Page 16

F O O D S O L U T I O N S M A G A Z I N E / M AY I S S U E / PA G E 16

FACT #1: GENETIC TESTS ARE USEFUL IN RULING OUT CD, BUT NOT FOR DIAGNOSING IT. Blood tests for gluten antibodies and a small intestine biopsy are still necessary for accurate diagnosis of celiac disease because celiac genes (HLA-DQ2 and/or DQ8) are present in about 30% of the general (non-celiac) population. These genes are present in approximately 95% of individuals diagnosed with CD. In other words, the presence of those genes does not necessarily lead to the development of CD.

FACT #4: CELIAC DISEASE MAKES YOU MORE EMOTIONAL.

FACT #5: FIVE TO 10 % OF INDIVIDUALS WITH CD ALSO HAVE TYPE 1 DIABETES.

Common emotional side effects of untreated CD are irritability, anxiety, unexplained feelings of anger, impatience and even depression.

Like CD, type 1 diabetes is an autoimmune disorder. Individuals with CD are more likely to have other autoimmune disorders than the general population.

Many individuals who have CD are also diagnosed with emotional or anxiety disorders. After all, it’s tough to make it through the days, weeks, months and years when you feel bad all the time and can’t find the answers to your health issues.

So far, science shows there is a digestive link as well as a two-fold genetic link between CD and type 1 diabetes.

For some the challenge of going gluten-free alone is overwhelming and leads to feelings of loss for gluten, and to grieving for foods one can no longer enjoy. (Others feel joyful to have found their health answers, so it can go either way.) Seeking support within the community, or in an online community for those living gluten-free is a great benefit, especially in those early days just after diagnosis.

In terms of the digestive tract, the pancreas and small intestine are closely related structures that share immune system connections called lymph nodes. In terms of the genetic link, both diseases are also associated with Human Leukocyte Antigen (HLA) class II genes. There is also a strong genetic tie between CD and type 1 diabetes in non-HLA genes. For a type 1 diabetic newly diagnosed with CD, dietary changes can be significant since gluten-free foods have a different carbohydrate, fat, and protein makeup than glutenfilled foods. These differences can cause some diabetics’ insulin needs to change. Always consult your doctor and nutritionist to discuss the diet that is best for you.

Food Solutions Magazine May 2014  

Food Solutions Magazine is a monthly digital publication filled with fact-based insight, fresh perspectives and immediately useful informati...

Food Solutions Magazine May 2014  

Food Solutions Magazine is a monthly digital publication filled with fact-based insight, fresh perspectives and immediately useful informati...

Advertisement