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Thailand Pharma report July 2012

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January 2012

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Pharma.FocusReports.net

Acknowledgements Focus Reports would like to thank Chernporn Tenganmuay, President of the Thai Pharmaceutical Manufacturers Association, and Dr. Kitima Yuthavong, CEO of Pharmaceutical Research and Manufacturers Association, for their support. We would also like to thank all companies whose interest and support have made this report possible.

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This report was prepared by Focus Reports Project Director: Merlin Ozkan Chief Editor Fred Gebhart Research and Editorial Herbert Mosmuller Project Coordinator: Herbert Mosmuller Contributors: Marine Neveu Project Publisher: Beatrice Collet

Contents Acknowledgements ...............................................................................2 Thailand: Survival of the Fittest in the Land of Smiles ..................... 5 Health Coverage in Harmony? ...............................................................6 The Quest for Value & Volume, and More .............................................6 Diversification Is the Name of the Game ..............................................7 Biotech – Ready for the Next Episode...................................................9 Interview with Wittaya Buranasiri, Minister of Public Health of Thailand ..................................................10 Interview with Witit Artavatkun, Managing Director, GPO.......................................................................12 Interview with Chernporn Tenganmuay, President, TPMA ....................................................................................14 Interview with Dr. Kanyawim Kirtikara, Executive Director, BIOTEC .................................................................16 Interview with Rachod Thakolsri, Managing Director, Biolab ....................................................................18 Interview with Aman Bhattacharjee, Managing Director, Merck ....................................................................20 List of exclusive interviews on pharma.focusreports.net ..................22 Directory ................................................................................................23

Copyright Š All rights reserved. No part of this publication maybe reproduced in any form or by any means, whether electronic, mechanical or otherwise including photocopying, recording or any information storage or retrieval system without prior written consent of Focus Reports. While every attempt is made to ensure the accuracy of the information contained in this report, neither Focus Reports, neither the authors accept any liabilities for errors and omissions. Opinions expressed in this report are not necessarily those of the authors.

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Index ......................................................................................................27 Past reports ...........................................................................................28

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Jirapat Tatsanasomboon, Thavibu Art Gallery

Thailand Report

More spotlights on pharmaceutical markets worldwide at

THAILAND:

Survival of the Fittest in the Land of Smiles

I

ndochina’s biggest pharmaceutical market (US$ 4 billion, 66 million population, <5 percent of GDP spent on healthcare) has quickly matured over the past years due to the implementation of heavy cost containment measures meant to make healthcare more accessible to the patient. These measures have driven the market from double-digit growth to almost flat growth within the course of two years.

While increased generics volumes have led to opportunities for local manufacturers, the high number of local competitors, facing off against an increasing number of regional enterprises and Multi-National Companies (MNCs) looking to market branded generics, meant that only the strongest were able to successfully navigate through the changes. At the same time, as the government targeted innovative drugs on the List of Essential Medicine, many MNCs had to change their focus to stay profitable in Thailand’s FOCUS REPORTS

state-dominated market. It is survival of the fittest in the land of smiles, but those MNCs and Thai manufacturers that fi nd the right answer in dealing with the new conditions are blossoming and, moreover, have a bright future ahead with market growth picking up again, expectations of more proportional spending in the government healthcare budget, and the opening up of ASEAN’s 600 million consumer market by 2015 as part of the ASEAN Economic Community (AEC).

This sponsored supplement was produced by Focus Reports. Project Director: Merlin Ozkan Journalist: Herbert Mosmuller Contributors: Marine Neveu Report Publisher: Beatrice Collet For exclusive interviews and more info, please log onto or write to contact@focusreports.net

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Thailand Report During several weeks of interviews with key stakeholders, Focus Reports went to look for the winning strategy in this fastchanging environment.

HEALTH COVERAGE IN HARMONY? The whole Thai population receives health insurance, only there are major differences between the three kinds of coverage provided. The Civil Servants Medical Benefi ts Scheme (CSMBS) provides uncapped healthcare but covers only a small proportion of population, providing probably double that of average spending per capita. Below the CSMBS is the Social Security Scheme (SSS), which covers a moderate percentage of the population through a capped system funded through employer contributions. At the lowest level Thailand has the universal coverage, through which the government claims 95 percent of the population is covered. This scheme is capped at a mere 60 USD per year. Patients covered under this scheme generally receive minimalist healthcare. The hospital channel represents 80 percent of the pharmaceutical market, and the government drive toward increasing accessibility to healthcare has essentially been successful. Measures are set to continue. “We do not have a policy to merge the different schemes into a single one, but we do try to harmonize them to reduce inequity in service, quality, and efficiency,” said Minister of Public Health Wittaya Buranasiri. “Expenditures in our system are currently very high, and although it is not our policy to just cut the budget, we try to harmonize our three healthcare schemes by changing the management between the schemes, and improving the Wittaya Buranasiri, benefit package while bringing the qualMinister of Public ity standards to the same levels.” Health A more proportional structuring of the government healthcare budget is expected to lead to dramatic market growth. Increased spending of five percent within Universal Coverage would mean an additional 800 Baht (25 USD) for about 45 million people. Such a measure would improve healthcare and open up spending on pharmaceuticals as well.

THE QUEST FOR VALUE & VOLUME, AND MORE “The revival of the Universal Healthcare Scheme as proposed by the newly elected government will create a big opportunity for the local industry volume-wise,” said Chernporn Tenganmuay, president of the Thai Pharmaceutical Manufacturers Association (TPMA). “There have been many government tenders, and over the last 5 years, local manufacturers have been growing very fast. As a result, as they can produce drugs much cheaper than competing MNCs. Thanks to the tendering system, the market can shift in favor of any company that gives the lowest price.” Still, the fight can no longer be won just on price. “It is safe S3 FOCUS REPORTS

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to say that half of the current 140 manufacturers will not be around anymore in a couple of years,” said Wisanu Assawes, managing director of A.N.B., a manufacturer just acquired by the Bangkok Hospital Group, owner of some of Thailand’s biggest and most modern hospitals. “The reason is that a company that sells less than 80 million Baht (USD 2.53 million) per year cannot stay on; they do not have the cash to improve and upgrade their facilities.” Thai manufacturers over the past years have been hesitant to make the required investments in quality, a doubt underpinned by uncertainty about whether the investment would pay off in a volume-driven market. But those that decided to invest early on are reaping the benefits today. A prime example of such a company is Biolab, currently the number three domestic producer. “The issue in Thailand is that 80 percent of the market is for the government hospitals, and their procurement method is solely based on price,” owner and managing director Rachod Thakolsri explained. “Whether or not to pursue membership of Pharmaceutical Inspection Cooperation Scheme (PIC/S) is a tough decision, because it also means that we have to increase our cost, which influences our competitiveness.” The decision, however, has paid off Rachod Thakolsri, for Biolab, with the company growing its managing director, market share with its high-quality generBiolab ics, while engaging in contract manufacturing for companies like Pfizer. Adhering to PIC/S is not only an advantage in the national arena, said Thakolsri. “This is a strategic time to invest in PIC/S, because in two or three years the picture might look very different. Japan, for instance, announced that it will increase its budget for generic products from 17 percent to 30 percent, and in Korea we see similar developments. That is why producers from these countries come to us: even if they want to produce generics, they cannot do so at low cost.” In an environment where prices plummet while demand for quality increases, Thai manufacturers have to find a perfect balance between the two. Beyond this balance, investing in brand recognition and company image becomes increasingly important—especially in order to compete against the MNCs’ branded generics. Great Eastern Drug (GED), part of leadPrakarn Kunothai, ing Filipino manufacturer Unilab, saw its country manager, business in Thailand grow 100 percent Great Eastern Drug over the past 5 years. “We have been optimizing our portfolio and have developed new initiatives in a move away from generics, which led to annual double digit growth,” said Prakarn Kunothai, GED coun-

