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Ladies and gentlemen, there can be no flash photography during the performances and no video or audio recording of the show. We thank you for remembering to turn off any personal electronic devices that might beep, buzz, ring, or vibrate.

Scenic Designer Rebecca Hamlin

Costume Designer Jeffrey Lieder

Lighting Designer Stephen Roy White

Sound and Music Designer Chris Guse Voice and Speech Michelle Lopez-Rios Original songs composed by Rick Hughes Dance developed by Rebecca Holderness

As You Like It 1


CAST Character

Actor

ROSALIND......................................daughter of Duke Senior...................... Megan Stapleton CELIA............................................. daughter of Duke Frederick......................... Sally Arenberg DUKE SENIOR...........................................living in exile......................................... Derek Morris DUKE FREDERICK.............................his usurping brother...................................Derek Morris ORLANDO........................... youngest son of Sir Rowland de Boys.............. Mark Puchinsky OLIVER....................................................his eldest brother................. Kyle Gallagher-Schmitz ADAM..................................... servant to the De Boys household....................John Glowacki DENNIS.....................................................Oliver’s servant............................... Terrance Kingsby CHARLES........................................ Duke Frederick’s wrestler............................. Nick Haubner Le BEAU.........................................................a Courtier............................ Gemma Fitzsimmons TOUCHSTONE.............................................. a Clown............................................. Alex Van Abel AMIENS.......................................a lord, follower of Duke Senior............. Glenn Widdicombe JAQUES........................................... a melancholy gentleman............................. Nick Haubner CORIN............................................................a shepherd.........................................John Glowacki SILVIUS..........................................................a shepherd.........................................Matt O’Rourke PHOEBE.....................................................a shepherdess............................................Caitlin Wolf AUDREY..................................................... a country girl........................................... Liz Leighton SIR OLIVER MARTEXT..........................a country vicar................................ Terrance Kingsby WILLIAM..................................................a country youth.......................................... Javon Dean HYMEN.......................................................................................................................John Glowacki JAQUES de BOYS................ second son of Sir Rowland de Boys......McCormick Sweeney LORD............................................attendant on Duke Frederick...........McCormick Sweeney LORD..............................................companion of Duke Senior............................... Javon Dean LADY...............................................companion of Duke Senior.................Gretchen Mahkorn There will be one fifteen minute intermission PRODUCTION PERSONNEL Stage Management Staff Stage Manager............................................................................................................ Allison Hunt Assistant Stage Manager................................................................................. Meredith L. Roat Rehearsal Choreographer..........................................................................................Liz Faraglia Production Assistant..........................................................................................Holly Geraldson Technical Production Staff Technical Director......................................................................................................... Chris Guse Production Shop Supervisor...............................................................................Tim Laughner Co-Technical Director...............................................................................................Kelly Pursley Scenic Artisans......................................................................... Eric Schallhorn, Theresa Ennis, Casey Miller, Sarah Olsen, Christine Isbe, Mike Gerlach Technical Crew..................................................................................... Students of Theatre 214 Properties Director............................................................................................ Sandra J. Strawn Props Master................................................................................................................Ann Vollrath Properties Artisans............................................Samuel Sirna, Ross Zentner, Julia Williams Master Electrician........................................................................................................Sarah Olsen Electrician....................................................................................................................Julia Williams Scenic Charge Artist.......................................................................................... Rebecca Hamlin Scenic Artist............................................................................................................. Christine Isbell Light Board Operator...................................................Brittany McDonald, Corin Davidson Sound Board Operator........................................................................................... Nina Morales Deck Crew....................................................................................Pam Seccombe, Nolen Borne, Kolton Christenson, Melanie Liebetrau, Clara Forrest, Erika Kirkstein-Zastrow, Lindsey Smith, Victor Cook 2 UWM Peck School of Arts


