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March 2016

MILES DALLY Taking RCL Foods forward

MEAN STEAM

The ultimate clean

RAW JUICE

IS THIS A REVOLUTION?

Cage-free Where’s the happy hens?

2016 SUPPLIER DIRECTORY FREE WITH THIS ISSUE


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CONTENTS March 2016

features

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8 Thought for Food We interview RCL Foods CEO Miles Dally 12 Maximum Protein with minimum water 14 Drink Your Salad Raw juice revolution is underway in SA 18 Happy Hens We enter the cage-free debate 23 Meat & cancer Lousy research clouds the facts 24 FSSC 22000 Food Safety Super-Standard

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packaging 30 Plastic Hell How to avoid it 33 Vapour curse It’s all about the dew point 35 Vinyl Rocks! The new-look in retail flooring

regulars 2

Editorial

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News briefs

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EDITORIAL .

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Lions and mice: we like them both - a lot!

his issue highlights a not-so-subtle change to our style (or attitude), a change I hope our distinguished readership will find both stimulating and informative. You might notice that the magazine is becoming more people-centric as our coverage increasingly focuses on those who drive and disrupt the industry, and not just on the products and technologies that help shape it (important as they are). The most interesting thing about any industry is, to my mind, its people. And I believe a key role for this magazine is to tease out and share the insights of those who make the sector rock ‘n roll: the lions as well as the mice. It’s the kind of coverage that will, hopefully, distinguish us from the zillions of on-line newsletters out there: more real journalism and less recycled press-releases. This month’s magazine, for example, features an in-depth interview with RCL FOODS’ Miles Dally, one of the key players at the highest levels of the industry (I asked him if he sleeps at night given the menacing clouds over the sector and the economy - and I’m relieved to advise that he does!). At the same time, we have put the spotlight on two dynamic innovators on the fringes of the industry: pressed juice trend-setters Fiona Stander and Antonia de Luca). What comes through so clearly - from Dally to De Luca (and, of course, Stander too) is a genuine passion for the

sector and an optimism about the future - despite the current economic gloom. It makes writing and reporting on the industry a pleasure and a privilige.

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had never heard of the term Circular Economy until I stumbled upon the report by the World Economic Forum/ Ellen MacArthur Foundation titled The New Plastics Economy: Rethinking the future of plastics (See article on Page 30). Seems that there are some truly far-sighted thinkers out there who actually have a plan, a scalable, workable plan nogal, that could halt the looming environmental catastrophe, turning the global plastics business into an eco-sustainable industry that will prevent us all from drowning in the stuff. And just as I had finished learning about this initiative, a welcome email arrived announcing that Germistonbased MPact’s new recycling plant would prevent a further 30 000 tons of PET bottles landing up in our landfills each year and be recycled back into food-grade packaging. Plastics SA has its conference (along with Propak) this month and I’m hoping we’ll hear more bold ideas, more practical, scalable solutions, to this huge challenge.

Bruce Cohen editor@fbreporter.com

& Reporter

Publisher Bruce Cohen editor@fbreporter.com Mobile: 083 454 1857

Advertising

Wendy Breakey wendy@fbreporter.com Tel: (011) 026 7311 Mobile: 083 653 8116

Administration

Alice Osburn adminfbr@fbreporter.com Tel: (011) 026 8220 www.fbreporter.com Published by AO Media 2nd Floor Oakfin House 367 Oak Ave Randburg Johannesburg PO Box 2082 Pinegowrie 2123 South Africa Tel: 011 026 8220 editor@fbreporter.com

Endorsed by the SA Assoc of the Flavour & Fragrance Industry.

Endorsed by SAAFoST

NEXT MONTH

We’ll be on the Rooibos Route looking at how a small group of previously marginalised farmers in the remote northern Cape banded together and are now filling shelves across Europe with their fabulous fair-trade organic tea.

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FBR is a member of the Audit Bureau of Circulations.

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Supreme

BakeSurance Experience creates Expertise TM

As the professional baker’s choice since 1919, we have nearly a century’s worth of skills and knowledge to pass on to you. Nearly a hundred years of world-class experience does not happen by chance. Supreme consistently supplies exceptionally crafted wheat flour products, under stringent controls, from the largest single site mill in South Africa. We pride ourselves on the highest levels of safety and excellence with our FSSC 22 000 accreditation. We also provide expert technical bakery services and support as well as training, costing formulations, industry insights and more. Our promise of Supreme BakeSurance stands for quality, service and know-how. The rest is up to you. Give us a call if you’d like to know more:

Tel: 012 308 3208.

www.supremeflour.co.za | www.facebook.com/supremeflour

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BRIEFS

This year marks the 50th anniversary of Appletiser, truly one of SA’s most iconic brands. Edmond Lombardi created it in 1966, the year the Beatles were at the peak of their fame, Ronald Regan was elected Governor of California, and Walt Disney died. Truly a vintage year for a golden anniversary. During 2016, Appletiser will be mounting a series of promotions to thank South Africans for loving this “champagne” of beverages.

UYS DOES SWEETIES I always wondered why Pieter Dirk Uys never really exploited his Tannie Evita brand in the food sector. After all, it’s probably just as well known (maybe even more so) than Ouma and Mrs Balls. He’s also put the town of Darling firmly on the cultural map. Well, I see it’s finally happened. I spotted these toffees at a deli in Simon’s Town the other day. The packaging is fabulous, but toffees? Well, I have my reservations. The cost of dental work is so through the roof these days that toffees (like biltong chunks) are well in my home anyway - firmly off the menu - BC

IN JAPAN, KITKAT PARADISE The things they do to the humble Kitkat in the land of the rising sun ... Rice wine (sake) flavoured KitKat is now available in Japan, described as “chocolate with the mellow body and smooth aftertaste of sake”. It contains 0.8% alcohol. While the rest of us get to enjoy just the basic version, Japanese have a seemingly endless bouquet of KitKat choices. like Strawberry, Purple Sweet Potato, Pear, Bean Cake, Cinnamon Cookie, European Cheese, Matcha-Green Tea, and others, including region-specific flavours. The country even has KitKat sandwiches and KitKat boutiques in Tokyo and Kyoto.

SIR FRUIT TAKES THE SMOOTHIE ROUTE Breakfast smoothies are a cool trend these days, leading Sir Fruit to launch a retail and hospitality range of ready-to-drink smoothies in four variants: Strawberry & Banana, Mango & Passion Fruit, as well as Apple, Yoghurt, Oats & Cinnamon and Berry, Yoghurt, Oats & Honey. “Our smoothies are really thick – but cleverly made. We’ve worked hard to keep the production process simple and as natural as possible, says Sir Fruit’s Brand Manager Taryn van Zyl. "Sir Fruit is all about simplicity, which is why our smoothies are less processed, using actual whole-blended fruit, preserving as much of the original flavours and nutrition as possible. No added sugar, artificial flavours, colours or stabilisers. We’re really happy with the result.”

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NOW EVEN ICE CREAM GETS A PROTEIN MAKE-OVER

ALL THOSE COKES ARE ... WELL ... COKE Coke has finally seen the - striking obvious - light: the need to consolidate all its variants under a seamless, single brand positioning. The all-new “one brand” family will now unite all the bits - Coca Cola, Coca Cola Light/Diet Coca Cola, Coca-Cola Zero and Coca-Cola Life - under a new global creative campaign, “Taste the Feeling.” “Every day, millions of people around the world reach for an ice cold Coca-Cola,” says Marcos de Quinto, Chief Marketing Officer, The Coca-Cola Company. “The new ‘One Brand’ approach will share the equity of Coca-Cola, across all Coca-Cola trademark products, reinforcing our commitment to offer consumers choice with more clarity. This is a powerful investment behind all Coca-Cola products, showing how everyone can enjoy the specialness of an ice-cold Coca-Cola, with or without calories, with or without caffeine.” The really good news out of all of this is that Coke will be spending a very large fortune to tell the world that all those Cokes out there are, well, actually ... Coke.

ANYONE FOR A FRUITFLY BURGER? ANYONE? An Israel start-up called Flying Spark has come up with an innovation that makes the usual next-bigthing-insects-for-protein suspects look decidedly boring. Flying Spark has perfected a system that turns fruit flies into a high-protein powder. “Insects have always been a part of the human diet,” says Eran Gronich, Flying Spark CEO. “We are the first company in the world to generate protein from fly larvae. “Our protein powder has no taste, but packs a lot of protein, and it can be added to any food product to instantly boost its protein level.” Gronich says fly larvae is a cheap, plentiful, and safe (fruit flies, after all, eat only fruit) source of protein.

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Skinny Scoop has launched a first of its kind sugar-free, protein-enhanced ice cream. With quirky flavours like Vanilla Camilla and Afterdark Cacao, its ice-creams are a clever combination of “clean” ingredients: full cream milk, cream, whey protein isolate, xylitol, sodium alginate (from brown algae/seaweed), vanilla powder/cacao powder. Skinny Scoop was born when co-owners Jarred Plu’g and Gabriella Esposito discovered their common health and fitness interests. “We wanted to combine my expertise from personal training and Gabriella’s knowledge of the delectable world of desserts to create a product that satisfies those late night and everyday cravings, but at the same time keeps you healthy and fit,” says Jarred. Skinny Scoop can be found at various retail outlets in and around Cape Town and plans are on track for Jo’burg and Durban launches. www.skinnyscoop.co.za

& Reporter SUBSCRIBE FOR JUST R250 PER YEAR Make sure you get every issue of Food & Beverage Reporter delivered directly to you. Visit www.fbreporter.co.za for subscription info.

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SPAZAS ARE THRIVING

These stories are from www.foodstuffsa.co.za and www.drinkstuff-sa.co.za, the topical, on-trend food-bev industry news websites with a local focus and cherry-picking relevant global content. They are augmented by a regular e-newsletter. Sign up for free online. We hunt down the latest SA and global food-drinks news and trends so you don't have to!