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Courtesy of Sanofi Pasteur

Hospital channel growth declines as a result of the cost containment measures

GPO MBP Manufacturing Facilities

very strong protected position in the hospital channel for decades, is changing its ways. By 2015, it will have to give up its protected position as part of the regulation that ac- Kitima Yuthavong, companies the AEC, CEO, PReMA and the company plans to expand into the ASEAN region. “This region is of interest to us, but it also is to India, China, and big multinationals such as Pfizer and Bayer,” said Dr. Witit Artavatkun, managing director of the GPO. “We are currently in the process of developing an appropriate strategy.”

Source: IMS Thailand

try manager. The main growth driver has been our flagship brand Decolgen, a cold pill. Through rebranding and changes in marketing strategy has been performing remarkably well.” While branding led GED sales to soar in the Over the Counter (OTC) channel, the medical channel with its fixation on price asked for another approach. “In

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the medical channel we have one core research product, a calcium channel blocker. Rather than go into the areas where we would meet competition from big pharma such as Sanofi and Novartis, we have developed our calcium channel blocker in a unique niche position,” notes Kunothai. Even the Government Pharmaceutical Organization (GPO), which has fostered a

DIVERSIFICATION IS THE NAME OF THE GAME The government’s cost-containment measures were mainly targeted at the top tier of the three national medical schemes: the Civil Servant Medical Scheme (covering 10 percent of the population), the focus area for most MNCs. As the most expensive therapeutic classes were targeted, scores

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Invida Finds the Cure So far this year, the fastest growing multinational among the Pharmaceutical Research & Manufacturers Association’s (PReMA) membership has been Invida. The company was formed through a strategic partnership of Quintiles, the world’s leading pharmaceutical services organization; Temasek Holdings, one of the world’s largest investment companies; and Zuellig Group, the largest pharmaceutical distribution and supply chain management network in Asia Pacific. With more than 3,500 employees throughout Asia Pacific, Invida operates throughout the commercial value chain, from regulatory approval and product launch to lifecycle management. After 16 percent organic growth in 2011, the company is set to grow another 20 percent in 2012, and Invida is quickly turning into the leading pharmaceutical commercialization services company in Asia Pacific. “We are able to substantially exceed market growth, because our own brands, and the brands in the portfolios of our

of MNCs lost their place on the List of Essential Medicine. Logically, representatives of MNCs urge the government for a more positive balance between innovative & generic medicine, as, according to Dr. Kitima

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partners, give us a wide therapeutic coverage,” explained Mark Brown, General Manager Thailand & Vietnam, the success of his company. “This makes our risks different from most MNCs, which are often highly therapeutically focused. It can be challenging for MNCs to gain growth because of generics exposure and therapeutic class Mark Brown, general pressure, whereas Invida is present in four times as many therapeutic classes manager Thailand & Vietnam, Invida as, for instance, Novartis.” Invida has set a 35 percent growth target for its brands. To reach these targets in the Thai market, Invida focuses on coverage of target specialists and hospitals and on having the right quality of sales people on board to target the right customers.

Yuthavong, CEO of PReMA, “there is a need for governmental funds to be balanced between the aim for cost containment, and the demands of patients and doctors.” Despite the efforts of the association,

it seems unlikely that the government is willing to change its ways. Furthermore, although the fruits of Indochina’s biggest market might not be reaped as easily as they had been prior to 2008, this does not mean that success is impossible. “The last IMS analysis showed that 60 percent of government hospital sales Aman Bhattacharjee, managing director, were still originator Merck products, but that the number is declining and growth is coming from branded generics both in the government and private segments,” said Helen Featherstone, general manager at IMS. Managing director Aman Bhattacharjee of Merck, one of the fastest growing MNCs in Thailand, outlined that it is the company portfolio that allows for an optimal position on the Thai market. “We are focused not just on the private sector, but on the government sector as well, while most MNCs focus solely on the private sector,” he said. However, government offers big business in terms of volume, so that base is needed to grow and sustain the business. Over the years, companies lose their value in Thailand because their commodities FOCUS REPORTS


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Thailand Report become cheaper, but the company has to ensure that production costs come down while volumes go up. Merck is doing this in high-growth segments, such as oncology and fertility.”

TOP 10 PHARMA COMPANIES IN THAILAND (COMBINED MARKET)

MAT ~12/2011 LC-BAHT BAHT SELECTED TOTAL

MAT ~12/2011 LC-BAHT BAHT%

MAT ~12/2011 LC-BAHT BAHT%

110,175,536,105

100.00

1.34

PFIZER INTER.CORP

9,551,192,695

8.67

–1.07

MERCK SHARP&DOHOME

6,115,099,620

5.55

4.34

SANOFI AVENTIS

5,710,316,734

5.18

1.58

Biotech – Ready for the Next Episode

NOVARTIS

4,662,778,408

4.23

0.41

GLAXOSMITHKLINE

4,491,160,404

4.08

2.34

After Thailand’s first National Policy Framework (20002009) saw impressive successes in establishing a biotech industry—120 companies saw the light of day for the first time—it is now time for round two, with a second framework running from 2012 through 2021. The new framework aims at specific target groups: rural communities, Small & Medium Enterprises, large biotech companies, and the R&D community. Through united efforts, Thailand has quickly established itself as the pivot of biotech activity in Indochina—and it is starting to rival Malaysia, and perhaps even Singapore. “Thailand uses a different model compared to Singapore. Rather than spending large sums to attract big scientists from abroad, Thailand chooses to build up the capacity of its people,” said Dr. Kanyawim Kirtikara, Executive Director of BIOTEC, Thailand’s premier biotech research institute. “The government is very supportive in giving out scholarships to support the cream of the crop to study abroad for Bachelor’s, Master’s, and PhDs—with the requirement that they come back to work in Thailand after completion of their studies.” The efforts have led to a research boom, and the country can Dr. Kanyawim Kirtikara, executive facilitate entire vaccine R&D prodirector, BIOTEC cesses today. The most advanced dengue program in the world is the result of a partnership between the Thai Ministry of Public Health, Mahidol University, and Sanofi Pasteur Thailand. Phase one & two research are still relatively rare in Thailand, but that is set to change. “In biotechnology, we talk about setting up the biotechnology fund from a higher level to bridge the gap between upstream and downstream by translating research,” explained Dr. Kirtikara. “That is built into the conditions of the second National Policy Framework, as it is especially relevant for biotechnology, where more time is needed to reach maturity and the success rates are modest.”

