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July 2021

the color issue 1


2012 The International Food Wine Travel Writers Association (IFWTWA) is a nonprofit, volunteer-run organization whose membership is comprised of seasoned, vetted professionals from around the globe—Australia, Brazil, Canada, Greece, India, Italy, Mexico, New Zealand, Portugal, South Africa, Thailand, The United Kingdom, and the United States of America. Our members promote food, wine, and travel through a variety of platforms that include print and digital publications, broadcasting, and social media. IFWTWA publishes Food, Wine, Travel Magazine both on its website and digitally; participates in broadcasts on Big Blend Radio , and sponsors a series of professional development webinars.

Get more information about the benefits, guidelines and application process at ifwtwa.org. 2

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letter from the editor I love color. One of the first songs I learned as a child was about colors… Red and yellow and pink and blue, Purple and orange and green, I can sing a rainbow, sing a rainbow… (©Arthur Hamilton) All these many years later, I still sing it at times. We take it for granted, but color affects us daily. Whether you realize it or not, companies use it to set off an emotional reaction. As I write this, I’m watching a news program whose graphics are set on a blue screen. Blue calms us and imparts a sense of trust, security, confidence, intelligence. A car company’s commercial breaks in with its red cars, red graphics, red logo. Red stimulates us and evokes feelings of energy, action, excitement, passion. If you think about it, color is a huge part of your travel experience. In a new environment, you may notice color more. You can’t think of Santorini without seeing the blue domes that dot the horizon. Red peppers stand out amidst the green vegetables in markets in India, Palermo, Beijing. Yellow cabs call to you from the streets of New York and Toronto and Melbourne. This issue, as you probably have guessed, is all about color. Our writers bring you the colors they see when they travel—from the bold reds, greens, and yellows to the softer orchids, apricots, and pinks. Hopefully our rainbow of the world will help you see more in a scene when you travel. On a side note, as the world opens up, be safe as you travel, and be sure to enjoy the journey.

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Christine Cutler Executive Editor

Christine Cutler | Executive Editor Amy Piper | Managing Editor Debbra Dunning Brouillette | AssociateEditor Noreen Kompanik | Associate Editor Irene Levine | Assistant Editor Jan Smith | Assistant Editor, Columns Mary Farah | Marketing Manager Paula Shuck | Marketing

Magazine Layout & Design Christine Cutler

Editorial Board

Debbra Dunning Brouillette David Drotar MaryFarah Irene Levine Noreen Kompanik

Contributing Writers/Photographers Jane Ammeson Pam Baker Jo Clark Michelle Fedosoff Erin Jones Sharon Kurtz Kathy Merchant Rose Palmer Jan Smith Bel Woodhouse

Editor: chris@fwtmagazine.com IFWTWA: admin@ifwtwa.org Visit our website: fwtmagazine.com

Color Photo ©Markus Spiske on unsplash.com

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Gary Baker Debbra Dunning Brouillette Judi Cohen Therese Iknoian Noreen Kompanik Debi Lander Lisa Morales Amy Piper Cori Solomon Scott Kendall

All articles & photographs are copyright of writer unless otherwise noted. No part of this publication may be reproduced without express written permission.

Contact

On the cover:

Kathy Merchant David Nershi Robyn Nowell Amy Piper Jan Smith


black pink red majorelle blue the greens sunflower yellow aquamarine provencal pink brown vineyard green

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antigua gold cornflower blue apricot turquoise orchid key west blue white cerulean blue azure

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Jane Simon Ammeson is a travel and food writer and author of 14 books. Her most recent, Lincoln Road Trip: The BackRoads Guide to America's Favorite President is a Bronze winner in the Travel Book category for the 2019-20 Lowell Thomas Travel Journalism Competition and was also a nalist for a 2019 Foreward Indie Award for Travel.

Sharon Kurtz is a freelance writer who shares her love of travel and food by exploring unique customs, cultures, and avors at home and around the globe. While Dallas, Texas is home with her husband and three spoiled dogs, her carry on is always packed ready for the next adventure. Catch up with her on her website or Instagram.

Pam and Gary Baker are freelance writers based in Northern California. They’ve written for regional, national, and international magazines including Porthole Cruise, Upscale Living, International Living, Via Magazine, and Australia and New Zealand Magazine. Pam writes a monthly wine column for Food Wine Travel Magazine. To read more of their stories, visit PamandGaryBaker.com

Debi Lander thrives on travel and the challenge of photography. She claims she’s never happier than when behind the lens. Her global explorations focus on wildlife, adventure, historical and cultural sites, unique lodging options and culinary experiences. Debi’s day with the bears in Katmai was one of the best in her life.