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he perception that South Africa’s Traditional Trade (TT) or spaza sector is shrinking in the face of increasing pressure from modern retail outlets could not be further from the truth asserts a new report by Nielsen. Sales through South Africa’s 134 000 Traditional Trade (TT) outlets currently amount to R46-billion per annum, which equates to one of every five rand spent and one third of all consumer goods packages sold in South Africa. Nielsen South Africa MD, Craig Henry, says the growth of the TT sector has taken place against the backdrop of South Africa’s population increasing from 38-million in the early 1990s to 54-million by 2014 (Stats SA). Additional factors driving its growth include the rapid progression of the middle class. South Africa’s marketplace is also more retail dense than ever before, with the number of Modern Trade outlets – Hypers and Supers - having increased from 790 to 2 875 and branded convenience stores having increased to more than 4 500 outlets. TT has, however, more than kept up with its more formal counterparts, with the number of outlets having grown from 31 000 to 134 000 in the last 20 years – a massive 100 000 new outlets. Interestingly, these stores are equally prevalent in both urban and rural areas and there are, in fact, now more urban than rural traditional trade outlets in SA, at 81 587 and 52 472 respectively. As a result, the sector has seen continued increase in sales, driven by higher shopping frequency and steadfast shopper loyalty despite modern branded formats opening up in less urbanised areas. A massive 48% of shoppers have visited a spaza outlet in the last seven days, versus 38% in 2012, representing a 10% increase in shoppers visiting the channel.

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HOT NEW HYBRID

A tiny cabbage-like flower sprout is being tipped as the next big veggie-hybrid to make its mark. The sprout - a cross-breed of kale and Brussels sprouts - was developed in the UK in 2010 and has been successful in the US, with "green and lean" actress Gwyneth Paltrow giving the vegetable the kiss of popularity. Named “the hot new vegetable of 2015” by Fox News, flower sprouts have also been picked up in Europe as foodie magazines and chefs experiment with the vegetable, and retailers M&S, Waitrose, Sainsbury’s, Asda, Lidl and Aldi have now taken them on.

SWISS BANK GOES BANTING Fear of fat is a thing of the past; In the coming years demand for fat will soar worldwide, and that for carbohydrates will fall. The entire world will start eating higher fat, lower carb diets (on average). These are the predictions of a recent research report from leading international bank Credit Suisse. The bank forecasts that: > Fat consumption per capita is expected to grow from the 26% of total energy intake registered globally in 2011 to close to 31% by 2030. > Carbohydrates will decline from 60% of global energy intake in 2011 to 55% by 2030 because of rising awareness of the link between excess carbohydrate consumption (and particularly sugar) with obesity and heart disease. > SFA is likely to experience the fastest growth, rising from 9.4% in 2011 to 12.7% of daily energy intake by 2030. > Meat consumption is expected to grow 23% over the next 15 years as the perception of red meat improves. > Eggs should do particularly well as the more people understand that the cholesterol theory has been discredited. By 2030, it is predicted that everyone will be consuming about 5 eggs per week. > Demand for butter and cheese should continue to grow at a fast pace. Milk and milkrelated products should grow by 50% or 2.5% a year. Butter should continue to replace margarine and benefit from the full ban on trans-fats. LAST WORD: It's the highest price ever paid for a local wine, putting businessman Sello Rasethaba in the history books. His was the highest bid for the 2014 Touch Warwick Cabernet Sauvignon at a charity auction at Klein Constantia in February.

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The Steam Energy Specialist behind the Food and Beverage processing industry

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P.O. Box 129, Bellville 7535 | Tel: +27 (0)21 959 8400 | Fax: +27 (0)21 959 8545 Email: nevilles@johnthompson.co.za | www.johnthompson.co.za


What’s your educational background? After matriculating from Kimberley Boys’ High, I did my B.Comm at the University of Natal in Durban. What was your earliest ambition? I always wanted to manage or lead some business where I could influence the end result and make an impact. Added to that, I had a passion for marketing - so becoming a marketing director and in time a CEO were major milestones for me. What’s the least healthy thing you do? Like many people, I do sometimes indulge in too much good food and wine! What’s the most healthy thing you do? I’m not fanatical but I’ve always been fairly health conscious. I absorb new ideas if they make sense - like eating less refined foods - and I’ve always kept up a reasonable level of exercise. It’s all about moderation and living a balanced life. Ever read a book that changed your life? No book has ever changed my life, but plenty have had an influence. Probably the most recent is Malcolm Gladwell’s David and Goliath, where he talks about the ‘advantage of disadvantage’ and the ‘disadvantage of advantage’. Maybe, because of my own background (I never went to a private school; I had to pay for my own varsity; I went to army first and to varsity much later), I’ve always admired people who succeed in spite of disadvantages. I’ve never employed people on the basis of their school ties or social background - I’m more interested in their values and that they are passionate. What’s the best advice anyone ever gave you? Be authentic, be yourself. The minute you try to be someone else, you’ll be tripped up. Related to that, be passionate. When you’re passionate about what you do, you’re more likely to succeed and have fun at the same time. Who would you invite to your movers

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“ I’ve

always tried to build teams of people who are better than me ” ‘n shakers dinner party? I’m not really a ‘movers ‘n shakers’ guy, and I’ve always kept a low profile. I would invite people I enjoy and respect, whoever they may be. For me it’s more about authenticity, not ranks and titles. How do you relax at weekends? I enjoy spending time with family and friends. My kids are both very active (one does showjumping, the other is a dancer), and supporting them in that is a form of relaxation for me. I also love reading

fiction, especially on holidays. Who do you most admire in the business world? Why? There are so many good people that it’s hard to single out anyone. The traits I admire most are authenticity, passion and innovation. I also enjoy people with a sense of humour. If you can’t laugh about something, it’s a disaster! How would you describe your leadership/management style? Any

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THOUGHT FOR FOOD

Miles Dally, CE of RCL FOODS, the JSE-listed food giant with household brands such as Rainbow, Selati, Yum-Yum and Ouma, usually keeps a low profile. In this, the first in a series of indepth interviews with key players in the foodbev sector, Dally tells Bruce Cohen what drives him and how the group with R24-billion in annual sales and 20 000 employees - is facing up to the challenge of doing business in such turbulent times.

key influence/s? When I left Robertsons for Rainbow in 2003, my chairman’s brief to me was: “The business needs fixing, but build me a team like you did at Robertsons”. No metrics, just “build a team”. I’ve always got credit for building teams, and I’ve always tried to build teams of people who are better than me. I’m quite informal and although I’m serious about what I do, I believe it’s important to have fun too. The SA food industry is being tested

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to the limit with a perfect storm of challenges (drought, economic stagnation, currency depreciation, political uncertainty etc etc). Do you sleep at night? My personal philosophy is that if you’re passionate about what you do, you’ll see challenges and crises as an opportunity, rather than lying there and stewing over them. I do worry about certain things but I’ve never panicked. My response is always to look for a solution, because there always has to be a way

to work within a given environment. If you get like-minded, passionate people together as a team then you will usually see something that other people don’t which is why one of our company values is “seeing and doing things differently”. People get most stressed when they’re alone. You employ a helluva lot of people within the group. And labour relations have been rocky in recent times at subsidiaries like Vector and Foodcorp. What’s your view on the state of labour relations in the sector? Are unions playing a constructive or destructive role? Labour relations in South Africa are generally a big issue, and between business and labour we need to get our act together. Having said that, I think it’s important to distinguish between labour and unions. Labour isn’t an entity, labour is our people. We need to find a way to have conversations with our people about our joint future, without another agenda. That starts with building relationships with our people, and technology could play a big role in helping do that. What is the No. 1 challenge facing the food industry in SA? Policy issues, service delivery and labour relations are all factors in our complex social and political fabric in SA, but I think the biggest challenge is probably a lack of service delivery. Simply put, we can’t make what we make without water and electricity, nor can people have a decent quality of life - which ultimately puts further pressure on the country, not just the food industry. How will Rainbow/Farmer Brown be affected by the AGOA deal allowing cheap American chicken to flood in from the USA? Duty-free dumping of 65 000 tons of American bone-in chicken would have adverse implications for the local market, with unfair competition from cheap imports affecting our sales volumes and the viability of the local industry especially for smaller producers. Although we believe AGOA is important for South Africa, we have ... Continued on next page

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Miles Dally: Service delivery must become Govt’s No. 1 priority ... From previous page

always asked for level playing fields when it comes to chicken. We don’t oppose imports into the country but we do oppose dumping (which ITAC proved was happening, leading to the anti-dumping duties on US bone-in portions). The US have always been welcome to export whole chickens to South Africa without

any anti-dumping duty, but they won’t because they are fully costed. The playing fields are also uneven from a phytosanitary perspective. If the rules prevent us from exporting chicken to the US because Avian Influenza in ostriches, then the same rules should apply to the US where there is AI amongst chickens in some states.