ROCHE

4,350,682,435

3.95

1.23

ASTRAZENECA

3,803,096,624

3.45

–9.19

SIAM BHAESAJ CO

3,535,371,440

3.21

1.00

GPO

3,341,445,167

3.03

–2.39

BERLIN PHARM

2,741,798,673

2.49

13.06

61,872,593,905

56.16

0.00

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*OTHERS* Source: IMS Thailand

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INTERvIEW WITH:

WITTAyA BuRANASIRI, MINISTER OF PuBLIC HEALTH OF THAILAND

What have been the healthcare priorities in Thailand since his Excellency was appointed Minister of Public Health? The main parity of Thai healthcare today is how to harmonize our health care system. The Ministry focuses on a number of urgent matters. One of those is emergency care, which we just launched this month. Emergency care allows patients to go to any hospital in the country without any obstacles. We are also solving other knots, such as accessibility to a standard quality level of healthcare to the whole population. Another focus area is HIV Aids; we try to provide ARV drugs to the patients that need it and also to promote prevention and care for children and the elderly, and we try to promote health through prevention & promotion.

How are you planning to make the three health insurance schemes - Universal Coverage Scheme (UC), Social Security Scheme (SSS) and Civil Servant Medical Benefit Scheme (CSMBS) - equitable for the benefit of the whole population? We do not have a policy to merge the different schemes into a single one, but we do try to harmonize them to reduce inequity in service, quality, and efficiency. Expenditures on our system are currently very high, and although it is not our policy to just cut the budget, we try to harmonize the three health insurance schemes by chaining the management between the three systems by improving the benefit package and bring the quality standards to the same levels. For example we launched the emergency service so that people can go to any place close to them for emergency care. We assigned the National Health Security Office as the clear-

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ing house that will evaluate the spending.

How does MOPH ensure the availability and accessibility of the most innovative drugs at the most competitive prices? In our system we have the responsibility to provide the drugs listed on the Essential Drug List. People may want other drugs not present on the list, in which case they will have to pay for it. We have a monitoring committee to guarantee that also for to Public Health Insurance Scheme we do not limit new drugs, and we are committed to selecting quality drugs for the popu-

Expenditures on our system are currently very high, and although it is not our policy to just cut the budget, we try to harmonize the three health insurance schemes by improving the benefit package and bring the quality standards to the same levels. FOCUS REPORTS


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for treatment longer in order to help the private sector. The visa extension allows for a 90-day stay on a 30-day visa. At the same time we try to network data between welfare state countries for example in the Middle East and to provide patient data to facilitate seamless communication for the reimbursement and financing of the patients so that we can help and promote Thailand as a medical hub. But once again, the Thai people have our main focus!

Although there are currently some regulatory restrictions for foreign direct investment, we already have a Joint Venture for vaccine manufacturing and we can discuss any FDI opportunity on a case by case basis.

lation. Once again, the freedom to choose other drugs is there, but it will be paid by the consumer.

With the ASEAN integration to be completed by 2015, what will be the keys to success in driving Thailand as the go-to location in AsiaPacific for health-related FDI and R&D initiatives, and what is the Ministry doing to unlock their potential? Right now the Government Pharmaceutical Organization is the main agency for drug development within our mandate and within the country. We promote a standard on a par with the ASEAN GMP standard so that our industry can be competitive on the ASEAN market. Right now we are producing and selling within Thailand only, but we are trying to promote Thai traditional medicine, and also other spa products to compete in the ASEAN region once AEC integration is reached in 2015. Although there are currently some regulatory restrictions for foreign direct investment, we already have a Joint Venture for vaccine manufacturing and we can discuss any FDI oopportunity on a case by case basis.

What are the three things you would like them to associate with the Ministry during your tenure? There is only one message: we are committed to providing full health care coverage to the Thai people according to international quality standards for medical care. We try to reduce the gaps between the three medical funds that we mentioned, and also we will reintroduce the thirty Baht scheme, as the integrity of the Thai people to buy care for themselves.

How do you value the status of Thailand as a medical hub and what is your policy to balance the pros and cons? Many international patients visit Thailand every year to receive medical treatment, but to maintain the balance, our first priority is to take care of the nation. We provide universal access to our Thai people first, that is how we weigh our priorities. At the same time, medical tourism is dealt with by the private sector, but we do help through rules and regulations to facilitate international patients. We provide visa extensions for patients and their families in case they need to stay in Thailand

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INTERvIEW WITH:

WITIT ARTAVATKuN, MANAGING DIRECTOR, GPO

What have been the milestones since you took the helm of the GPO five years back? We strive to remain the leader in the domestic market, and in reaching this, our quality standards are of major importance to us. We are realizing a number of new facilities, which combined should double the capacity of GPO’s existing plant in Bangkok. The facilities manufacture according to the World Health Organization’s GMP standards. We are constructing a new, four-floor ARV manufacturing facility for solid dosage forms. The facility in Pratumthani, 40 miles outside of Bangkok, is a 700 million Baht plant with a production capacity of 3.5 billion tablets a year, which could treat an estimated 140,000 people with HIV/AIDS. With this capacity, we will be able to save hundreds of millions of baht each year on drug imports, and it will help speed up distribution of drugs to cover people living with HIV/AIDS. The facility should open its doors in July 2012. We have two vaccine plants coming online as well. One plant will manufacture essential medicines such as anti-AIDS drugs Efavirenz and Lopinavir/Ritonavir, and drugs for diabetes, hypertension, heart disease, hepatitis, psychosis and intestinal diseases, while the other will produce seasonal and pandemic flu vaccines. These facilities, part of our National Vaccine Strategy, will make Thailand one of a few countries in Asia with substantial vaccine-making capability. Obviously, that was nowhere near sufficient, so it is in the interest of national security more not commercial reasons. We produce to cover our population in times of pandemics.

As a country long focused on high quality manufacturing, does Thailand have what it takes to become a pharmaceutical manufacturing

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base for the ASEAN region? Thailand already exports to neighbouring countries, and we expect volumes to increase. The top dozen manufacturers in Thailand are well on their way to adhere to the highest GMP standards and PIC/S, and as such Thai products will be able to compete on the ASEAN market. I believe the country will even be able to compete with manufacturing powerhouses India and China.

Could you please elaborate on the 2011 financial performance and your expectations for 2012? We continued to show strong growth ever since, from 5.5 billion Baht in 2007 to 11 billion Baht in 2011. Profits went from 1 billion to 1.5 billion. The GPO’s profits are used for the public good, such as to produce medicines in response to emergency situations like the influenza pandemic, and to make orphan drugs. A major part of this growth was a result of government policies regarding the universal coverage scheme, but a main part of the growth came also the introduction of a range of new products.

We strive to remain the leader in the domestic market, and in reaching this, our quality standards are of major importance to us. FOCUS REPORTS


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When our new plants come online, we will be able to diversify our portfolio even further and quicker.