Debbra Dunning Brouillette, Tropical Travel Girl, was born and raised in the Midwest but Florida vacations opened her world to sun, sand and turquoise water. A scuba diver and avid photographer, she enjoys exploring the reefs and natural wonders, and nding what makes each island unique. She savors the food and wine wherever her travels take her. Jo Clark is a food, wine, nature, and travel writer and photographer. A retired teacher, she loves learning locals’ secrets about travel spots and adding to her list of “off the beaten path” places. You may read her articles on HaveGlassWillTravel, follow her on Facebook, Instagram. or Twitter. Judi Cohen is a travel writer from Toronto, Canada, with a passion for off-the-beaten-path destinations and small ship cruises around the world. She has been sharing her travel photography from over 90 countries on Instagram as @Travelingjudi. Judi is a contributing writer for various online publications Michelle  Fedosoff  is a traveler, writer, and photographer. Visiting thirteen countries so far with many more on her bucket list, she is always on the hunt for interesting foods to try and experiences to have. You can nd what she has been up to at www.whathappendtoday.ca  A lifetime love of travel, languages, exploration, and cultures led Therese Iknoian into writing and photography. First, daily newspaper (and part of a Pulitzer Prize-winning news team), then freelancing and books, and now HITravelTales.com, dedicated to meaningful travel adventures emphasizing immersive travel and award-winning storytelling in words and photos Erin Jones is a freelance Travel Writer based in the Midwest of the United States. England is her favorite place to be but is always up for an adventure in new cities. Catch up on Erin's adventures on her blog, www.adventuresoferin.com, and on Instagram @adventuresoferin82 Noreen Kompanik is a San Diego-based travel journalist with over 600 published articles. She’s a regular contributor to Travel Pulse, San Diego Explorer, and co-publisher and editor of her newly launched magazine https:// travelbyvacationrental.com/. She’s a guest speaker at Great Escape Publishing’s workshops and pioneered the travel writer’s program, Travel Writers Café

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meet our writers

Based in Cincinnati, Ohio, Kathy Merchant writes a travelwine-food blog called Vino Ventures. Her rst book, on Cincinnati women in the arts, debuted in June 2020. Publication of Kathy’s second book, a biography of Cincinnati Zoo’s “cheetah champion” Cathryn Hilker, will be June 2021. Lisa Morales is a marketer and publicist by day, and writer and editor-in-chief for Live in Italy Magazine. Lisa is passionate about the visual arts and her favorite assignment of the year is Art Basel Miami. She loves to cook, study wine, go for nature walks, take photos and, of course, travel. Find her at www.allegorypr.com or www.liveinitalymag.com Rose Palmer is a retired PhD chemist who is also an award winning travel writer, photographer and quilter. She likes to focus her traveling lens on history, art, architecture, nature, and soft adventure with a touch of luxury. Discover her travel and quilting content at Quiltripping.com Amy Piper is a travel writer and photographer who had sixmonth expat assignments in South Korea and Argentina. Bomb-snif ng dogs chased her in the middle of the night in Bogota, gate agents refused her boarding to Paraguay, and Federal Marshalls announced her seat on a plane looking for a murder suspect (traded places.) It is always an adventure! Amy is on the editorial board of Food, Wine, Travel Magazine. Follow her adventures at  http://www.followthepiper.com. Jan M. Smith is a food, wine, and travel writer enjoying a lengthy career in the travel, tourism, and hospitality industry. Jan and her husband are grateful for the time they have to travel and explore this beautiful world. Follow Jan’s adventures at neverenoughtravel.com Cori Solomon, an award-winning writer/photographer in Los Angeles, can often be found traveling with her dogs in tow. Her blog, The Written Palette, focuses on travel, art, food, wine, and pets. Cori's background is real estate. Also, being an animal artist, her articles utilize the art palette both visually and verbally. Bel (Belinda) Woodhouse is an Australian travel writer with over 170 published articles. She is author of the “21 Reasons to Visit … “ travel guide series. You can nd her on The Travel Bag, Instagram: Travel Writer Bel Scott Kendall is a former Navy Of cer, teacher and tennis coach who is an avid traveler and writer. Scott has traveled extensively throughout the United States and Europe. Follow him at scottkendalltravels.com and https://playstayeat.com/.


black By Therese Iknoian

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Milky Way at Pemaquid Lighthouse, Maine

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urning my head upward to gaze at the stars sparkling above, I inhale the night deeply. Hello, I’m home. Then I go about setting up my camera gear, a routine that has somehow become comforting even with the omnipresent anxiousness about what the night’s sky will bring and what photographic dreams will be realized – or frustrated Although black may represent a struggle between good and bad, happy and sad, or certainly and doubt, for me it represents a clean palette waiting to be lled by the colors of the night. Since black is the absorption of all colors, it is in reality no color and yet every color. You just have to coax them out. From an urban jungle with hurry-hurry people and cars, to redwood forests lled with mystery and deep silence, to mountains and seasides with unending views of stars, the night and its blackness offer hope and peace. You have not experienced a place until you have seen its blackness As a night photographer, discovering what can be pulled from the black after most people have put away their cameras and called it a day is always a challenge. I love the simplicity of stars and the beauty of a Milky Way, but I particularly enjoy capturing the energy that exists in a place or a story that can be told. I am pulled out into the black of night again and again, seeking to look beyond the blackness to its many colors. Hello, I’m home.

