brass Quintet. Past summers have included solo appearances in Spain, Costa Rica and South America. Gregory currently spends his summer months in New Mexico as a member of the Santa Fe Opera orchestra.

24 UWM Peck School of the Arts

René Izquierdo René Izquierdo is currently a professor of classical guitar at the University of Wisconsin in Milwaukee. As a concert artist, Rene has performed throughout North America, Cuba, Puerto Rico and Europe as solo recitalist, chamber musician and soloist with orchestra. He has received wide critical acclaim for his performances, and is recognized as one of America’s classical guitar virtuosos. A native from Cuba, Rene graduated from the Guillermo Tomas, Amadeo Roldan Conservatory and Superior Institute of Art in Havana. In the United States, he earned a Master of Music and Artist Diploma degrees from the Yale University School of Music. As one of the world’s leading classical guitarists Mr. Izquierdo is a recipient of numerous awards. He is a winner of JoAnn Falletta International Guitar Competition in 2004, Extremadura International Guitar Competition, Schadt String competition, Stotsenberg International Guitar Competition among others. Todd Levy Principal Clarinet of the MSO and The Santa Fe Opera orchestras, two-time Grammy Award winner Todd Levy has performed as a soloist at Carnegie Hall, Mostly Mozart, with the Israel Philharmonic, and at the White House; as chamber musician with members of the Guarneri, Juilliard, Orion, Miami quartets, James Levine, Christoph Eschenbach, and Mitsuko Uchida; and as guest principal clarinet with the New York Philharmonic, the Philadelphia Orchestra, the Metropolitan Opera, and frequently for Seiji Ozawa and Ricardo Muti in Japan. He has performed world premiere concerti or chamber works by composers such as John Harbison, Joan Tower, Peter Schickele, Paquito D’Rivera, Morton Subotnick, and Marc Neikrug and performs on the new release of Marc Neikrug’s Through Roses chamber work with violinist Pinchas Zuckerman, actor John Rubenstein and the composer conducting. He has recorded the Brahms Clarinet Sonatas for Avie, and three educational book/CDs of clarinet competition works for G. Schirmer/Hal Leonard, and a new


A R T I S T S B I O S ( c o n t .) edition/CD of the Bernstein Clarinet Sonata for Boosey and Hawkes/Hal Leonard. He performs exclusively on Vandoren reeds, mouthpieces, and ligatures, and Selmer Signature clarinets. He is also on the faculty of UW/Milwaukee and is co-director of Chamber Music Milwaukee. For a more complete biography, visit toddlevy.org. Richard Walters Richard Walters is a composer primarily interested in writing for the voice. He has composed nine song cycles, which remain unpublished, and is at work on an opera. His published concert arrangements, which are art song treatments of carols, hymns and American standards, have been recorded and are widely performed. His compositions and arrangements for Canadian Brass were recorded by the ensemble on a recent CD, People of Faith, a recording for which Walters was also producer. Walters is Vice President of Classical Publications at Hal Leonard Corporation, the world’s largest music print publisher, and directs all publishing, marketing and the business for the division, which includes G. Schirmer and Boosey & Hawkes. He also oversees North American marketing and distribution of European classical publishers, including Ricordi, Schott, Salabert, Durand and Henle. Walters’ editing credits number in the hundreds of publications, including the G. Schirmer American Aria Anthology; the Oratorio Anthology; Standard Vocal Literature; Samuel Barber: 65 Songs; Samuel Barber: Complete Piano Music; the multi-volume Singer’s Musical Theatre Anthology , which has sold over one million copies; 28 Italian Songs and Arias of the 17th and 18th Centuries ; editions of songs by Brahms, Faure, Schubert and Strauss, and many other publications. He has produced hundreds of recordings related to publications, and is recorded as pianist on many of them. Among his professional affiliations, he serves on the concert music committee of ASCAP, and adjudicates in the Metropolitan Opera National Council Auditions. He has covered the Milwaukee classical music scene as critic for Shepherd Express since 1998. Walters’ undergraduate studies were in piano at Simpson College in Iowa, where he