COMPANY SNAPSHOT RCL FOODS Ltd is listed on the JSE and is a subsidiary of Remgro Ltd. It is the holding company of 3 principal business divisions: Consumer (Foodcorp/Rainbow), Sugar & Milling (TSB/Supreme) and Logistics (Vector). 2015 2014 Sales (billions) 23. 4 19.5 Net profit (millions) 862 (277)

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And how will Rainbow’s performance be affected by the rapidly rising maize price, which has doubled in a year? It’s a tough one. The first big crash about 6 years ago had an on-cost of R1.5 billion in one year, which can’t be passed on to

the consumer. So yes - it’s a problem, but we’re working on the things we can change to offset it. What’s your take on Genetically Modified foods? Do you agree that consumers should be given the choice to opt out of GMOs thorough clear labelling? Do you have a labelling policy for GMOs? GM maize has been grown and milled in SA for many years and I don’t want to enter the debate for or against it. Clear labelling - even if that is based on the assumption that GMOs are bad for you is the most ideal way to give consumers a choice regarding the products they consume. TSB has a major sugar project in Mozambique that has taken some

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THOUGHT FOR FOOD

knocks. Can you give us a quick update? The Massingir project, which is a proposed greenfields project, was impaired at the end of June 2015 because we hadn’t satisfactorily concluded the funding model by the deadline we had set for ourselves. We are still working on it and will go to the market with a project update in our interim results. What’s the most important thing government could do to improve the economic outlook for the country? Provision of services is our biggest priority, because without them business and civil society can’t function properly. Beyond basic infrastructure, the challenge is to stimulate growth and give the country a competitive advantage that will attract investment. That brings with it the need for safety, modern economic practices, ease of physical movement in and out of the country, and a generally welcoming environment to visitors. Prickly question for a company that is a major sugar producer: There’s a growing global campaign to reduce added/hidden sugars in processed foods. Given the shocking health profile of South Africa (diabetes, obesity etc) for which sugar is increasingly being blamed, does RCL FOODS plan to reduce added sugar in its own products? It’s widely accepted that the Western diet generally has too much sugar, along with too much fat, salt and too many artificial additives. The solution to health issues lies ultimately with the consumer, who needs to be educated to make healthy choices and eat various food types in healthy moderation. I think that demonising sugar is slightly unfair, given the controversy surrounding so many other ingredients. As a Group we try to create as much authentic food as possible, and we give consumers the power to choose through clear labelling.

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Natural sugar remains a significant source of energy for many of our people, particularly in lower income groups. We’re obviously conscious of trends and are constantly reviewing our product portfolio, but it isn’t our place (or our wish) to parent our consumers. The modern lifestyle means that we should all be more aware of what we consume, and in what proportions. If I look at the numbers of the last few years, RCL FOODS, has not been the most exciting business (in fact you’ve had some pretty disappointing results, though 2015 was a slight improvement). Your peers (eg Tiger, Pioneer) have been performing better in terms of sales growth. Your comments?

It’s actually been a very exciting few years! In less than 5 years we’ve transformed ourselves from a chicken business to one of biggest food businesses in SA, with over 20 000 people and a diversified portfolio of brands across a variety of categories. So we’re very excited about the future, even though the process of becoming one company has impacted to an extent on our results. Macro influences in chicken and sugar have also posed challenges which some of our major competitors are less exposed to. Apart from those areas, we have performed well and believe the benefits of our restructuring will show in our results going forward. x

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INNOVATION

m u m i x a M n i e t o r P m u m i n i M r e t a W

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he impact of climate change and freshwater shortages in a growing number of regions around the world inspired Israeli company Hinoman to seek a complete watermanagement solution for its plant protein cultivation system. The result: an eco-friendly cultivation process for protein that enables water savings of up to 90% compared with protein alternatives such as soy. Hinoman’s solution utilises a semiclosed-environment system to control and optimise the Mankai plant, a highprotein strain of duckweed grown in shallow water. In comparison to soy, kale, or spinach, Mankai utilises 10 times less water to grow as a crop. This ensures stable and sustainable production for 12 months of the year. “We designed a precise hydroponics cultivation system that can answer

water-management challenges in a wide range of geographical locations,” says Udi Alroy, VP of Business Development for Hinoman. He says Hinoman’s proprietary hydroponic cultivation process is fully adjustable and suitable for a variety of climates. It optimizes water usage and iis especially applicable to semi-desert areas as well as colder climates. Adds Alroy: “Hinoman guarantees

THE ROBOT LETTUCE FACTORY If you just can’t envisage the future of vegetable farming, Japanese company Spread will do it for you. Take a look at their website (spread.co.jp/en/vegetable-factory/). Spread, which has been intensively factory farming lettuce in Japan for a decade using state-of-the art

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Mankai protein ... uses 10 X less water.

the plants will remain pure, clean, uncontaminated and free from pesticides and other undesirable residues. The resulting protein exceeds food safety and food security requirements under the very strictest international standards.” Ron Salpeter, CEO of Hinoman, says “the race for alternative protein has just begun, and the winners will be the companies that can provide a vegetable, non-GMO high-protein option with maximum proximity to urban centers.” Consumers, says Salpeter, are demanding quality, sustainable protein, locally or regionally sourced and with proven traceability. He says Hinoman offers an affordable, comprehensive solution that supports urban cultivation. Contacts Udi Alroy udi.a@hinoman.biz www.hinoman.biz

technology, has announced the construction of its nextgeneration “Vegetable Factory” run mostly by robots. When it opens next year, it will produce 30 000 heads of lettuce a day with just 25 people employed. The techniques developed by Spread will enable it to produce a lettuce using just 100ml of water, compared to 10L used in conventional farming. And to cap it all, the factory will recycle 98% of the water is uses.

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BEVERAGES

C

old-pressed juices couldn’t be hotter. They used to be a niche product, mostly the preserve of muesli-munching health-food fanatics bent on cleansing and detoxifying body and mind with nutrient-dense nectars. But now they are slipping into the mainstream as “super-premium juices” bubbling with business opportunities and stimulating excited interest worldwide. Potent bursts of free promotion in the form of spontaneous endorsements from big-name stars such as Beyoncé and Gwyneth Paltrow who take regularly to social media to preach the benefits of these “liquid salads”, has helped boost demand and raise the profile of coldpressed/raw juices globally. Drivers of cold-pressed juices in South Africa, as in other countries, are the global health and wellness trend and the rise of the “conscious consumer”. But is it just marketing hype, or are these raw juices really healthier than pasteurised juices made with masticators or centrifuges? Health claims for cold-pressed juices appear to be limited only by the imagination. Despite the hype, common sense and gut instinct on their own are sufficient to suggest that these juices do indeed deliver a strong health proposition by virtue of being 100% natural with no added sugars, colourants, or preservatives and extracted without heat, thus retaining most of the nutrients and live enzymes that are part of Mother Nature’s design. The benefit, as one analyst puts it, is simply that cold-pressing pushes “almost every drop ... out of the fiber, producing a drink dense with hue, tang and nutrients”. The downside is manufacturing challenges like shorter shelf life and food safety issues; raw, unpasteurised fruit / veg juices may be a nutrient goldmine, but they can also be a breeding ground for pathogens. These concerns have prompted the usage by some manufacturers of (very) expensive High Pressure Processing (HPP) technology. HPP involves submerging the bottled juices

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Cold-pressed juices offer timethirsty consumers a deliciously fresh way to drench their bodies in key nutrients. And healthaware buyers are snapping up these trendy beverages. Could this be the next craft beer? F&BR investigates.

Drink your salad

Fiona Stander ... “I didn’t choose juicing. Juicing chose me ...” in cold water under massive pressure which eliminates pathogens and increases typical shelf life of 3-5 days to a significantly longer 30-45 days. Woolworths introduced its coldpressed fruit and vegetable juice range in September 2015, the first South African retailer to offer a juice using the HPP process. The company says that using HPP prevents spoilage without altering the taste, colour and texture of the fruits and vegetables. The range has been catalogued to 262 of out 310 stores, Woolworths says, and customer response has been “very positive and exciting”. But just how likely is it that these premium juices will conquer South Africa the way premium coffees have done?

What sets these products apart is a new way and wave of raw juicing that harks back to ancient wisdom about food as medicine, and the slow process of cold-pressing - with or without HPP. It fits perfectly with the lucrative and growing global health and wellness trend, something Stellenbosch coldpressed juice pioneer Fiona Stander has personally experienced. Stander is owner of the aptly-named Juice Revolution, a business she started in 2012. “I didn’t choose juicing. Juicing chose me,” she says. Her husband came home in 2012 and announced he was going to do a juice cleanse. At first, she wasn’t very happy with the idea of living on fruit and veg for a week, but decided to join in and support him. A week later, Stander says,

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and nutritional value of various juices, then invested in a blast freezer which, she says, locks in all the flavours and nutrients until the consumer decides to open the bottle. She uses a singleload blast freezer with a large capacity that was specially designed and built in 2014. She is able to produce 800 bottles frozen to -30C less than two hours after bottling. Stander calls her juices “fresh frozen”. Apart from advantages such as a higher quality, better tasting product, blast freezing offers health and safety benefits. Stander says the extreme temperature dramatically slows down metabolic activity. “This means bacteria growth is slowed and there is a greatly reduced risk of contamination provided food is handled safely and subjected to freezing immediately after preparation.” Stander also refers to her products as “lovingly hand-made”. “There is personal care and attention paid in every step of our process, from sourcing to washing, shredding, pressing, blending, capping, labelling and freezing.” Raw juicing is very uch part of the new economy and almost half of Stander’s customers order online from all over SA. She couriers the juices packed in dry ice. For the rest, she has a juice bar in Stellenbosch and supplies selected Spar stores and several independent retailers, most of them in the Western Cape Another innovator in cold-pressed juices in SA is Antonia De Luca, who studied at Stellenbosch and at Bond University in Australia, and has degrees in marketing and entrepreneurship as well as an MBA in finance. She was brought up vegetarian from the age of 12, and became a vegan five years later. After traveling to the USA

Nothing compares to the honesty and purity of raw juice

she “felt amazing”. “We had tried other ways to improve our lifestyle and get healthier but nothing compares to the honesty and purity of raw juice.” Stander threw herself headlong into learning about the world of juicing and quickly realised a gap in the market: home delivery of cold-pressed juices was not available anywhere in South Africa. She enrolled in an internationallyrecognised natural juice therapy programme and used her extensive business experience gained locally and abroad to develop a sustainable model for a raw juice business. She set off what has become a real cold-pressed juice revolution in South Africa. The Juice Revolution uses two