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Marshall Point Lighthouse Maine aglow; Truck in Rhyolite Ghost Town Nevada


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Light Painting 3 Brothers Graves, Nevada; Berlin Christmas Market Ferris Wheel; Desert X Palm Springs Light Paint; Star Trails over Lone Pine Peak, California


pink

By Lisa Morales

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t’s hard to stroll down rather than ‘salsa’ down Calle Ocho in Miami’s Little Havana neighborhood. The colors, aromas, sounds and social vibe keep you smiling and dancing. It’s my Happy Place! If searching for Shocking Pink (FC0FC0), there's only one place in Miami to nd that color on every block! Have you been? Here you’ll nd a snapshot of Havana libre (free Havana) encapsulated in the minds and hearts of the Cubans who ed their homeland located just 90 miles away. This lively street is the best place to drink a cafecito, play dominoes, or sip on a Mojito while catching up with friends. While there’s a lot of tourist buses passing through, there’s still plenty of locals looking for an affordable lunch and cool refuge from the heat. If you prefer lunch on la Calle, line up at the ventanita (window). Foodie Tip: try an original Frita Cubana (seasoned hamburger with potato sticks) at El Rey de las Fritas. Enjoy the vibrant murals by Diana “Did” Contreras; stroll through Futurama Art Gallery and buy an original work of art; or enjoy a sweet, cool treat at Azucar Ice Cream. I wore my shocking pink Beautiisoles for the occasion, and my friend Liza, who joined us for lunch, coincidentally carried a matching purse. You must go, or as Cuban Americans and Pitbull say: “Dale!

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Photos (From top right): Guantanamera Cigars; Annie M. painting detail; Liza Gallardo Walton and Lisa Morales ; Lung Yai Thai Tapas mural on Calle 8 Opposite page: Diana Didi Contreras mural

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Photos (From top): Sanguich de Miami bathroom wallpaper; Las Menina of Little Havana collarborative art project in Futurama Art Gallery in Little Havana; Street planter on Calle 8; Azucar Ice Cream

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red By Judi Cohen

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ne of my earliest childhood memories was watching the cherries ripen on the trees at our family home. When the plump shiny cherries turned bright red, it was time to pick and eat them. Happily, I was able to see the bursts of cherry blossoms in the spring and the picking of bushels of cherries for the 60 years my mother lived in that house. Perhaps that is why I have been drawn to the colour red during my travels and at home. From nearby New York where I regularly see Robert Indiana's iconic "Love" sculpture to my many trips to India to see Holi, the festival of colours, or during Diwali, where I learned about the signi cance of the colour red for fertility, love, and weddings. In the colourful markets in Asia, it is the red fruit and vegetables, like tomatoes, chili peppers, apples and pomegranates that always caught my eye, and became the subject of my photographs.

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Streaks of red in art, furniture, carpets, cars and clothes are signatures of my style and personal choices. I accessorize my rooms, backyard, clothing with reds, and even wear bright red lipstick proudly! Red screams "life" to me. I am, after all, an assertive, passionate and energetic person, all characteristics associated with the colour red!


Photos (Opposite, from top left): LOVE; Traditional red wedding dress Bishnoi Village, India; Celebrating Holi in Narlai, India; Flower Sellers in Myanmar This page (Clockwise from top left): Fiery Red Ferrari in Paris; Dancers during Holi Festival India; Sofa and art Byblos Art Hotel Villa Amista Italy; Ripe Red Cherries; Hot Red Chilis in Market, India

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majorelle blue By Erin Jones

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arrakech, Morocco, is a lively city that ghts for attention from all your senses. It is hard to focus on what is capturing your attention the most. Is it the moment you catch a scent of the fragrant tagines full of spices and fresh vegetables, and your eyes feast upon the colorful rugs in the Medina? For me, the Majorelle gardens are what captures Marrakech. The gardens provide a moment of serenity in an otherwise frantic pace The Majorelle blue of the buildings and planters in the garden is stunning and the brightest and truest blue

Majorelle blue origin French artist Jaques Majorelle created a home and garden in Marrakech in 1917, the Majorelle Gardens. Majorelle created and trademarked his signature color by using the lapiz lazuli gemstone found locally in Marrakech. Using the distinct color, he painted his house and walls of his garden with the ultra-bright blue color. The famed fashion designer, Yves Saint Lauren, saved the property from disrepair in the 1980s. The property is now a popular tourist spot and features a museum on the Barber culture, and is the perfect place to nd rest while gazing at the botanical gardens

Finding Majorelle blue If adventures ever take you to Marrakech, I hope you discover the Majorelle blue and the gardens named after it. I will forever associate Majorelle blue with Marrakech and wish the same for you!