ASEAN integration is high on the agenda and viewed as a great opportunity by the private industry to export their products to half a billion people in the region. How do you see the importance of ASEAN markets in GPO’s portfolio develop? ASEAN is bound to mean fiercer competition in the generics business - locally, regionally and beyond ASEAN borders. The GPO does not only focus on serving domestic demand under the Government’s healthcare scheme. We began exporting our products about 10 years ago, starting with neighboring countries. We did this in order to support and fulfill their needs among others under today’s changes in global pathology. Now, we are gearing up to capture opportunities arising from this. The ASEAN region as a whole is of interest to us, but it also is to India, China, and big multinationals such as Pfizer and Bayer. We will have to compete with them, and we are currently in the process of developing an appropriate strategy. We focus special attention on Laos, Cambodia, Myanmar, and Vietnam. In these countries, we are forging strategic partnerships to stimulate our international development, among others in Malaysia. Unfortunately I cannot disclose any further information about this at this moment.

Could you tell our readers about your R&D initiatives and partnerships to transfer technology & know how? The Thai pharmaceutical market is growing and we need to establish strategic partnerships with recognized institutions such as NANOTEC. We will start slowly; we are proceeding carefully because the endeavour is very costly, but the partnership will help upgrade research capabilities of our two agencies and help promote national competitiveness. The focus of our research collaboration will be in the area of cosmetic and drug delivery using nanotechnology. The opportunities for nanotechnology in pharmaceutical manufacturing and development are enormous. It is clear that the international pharmaceutical industry has embraced nanotechnology research in their manufacturing. It is essential for the GPO and NANOTEC to join force and share our expertise if we are to keep pace with drug discovery.

The Thai pharmaceutical market is growing and we need to establish strategic partnerships with recognized institutions such as NANOTEC to upgrade our research capabilities and help promote national competitiveness.

serve the population. Meeting the needs of the population is a challenge, but we also have to balance between serving the national interest and commercial success. We will focus on HIV, heart and cardiovascular diseases, while we are also looking more and more at orphan drugs. It is a big responsibility to bring drugs to the population. Even during crises we safeguard the necessary pharmaceuticals for the public hospitals, at all costs. For me personally, I would like to see GPO as a social enterprise, but still, we need to make a profit. We run our business under the Government’s rule and regulation, only the GPO submits hundreds of millions of Baht a year to the Finance Ministry. These GPO profits are used for the public good, such as to produce medicines in response to emergency situations like the influenza pandemic and to make aforementioned orphan drugs.

What are your plans for the next 5-10 years? First and foremost to boost our capacity to be able to better

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INTERvIEW WITH: CHERNPORN TENGANMuAy, PRESIDENT, TPMA

What do you consider to have been the main milestones and achievements since your inception? Our first milestone will be to open and free the pharmaceutical market in Thailand by breaking the monopoly of government on the industry. The government has a privileged position in the Thai pharmaceutical market through the Government Pharmaceutical Organization, and local industry cannot develop while the government is still our competitor. As of 2015, with the completion of ASEAN integration, opportunities will arise for the member countries to emerge. The free market conditions are expected to apply by 2015 throughout ASEAN and the Government Pharmaceutical Organization will have to abandon its special privileges over the market. However, if we wait until 2015, it will be too late for the local manufacturers to be able to adjust themselves. Nevertheless, we keep up the fight to open up the market earlier.

What share of the market do local manufacturers represent in terms of volume and what are the main growth areas for the pharmaceutical industry in general? There has been little change in the market share in the last decade. The market is dominated by generics in terms of volume. New medicines are coming up and showing good efficacy over the old generics, and we still have to import products. Although Thailand is an open market, there have not been many investments made by the multinationals. There are two main international contract manufacturers and multinationals are re-packing or contract manufacture through these two main companies. It is hard to talk about any local success stories coming out of Thailand due to the dominant government

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Our first milestone will be to open and free the pharmaceutical market in Thailand by breaking the monopoly of government on the industry. policy. However, the revival of the 30 Baht Universal Healthcare Scheme as proposed by the newly elected government will create a big opportunity for the local industry volume-wise. There have been many government tenders and for this reason, the local manufacturers have been growing very fast for the last 5 years as they can produce drugs much cheaper. Thanks to the tendering system, the market can shift in favor of any company that gives the lowest price.

What are the main challenges the national industry is facing and what specific actions is TPMA taking to address these challenges? Currently the main challenge is that local industry is trapped in price competition. The market is big and has been growing fast thanks to the 30 Baht universal health coverage scheme. The government is the biggest client for the industry. 60 % of the market share used to go to the hospital and 40% to the OTC or drugstore market. With the utilization of the 30 Baht Scheme, my feeling is that the market distribution is for the hospitals and OTC drugs shifted for the former and the latter to 70 and 30 %.

The government plan to revive the 30 Baht universal healthcare scheme creates expectations FOCUS REPORTS


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that the industry will be dominated by generics. What opportunities does this represent for the local manufacturers in Thailand? We should first state that the essential drug list is the main factor in the governmentâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s expenditures. That is, the new generics are considered in the essential drug list (EDL) if there is a great improvement from the old generics in terms of price and efficacy. In this case, you get a big opportunity in the governmentâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 30 Baht healthcare scheme. The government has a committee that screens the drugs to decide which generics are suitable for the EDL. However, of course, for the self medication market and private healthcare, some new generics can replace the original products, although not entirely. As they can afford the branded products and do not have to opt for the local generics.

However, as you say 30 Baht scheme will give the upper hand to generics but it not being implemented yet. There are many opponents. What is your opinion? The government has announced it will be implemented. The scheme should be developed into a 50 Baht or 100 Baht medication fee in a co-payment system, which will be a big step for the development of a better healthcare service and system in Thailand. However, naturally once you get the medication for free as it is in the current system another, opposition is inevitable. I believe that co-payment should be implemented for those who can afford it and there should another co-existing

The local industry faces a bigger market with the implementation of GMP standards and ASEAN integration. However, if there are delays in government decisions in this matter, Thailand will lose the opportunity and position in the ASEAN region. FOCUS REPORTS

system that provides free medication for those who cannot.

How large is contract manufacturing today, how does the TPMA ensure the highest GMP standards are met, and what future do your foresee? In the past, contract manufacturing was not an area that interested the local manufacturers due to the propriety of know how. Multinationals went directly to the two main international contract manufacturers in Thailand for 2 reasons. Firstly the confidentiality agreements were very tight for the local companies and secondly the contractors were not feeling comfortable. This used to be a problem but now the situation is different and contract manufacturing is seen as a big opportunity since with the AEC membership, the ASEAN market is opening up. It means much more investment will flow into Thailand as from here you can export throughout ASEAN. Now it is not the only local pharmaceutical industry that is interested in being contract manufacturers but the multinationals also re-consider make their own investments in the ASEAN. The opportunities are coming up, Thailand should make a big move to invite pharmaceutical companies to invest in Thailand. Regarding the GMP standards, the local industry has learned and improved a lot in the last 5 years. Thai FDA applied for PIC/S membership. The entire local industry now has to comply with the PIC/S GMP. As TPMA, we also run a project for PIC/S GMP training and approval. Twenty factories entered the program under PIC/S scheme and 10 of them have been approved by Thai FDA. By 2015, many will be ready to get involved in contract manufacturer.