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juicers, an all stainless-steel twin gear, twin auger commercial Angel Juicer which turns at a leisurely 82 rpm and which, she says, is widely considered to be one of the best enzyme juicers on the market worldwide. The other is an all-stainless steel hydraulic cold-press juicer with an integrated shredder which cuts the fibres of the produce down to almost cellular level and the juice is then expressed using 14 tons of hydraulic pressure. Both extraction processes result, says Stander, in an extremely high quality juice with more vitamins, minerals and enzymes intact due to very little friction and oxidation. Stander, concerned that once made, cold-pressed juice starts losing its nutritional value quickly, and that there are vast differences in the shelf life

... Continued on next page

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BEVERAGES

De Luca ... juicing is cleansing

Cold-pressed = hot trend ... From previous page

where she studied nutrition and health, and visited raw food restaurants for inspiration, De Luca opened Leafy Greens Café next door to the family’s landmark Casalinga restaurant in Muldersdrift. Cold-pressed juices have always been on the menu at Leafy Greens, as well as the family’s two other restaurants, and De Luca is happy to supply in bulk to other restaurants. At Leafy Greens, De Luca says she is able to offer cold-pressed “living” juices for the same price as regular fruit juices served in conventional restaurants. “When you know how to buy fruit and veg properly, you can keep prices low.” Last year she shipped in a high-end,

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high volume cold pressed juicer from the USA that has no fast-turning gears and thus generates no heat in the juicing process. All fruit and veg are first washed in ozone which keeps them - and the juices - fresher for longer. De Luca says she sources organic produce whenever possible but makes the salient point that even with best will in the world, “it’s impossible to get everything organic”. What sets her apart is that many of the fruits and veggies, especially the “powerhouse” greens such as kale and brocolli, are picked from the extensive organic garden on the property and juiced the same day. Customers need to collect their juices from Leafy Greens at this stage as she does not have a coldchain distribution network set up yet, but it’s “in the pipeline”. In October last year De Luca started offering an innovative range of coldpressed juices for cleansing and detoxifying, specially formulated to prevent

“flavour exhaustion”. They’re sold under her bright new brand, Antonia’s. Nutrient loss is kept to a minimum by careful coldpressing, says De Luca. Also, the bottles are filled virtually to the top so there is very little headspace, which limits oxygen and thus oxidation. “None of us is on perfect diets,” she says, “and most people don’t eat enough – or any – of the leafy greens and vegetables they should be eating.” The juices are specially formulated to be taken at different times of the day, beginning with sweeter, green juices that contain protein to start the day. The last juice of the day is a savoury blend, much like a gazpacho, she says. De Luca also produces cold-pressed nut milks. Passionate entrepreneurs like De Luca and Stander are helping to reinvent - perhaps even revolutionise the tired old fruit juice category with its unfashionably high sugar content. Their raw juices, like craft beers, are becoming an attractive beverage niche to be reckoned with.x

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SPOTLIGHT What eggactly does the cage-free movement mean for SA? Melody Macintyre pecks and scratches around for answers.

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ens have suffered from a serious PR problem for the last 50 years - because of the math: Eggs = lots of cholesterol = lots of heart disease. But that equation is no longer adding up to much these days and the “science” behind the health horror-stories heaped upon the humble egg is starting to look pretty Humpty Dumpty indeed. Globally, the rehabilitation of the egg has been gaining pace as a result of a bulging in-tray of research showing that, despite what the multi-billion dollar statin industry says, dietary cholesterol is not health-damaging. On the contrary, it’s vital for good health. Adding to this, the recently-updated US dietary guidelines – which influence dietary trends worldwide - have, albeit grudgingly, put eggs back on the breakfast menu (well, one-a-day for now). In South Africa, eggs are enjoying a renaissance thanks to the Banting diet which is a big promoter of eggs (along with once-vilified bacon and butter too). But now that the health concerns about cholesterol and eggs are beginning to dissipate, the global egg industry is facing up to perhaps an even bigger challenge: public perception about its production methods which are viewed by many as inhumane. At heart, too, is a growing demand from consumers for choices about the kind of food they put on their tables. The public is increasingly demanding information on whether or not their food has been ethically and humanely produced, as well as its impact on the environment, so they can make informed choices. This trend has spawned the rise of the “cage-free” movement that is gathering momentum in many countries, including SA. Caged laying hens have been described as “among the most intensively confined animals in agribusiness”. Critics say the cages prevent the hens from performing natural behaviours such as nesting, perching, and dustbathing. But the cage-free movement itself has a number of cracks, since cagefree means different things to different people. The term is generally used to mean farming methods in which hens are able to walk around, spread their wings and lay their eggs in nests. It’s often used interchangeably with barn-raised, freerange, pasture-fed and organically-raised.

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Searching for

Millions of chickens, billions of eggs Eggs occupy an important place on the global menu as a cheap source of first-class protein. And SA is no exception, although egg consumption here is relatively lower in comparison to many other countries. SA Poultry Association (SAPA) CEO Kevin Lovell is bullish about the future of the egg industry in this country, describing it as “pretty good” with “huge room for growth”. He says that with a gross turnover of R9,2-billion at producer level in 2014, eggs remain the fourth largest animal product sector in agriculture in SA, after poultry meat, beef and milk. Production levels peaked in 2012, and have not yet returned to that high. Total value at retail level was R13-billion in 2014, with 24-million hens laying a whopping 7,5-billion eggs sold in 2014.

The International Egg Commission (IEC), in a recent report on global hen housing practices, notes that the only country without any form of cages is Switzerland, the first country (way back in 1992) to step away from keeping laying hens in cage systems. The EU has since introduced so-called “enriched cages” or “furnished cages” but they have done little to allay consumer and animal rights concerns about the welfare of the hens. According to an IEC report in 2015, 90% of the world’s eggs are still caged, a situation that is unlikely to change significantly any time soon.

SA Poultry Association (SAPA) CEO Kevin Lovell says South Africa currently has no enriched cages, and only around 4% of our eggs are cage-free. Lovell is an “eggspert” on chickens and their welfare. He has two BSc degrees, in agriculture and agriculture extension, and represents global egg producers on the welfare working group of the World Organisation for Animal Health. He is also a member of a global task team set up to resolve avian influenza challenges and an advisor on egg production in the developing world. Lovell says in general most South African consumers “are much less

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SPOTLIGHT

The Chicken Liberation Struggle continues ...

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nimal rights advocates in the USA are trumpeting significant recent victories in the push for cage-free eggs. Last September, McDonald’s set off a domino effect by pledging to move to 100% cage-free eggs in its supply chain by 2025. Nestlé followed suit, announcing a transition to cage-free eggs in all of its US food products within the next five years. Some of the biggest US egg producers have also pledged allegiance to cage-free. But, interestingly, with the exception of Costco, none of the big supermarket chains have so far made any commitments. In South Africa, Woolworths has been ahead of this game: the company stopped selling shell eggs from concerned if farmers keep commercial laying-hens in cages or caged systems in 2004. It says free-range eggs are “a not”, although he concedes there are welfare issues that need to key milestone on our Good Business Journey” in terms of be addressed. animal welfare. And while he’s aware that it’s an “We’re proud to be the only South African retailer unpopular viewpoint, he says there is that can say all the whole eggs we sell are free-range, considerable evidence to show that caged laid by hens fed a diet that contains no animal byeggs are actually best for the hens and the products and free to roam outdoors during the day, environment. with unlimited access to shelter and water.” The IEC report includes an in-depth Currently, over 95% of Woolworths private-label comparison of the pros and cons of the food products that contain egg as an ingredient are different kinds of housing for laying eggs made with free-range eggs, and the company says it is that makes fascinating reading. It notes aiming to reach 100% in the near future. that keeping laying hens in battery cages Approximately half the eggs it sources and uses has distinct advantages from a welfare every year are sold in cartons, while the remainder are perspective: “The birds are separated pasteurised liquid eggs used in processed foods. from their excreta which results in cleaner Woolworths says it takes animal welfare “very feathers and eggs, and also reduces the risk seriously” and points out that its achievement in terms of an infection, thus improving the health of of free-range eggs was recognised and awarded the the laying hens. Small groups of hens with a stable social order also reduces the vice of Lovell ... laws aren’t in place international Good Egg Award by Compassion in World Farming (CIWF) in 2014. feather pecking and cannibalism.” Pick ‘n Pay Executive Head of Group Strategy It also confirms the view of animal David North says that while the company does offer welfare advocates internationally that while cage-free hens are free-range eggs, many families in South Africa are on very spared some of the more severe cruelties inherent in battery limited budgets and this means battery eggs “remain systems, it’s a big mistake to consider cage-free to be “crueltyan affordable and nutritious choice for the majority of free”. customers”. For example, according to the Humane Society of the US, Pick n Pay free-range eggs meet the RSPCA Freedom both systems typically buy hens from hatcheries that kill the Foods Welfare Standard, and the definition set out in the male chicks upon hatching. In the US alone, this involves more Agricultural Products Standards Act of 1990, North says. than 200-million chicks slaughtered annually. “Animal welfare and other standards are in place for Both caged and cage-free hens are also beak trimmed to these products and our company food technologists prevent injury from the pecking order or cannibalism. In South conduct factory and site visits to ensure compliance with ... Continued on next page these standards and with our free-range standards." x

Happy Hens

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SPOTLIGHT

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fascinating insight into how global food companies are tackling ANIMAL WELFARE animal welfare issues can be found in the latest (2015) Business Benchmark on Farm Animal Welfare (BBFAW). It’s a review of 90 of the world’s leading food processors, retailers and restaurant chains (eg Nestle, Marks & Spencer, Yum Brands, Con Agra, Unilever, Tyson, General Mills, Danone, Carrefour, McDonald’s, Costco etc etc). The report, the fourth so far, compiled in collaboration with animal welfare organisations Compassion in World Farming and World Animal Protection, and investment firm Coller Capital, reveals that many companies are increasing the importance they attach to farm animal welfare. It shows, for example, that: * 70% of those surveyed now have published farm animal welfare policies (compared to 46% in 2012) * 54% have published targets on farm animal welfare (up from 26% in 2012) The report zooms in, in extraordinary detail, on every aspect and stage of farm animal welfare, revealing how complex the subject really is. In his foreword, Donnie Smith, President of food giant Tyson, says: “People today want to know that the animals used to produce their food are raised and handled humanely. It’s a shared responsibility among farmers and food companies to provide transparency, candour, continuous improvement and clear measurement at every stage of the value chain – from farm to table. “As farm animal welfare moves up the business agenda and companies invest more resources in it, those who are serious about improvement need to ask themselves three questions: 1. Are we curious – and open-minded – enough to find better ways? ... We must open our minds to creative improvements in all aspects of animal welfare, including solutions for complex challenges such as housing systems, pain mitigation and antibiotic usage; 2. Can we accept that we may not have all the answers ourselves? We must be humble enough to ask for expert advice and engage in constructive, collaborative dialogue with others in the food chain, research, science and advocacy communities. Continuous improvement must be the driver, but an open mind is the facilitator; 3. Are we telling our story openly, honestly and understandably? We need to share our performance in a way that is meaningful and relevant to our stakeholders, and we need to be responsive to their questions.” Two UK majors, Mark’s & Spencer and Waitrose, were in the top 3 of the BBFAW survey, along with Switzerland’s Coop Group.