Photos (From top): Majorelle garden staircase; Majorelle blue stand with yellow planter

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Photos (From top left): Majorelle garden building through the trees; Majorelle garden building with light teal accents; Majorelle Garden backdrop; Majorelle Garden pond

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the greens By Kathy Merchant

Dining at Creation Winery, Hermanus, South Africa

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Green is a universal signal of growth, hope, joy, and progress as little sprouts and owering shoots announce the arrival of the vibrant yellows, pinks, roses, and reds that emerge as sunshine and soft rain warms the earth in the snap of a few days. Going green to plan global travel means you can pick your preferred hemisphere to coincide with a prime season anywhere in the world. If it’s cold, grey skies from November through February in Cincinnati, it’s sunny and green in Chile, Argentina, New Zealand, Australia, and South Africa Budding vines announce the beginning of the rst critical phase of winegrowing, when the timing of new vines and the owering of new buds presage the possibility of an amazing vintage Green peas, asparagus, avocados, broccoli, lettuce, kale, spinach. For food lovers, spring green vegetables launch summer gardens into a satisfying season of healthy eating My collection of beloved green photos spans 10 years and eight countries, a small sharing of happiness from global travel and delicious food and wine.

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pringtime is green, so many different shades of green. It’s impossible to pick just one shade to express the range of uplifting emotions inspired by springtime green


Photos (Opposite page from top): Michelin 1-star Ristorante Arnolfo, Colle Val d'Elsa, Italy; Green turns to yellow, France turns to Germany; Lily pads; (This page, clockwise from top): Kenroku-en Garden, Kanazawa, Japan; Toscana; Vietri Sul Mare, Amal Coast, Italy; Hydrangea Garden, Kamakura, Japan; © Rodney Strong Vineyards

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sun ower yellow By Michelle Fedosoff

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un ower yellow is the color of warmth, happiness, and summer and there is no place better to capture that than in the sun ower elds in Chilliwack BC.

Upon rst hearing of the Sun ower Festival, I was intrigued. I purchased my tickets online and set the alarm for the next morning. The ringing of my alarm at ve a.m. was not what I wanted to hear but I had a one-hour drive ahead of me and my goal is to make the sun ower elds as the sun comes up.  Upon arriving, I park in the grassy area, show my ticket at the gate, and enter with dozens of other people.  I nd a place to sit and wait for the sunrise over the owers. As the sun rises, the color of the sun owers gets brighter and brighter and I cannot stop myself from smiling. Rows upon rows of sun owers of different heights all with that beautiful warm yellow.  As the morning grows warmer, the bees come out and I nd myself wandering from section to section counting the bees, watching the dragon ies, smiling at the children running, and being amused by the people dressed for sel es.  I expected to stay for an hour, take a photo or two, then return home but instead found myself staying until early afternoon. Leaving, I purchase a sun ower bouquet and seeds for my own garden. 

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Photos (From top): Sun ower and bee; Sun owers in bicycle basket; Dragon y on a sun ower; Sun ower bouquet from the festival; One of many varieties of sun owers

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Early morning in the sun ower elds

One of the many photo props with the sun owers

Painting the sun ower elds

Sun ower petal fallen on the leaves fi

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aquamarine By Noreen Kompanik

Belandra Bay

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quamarine’s name comes from Latin for seawater. Steeped in ancient myth, the aquamarine stone was renowned as the treasure of mermaids. Sailors believed it brought good luck and protection. It’s considered one of the most beautiful gemstones for its clarity and translucency As a beach lover, I’m forever drawn to ocean waters that most represent a q u a m a r i n e ’s m a g n i c e n t c a l m i n g turquoise hue. Some of my favorites are

Belandra Bay, La Paz, Mexic Surrounded by massive rock formations, Belandra’s waters are pristine, shallow, and warm. This “Laguna de la Colores” showcases six different dazzling colors of blue and turquoise. Thatch-roofed palapas line a spit of sand along the beachline. The calm bay waters are ideal for kayaking. It’s breathtaking paradise in its most perfect form

Turks and Caicos Islands, Caribbea

Turks & Caicos

You’ll look far and wide to nd waters this crystal clear with shades ranging from aquamarine to deep azure. The healthy coral reef ecosystem and large coastal areas protected by the National Parks Ordinance provide ideal snorkeling and diving opportunities. Soft sugary-sand beaches stretch for miles along this stunning picturesque coastline. It’s an absolute treasure-trove of natural beauty

Virgin Gorda Baths, British Virgin Island Framing the aquamarine Caribbean along a tropical white sandy beach, the British Virgin Islands’ Baths invariably evoke a jaw-dropping reaction each time we visit. Shallow clear waters and delightful boulder-strewn coves are perfect for swimming. The bay also sports underground caves and reefs teeming with tropical sh. Simply magni cent!