Would you give a projection on the future of the pharmaceutical industry in Thailand? The year 2015 is our final target: the market should be completely open by then. The GPO privileges will have disappeared and our industry will be able to compete with all of the ASEAN manufacturers. The local industry faces a bigger market with the implementation of GMP standards and ASEAN integration. However, if there are delays in government decisions in this matter, Thailand will lose the opportunity and position in the ASEAN region. Furthermore, the Thai market is sizable and fit for investment. With government policies on healthcare support Thai people will reach good treatment and medicines. Thailand is the best location for investment in the region, and the government should take the opportunity to invite more investors.

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INTERvIEW WITH:

DR. KANyAWIM KIRTIKARA, ExECuTIVE DIRECTOR, BIOTEC

As one of the figureheads of the biotech industry in Thailand, could you introduce your organization to our readers? When I started with BIOTEC it was a small government outlet under the umbrella of NSTDA. At that time, the role of BIOTEC was to promote R&D in Thailand, to conduct research and to transfer technology. At that time, the national center would support the funding and would conduct the in-house research itself as well as promoting human resources development in the field of biotechnology. The mission is still the same: we do R&D, infrastructure development, and human resources development. Each national center within the scope of NSTDA has the duty to promote a platform for technology. BIOTEC for instance set up the genome institute, so that we can promote genome technology and functional genomics research.

What have been the results of the National Policy Framework (2004-2011) compared to the expectations? The first framework ran from 2004 to 2009 and had several major goals from turning Thailand into the kitchen of the world to promoting Thailand as a hub for health care. HR development was another main focus, as it is the foundation for everything else to develop from. The percentage of researchers in Thailand in comparison to developed countries is still relatively low, especially when talking about biotechnology. Also, at the time we wanted to promote private companies in Thailand. After the first Framework was completed, we evaluated the first five years. During 2000-2009, 120 new biotech companies were established. The growth rate of 10 percent was

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set before 2004 and increased to 15 percent afterwards. Currently we are drafting a second National Policy Framework to run from 2012 to 2021 aiming at specific target groups: rural communities, SMEs, large biotech companies, and the R&D community.

Where does life science fit in Thailandâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s biotech landscape? In terms of life sciences, we see more companies that are providing biotechnology related services, for example stem cell technology and diagnostic technology. Activity in major small molecules is limited at the moment, but I see much potential for biologics in proteins and vaccines.

How successful has BIOTEC been in making biotechnology a key area for investment for the country? The Board of Investment (BOI) is very important in this. The BOI set up a special policy providing maximum incentives such as 8-year tax exemptions for six categories of biotech business. At the end of Phase I of the development of the Science Park in 2007, most spaces for private companies were filled up. Sixty companies have a home here currently, one-third are biotechnology and related companies. As a national center we conduct research with these companies and support R&D. A sizable new building is erected under Phase II which will double the usage space, with which the Park aims to attract 200 more companies. In terms of infrastructure development, BIOTEC and KMUTT jointly established National Biopharmaceutical Facility (NBF, http://www.nbf.kmutt.ac.th/) as Thailandâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s prime manufacturing site for biopharmaceuticals. The unit serves as a center of excellence in science and technology to ensure self-reliance in the country for the production of drugs, vaccines and other highvalue biomedical and biopharmaceutical products. Right now it is being equipped, and the first module will open very soon.

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With AEC integration approaching, we are hoping to be a major facilitator of biotechnology not only in Thailand, but in South East Asia. The facility, based at KMUTT Industrial Park Center, will have the dual purpose of serving as a training ground to build up Human Resources and as a centre for transfer of knowledge from the lab to the real industry, while it will also be a launching pad for industry from abroad that would like to come to Thailand and establish a small production plant.

Does the Thai educational system have what it takes to deliver the top notch quality researchers needed? Thailand uses a different model compared to Singapore. Rather than spending large sums to attract big scientists from abroad, Thailand chooses to build up the capacity of its people. The Thai government is very supportive in giving out scholarships to support the cream of the crops to study abroad, with the requirement that they come back to work in Thailand after completion of their studies. Various schemes such as the Royal Golden Jubilee Program and the Thailand Graduate Institute of Science and Technology (TGIST, www.nstda.or.th/tgist) help to structurally build up human resource capacity in the biotechnology field.

How do you assess Thailand’s positioning and competitive edge on the regional map in terms of R&D? Thailand is very well located and we are actively extending our relations with neighbouring countries. Within the group Thailand, Cambodia, Vietnam, and Laos, our country can look at itself as an R&D training hub for its neighbours. For instance, Thailand has a human resource training program in biotechnology started in 2001 with Cambodia, Vietnam, Laos, and Myanmar, allowing their scientists to come work in our lab for three to six month periods. (http://www.biotec.or.th/en/index.php/

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international-collaboration/hrd-program) Each year we select 10-15 scientists on a competitive basis. The program covers the whole of Asia Pacific, up to Mongolia and the Fiji Islands! We follow participants’ progress after completion, and the majority continues with an excellent career. Several research collaborations have resulted from this Program, such as a joint research on insect-pathogenic fungi with two institutes in Vietnam, molecular rice breeding with Mekong-region countries (Laos, Myanmar and Cambodia) and animal vaccine research with Vietnam. We build up a quality network through this program and it leads to good relations with our neighbours. This is the kind of initiative that shapes the image of Thailand as a supportive friend, which is highly valuable for future cooperation. Strengthened regional cooperation also offers the possibility to create leverage on an international scale.

Thailand is very strong at phase 3 & 4, but what is the potential for Thailand to develop its capacity for phase 1 & 2 clinical research? Several things have to be taken into account. In biotechnology we talk about setting up the biotechnology fund from a higher level to bridge the gap between upstream and downstream by translating research. That is built into the condition of the second National Policy Framework, as it is especially relevant for biotechnology, where more time is needed to reach maturity and the success rates are modest. In terms of promoting the industry, the Office of Science and Technology is talking about adding several schemes, for example to allow Thai scholars that return from abroad, usually destined to come back to work for the government because of the scholarship obligations, to work directly for the private sector in an effort to better divide resources between government labs and industry.

Would you outline what your hopes are for the future of biotech in Thailand? I would like to see more Thai companies turn to biotechnology to boost their competitiveness. There are a lot of small companies interested in using biotechnology, but they might lack some funds to begin with. Companies can take advantage of Thailand’s strong human resource and infrastructure foundation. BIOTEC is strongly committed to developing and promoting Thailand’s biotechnology. With AEC integration approaching, we are hoping to be a major facilitator of biotechnology not only in Thailand, but in South East Asia. We have already built up good relationships and are well on our way to realizing this.

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INTERvIEW WITH: RACHOD THAKOLSRI, MANAGING DIRECTOR, BIOLAB

What have been the main milestones and achievements of the company since we last met in 2007? We reached major success in 1999, when we became the first ASEAN pharmaceutical manufacturer which was accredited with ISO 9001. Back then, most companies were accredited with ISO 9002 and ISO 9001 actually included criteria for R&D activities. In 2009 we received the PIC/S and we became the first Thai producer to adhere to EU GMP. In 2011 we received the certification again, and we still are the only Thai pharmaceutical producer to adhere to this standard. In 2009 the Thai FDA presented us with their Quality Award. More than 100.000 companies from the medical equipment, pharmaceutical, cosmetics, and food industries participated, out of which 22 were selected, just two of which were pharmaceutical companies.