P R O D U C T I O N P E R S O N N E L ( c o n t. ) Costume Production Staff Costume Supervisor................................................................................................. Karmen Seib Faculty Draper.....................................................................................................Pamela Rehberg Drapers...................................................................... Kari Ehler, Emily Peplinski, Karmen Seib Stitchers................................................................................... Hannah Glowacki, Amy McLain, Levi Miles, Theatre 225 Costume Construction Class Wardrobe Supervisor............................................................................................... Karmen Seib Wardrobe Crew..................................Andrew Beyer, Shelby Kaishain, Aaren Wallsworth Rebecca Hamlin is happy to be designing scenery as a guest artist here at UWM for the first time, after designing Henry IV Part 2, directed by Susan Finque, for the late, great Milwaukee Shakespeare a few seasons ago. She has designed extensively for Chicago area theatres including Apple Tree Theater, the Next Theatre, Ars Viva, Bailiwick Repertory, Lifeline Theatre, Seanachai, City Lit Theatre, Oak Park Festival Theatre and others. Rebecca’s work with educational theater includes Steppenwolf Outreach Program, Harper College, North Park University, Prarie State College, the University of Tulsa, and a variety of programs for children and teens. Rebecca’s non-theatre design and production clients in Chicago include Millennium Park, the Chicago Botanic Garden, Garfield Park Conservatory, the Shedd Aquarium and Loyola University. You can see more of her design work at www.chichonia.com. D I R E C TO R N O T E S Why do this play? Shakespeare continues to live at the center of our culture. 400 years on, his plays still probe our humanity and speak to us at a level of complexity and understanding that no other art in any medium has surpassed. As theatre artists and educators, a part of our mission always lies in taking audiences and students alike into the worlds Shakespeare created, to learn about ourselves, who we are, who we have been, where we’ve come from and of what we need to stay mindful, living in this present and creating the future before us. Again and again he can seem so contemporary in his understanding of life and the complexities of the world we live in today: he speaks to the volatility and manipulative nature of our politics in Julius Caesar, the hubris, narcissism and corruptions of power in our time in any one of the history plays, the violence and danger imbedded in our age’s religious righteousness in Measure for Measure. Most extensively he writes of love in its many forms and manifestations. And in his many iterations of love, no play explores the deep truths about intimacy, authenticity in love, the balances between partners necessary to healthy, thriving relationships than As You Like It. The play stands on its toes and stretches toward a future age yet to come, a different possibility of how to be man and woman with each other and feels like it finds its footing securely in our own. The play is in so many ways the most contemporary of his comedies. As You Like It is Shakespeare’s greatest comedy and Rosalind is Shakespeare’s greatest female character. There will be those that argue for Twelfth Night or Much Ado about Nothing, and one’s affection may attach more easily to either of these two nearly equally great plays, but As You Like It digs deeper than either of its siblings. Gender disguise, social satire, fist-fights and wrestling matches, threat and danger, romance and rebirth. A journey that begins in primal sin, with brother seeking the murder of brother climbs its way out of the dark to achieve love, triumph and forgiveness. At the center of it all lays this story of Rosalind and Orlando. Struck dumb by the sight of her the first time he sees her, Orlando needs to learn whom it is he thinks he loves and Rosalind takes him on a journey of discovery into authenticity in relationship. Do we see the whole package of the object of our desire? Looking below the surface picture that first drew us, do we As You Like It 3


D I R E C TO R N O T E S ( c o n t .) see all the contradictions, paradoxes, foibles and glories that make up any one of us and accept and love the fullness of the human being that stands before us. This is what Rosalind demands of Orlando and the play asks all of us to move beyond romance, custom and self-involvement and truly see the other. In our world where beauty has been as commoditized and mediated as it is, authenticity in our most intimate relationships is more important and perhaps more elusive than ever. The dance between Rosalind and Orlando to find and know each other is our dance and nobody plays the music of the dance with richness and vigor of Shakespeare. Bill Watson, Director December 2011 D R A M AT U R G ’ S N O T E S Revolutionary Tarts: The First Actresses on the English Stage Imagine, if you will, an iconic female character. Perhaps Scarlet O’Hara. Or Holly Golightly. Or The Girl from The Seven Year Itch. You may now possibly have the image of Vivien Leigh, Audrey Hepburn, or Marilyn Monroe in your mind. All three women were and are huge icons, making those characters famous. Now imagine if all three were portrayed by Justin Bieber in drag. Welcome to theatre in the time of Shakespeare! Yes, young boys played the parts of women. This trend of males playing female roles is actually not just limited to Shakespeare’s time. Dating back to Ancient Greece, Ancient Rome, and Medieval Europe, women who performed onstage were considered to be disgraceful. It was not the profession a proper woman would get into. There were female performers, but they were not seen as respectable. Young men could play the parts of the leading ladies then as well. This was not done as a means of comic effect with drag as we find very common in more modern times. This was the norm. In England, boys began playing the roles of female characters on stage with the birth of the professional theatre in the 1560s. Some men could also depict women, but the higher pitched voices of the pre-pubescent boy players worked better for portraying women. It would take a while before women gained their rightful place on the stage. It was not illegal for women to perform on stage during the English Renaissance period; however, it was just never thought of as acceptable. A woman would be reduced to the status of prostitute if she had the audacity to show herself in front of an audience. In the early to mid seventeenth century, the Puritans held power in Parliament. They made all theatrical activity illegal and closed the theatres down, with the exception of Court performances. It wasn’t until the Restoration of Charles II to the throne that the Puritan prohibition of drama was finally lifted in 1660 and in 1662, women were finally allowed to perform onstage, partly because King Charles II enjoyed watching actresses onstage. He had been raised in France, where the arts thrived, especially theatre. Elsewhere in Europe, women had been given the right to perform onstage in the early seventeenth century. Charles had been exposed to women performing for audiences in other lands, and wanted to see this in his own land. It also so happened that some of these female performers were to become mistresses of his. The first actresses paved the way for all female performers. Women had to deal with a lot in their early days on the stage, working harder than men for roles and to support themselves. They were thought to be whores and coquettes, but also had gained the reputation of talented celebrities. These women fought for that rightful reputation. Some actresses, like King Charles II’s favorite mistress, the pretty, witty 4 UWM Peck School of Arts