Playa Ruinas

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provençal pink By Cori Solomon

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here are many variations of pinks and coral colors in Rosé. Provençal Pink represents some of my favorite Rosés. Typically those Rosés come from the south of France and have distinct aromas and nuances.

The Provençal Pink of the Rosés from Provence exhibits an iridescent hue re ecting an almost opalescent, luminous, or pearl-like quality to its color. I think of a splash of freshness when looking at the pink hues The aromas that permeate these Rosés remind me of the sea on a day when there is a slight wind. In the south of France, it might be the Mistral wind. It also reminds me of the smells I often sensed when I strolled along the Côte d'Azur in Nice and Cannes on a visit to the French Riviera or when I drove down the Mediterranean coast from St. Tropez to San Remo. Their subtle nuances differentiate them from other Rosés throughout the world. Perhaps the fresh soft avors of fruit, herbs de Provence, and lavender make these wines stand out Of course there are Provençal Rosés produced around the world that also display a color, demeanor, and style similar to the Rosés from Provence.

Provencal Pink Ros

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Photos: (From top): Provençal Pink Ros Wines; Ch teau Roubine ; Glass of Provencal Pink Ros


brown By Debi Lander

Close-up of Coastal Brown Bear

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Muscular bear moves along; Kodiak on the banks

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typical preschooler’s alphabet book teaches that “B” is for brown bears. That’s exactly what I hoped to see and photograph – Kodiak and Coastal Brown Bears in Katmai National Park and Preserve.

I caught a short ight to Kodiak Island from Anchorage, Alaska, home to Kodiak bears, the largest subspecies of grizzlies. I found the Buskin River alive with thrashing salmon, so many, it looked like you could drop a net and scoop out twelve. The annual salmon run provides the perfect opportunity for hungry bears to fatten up before hibernation. Alas, I did not see a Kodiak until afternoon. Then, excitedly I spied a chocolate-colored creature nonchalantly strolling the banks. He entered the water and forcefully pounced on a sh in the river, tearing it apart with his long claws. Yikes The following morning, I donned thigh-high wader’s and boarded a oatplane headed to Geographic Harbor within Katmai Park. What a thrill to discover about 15 coastal brown bears. These momentarily gentle giants focused on feeding and didn’t seem to care about my small group. They followed their instincts as they shed and paraded down the waterway Like a mother anticipates her child’s routines, our expert guide predicted the habits of the resident bears. He led us to prime viewing spots yielding an up-close encounter with a mama bear trailing three mischievous cubs. They frolicked with sibling rivalry, watching mom until she produced a real teddy bearlike picnic To take advantage of this extraordinary experience, you must visit during the late summer/early fall

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Kodiak feasting on his catch; A moveable feast


Photos: Bear Tracks; (From top): Mama checks on her cubs; Climbing the banks; The three little bears; Cubs on the banks

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Photos (From top): First look at a Kodiak Bear; Bears at work; Little bear wants some lunch


By Jan Smith

Nine Winery Heart-shaped Vineyard

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he vineyards are dressed in green, symbolizing it’s the time to get out and go. Summer is a perfect time to plan a trip and resume those pent-up travel desires of the past year. Destinations are reopening and welcoming back visitors. California’s central coast Paso Robles and Santa Barbara wine regions are easily reached and destinations to consider

Wineries Worth a Visit Niner Wine Estates - Pure Green signi es sustainability. This winery is known for being the rst winery on the Central Coast to earn a LEED certi cation for its commitment to sustainability. A farm-to-table restaurant is available on this Paso Robles property. J Dusi Winery- Third generation winemaker Jannell Dusi leads in producing their well-known old vine Zinfandel. The expansive vineyards and

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vineyard green

canopied trees create a sea of green enjoyed best from the various patios. DAOU Vineyards- DAOU Vineyards was well ahead of green technology when implementing the rst gravity- ow winery in America in the early 1960s at their Paso Robles winery. The winery sits atop DAOU Mountain, offering green vistas and views for days. Enjoy the colorful panorama in one of the winery’s Adirondack chairs while sipping a few of their award-winning wines. Sunstone Winery- This San Ynez Valley winery in Santa Barbara offers outdoor seating on its sprawling green lawn. The property (tucked away from the main roads) offers a tranquil spot for a picnic lunch. A food truck is available, or you can BYO and enjoy a bottle of the winery’s latest release. It is time to start traveling again. California wine regions are ready for you!