Thailand is not a member of PIC/S yet, but we see an increased focus on quality standards. How much of a challenge is it to stay ahead of the rest? The issue in Thailand is that 80 percent of the market is for the government hospitals, and their procurement method is solely based on price. Whether or not to pursue membership of PIC/S is a tough decision, because it also means that we have to increase our cost, which influences our competitiveness. Most of our competitors did not yet start to invest in these quality standards. Biolab started in 2003 and for us as well it was a difficult decision to take. We had a big discussion with our marketing team about whether we were not making the investment prematurely, and they actually believed it was too early. In return we kept the promise to keep costs low throughout the application procedure, which is also the

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reason why we are still the number three biggest Thai manufacturer in sales volumes. We discussed also with our marketing arm whether we should aim to become number one in terms of volumes, we decided not to. If we would aim for that it would mean we would have to focus on competitiveness solely based on price instead of quality, which in turn would mean we would miss our opportunity to be complied with international quality standards. It took us six years, from 2003 to 2009, to comply to the EU GMP standards.

What makes you the partner of choice for contract manufacturing as opposed to well-established manufacturers such as Olic? We will start producing for Pfizer towards the end of the year, and for other partners we aim for 2014. Today the revenue from contract manufacturing is only two percent, but we ex-

In 2009 we received the PIC/S and became the first Thai producer to adhere to EU GMP, and we still are the only Thai pharmaceutical producer to adhere to this standard. FOCUS REPORTS


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We do not only believe in know-how, but also in know-why, which means that we apply technology and quality in a sensible way to add real value for our customers.

pect this number to increase to fifteen percent in coming years. This is a strategic time to invest in PIC/S, because in two or three years the picture might look very different. Japan for instance announced that it will increase its budget for generic product from 17 percent to 30 percent, and in Korea we see similar developments. That is why producers from these countries come to us; even if they would want to produce generics, they could not do so at low costs. Biolab will still have to improve further, and we are preparing a second round of investment. For the first round the Board of Investment granted us tax exemptions, and we plan to apply for the same exemptions for the second round. We hope to have it approved in a couple of months. Establishing Biolab as a contract manufacturer was not part of our strategic plan. Even before the renovation of our facilities starting in 2003 we were already contract manufacturing for Boots and Astellas, back then Fujisawa. At the time we hoped that the Thai FDA would go strict in regards of GMP. We have to see these decisions in the light of the confusion at the time about whether Indian and Chinese competitors would choose to first focus on regional markets or whether they would go to the international markets straight away. They ended up doing the latter, but we know that they will come to our markets as well, and EU GMP should be seen a safeguard against Chinese and Indian competition. We discussed the matter extensively with the Thai FDA and the Thai Pharmaceutical Manufacturers Association, but it is not what happened. Many of our peers did not even start upgrading today and are awaiting the final FDA announcement of its PIC/S membership. The process has been dragging on since 2003, with the FDA only last year finally announcing this.

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How will you capture the opportunities arising from ASEAN integration? Thailand as a country is open to trade and does not have tariff barriers. With the establishment of AEC we hope that all ASEAN member countries will open up registration procedures, but so far I am cautious. The most relevant aspect of ASEAN integration for me is Indonesia, because most other countries in the region, including Thailand, already have quite open trade regimes, and if we wanted to be there, we could. Indonesia is of course very big and offers high opportunities, while the competition of their industry might not be as intense as in Thailand. While we are focusing on our home region, we are also looking beyond ASEAN, to Japan, South Africa, and Australia, where we already have partners and are registering our products. We also have a partner in Germany and have already scheduled the visit of a German auditor in November this year for our facility. This would open up opportunities in Europe as well as the Middle East.

What is your vision and what are your corporate objectives for the coming years and what is your corporate strategy to ensure that Biolab achieves these goals? We hope that we will qualify with the German audit by the end of this year. It will bring yet two other regions within our reach, Europe and the Middle East. We also are in contact with a potential American partner, and after Europe and the Middle East we might go to the US. We will take it slow however, because there are many examples of companies expanding too quickly and getting lost in their home market as a result. The home market and the surrounding region is where Biolab will have to secure itself first. We firmly believe in quality, and are fully committed to our high standards. We do not only believe in know-how, but also in knowwhy, which means that we apply technology and quality in a sensible way to add real value for our customers. We teach our people not to just follow the SOP, but to understand why we ask them to follow it, and I am convinced this makes us more stable in terms of quality. Having said that, cost is also a major incentive for our customers, and we will continue to combine top-notch quality with interesting cost-reduction programs. I always tell my customers to approach Biolab as insurance. You pay a bit more than with Indian or Chinese manufacturers, but it means that quality is guaranteed!

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INTERvIEW WITH: AMAN BHATTACHARJEE, MANAGING DIRECTOR, MERCK THAILAND

discrepancy?

According to 2011 figures of PReMA, there was only 2 percent growth projected last year, and for this year some even expect ďŹ&#x201A;at growth. Nonetheless the IMS ranks Thailand on the 12th place among the pharmerging countries. How do you explain this

Although the market is dealing with the governmentâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s price containment measures and medium price, the growth is not flat. For Q1 of this year, it is set at seven percent. Some say that this is part of the replenishing of stock in the aftermath of last yearâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s flood, but this does not go for Merck. Thailand is a mature market in comparison to other emerging countries. The maximum value generation comes from multinationals, whereas the government sector contributes to the volume, not the value. It is a typical mix in which generics sales are done through the government sector, and the value comes from the private sector. Merck however is more balanced; we have products in oncology, fertility, and endocrinology, that go into the high tier sector, where cloning the product is not possible. But Merck also has diabetes and cardiology products in the market, which have been around for fifteen years and where we hence see a brand acceptance. Therefore Merck is differently placed from most companies: our niche is highly focused on the government sector when it comes to generics, and private sector for specialities.

Merck last year generated 2 billion baht in sales and expects to continue the double digit growth and double sales in three years. Could you please tell us about the winner strategy and how you manage to drive growth despite

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the challenges of cost-containment? Doubling the sales goes not just for Thailand but for the whole of Indochina. In Thailand we have geographically expanded outside of Bangkok and are focused not just on the private sector but on the government sector as well, while most MNCs focus solely on the private sector. However, the government segment offers big business in terms of volume, so that base is needed to grow and sustain the business. Over the years, companies lose their value in Thailand because their commodities become cheaper and cheaper, but the company has to ensure that production costs come down and volumes go significantly up. Merck is doing this nicely, and in high-growth segments on top of that such as oncology and fertility. We furthermore work with two contract manufacturers, Olic and Interthai, to which we are looking for support in supplying the economies in ASEAN. We feel that Thailand has an edge as a manufacturing hub. Our two contract manufacturers are still highly attractive in the regional perspective. Perhaps Thailand still knows capacity constraints, but I expect this to be solved soon through targeted investments of Thai manufacturers. However, because the Merck products are high cost and low volume, this does not provide an obstacle to us.