Are we telling our story openly, honestly?

You can read the full report at http://www.bbfaw.com

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Laws regulating ... Continued from previous page

Africa, Lovell says all hens, whether caged or cage-free, are beak trimmed using infra-red light that has a very low injury rate or by an older method using a hot knife. Both caged and cage-free hens may typically be slaughtered at less than two years old, far less than half their normal lifespan and are often transported long distances to live sale without food or water. And while the word “barn” might conjure up the image of a bucolic red building in the countryside, experts say these hens are usually confined to aviaries, “massive industrial barns that house thousands of birds”. These do allow birds to walk around, perch, lay their eggs in a nest and spread their wings, all of

which are important natural behaviours. But as Lovell points out, it can also be a brutal life – a case of “nature red in tooth and claw”, a quote from Shakespeare about the violence that is part of natural living. A study by Michigan State University, for example, shows that while cage-free birds have more feathers, stronger bones and exhibit more natural behaviours, they have double the chance of dying prematurely, mostly as a result of pecking by other chickens. That puts a very different spin on the announcement late last year by food giants McDonalds and Nestle that they were moving towards exclusively cage-free eggs - ostensibly to promote the welfare of hens. It spurred the US National Association of Egg Farmers to publish a stinging attack on the two companies, accusing them of the “greatest case of fraud”. ... Continued on next page

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SPOTLIGHT

cage-free have been stalled ... Continued from previous page

Back home, NSPCA spokesperson Christine Kuch agrees that cage-free is a complex issue which must also include ethical and environmental issues around the disposal of male chicks. She says while cage-free can be “a step in the right direction”, animal welfare is about “holistic and humane treatment of an animal from birth to death - and the manner of death.” Adds Lowell: “What must happen is that death is pain-free and with as little stress as possible for the animal. To achieve both criteria requires different approaches for different domestic animals.” One problem for the cage-free movement in South Africa is that it is tricky for consumers to identify authentic free-range and organic foods because both concepts are presently not properly covered by law. Lovell says that while there are laws in place to prevent animal abuse, for cage-free there is only limited control of the concept by the Department of Agriculture, Forestry and Fisheries (DAFF). At present, the current wording simply says that it is “essential” that the birds spend some time outdoors. Lovell’s association agreed a workable set of free-range regulations with the DAFF a few years ago. But the process has been stalled because the DAFF cannot gazette any new rules until the underlying Agriculture Products Standards Act has been changed to allow for production control schemes to be properly regulated. A leader of the cage-free movement in South Africa is Louise van der Merwe of Animal Voice South Africa (www. animalvoice.org). Van der Merwe says she has spent 26 years fighting for a ban on battery cages, which she calls “one of the cruellest manifestations of exploitation ever invented”. Van der Merwe runs the Cage-Free Cape Town project which last year made a submission with Animal Voice to the DAFF to have all battery eggs labelled as

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3 clucks for Burger King The Humane Society's Africa programme manager, Tozie Zokufa, has congratulated Burger King for its recent committment to eliminating eggs from caged hens at all its outlets. In a statement, Zokufa says one of HSI Africa's goals is to encourage all stakeholders in South Africa to follow more humane practices. “HSI is asking farmers, producers, corporates, retailers and government to go cage-free and buy cage-free. We look forward to seeing more companies in SA phase out producing and using eggs from battery cages.”

“Cage Eggs”. The department rejected the submission, she says, on the grounds that consumers would take it for granted that eggs laid by chickens in battery cages were the “norm”, and therefore did not require specific identification. However, her organisation has now written to Trade and Industry Minister Rob Davies, motivating why he should exercise his right, in terms of the Consumer Protection Act, to stipulate that battery eggs should be labelled as such. Meawhile, what consumers currently have to protect them from misleading claims are the standards of the retailers. Lovell says Pick ‘n Pay, Woolworths and Shopright Checkers, for example, do the checking as part of their brand reputation policies. “The issue becomes not so much about whether consumers are being

misled, but about what can happen to those who mislead them – at this stage, very little,” he says. While there is growing demand for free-range poultry products, including eggs, in South Africa, Lovell says these are very much still niche products. Cost implications of the cage-free movement means its greatest impact so far is in developed, rather than developing, countries. In the USA, costs of cagefree facilities are almost double that of battery farming. Production costs are also significantly higher. The US egg industry says going cage-free could increase the price of eggs by up to 36%. In general, says Lovell, “people vote with their wallets”, and currently most South Africans are voting for cheaper, caged eggs. “But if demand changes, the industry will respond,” he says. x

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OPINION

THE CANCER REPORT

Unfair to SA’s red meat industry?

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meat. Similarly, South Africans eat he International Agency for uniquely. The majority of our meat-eating Research on Cancer (IARC) is part folk consume mostly chicken, then beef, of the World Health Organization followed by pork, lamb or mutton and (WHO) and evaluates observed then only processed meat (BFAP, 2015). relationships or associations between But importantly, our processed meat agents and cancer risk. For this they looks significantly different to processed developed a system of categories to meats found in many other countries. In assess the carcinogenicity of different most viennas and polonies sold in SA, the agents (including foods) to humans. Of bulk of the ingredients include chicken, the nearly 1000 agents evaluated by turkey, pork and vegetable proteins. the panel, only a single one (a precursor There is no, or only trace quantities for Nylon), has ever been of, red meat. grouped as probably Secondly, IARC not carcinogenic to evaluations involve humans. hazard analyses, not Late last year risk assessments. IARC published This distinction is a report on the important. link between It means that red and the panel members processed meat consider whether and cancer the agent at some which led to level, under some media frenzy. The circumstance, could be report said that a hazard for cancer. the consumption of The fact that it does red meat is probably not include a risk assessment carcinogenic to By Dr Nicolette Hall means that it doesn’t take into humans, and the account the real quantifiable consumption of exposure to the substance linked to its processed meat is carcinogenic to potential to cause cancer. humans. Despite not conducting a risk What we need to know, firstly, is assessment, the 2015 report continued that the IARC represents the opinion to publish a risk that eating 50 grams of of a select group of scientists (all from processed meat each day can increase developed countries) and their opinion the risk of colorectal cancer by 18% (no is not necessarily based on consensus quantifiable risk for eating fresh red meat in the global scientific community. was given). (Noteworthy: the final classifications for the 2015 report were apparently also based on a majority agreement and not o make allegations about causation unanimous consensus of the working and risk for the entire global group). population (and all processed The IARC evaluation did not introduce meats) is ignorant and even erroneous. any new evidence and was based on a Even if there is some validity in the review of existing scientific literature, published risk, it has a fairly small impact none of which included any study from on South Africans. Apart from our diets a developing country. The populations being very low in processed meat to within the 108 developing countries begin with (on average we consume across the globe consume culturally less than 12g per person per day (BFAP, unique diets which are often high in 2015), our normal lifetime risk for colon starch-based staple foods with limited cancer is 0.88% or 1 in 114 for men, and

T

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0.55% or 1 in 182 for women (NHSL, 2010). If you then do decide to consume more than 50g processed meat every day, your risk of getting colorectal cancer will increase to 1.04% if you are male, and 0.65% if you are female – remaining a relatively low risk. Despite being a meat-loving nation, South Africans consume less red meat than what is often perceived. On average we eat notably less protein (11 to 18% of dietary energy) compared to recommended levels (20% of dietary energy) – a recommendation made by the same WHO which released the cancer report. We are recommended to eat up to 90g meat per day as part of our national food-based dietary guidelines (a story for another day) yet, as a population, we consume only 54g of beef, pork and lamb per person per day. What we need to keep in mind is that cancer is a multi-complex problem that cannot be solved or blamed on one specific product or food group. The best way to minimize cancer risk is to live a healthy lifestyle.