Photos (L-R): Santa Barbara hillside vineyards ; Lunch Favorite Cello Ristorante at Allegreto; New vintages on their way

Ballooning in the Vineyards

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Photos (L-R): Sunstone Winery's expansive picnic area; The view from J. Dusi Winery's Patio; The Quiet Backroads of Paso Robles Wine Country


Taste something completely new.

Hear the gentle lapping of the Gulf waves nearby as you dine al fresco. Taste a local favorite as you bite into fresh-caught grouper. Raise a toast with a glass of wine as the sun warms your shoulders. Discover the unbeatable open-air dining scene in St. Pete/Clearwater. VisitStPeteClearwater.com

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antigua gold By Bel Woodhouse

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I found joy in these yellows. From the light bright sun oweryellows and sunshine-in-a-bottle happy honey yellows through to thedeep mustard and amber almost terracotta hues. Their golden glows turn Antigua into a photographer’s dreamscape.

The City’s Golden Icons Grand golden churches like La Merced with elegant white ligree delicately entwined around its columns and doorways are breathtaking. Antigua’s richest church it radiates in the heart of town right next to its most photographed icon, Santa Catalina Arch. At the opposite end of town was my favorite. El Calvario church’s light yet vibrant lemon butter facade with bold white banding radiated peace. Lit up at night I was like a moth to a ame, staring at it for hours.

Volcanic Charm I love the volcanic charm of Antigua. Volcán de Fuego–the local active volcano–small, almost daily eruptions wear the city’s buildings down. Creating a unique lightly-crumbling historic vibe. Making me feel slightly like a time traveler witnessing history as washed out yellowish volcano-damaged walls ended up creating my favorite urban landscapes. Around every corner, down every street and in the town’s parks this historic vibe complemented the glorious yellows. Even Tanque La Union, the town’s communal laundry.

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Photos (This page): Antigua's deep golden homes; Volcanic charm of Antigu (Opposite page, clockwise from top, left): Mayan lady carrying owers on her head; Man sitting in the laundry tub reading at Tanque La Union, Antigua's communal laundry; Weathered peeling paint part of Antigua's volcanic charm; The author playing National Geographic photographer

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loved living in Antigua Guatemala for two years. Strolling the cobblestoned streets, I was awash with golden glows daily. Yellow is one of only four colors permitted in the UNESCO world heritage listed Spanish colonial town. Sky blue, cream and red are the other three


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By Pam & Gary Baker

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n the vibrant Marina da Horta on Portugal’s island of Faial you will nd the largest maritime painting collection in the world. The walls around the  marina  display a  rainbow  of  brightly  colored paintings from nearly every ship that’s visited  there over  the last  half a century.  Corn ower Blue, the predominant color in many of the paintings, seems to marry the color of the sky and the sea into one. This  collection,  inspired by a legend,  is well known among sailors and visitors to the welldecorated  marina.  According to the  Marina’s  legend,  sailors  whose ships  dock at  Horta  must leave a painting of their boat on the breakwater so their ship  can  arrive safely at its next destination. However, some ships who failed to leave one have fallen victim to the curse, suffering shipwrecks and other nautical disasters. The main harbor of the Azores, Horta’s colorful marina is the fourth most visited marina in the world and the place where most yachts stop when crossing the North Atlantic.  Since the early 18th  century, the town’s harbor has served as an anchorage for whaling ships, clippers, and yachts. Now nearly 1,500 boats visit each year. No one knows when or how the tradition of leaving behind colorful calling cards on Horta’s harbor piers and walls started. But the paintings can be traced back at least fty years. New paintings are painted over old paintings. The images depict mermaids, whales, puf ns, yacht names, and captions. Like colorful pictures in children’s story books, the paintings number in the hundreds. Each, however, serves to ward off potential shipwrecks and assure safe passage to a ship’s next destination.

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Photos (L-R): A ship's three visits to Faial; Commemorating a visit in 2008 and 2014

corn ower blue


Photos (Top-bottom): Paganini II; Old and new paintings; Paintings faded and chipped from weather; Faded paintings; Rapa visited Faial ve times; Painting of clowns from 1997; Young girl prepares to paint her family's log

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By Jane Simon Ammeson

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slight tang from the Cantabrian Sea wafts through the gardens of Capricho de Gaudi as the setting sun casts a soft apricot glow on the brick walls of the 19th century summer home originally owned by Máximo Díaz de Quijano, a wealthy lawyer who lived here just a short time before dying young.