Merck is actively urging the government to promote and incentivize R&D efforts. What role can Merck play and what kind of initiatives are you putting in place on behalf of Merck Thailand? Unfortunately the government focuses on areas such as biotechnology and life science, but not so much pharmaceuticals. Merck researched the R&D matter two years ago. Investors prefer to go to Hong Kong, Singapore, Malaysia, because the governments of these countries offer targeted incentives. Home-grown research has only come up in Thailand in the last three to five years because of government policies. Before, the

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I follow a policy of nothing ventured, nothing gained: if you do not take risks, you will not win. The pharmaceutical market is growing in Thailand and in Indochina, and we will use our resources in Thailand to look at this external market.

government was only interested in receiving investment for production. The government says it will grow R&D investment rates at 17 percent, but it comes from a very low base. Something big needs to be done here if the government wants to really rake in technology. The Singaporean model offers a great example. The Singaporean government offers companies infrastructure, and orders in return to bring investment in and use 30 to 40 percent of the employees for research. In exchange the company gets a 3-5 year tax exemption. The system is a great trade-off; by offering infrastructure, jobs and knowledge are created.

How are you positioning Merck Millipore in Thailand and what kind of opportunities do you see in bio-research and bio-production in Thailand? I see very positive developments here. We are growing at 200 percent, although coming from a small base. When it comes to biotechnology the government is serious; I believe the government is emulating what Malaysia has done, but it will still take 3-5 years before we can say whether Thailand really made a success out of it. Merck acquired Millipore at the right time. Our high, double digit growth is based in large on our growth in life sciences through Millipore.

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A lot of scientists need our support to understand what research field to get into and for product support. Some of them are also collaborating with research institutes globally. When doing research, 40 percent of expenditure goes to chemicals, and Merck can deliver those, and the Merck Millipore acquisition really helps in this. Our growth ambition for this year is 17 percent in the Merck Millipore life science range, and this is mainly coming from government investments into R&D. Vaccine production is also a very interesting segment in Thailand. Until last year, 70-80 percent of vaccines were imported. Producing vaccines is not very complicated; the key is securing the right ingredients. We are working with GPO on vaccine production, and Merck is one of the active partners along with Novo Nordisk and Sanofi Pasteur. Our trials have been very successful so far.

If we were to come back three years from now, where will you have taken the operations of Merck? I follow a policy of nothing ventured, nothing gained: if you do not take risks, you will not win. We take calculated risks in terms of investing, in terms of understanding what the future is. The pharmaceutical market is growing in Thailand and in Indochina and we will use our resources in Thailand to look at this external market. In the coming years I see us growing double digit annually, mainly driven from the chemical business, life science, and by growing pharmaceuticals higher than market- and GDP growth.

What is your vision for bringing Merckâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s high quality medicine to the Thai population in the future? Every pharmaceutical company has to differentiate itself from others if it wants to grow. We cannot all do the same thing. Merck has been the first company to innovate its approach through engaging society, our people, and the community. We also balance between generics and niche products. Any company that is only into one of those segments faces difficult times. We need to have economies of scale both in terms of cost optimization as well as in terms of innovative marketing.

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Exclusive interviews More interviews available on www.pharma.focusreports.net:

Alan Adcock, Tiziana Sucharitkul and Darani Vachanavuttivong, Managing Partners, Tilleke&Gibbins

Dr. Rolf Ammelburg, General Manager, Roche Thailand

Mark Brown, Country Head, Invida

Hans Dujf, Country Manager, Novo Nordisk Thailand

Yves Hermes, CEO, Zuellig Pharma

Prakarn Kunothai, Country Manager, Great Eastern Drug

Richard Parnell, Country Head, Quintiles Thailand

Heike Prinz, General Manager, Bayer Thailand

Reginald Seeto, Country President, AstraZeneca Thailand

Sirirug Sonsivilai, Executive Director, NANOTEC

Emin Turan, Managing Director, Sanofi Pasteur Thailand

Dr. Kitima Yuthavong, CEO, PReMA

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Company directory Government BIOTEC 113 Science Park Phahonyothin Road Klong 1, Klong Luang Pathumthani 12120 +66 2564 6700 Government Pharmaceutical Office (GPO) 75/1 Rama VI Road, Ratchathewi, Bangkok 10400, +66 2203 8099 Ministry of Public Health Tivanond Road, Nonthaburi 11000, . +66 2590 2028 NANOTEC 111 Science Park Phahonyothin Road Klong 1, Klong Luang Pathumthani 12120 +66 2564 7100 National Health Security Office (NHSO) Building B 120 Moo 3 Chaengwattana Road, Lak Si District, Bangkok 10210 +66 2141 4025 National Vaccine Institute Tiwanond Rd., Muang Nothaburi 11000 +66 2590 3196-9

ASSOCIATIONS AMCHAM 7th Floor, GPF Witthayu Tower A 93/1 Wireless Road, Lumpini, Pathumwan, Bangkok 10330 +66 2254 1041 PReMa 408/85, 19th Floor, Phaholyothin Place Bldg. Phaholyothin Road Samsennai, Phayathai Bangkok 10400 +66 2619 0232 Thai Medical Device Technology Industry Association 11th Fl., Dr. Gerhard Link Bldg., 88 Krungthepkreetha Rd., Huamark, Bangkapi, Bangkok 10240 +66 2379 4279-80 Thai Pharmaceutical Manufacturers Association The 188/107 Jaransanitwong. Road House founder Bangkok Noi district, Bangkok 10700 +66 2863 5106

PHARMACEUTICAL COMPANIES

AstraZeneca 19th Floor, Asia Center Building 173/20 South Sathorn Road,Thungmahamek, Sathorn, Bangkok, 10120 +66 2739 7400 Atlantic Laboratories 2038 Sukumvit Road, Bangchak, Phrakanong, Bangkok 10250, +66 2311-0111 Baxter 28/19 Moo 4 Soi 36 Changwattana Rd., Bangtalad, Pakkred, Nonthaburi, 11120 +66 2667 0505 Bayer 28/19 Moo 4 Soi 36 Changwattana Rd., Bangtalad, Pakkred, Nonthaburi, 11120 +66 2831 4900 Berlin Pharmaceuticals 1575 New Petchburi Road, Makkasan, Ratthevee, Bangkok 10400, +66 2225 4261 Biolab 7th Floor, Bio House Building, 55 Sukhumvit 39 Road, Bangkok 10110, +66 2258-0575 BMS 17th Fl., Exchange Tower, 388 Sukhumvit Rd., Klongtoey, Bangkok, 10110 +66 2725 1400

Queen Saovbha Memorial Insititute 1871 Rama 4 Road, Pathumwan Bangkok +66 2252 0161-4

Abbot 5th, 5A and 9th Fl., Nai Lert Tower, 2/4 Wireless Rd., Lumpini, Pathumwan, Bangkok 10300 +66 2657 5555

FDA Tiwanon Road Nothaburi 11000 +66 2590 7001

Allergan 971,973 President tower 11th floor, Ploenchit Road, Lumpini, Pathumwan, +66 2612 0371-5