References: • IARC. International Agency for Research on Cancer. Agents classified by the IARC monographs, volumes 1–108. Available from: http://monographs.iarc.fr/ENG/Classification/ index.php. • NHSL. National Health Services Laboratory. National Institute for Occupational Health. National Cancer Registry. 2010. Report available online at: http://www.nioh.ac.za/ assets/files/NCR_Final_2010_tables(1).pdf • BFAP. Bureau of Food and Agricultural Policy. 2015. Baseline Report. Report available online at: http://www.bfap.co.za/index.php/researchprojects/baselines

Dr Hall is a research consultant at the Institute of Food, Nutrition and Well-being at the University of Pretoria

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TECHNOLOGY

By Bruce Cohen

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frica Spice CEO Zev Krengel was hobbling on crutches after a knee op when I visited his City Deep factory recently. But he soon had me chasing after him as we headed towards the newest addition to his business: a state-of-the-art, Swiss-made steam sterilization plant that is revolutionising the purity of his spices – naturally. Krengel’s excitement was palpable as he and new product development manager Emil Caddie took me on the grand tour of the brand-new, purposebuilt facility. Africa Spice has grown from humble beginnings (it was started by Krengel’s grandfather) into a leading player in the SA spice sector, with blue-chips like Nando’s and Famous Brands as key clients. Last year, says Krengel, he decided to up his food safety game and look for alternatives to irradiation because of growing client/ consumer demand for natural solutions. After much research, he opted for the BioSteam system from Swiss company Imtech-Steri, which has been specialising in steam sterilization since the 1980s. It’s core business is the pharmaceutical sector, but in recent years has expanded to include the food sector as well. In effect, the implementation of the BioSteam system has enabled Africa Spice to produce “pharmaceutical grade” herbs and spices using a 100% natural solution. Spices treated this way are validated/export-grade to even the toughest food-safety markets. Imtech installed the system last November and Africa Spice has been building up its skills in managing the process. Krengel says they are already receiving approaches from other companies keen to use the technology and he expects the third-party business opportunity to increase as companies come to recognise the value of such

All steamed up … Africa Spice’s Emil Caddie, Eric Twala and Zev Krengel.

Bugs vs The Clean, Mean Africa Spice declares war on pathogens - with Swiss precision

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“clean label” technology. Imtech, with typical Swiss fastidiousness, did not simply build and then install the system in Jo’burg; it also monitors it continuously through a fibreoptic link back to its headquarters. The software generates detailed reporting on all phases of the sterilization process and has been programmed with specific parameters for various spices to ensure optimum results (typically, a spice will need to be treated at around 80-90 degrees C for three-five minutes). And the results, says Krengel, have been impressive. “We’ve run microbials on the treated spices and have seen dramatic drops in bug count,” he says, pointing to a recent test on African bird’s eye chilli: the spice arrived with a total plate count of 750 000 and came out of the BioSteam chamber at below 4 000. To achieve the same result with irradiation would have required intensive exposure of the spice to ionising

Precision control of the sterilisation process

radiation, says Krengel. The saturated steam has no negative impact on taste or colour; in fact, says Krengel, it actually improves the colour of some spices. Africa Spice is currently deploying the BioSteam system to sterilise paprika, cayenne, chilli and black pepper. Others will follow. Mathieu Oser, CEO of Imtech-

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TECHNOLOGY

THE POWER OF SATURATED STEAM Sterilisation/pasteurisation in a vacuum chamber with perfectly dry saturated steam is probably the healthiest and most reliable method of ensuring food safety. It does not require the use of chemicals or radioactive substances. It also does does not wet the product, which eliminates the need for drying that can cause significant loss of colour, essential oils and aroma, thus badly altering the organoleptic characteristics of foods like spices and herbs. The Imtech BioSteam System was developed in Switzerland over 20 years ago. It’s validated to produce effective results, especially in spices, herbs, nuts and drIed fruits. Batches can be processed in around 30 minutes. The saturated steam - from water heated to boiling point and then vaporized with additional heat so it is completely dry - is rapidly introduced into an air-free chamber (under vacuum) and expands to fill the empty space. This process ensures optimal penetration and heat transfer onto the product being sterilized. Pathogens are destroyed by the sudden and dramatic rise in temperature – a sort of shock treatment that prevents them from adjusting to the heat - followed by rapid cooling.

n Steam

There are some limitations to steam sterilization, such as viscosity/ moisture content of the target product, which means products like onion and garlic powders don’t do as well. Also, products need to be sterilized separately, so no blends can move through the system. x

Steri, had this to say about the project: “I was impressed by the motivation and commitment of Africa Spice’s management team. It was the first time we had installed a plant in a southern African country and we never know what to really expect when starting such a project with new countries. The Africa Spice people were really friendly but also really professional and target-oriented, and we were able to achieve a state-ofart installation much easier than what we sometimes achieve in other countries, including North American or European projects.” x Contacts: Africa Spice www.africaspice.co.za Tel: +27 11 623 1322 emil@africaspice.co.za delia@africaspice.co.za IMTECH-Steri www.imtech-steri.ch Tel.: +41 61 406 91 11 info@imtech-steri.ch

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Back-view of the sterilisation chamber ... not your ordinary steam-cleaner!

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FOOD SAFETY

F

ood manufacturers and distributors, faced with implementing a perplexing set of food safety standards, often find themselves having to comply with multiple standards/variants in order to supply the big retailers, each with their own special preferences. If there was such a thing as food management paradise, it would be one standard recognised by everyone, everywhere. FSSC 22000 compliant ... from left, Nu Leaf Brands’ GM Mark Bartlett, Christa Swanevelder, Food Safety Pipe dream, perhaps? Consultant, Zondai Nzembe, Food Safety Team Leader, and Cedric Bartlett, MD, with J P Groenewald, Believe it or not, such a Operations Manager of SAI Global. “super-standard” actually exists – it’s called FSSC 22000, and South Africa is joining the international trend towards adopting the new standard. One of the first local FSSC 22000 certifications was completed recently for Gauteng-based fresh produce packer and distributor Nu Leaf Brands. The IAF-accredited certifier was SAI Global. The FSSC (Foundation for Food Safety Certification) is an independent, www.nuleafbrands.co.za intensive, more encompassing, more non-profit organisation based in the introspective. It requires going the whole Netherlands. FSSC says the standard, SAI Global nine yards … but it’s been worth it.” based on ISO 22000, brings it in-line with Tel: +27 (0) 21 850 0510 One of the advantages of FSSC the additional requirements of the Global www.saiglobal.com certification is that it eliminates the need Food Safety Initiative (GFSI). for full annual audits; it only needs to be The FSSC 22000 standard is done every three years, interspersed with recognised by major players and their frequent, random surveillance audits. members worldwide, among them GFSI, Says Jacques Williams, Certification The European Organization for Food and Manager, Assurance Services for SAI Drink Manufacturers, and GMA (Grocery Global’s South African office: “FSSC Manufacturers’ Association in the USA). 22000 is specifically targeted at food In South Africa, most major retailers (Pick manufacturers. This certification scheme ‘n Pay, Spar, Shoprite etc) have green-lit Reporter will help secure food safety standards FSSC 22000. Food & Beverage Reporter is within the production process of the Mark Bartlett, GM of Nu Leaf Brands, available in digital format (PDF) supply chain. says that before FSSC 22000, the immediately it is published. “SAI Global is a worldwide leader company needed multiple certifications The digital edition is free. in Food Safety audits, certification and in order to service its diverse client base. training. We understand that obtaining There was a lot of duplication. Make sure you don’t a certificate is just the beginning of Bartlett says Nu Leaf’s business – it miss out by emailing a food safety management systems has 3 500 Global GAP-certified farmers adminfbr@fbreporter.com journey. Our auditors understand that in its supply chain – has required a and we’ll send you a reminder the application of the standard can be major investment in food safety. “It’s each month with a link to the quite different in small, medium and prudent and it’s a necessary part of good latest e-edition. large organizations, and are trained to corporate governance at Nu Leaf, but assess client systems in a way that will be you really need to live and breathe it in For subscriptions to the printed appropriate to their business.” order for a food safety programme to magazine, visit Contacts be effective”. FSSC 22000, says Bartlett, www.fbreporter.co.za Nu Leaf Brands is more than just an enhancement of Tel: +27 (0) 11 827 8623 their previous programmes. “It’s more

FSSC 22000

The food safety super-standard

&

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MARCH 2016

INSIDE The New Plastic Economy The curse of water vapour The hot-swop hopper is here Think Retail Think Vinyl

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BRIEFS

APC PUTS 5 500 PALLETS ON THE RACK

APC Storage Solutions SA recently assisted Lynca Meats in designing and erecting an on-site 2000 sqm cold storage facility to hold the company’s pork products at its Meyerton premises. The storage solution included this mobile racking system, Movirack, as well as two articulated forklifts that will store and retrieve the approx 5 500 pallets. The racks are configured to seven bays in length, six levels high, with each bay holding three pallets. www.apcstoragesolutions.co.za

A PRINTER SPECIALLY FOR THE BEVERAGE SECTOR Pyrotec PackMark has launched the Markem-Imaje 9450 continuous inkjet printer for all manufacturers regardless of sector, and the 9540 S, an inkjet printer for the beverage industry that meets the demanding constraints for traceability, versatility and hygiene. With a seven-inch colour touch-screen, the 9450 printer offers optimum ease of use. The printer and printhead are fully stainless steel with IP56 protection rating (IP66 optional) for pressurised water and detergent wash-downs and faultless operation in demanding or dusty environments. www.pyrotec.co.za


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• Slide fragile materials gently through smooth stainless steel tubing using low-friction polymer discs attached to galvanised, stainless or Nylon-encapsulated stainless cable • Prevent separation of blends • Short to long distances • Durable discs in 10 and 15 cm diameters • Available CIP accessories • Single or multiple inlets/outlets can be removed/relocated and the cable-disc circuit lengthened/shortened/re-routed • Minimal power usage • Evacuates material, minimising waste and cleaning time

• Single-point “up-and-in” installations to crossplant systems with multiple pick-up and discharge points and automated controls • Positive pressure and vacuum dilute phase systems complete with blowers, rotary airlock valves, pick-up adapters, filter receivers, cyclones, fill/pass valves, wands and weigh batching controls • Short to long distances • Wide capacity range—feed small packaging lines to silos and railcars • Single or multiple inlet and discharge points • Total evacuation of supply vessel and the conveyor line for accurate weighments, minimal waste and easy cleaning

Stand-alone units to weigh batching configurations to automated plant-wide systems backed by Flexicon’s Lifetime Performance Guarantee* ™

See the full range of fast-payback equipment at flexicon.co.za: Flexible Screw Conveyors, Tubular Cable Conveyors, Pneumatic Conveying Systems, Bulk Bag Unloaders, Bulk Bag Conditioners, Bulk Bag Fillers, Bag Dump Stations, Drum/Box/Container Tippers, Weigh Batching and Blending Systems, and Automated Plant-Wide Bulk Handling Systems

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EE-0463

©2016 Flexicon Corporation. Flexicon Corporation has registrations and pending applications for the trademark FLEXICON throughout the world. *See complete Guarantee for details.