Capriciously Fantastica Designed by famed architect Antoni Gaudi, Capricho is Spanish for caprice, a perfectly apt description for this former bachelor pad circa 1883 with its Persian-style minaret and red tile roof. Muted red blooms of hydrangeas match the centers of the deftly sculpted tiles of glossy ceramic sun owers surrounded by green leaves. These cover the apricot-colored walls that as they rise change shapes, becoming pitched gables, turrets, tower, balconies, and other architectural whimsy

Traveling in Tim Alone, I savor my solitude after a week aboard the wonderful Costa Verde Express, Spain's oldest tourist train, on a trip through Basque Country. Inside El Capricho there’s laughter and chatter as my friends enjoy the cooking of Sergio Bastard of nearby Casona del Judio. There’s music as well--a 1920’s tune I know but can’t name

Synchronicity As the wind slightly stirs in the depths of the garden, I muse at how both Gaudi and I arrived in Comillas by train though separated in time by a century-and-a-half. Might these synchronic events have opened a portal to the past? Could his spirit be here as well? Then someone calls my name and I’m back, hungry and ready to join in. Will there be an apricot cocktail waiting for me

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All photos both pages: El Capricho de Gaudi


turquoise By Amy Piper

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urquoise sits on the color wheel between the watery blues and verdant greens with a touch of sunshine yellow thrown in for good measure. When you hear mention of The Turquoise, they refer to the Caribbean Sea as it takes on the color turquoise in sunlight due to the area’s shallow water The color turquoise calms you and helps recharge your energy. Color analysts say it helps provide clarity in your thoughts and increases concentration. That’s probably why after visiting Gulf Shores and Orange Beach, Alabama, I feel so calm and recharged. I must be all the turquoise. You’ll nd it on the beach, in your accommodations, in the décor of coffee shops and restaurants, and even in the ice cream. Wake up in Turquoise Place, a luxury condominium resort accommodation along the white sandy beaches of Orange Beach, Alabama. Create sandcastles, play beach games by the turquoise waters, rest on the loungers, and enjoy the calming view. At the award-winning Southern Grind, enjoy breakfast or a Cuppa Joe in a calming, tranquil, turquoise, and white environment. You’ll also nd shades of turquoise throughout the Gulf State Park and the Hugh S. Branyon Backcountry Trail, where hiking and biking provide another means to spot this calming hue. And you’ll need sustenance for all this activity, and the turquoise- lled LuLu’s is just the place to have a meal and enjoy some live music After a day on the turquoise waters, enjoy an overthe-top turquoise shake at The Yard, where the ice cream treats include a sampling of baked goods to make it extreme.

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Photos (Opposite page): The Yard Milkshake Bar; LuLu's Bread Pudding ©Amy Pipe (Top-bottom): Turquoise Place; Sand Castle University; Hugh S Branyon Backcountry Trail; Bike Share Gulf State Park; The Southern Grind Coffee House; Unless noted, photos ©Gulf Shores & Orange Beach Tourism

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orchid By Jo Clark

Photos (this page): Azalea; (Opposite page, from top): Dreamweavershop on Etsy's Wild Grape Fudge; Hot Air Balloons Glowing; Water Lilies with bees

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It is a gentle shade of purple, created from blue, pink, and gray tones, taking its hue and name from the ower Orchidaceae. The color is said to inspire con dence, creativity, love, and joy. Orchid, selected as Pantone’s 2014 Color of the Year, is described as

“an enchanting harmony of fuchsia, purple, and pink undertones. I know—you’re thinking, “Yes, but this is a food and wine magazine—not a oral journal.” You’re right. But let me tell you—orchid may be the new green! Orchid can be found lined up in the farmer’s market; from eggplants to grapes to heirloom tomatoes, even fudge! You aren’t limited to owers if you are looking for orchid-colored edibles Edible orchids vary from pale pink to magenta and add lovely accents to cocktails, salads, and desserts. The world’s only fruit-bearing orchid? The vanilla bean—it’s pretty enough to eat! Orchid livens up neutrals such as white, beige, and yellow. Think of it as a fashion statement, not just a paint chip. Not only a designer’s or decorator’s tip, just look around at nature for con rmation! What a drab world this would be if this shade were not part of the rainbow!

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eatrice Eiseman, author of ten books on color, says of orchid, “It is a captivating purple, one that draws you in with its beguiling charm.” We nd the word “orchid,” rst used in 1915 to specify a color. How did people live without an adjective for this shade?


Photos (Clockwise from top left): Orchid Orchid; Aviation Martini with Violet Syrup; Wisteria at Charlestowne Landing Lake; Eggplant at the Farmer's Market

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key we blue By Sharon Kurtz

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lue painted porch ceilings are a common and aesthetically pleasing sight in Key West.

If you’ve visited the Island before, you’ve no doubt seen the historical color on the ceilings of restaurants, homes, and everywhere The light cerulean blue is often called "Key West Blue" or "Haint Blue." One reason for the color of the porch ceilings is a tradition passed down for centuries on the Island. Architectural historians agree that this custom dates back to African descendants from the West Indies. Another theory about blue porch ceilings is that the color repels insects and will help keep your porch bug-free. Many people believe this is because the bugs are tricked into thinking that the blue color is the sky, so they don't attempt to nest there. Regardless of how you feel about ghosts or bugs, the blue-painted porch ceiling is an iconic sight in Key West. The quaint outdoor porch, often with cozy, comfy wicker chairs, is a big part of what de nes the charm of the Key West old-town neighborhoods. Enchanting and restful, it encourages visitors to slow down and stay awhile. Next time you're on the Island, be sure to look up as you walk around. Regardless of the house's color, the pale blue ceiling is the icing on the cake and always reminds me of Key West.