also studied opera coaching with Robert Larsen. His graduate studies in composition at the University of Minnesota were with Dominick Argento. Yasuko Oura Yasuko Oura has received national recognition as a virtuoso collaborative pianist, with concert appearances in notable venues as Alice Tully Hall, Merkin Hall, and Carnegie’s Weill Hall. Also known as a noted vocal coach and repetiteur, she has worked with such distinguished conductors as Harry Bicket, Jane Glover, and John DeMain. Ms. Oura was recently made the principal production pianist and coach for the Florentine Opera. She is also on the music staff for Des Moines Metro Opera, and formerly for Fort Worth Opera and Madison Opera. Her 2010-2011 season will include Rake’s Progress for Toledo Opera, Hansel and Gretel for Santa Fe Concert Association, L’Italiana in Algeri and Dido and Aeneas/Venus and Adonis for Florentine Opera, and Dialogues of the Carmelites and La Boheme for Des Moines Metro Opera. Active as a recitalist, past seasons include performances with singers such as Susanne Mentzer, Susanna Phillips, and David Cangelosi, as well as performances for the Dame Myra Hess Memorial Concert Series, and the Bel Canto Foundation. In addition, she is the artistic director of the NSUC Concert Series. She currently resides in Chicago, where she is on the faculty of Roosevelt University as a vocal coach, and has also coached at Northwestern, DePaul, and North Park Universities. Locally, she has worked with Grant Park Orchestra Chorus, Music of the Baroque, Light Opera Works, the Metropolitan Opera National Council Auditions Wisconsin District and Ars Viva Symphony. Ms. Oura has received fellowships to San Francisco Opera’s Merola Opera Program, Tanglewood Music Center, Aspen Opera Theater Center and Music Academy of the West and has performed for numerous masterclasses, including those for José Van Dam, Rudolf Piernay and Marilyn Horne’s Song Continues series. She holds a bachelor’s degree from Oberlin College and master’s and doctoral degrees from the Juilliard School, where she was a C.V. Starr Doctoral Fellow. UWM Peck School of the Arts 25


D E PA R TM E N T O F M U S I C FAC U LT Y A N D T E AC H I N G S TA F F Ensembles John Climer, Bands Scott Corley, Bands Margery Deutsch, Orchestras Curt Hanrahan, Jazz Band Gloria Hansen, Choirs Sharon Hansen, Choirs David Nunley, Choirs José Rivera, Choirs Guitar Peter Baime Beverly Belfer Pete Billmann Elina Chekan René Izquierdo Don Linke John Stropes Harp Ann Lobotzke+ Jazz Studies Curt Hanrahan, Jazz Ensemble/ Jazz Arranging Steve Nelson-Raney, Jazz Theory and History Music Education Scott Emmons Sheila Feay-Shaw Jeffrey Garthee José Rivera

Music History and Literature Mitchell Brauner Judith Kuhn Timothy Noonan Gillian Rodger Martin Jack Rosenblum

Voice Valerie Errante Jenny Gettel Constance Haas Jamie Johns Tanya Kruse Ruck Kurt Ollmann Teresa Seidl

Music Theory, Composition and Technology James Burmeister Christopher Burns Lou Cucunato William Heinrichs Jonathan Monhardt Steve Nelson-Raney Kevin Schlei Amanda Schoofs Jon Welstead* Piano Elena Abend Judit Jaimes Leslie Krueger Peggy Otwell Jeffry Peterson Katja Phillabaum Strings Scott Cook, String Pedagogy^ Darcy Drexler, String Pedagogy^ Stefan Kartman, Cello Lewis Rosove, Viola Laura Snyder, String Bass+ Bernard Zinck, Violin

Winds, Brass and Percussion Dave Bayles, Percussion Dean Borghesani, Percussion+ Margaret Butler, Oboe+ Stephen Colburn, Oboe+ Marty Erickson, Tuba & Euphonium Gregory Flint, Horn Beth Giacobassi, Bassoon+ Curt Hanrahan, Saxophone Kevin Hartman, Trumpet Mark Hoelscher, Trombone Kyle Knox, Clarinet+ Todd Levy, Clarinet+ Ted Soluri, Bassoon+ Carl Storniolo, Percussion Caen Thomason-Redus, Flute Thomas Wetzel, Percussion+ *Department Chair +Milwaukee Symphony Orchestra ^String Academy of Wisconsin

Fine Arts Quartet Ralph Evans, Violin Efim Boico, Violin Nicolò Eugelmi, Viola Wolfgang Laufer, Cello

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