It’s a plastic hell, or we cho

PLASTICS

S

o picture this: The year is 2050. There is more plastic by weight in the oceans than fish. Our love for plastic has grown so big that the plastics industry is now consuming 20% of the world’s oil and contributing 15% of the global carbon budget (that’s the amount we dare not exceed if we are to keep global warming below 2C) ... The world sure loves plastic (and the foodbev industry is totally besotted with the stuff) … but we don’t have to go down this path to hell if we start applying circular economy principles to global plastic packaging flows. A circular economy is one that is restorative and regenerative by design. And it could transform the plastics economy and drastically reduce environmental damage such as leakage into oceans, according to the latest report by the World Economic

Forum and Ellen MacArthur Foundation. The New Plastics Economy: Rethinking the future of plastics, released earlier this year, provides for the first time a vision of This report demonstrates the importance of triggering a revolution in the plastics industrial ecosystem and is a first step to showing how to transform the way plastics move through our economy. To move from insight to large scale action, it is clear that no one actor can work on this alone; the public, private sector and civil society all need to mobilize in order to capture the opportunity of the new circular plastics economy. - Dominic Waughray World Economic Forum a global economy in which plastics never become waste, and outlines concrete

steps towards achieving the systemic shift needed. The report was produced as part of Project MainStream, a global, multi-industry initiative that aims to accelerate business-driven innovations to help scale the circular economy. The report acknowledges that while plastics and plastic packaging are an integral part of the global economy and deliver many benefits, their value chains are hugely problematic. Assessing global plastic packaging flows comprehensively for the first time, the report finds that most plastic packaging is used only once; 95% of the value of plastic packaging material, worth $80-120 billion annually, is lost to the economy. That’s apart from the environmental damage worth billions and billions more. In this context, says the report, an opportunity beckons for the plastics


oose the circular economy industry to deliver better system-wide economic and environmental outcomes, while continuing to harness the benefits of plastic packaging. The New Plastics Economy outlined in the report envisages a new approach based on creating effective after-use pathways for plastics; drastically reducing leakage of plastics into natural systems, in particular oceans; and decoupling plastics from fossil feedstocks. Achieving such systemic change will require major collaboration efforts between all stakeholders across the global plastics value chain – consumer goods companies, plastic packaging producers and plastics manufacturers, businesses involved in collection, sorting and reprocessing, cities, policymakers and NGOs. The report proposes the creation of an independent co-ordinating body to set direction, establish common standards and systems, overcome fragmentation and foster innovation opportunities at scale. In line with the report’s recommendations, the Ellen MacArthur Foundation will establish an initiative to act as a cross-value-chain global dialogue mechanism and drive the shift towards a New Plastics Economy. The report’s findings are timely; new technologies are unlocking opportunities in material design, reprocessing and renewable sourcing; developing countries are investing in after-use infrastructure; and governments are increasingly considering – and implementing – policies around plastic packaging. The New Plastics Economy: Rethinking the future of plastics provides a fact-base and a vision to inform the choices that need to be made. Plastics are the workhorse material of the modern economy – with unbeaten properties. However they are also the ultimate single-use material. Growing volumes of end-of-use plastics are generating costs and destroying value to the industry. After-use plastics could - with circular economy thinking - be turned into valuable feedstock. Our research confirms that applying those circular principles could spark a major wave of innovation with benefits for the entire supply chain. - Dr. Martin R. Stuchtey, McKinsey Center for Business and Environment

You can read the full report here: www.ellenmacarthurfoundation.org

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MPact’s rPETs get EU green-light Mpact’s R350-million PET recycling operation in Wadeville, Germiston, which produces recycled PET (rPET) plastic for food grade packaging, has announced that its recycling process complies with European Union (EU) Food Safety Authority specifications. Now fully operational under the name Mpact Polymers, this bottle-to-bottle grade operation forms part of Mpact’s mission to reduce the PET industry’s impact on the environment. Mpact says its recycled PET has been tested by the Fraunhofer Institute in Munich, Germany and found to be safe for use in the packaging of food and beverage products. This is good news in the recycling and bottling industry as the opening of this operation increases the amount of PET bottles collected for recycling by 29 000 tonnes a year, generating a new raw material directly from what was previously considered waste - a saving of about 180 000 cubic metres of landfill space each year. Further, through PET collection and recovery, the operation will also help to create entrepreneurial income opportunities. “The PET recycling process used by Mpact Polymers transforms used PET bottles into resin that meets the needs of the most demanding food and beverage packaging applications,” says John Hunt, Managing Director at Mpact Recycling. “This ensures that the material can be re-used to make the same bottles from which it came, thereby closing the recycling loop. “Our rPET product will be known as Savuka - which means ‘revival’.” According to Industry body PETCO, total PET consumption in South Africa is around 198 000 tonnes per annum of which 68% is consumed in the beverage industry for bottle manufacture; in 2015 half of post-consumer PET bottles were collected. Contact: Mpact Recycling 011 538 8603

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INNOVATION

Flexicon’s hot-swop hoppers A new BULK-OUT™ Bulk Bag Discharging Station from Flexicon prevents cross-contamination during material changeovers, while eliminating down-time associated with cleaning of hoppers. Targeted at applications involving food allergens, pigments, flavourings and other contamination-sensitive materials, the discharger features a shuttle system that allows a used hopper to be replaced with a clean, dry one in less than a minute. Each hopper is equipped with a stainless steel rotary valve that meters material into process equipment positioned below the mezzanine. Once empty, a hopper can be rolled within two C-channels to either side of the central filling position for sanitising offline. Integral support rails on the rotary valve allow the rotor assembly to separate from the valve body for cleaning of all material contact surfaces, and to close securely in seconds without the use of tools. The hopper shuttle system can more than double productivity by allowing one hopper to be filled and discharged, while the other hopper and metering valve are cleaned, according to the company. The discharger portion of the dusttight system employs a SPOUT-LOCK™ clamp ring that secures the clean side of the bag spout against the clean side of the discharger. A TELE-TUBE™ telescoping tube promotes material flow through the bag spout by maintaining constant downward tension on the clamp ring as the bag empties and elongates. The assembly consisting of the clamp ring, telescoping tube and quick-release cone hopper lid, provides unobstructed access to all material contact surfaces for rapid cleaning during material changeovers. Additional flow promotion is afforded by two FLOW-FLEXER™ pneumatically actuated devices, one of which employs a pair of rams that presses opposing sides of the bag in increasing strokes as the bag decreases in width, and another that uses specially contoured plates that increasingly raise opposing bottom sides of the bag into a steep "V" shape

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as the bag lightens, promoting complete discharge. Positioned above the clamp ring is a POWER-CINCHER™ pneumatically actuated flow control valve that cinches the spout concentrically, allowing gradual release of material after untying the drawstring, and re-cinching of partially empty bags for leak-free tie-offs. The model "BFC" discharger is distinguished by its cantilevered I-beam with electric hoist and trolley that allows raising and positioning of bulk bags without the use of a forklift. To operate, the bag loops are connected to Z-CLIP™ bag strap holders on the unit's lifting frame at floor level, and the bag is raised into position using a pendant. The telescoping tube is raised pneumatically, allowing connection of the bag spout to the clamp ring using snap-action handles, and then released, relying on the weight of the assembly to maintain downward tension on the

spout throughout the discharging process. Construction is of carbon steel with durable industrial finish, with all material contact surfaces of stainless steel. Contact Flexicon Africa Tel +27 (0)41 453 1871 sales@flexicon.co.za www.flexicon.co.za

The hopper shuttle system of this BULK-OUT™ Bulk Bag Discharging Station allows an emptied hopper to be rolled outside of the central filling position for cleaning and drying offline, while a second hopper is receiving material from a bulk bag and/or metering it into process equipment below the mezzanine

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SOLUTIONS

Vapour: a costly curse ... F ailure to remove water vapour from factory air can quickly become a costly maintenance headache. According to Brian Abbott, Product Manager at SMC Pneumatics South Africa, water vapour and the resulting water condensate are the foremost causes of downtime and increased maintenance. “The blame is often laid on the more visible culprit - oil or contaminants - both of which are easily removed with proper filtration.” “Moisture in facility airlines can cause corrosion and rust which can break loose in the air passageways, causing blockages in narrow restrictions and filter elements. This can lead to pressure drops and loss in machine performance, not to mention energy loss and the costs of the compressed air,” says Abbott. Aftercoolers, drip legs and water separators are used to remove water condensate from factory compressed air. However, this air is still at 100% relative humidity and is still at risk of condensing into water should the surrounding temperatures drop to its dew point. In order to increase protection of expensive automation equipment, factory compressed air must remove as much water vapour as possible to avoid any condensation further downstream. This is done by lowering its dew point. Abbott says drying compressed air

Abbott ... get that dew point right.

at the highest pressure consistent with the facility’s demands will result in the most economical dryer operation. For most industrial applications, the rule is to first set the pressure dew point to meet general requirements, then adjust it between -6°C to -10°C lower than the facility’s lowest ambient temperature. Hence, factory air dryness or dew point is relative to the application’s specific requirements. Refrigerated dryers are the most commonly-used method to lower dew point. A refrigerated dryer will further

cool the compressed air by removing heat at its inlet side, lowering its temperature dew point down to 3°C and then expelling the condensate through an automatic condensate drain. The dryer will then reheat the dried compressed air back to ambient temperature by recycling the previously removed heat using a heat exchange process. This reheating of the compressed air to ambient temperature will eliminate “sweaty” cold pipes when working in humid factory conditions. ... Continued on next page


SPRINT 2™ DICER Merging the Cutting Advances and Features from the DiversaCut Sprint® and the Model G

The Sprint 2™ Dicer combines the legendary Model G Dicer footprint and similar infeed/discharge heights with the cutting advances offered by the popular DiversaCut Sprint® Dicer. The dicer offers a convenient solution for food processors seeking to replace their existing Model G, G-A, GK-A, H, or H-A Dicer. The Sprint 2 Dicer produces a wide variety of dices, granulations, slices, and strips of vegetables, fruits, bakery products, meats, and seafood. The cutting principle is based on the DiversaCut Sprint technology turned at an adjusted angle.