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Whirling Dervishes in Istanbul


white By Rose Palmer

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ou would probably be hard pressed to nd a person that picks white as their favorite color. It’s easy to think of white as being colorless, but that really isn’t true. A clear glass of water has no color, and it is not white. And while a can of white paint is indeed pure in its lack of other hues, white light can be split into a colorful rainbow with a piece of prismatic glass. In western culture, white has come to symbolize purity, innocence and peace and is commonly the color worn by brides at their wedding. However, in many Asian countries, white is associated with death, mourning and bad luck and is traditionally the color worn at funerals By itself, white is not very exciting. But next to other colors, it adds light and brightens up everything around it. The yellow center of a daisy is much more prominent surrounded by its white petals than a yellow center in a blue aster. Yet too much white can be sterile, unwelcoming and disorienting and can overwhelm the senses, much like trying to walk through a blizzard White can also be a chameleon. Shine a red light on a white stage and suddenly, a boring space is infused with hot, passionate color. But the best foil for white is its total opposite, black, especially in photography. A photo that is only white, black and the grey shades in between emphasizes shape, texture and line and can create endless drama A different Louvre Pyramid perspective

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Photos (top-to-bottom): Local boys eating ice cream in Stone Town, Zanzibar; Kayaker in Glacier Bay National Park; Chihuly glass sculpture at Kew Gardens; Mural in Chicago; The London Eye

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A dazzling dazzle of zebras

Camels in the Sahara

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The Washington Monument in winter


cerulean blue By Debbra Dunning Brouillette

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erulean blues — the colors of sea and sky — are my favorites among all in the color spectrum. As a lifelong lover of the sea, I have always been drawn to tropical destinations. Some of my happiest moments have been those spent by the ocean. I have glorious memories of being aboard a ship, gazing out at its depths, and of diving beneath the surface of a cerulean-hued sea to explore the underwater world. When a blue sky meets the multi-hued shades of the sea, which often combine light and medium shades of turquoise, there is nothing more beautiful, more peaceful, more calming Drink in the cerulean beauty with me in these photos, taken on my travels to far away places, including Bora Bora, French Polynesia; Ajacio, Corsica; Santorini, Greece; Vomo Island, Fiji; St. Vincent & the Grenadines; and Tenerife, Canary Islands.

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Photos (Opposite page): Mopion Islet Grenadines; Ajaccio Corsica Beach Resort; Tenerife Canary Islands, Pilot Whales (This page, top-to-bottom): BoraBora Aerial View; Overwater Bungalows, BoraBora; Fiji, Vomo Island Beach; The writer InT he Crow’s Nest, Star Clippers; Santorini, Greece, Blue Dome Churches

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azure By Scott Kendall

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zure is the color of a clear blue sky, oceans, rivers, and precious gemstones, a bright, cyan-blue color named after the mineral azurite. On the RGB color wheel, azure sits at 210 degrees, halfway between blue and cyan. This popular color’s name originates from the Persian Iazhward, an ancient place known for its blue stones.

The Calming Effects of Azure On recent trips to the Florida Keys and Colorado, I saw azure images everywhere I went. Clear azure skies, deep azure oceans, lakes, and rivers. The calming characteristics of this tranquil blue color evoke nature, calmness, strength, and peacefulness.

Azure Among Contrasting Colors in Nature I love it when the azure color sharply contrasts with another brilliant color. For example, in the photo taken of the Kissing Camels at Garden of the Gods in Colorado Springs, the vivid reds of the rocks form an inviting contrast to the azure colored sky. In the sunset over Pikes Peak, the azures of the sky swirl within the oranges, yellows, and darker blues against the stark blackness of the mountainous terrain below.

Photos: Dolphin tail rises above azure waters at Hawks Cay; Kissing Camels

Since azure is so common in nature, I often discover this delightful color popping up in many of my outdoor photos. The dolphin tail rises above the azure waters off Hawks Cay . The Canadian geese swim in the azure Cheyenne Lake at The Broadmoor, and the peacock at Sudely Castle in the Cotswolds shows off the azure blue in the eyes of its feathers. Each is a wonderful display of azure “A” is for azure.

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Photos: (Top-to-bottom): Peacock at Sudely Castle; Geese swimming in the azure waters of Cheyenne Lake; Azure Hawks Cay Lagoon; Pikes Peak sunset in Colorado Springs

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Food, Wine, Travel Magazine: The Color Issue  

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