D R A M AT U R G ’ S N O T E S ( c o n t . ) Nell Gywnn, did not even care about being referred to as a “whore.” If it weren’t for these early female performers on the stage, the theatre could have been a much different place. A man playing the role of a female is funny now, but if that were all we were used to, it would not be a tremendous joy to watch. After all, can we really imagine anybody besides Marilyn standing on the subway grate in that white dress? “All the world’s a stage”… and a few other facts about its players: Until the late 17th century, actors in the Western world were not given the reverence and respect they receive today. They were some of the lowest citizens. In the Early Middle Ages, actors were seen as sneaky, dishonest, and unrespectable. They were not even allowed Christian burials. With traditions at the time, actors would be forever condemned. The term “actress” was first used in 1700, attributed to the poet John Dryden. Though “actor” and “actress” were interchangeable by the time women began performing onstage. An “actor” refers to a person who acts, regardless of their gender, while “actress,” influenced by the French word actrice, simply refers to a woman who acts. Margaret Hughes is credited as the first professional actress of the English stage. Her first role was as Desdemona in Shakespeare’s Othello in December 1660. By Melissa Neumann, Dramaturg

D E PA R TM E N T O F T H E AT R E LeRoy Stoner........................................................................................................................................Chair Administrative Staff Kristy Volbrecht.............................................................................................................. Office Manager Faculty and Teaching Academic Staff Katherine Balsley.........................................................................................Lecturer, Popular Culture Anne Basting, Ph.D.........................................................................Associate Professor, Playwriting Jessica Berlin.........................................................................................Lecturer, Stage Management Dick Chudnow................................................................................................................Lecturer, Acting R.H. Graham...................................................................Associate Professor, Graphics and Design Christopher J. Guse.................................... Associate Professor, Scenic and Audio Production Joseph Hanreddy......................................................................................................Adjunct Professor Rebecca Holderness............................................................................... Associate Professor, Acting Anthony Horne....................................................Assistant Professor, Directing, Musical Theatre Tim Laughner........................Associate Instrumentation Innovator, Scene Shop Supervisor Jeffrey Lieder................................................ Associate Professor, Head of Costume Production Michelle Lopez-Rios................................................................Assistant Professor, Voice & Speech Raeleen McMillion........................................................................................... Senior Lecturer, Acting Robin Mello, Ph.D..............................................................Associate Professor, Theatre Education Corliss Phillabaum, Ph.D........................................................Professor Emeritus, Theatre History Pamela J. Rehberg............................................................................ Associate Professor, Costumes Alvaro Saar-Rios.................................................................................................Lecturer, Play Analysis Pamela Schermer..............Associate Professor, Visual Communication for Performing Arts Sandra J. Strawn........................................................Associate Professor, Properties Production, Head of Technical Production James Tasse......................................................................................................................Lecturer, Acting Jenny Wanasek...............................................................................................................Lecturer, Acting William Watson........................................................................ Associate Professor, Head of Acting Mark Weinberg, Ph.D.....................................................................Senior Lecturer, Theatre History Stephen R. White........................................................................... Senior Lecturer, Lighting Design As You Like It 5


PECK SCHOOL OF THE ARTS Wade Hobgood......................................................................................................................... Dean Scott Emmons.......................................................................................................Associate Dean ADMINISTRATIVE STAFF Mary McCoy................................................................................................ Assistant to the Dean Sue Thomas...............................................................................................Administrative Officer Randall Holper..................................................................................................Facilities Manager MARKETING AND DEVELOPMENT STAFF Ellen Friebert Schupper................... Director of Marketing and Community Relations Diane Grace..............................................................................................Development Director Nicole Schanen........................................................................................... Marketing Specialist BOX OFFICE Tianna Conway............................................................................................. Box Office Manager Chris Ouchie, Nicholas Ouchie,........................................................................ Box Office Staff Lauren Messner, Brianna Husman, Mike Gold, Bob Schaab, Maria Del Carmen Corpus, Tom Gray SPECIAL THANKS Lisa Schlenker Skylight Opera Theatre, UWM Art Department Sculpture Lab, Utah Shakespeare Festival

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As You Like It-UWM Peck