® www. U R S C H E L .com

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FOOD & BEVERAGE REPORTER info@heatandcontrol.com

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® Urschel & DiversaCut Sprint are registered trademarks of Urschel Laboratories, Inc. U.S.A. ™ Sprint 2 trademark pending.

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VAPOUR CURSE ... Continued from previous page

Abbott recommends that a coalescing filter be installed upstream from the dryer to remove any compressor oil and other contaminants that may still be trapped in the compressed air. Another option is a membrane dryer, which use hollow fibers through which water vapour passes easily, but is difficult for air (oxygen and nitrogen) to pass through. When humid compressed air reaches the membrane, the water vapour permeates it and is drawn to the outside due to a pressure differential in the the hollow fibers. The compressed air becomes dry and flows out. The system allows for continuous dehumidification. By altering the air flow rate and membrane configurations, pressure dew points up to -60°C can be achieved, says Abbott. Desiccant dryers, on the other hand, pass air through beds of desiccant, an absorbent material such as silica gel or activated alumina, which adsorb water vapour to its surface to effectively lower dew points to temperatures well below that which a refrigerated dryer can achieve. Heatless regenerative models use a pair of desiccant beds which alternate in service; while the one bed is operational, the off-line bed is regenerated via a pressure swing adsorption process. Pressure dew points from a standard -30°C to an optional -50°C and beyond can be achieved with a desiccant dryer. Both membrane and desiccant dryers are adversely affected by the presence of oils or liquid water and must be protected with a quality coalescing filter. What is the appropriate dew point? Abbott says over-specifying an applicationor a facility dew point can be very expensive due to high energy costs, just as the maintenance costs for water vapour damage to product lines can be for an under-specified dew point. He says drying the entire factory’s compressed air supply to -30°C dew point is unnecessary and wasteful. It is more sensible to dry the compressed air to a dew point -10°C lower than the factory’s lowest ambient temperature and then subdivide the compressed air supply by application, using zone or point-of-use membrane or desiccant dryers to provide the appropriate level of dryness. The costs of energy, downtime, replacing components, end product defects or even loss of brand value are just a few factors to consider when determining an appropriate dew point. For more info on dryers, visit www.smcpneumatics.co.za

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RETAIL

Think retail. Now think vinyl. T

he recently-opened Eagle Canyon Super SPAR in Roodepoort took a giant retail leap forward when the owners decided to veer away from the usual porcelain tiles and opt instead for luxury vinyl tiles and sheeting for the 2700 sqm store. Vinyl floors have proven to be an excellent option for high traffic areas and for use in environments where hygiene is of paramount importance. No longer limited to hospitals and healthcare environments, modern vinyl floors come in a wide range of different looks and finishes, including wood, stone or porcelain. "They are easy to maintain, slip resistant, able to withstand heavy foot traffic and even inhibit bacterial growth,” says Tandy Coleman-Spolander, Marketing Director of Polyflor SA, which supplied the Eagle Canyon flooring. Retail flooring has to meet certain functional needs, such as being able to withstand high foot traffic, shopping trolleys Not your average vinyl floor ... the Polyflor finish at Eagle Canyon SuperSPAR. and the day-to-day operational issues of moving stock around. he floors in the food preparation areas also have to conform to health standards similar to those in health care facilities. On-going maintenance and long-term replacement of the flooring must also be considered, as changing of porcelain tiles in-store always presents operational difficulties. “All these considerations made vinyl flooring a viable product for this purpose,” says Adrian Breckenridge, designer for SPAR South Rand. “We used two major finishes to give us two very contrasting looks. On the one hand we used Polyflor's Expona Commercial PUR in Blue Recycled Wood giving a feel that is very natural, warm and engaging in the service department areas, where we created a “market” feel that sub-consciously encourages consumers to mill through the areas On the other hand, using Pearlazzo PUR Chalkburst we have a clean, modern and slick look that provides an uncomplicated experience in the dry goods areas,” he explains. Both floors have a PUR coating, giving them a polish/ sealer-free maintenance regime for the life of the floor. The polyurethane has been reinforced by applying a higher weight, top quality polyurethane, that has been UV cured and cross-linked, to the product, ensuring significant cost savings for the owner in the long run. Furthermore, the lack of grout joints and the smooth, warm feeling of the vinyl floors adds to the ambience and the overall appeal of the shopping experience. Breckenridge believes the Eagle Canyon SuperSPAR has set a new standard that other stores will soon be following.

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SHOWCASE CONSULTANTS, SERVICES AND MANUFACTURING

DINNERMATES

Tel: +27 11 462 0020 +27 30-8600/+27 32-8600 Fax: +27 11 462 0032 Email: sales@dinnermates.co.za Website: www.dinnermates.co.za Suppliers to the hospitality and food industries of quality portioncontrolled, chilled, frozen and dried meat products. Service excellence, innovation and flexibility give Dinnermates the edge in providing meat and chicken products tailored for special applications in the food industry.

PHT-SA TRADING INTERNATIONAL Tel: +27 86 1777 993 Fax: +27 86 628 9800 Email: info@pht-sa.co.za Website: www.pht-sa.co.za

PHT, your partner for hygiene and technology; plans and offers hygiene, food safety and technology solutions for food and beverage companies of any size; personnel hygiene equipment, change room equipment, drain technology, cleaning machines, foam cleaning technology, consumable goods, ergonomic handling systems, doors and components, deboning conveyor and racking systems, stunning and slaughter systems, water treatment systems, smoking and cooking systems, wood, pan releasing agents, speciality ingredients. WATER EQUIPMENT & SERVICES

VEOLIA WATER SOLUTIONS & TECHNOLOGIES SA Contact: Tel: Fax: E-mail: Website:

Gerhard Burger +27 11 974 8161 +27 11 974 8867 gerhard.burger@veoliawater.com www.veoliawaterst.co.za

Veolia Water Solutions & Technologies SA is a specialist provider of complete water and wastewater treatment solutions and is active throughout southern and subSaharan Africa. As a subsidiary of the Veolia Water multinational, the company offers a full range of products and services to a variety of industries, including food & beverage, petrochemical, mining, municipalities and numerous others. Veolia employs leading technology for disinfection, filtration and general purification – including environmental protection. Solutions are completed by in-house capacity to provide a speciality chemical treatment range - Hydrex™ - as well as SABS-approved hygiene products and services.

ADVERTISE IN OUR SUPPLIER SHOWCASE R20 per word (ex VAT) per insertion. Discounts apply for multiple insertions. Email wendy@fbreporter.com Tel: 083 653 8116

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INGREDIENTS

CREATIVE FLAVORS INTERNATIONAL (PTY) LTD

Tel: +27 11 760 1830 Fax: +27 11 760 1829 Email: info@creativeflavors.co.za Website: www.creativeflavors.co.za Creative Flavors is a manufacturer of compounded flavours. We supply flavours and essences to the bakery, beverage, confectionery, dairy, savoury, alcohol, tobacco and pharmaceutical industries. Our flavoured emulsions are tried and tested to ensure best results in carbonated drinks, cordials and fruit juice concentrates. We offer a personal touch to your product development and with us your projects are in best hands, resulting in ultimate consumer satisfaction.

FLAVOUROME

Tel: +27 11 314 0219 Fax: +27 11 314 0784 Email: nathanb@flavourome.co.za Website: www.flavourome.co.za Flavourome is a professional company with HACCP accreditation, providing customers within the food, beverage and health industries with innovative products, solutions and ideas. We are partnered with Firmenich and thus supply some of the world’s best available flavours. Our state-of-the-art facilities allow us to manufacture, blend and supply various food colours (lake, primary and blends), sweetener blends (non-nutritive), juice compounds, clouding agents, emulsions and health ingredients. We also provide formulating services in our fully equipped laboratories, as well as blending services in our powder and liquid facilities, providing our customers with a unique and competitive edge.

NICOLA J

Tel:+27 11 315 6582 Fax:+27 11 805 4536 Email: sales@njflavours.co.za Website: www.njflavours.co.za • Flavours: sweet & savoury, powder & liquid • Fragrances: industrial & household • Colours: primary, lakes, blends • Caramel colours • Oleoresins • Flavour chemicals • Supplied throughout SA and Africa

BEVERAGES

ELVIN GROUP (PTY) LTD

Tel: +27 43 707 6200 Fax: +27 43 736 1293 Email: general@elvin.co.za Website: www.elvin.co.za Manufacturer and supplier of a wide range of fruit nectar concentrates, ready-to-drink fruit juices, dairy fruit blends, lemon juices and vinegars under its own label as well as for private label brand owners in local and international markets.

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GEA Southern & Eastern Africa 48 Reedbuck Crescent, Corporate Park South, Midrand 1682, RSA Tel. + 27(0)11 392 7114, Fax. +27(0)11 392 7000 info-sea@gea.com

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Food & Beverage Reporter March 2016