Boehringher Ingelheim 12th Fl., Charn Issara Tower New Petchburi Rd., Bangkapi, Huaykwang, Bangkok, 10320 +66 2308 8500

The Board of Investment (BOI) 555 Vibhavadi-Rangsit Rd.,Chatuchak, Bangkok 10900, +66 2553 8111

Astellas 10th Fl., Wave Place , 55 Wireless Rd., Lumpini, Patumwan, Bangkok 10330 +66 2665 4050

Daichii Sankyo 10th Fl., Boonmitr Bldg., 138 Silom Rd., Bangrak, Bangkok, 10500 +66 2634 3401

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Eisai 6th Fl., GPF Witthayu Tower A, 93/1, Wireless Rd., Pathumwan, Lumpini, Bangkok 10330 +66 2256 6296-8 Eli Lilly 14th Floor, Thanapoom Tower, 1550 New Petchburi Rd., Makasan, Rachtavee, Bangkok 10400 +66 2207 0920 Great Eastern Drug Thai Wah Tower I, 18th Floor., 21/52-54 South Sathorn Road, Tungmahamek, Sathorn, Bangkok 10120 +66 2850 33948 Greater Pharma 46, 46/1-2 Soi Charansanitwong 40, Charansanitwong RDBangyikhun, Bangplad, Bangkok 10700 . +66 2886 8190-9 Jannsen Cilag 106 Moo 4, Ladkrabang Industrial Estate, Chalongkrung Rd., Lamplatew, Ladkrabang Bangkok 10520 +66 2739 7200 LBS Laboratory 602 Soi Panichanant, Sukhumvit 71 Rd. BANGKOK 10110 - . +66 2392 4082 , M & H Manufacturing Co., Ltd. 41 Sukhumvit Road, Paknam, Amphur Muang, Samutprakarn 10270, . +66 2394 2121

Merck 19th Fl., Emporium Tower, 622 Sukhumvit Rd. Klongton, Klongtoey, Bangkok 10110 +66 2667 8000

Servier Ploenchit Center Building, 15th Floor, 2 Sukhumvit Klongtoey +66 2656 8388

MSD 37th Fl., The Offices at Central World, 999/9 Rama 1 Rd., Lumpini, Pathumwan, Bangkok 10330 +66 2262 5700

Siam Pharma 551, 2nd Floor, Soi Sukhumvit 103,Sukhumvit Rd., Bangjak, Phrakanong, +66 2398-4401

Novartis 14 th/1-5, 15th/1-8 Fl., 622 Emporium Tower, Sukhumvit Rd., Klongton, Klongtoey, Bangkok 10110 +66 2685 0999 Novo Nordisk 139 Sethiwan Tower, 4th Floor, Pan Road, Silom, Bangkok 10500 +66 2237 9263-4 Otsuka 33rd Fl., Q.House Lumpini Building, 1 South Sathorn Rd., Tungmahamek, Sathorn, Bangkok 10120 +66 2401 9560 Pfizer 36-38th and 42nd Fl., United Center Bldg., 323 Silom Rd., Silom, Bangrak, Bangkok 10500 +66 2665 4555 Roche 27-29th Fl., Rasa Tower II, 555 Phaholyothin Rd., Chatuchak, Bangkok 10900 +66 2918 2500

Mega Life Sciences 384 Soi 6, Pattana 3 Rd., Bangpoo Industrial Estate, Samutprakarn 10280 +66 2401-8686

Sanofi Aventis 24th Fl., CRC Tower, 87/2 All Seasons Place, Wireless Rd., Lumpini, Pathumwan, Bangkok 10330 +66 2264 9999

Meiji 26th Fl., Lake Rajada Office Bldg., 193/106-107 Ratchadaphisek Rd., Klongtoey, Klongtoey, Bangkok +66 2661 8100-5

Sanofi Pasteur 24th Fl., CRC Tower, 87/2 All Seasons Place, Wireless Rd., Lumpini, Pathumwan, Bangkok 10330 +66 2264 883

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Silom Medical 35/3 Soi Supharat 1, Phaholyothin Road, Pyathai, Bangkok 10400, +66 2272-6890-4 Sriprasit Pharma 619 Charoenrat Road, Klongsarn, Bangkok 10600, +66 2437-0343 Takeda 10th Fl., Rajanakarn Bldg., 183 South Sathorn Rd., Yannawa, Sathorn, Bangkok 10120 +66 2676 6770 - 9 Thai Nakorn Patana 94/7 Ngamwongwan 8, Ngamwongwan Road, Amphur Muang, Nonthaburi 11000, +66 2555-9999 Unison laboratories 39 Moo 4, Klong Udomcholjorn Muang Chachoengsao Chachoengsao 24000 +66 38564930-32

CONTRACT MANUFACTURERS Olic 594 Luang Rd. Pomprab, Bangkok 10100 +66 2220-9000 Pharma Industries 1899 Phaholyothin 39, Jatuchak +66 2294-1299 FOCUS REPORTS


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Herbal Medicine Companies Hatakabb 80 / 3-4 Rama 2 Road., Takham, Bangkuntien, Bangkok 10150, +66 2415-1401 Kankee Namtaothong Co., Ltd. 1128 Chareannakorn Rd. Clongsarn Bangkok 10600 +66 2437-0131-2 KHAOLAOR Laboratories Co., Ltd. 146/22 Suksawad Rd., Prasamutchedi, Samutprakarn 10290 . +66 2819-1991-5 Penpark 999, Moo 18, Soi Sappirin, ThammasartChiangrak Rd., Rd., Klongnuang,, Klongluang,, Pathumthani +66 2153-4115-20 Siribuncha Co.,Ltd. 37 Sukhumv Soi Vasiratummasatit Sukhumvit 101/1 Bangjak Prakanong, Bangkok 10260 +66 2393-0145

SERvICE PROvIDERS Baker&McKenzie 5th and 22nd - 25th Fl., 990 Abdulrahim Place, Rama IV Rd., Silom, Bangrak, Bangkok 10500 +66 2636-2000 Cegedim 27th Fl., Q-House Lumpini Bldg., 1 South Sathorn Rd., Tungmahamek, Sathorn, Bangkok 10120 +66 2610-3656 IMS 16th Fl., Ploenchit Center Bldg., 2 Sukhumvit Rd., Klongtoey, Bangkok 10110 +66 2656-9123-6 Tilleke&Gibbins Supalai Grand Tower, 26th Floor, 1011 Rama 3 Road, Chongnonsi, Yannawa, Bangkok 10120 +66 2653 5555 FOCUS REPORTS

DISTRIBUTORS BJC 9th Fl., Berli Jucker Bldg., 99 Soi Rubia, Sukhumvit 42 Rd., Phakanong, Klongtoey, Bangkok, 10110 +66 2367-1243-4 DKSH 2355 Sukhumvit Road, Bangchak, Prakhanong 10260 Bangkok +66 2790 8000 IHC Heathcare 23rd. Floor, Olympia Thai Tower, 444 Ratchadapisek Road, Samsennok, Huay Kwang, Bangkok10320, +66 2513-0682 Invida 2 Ploenchit Center, 6th Fl., Sukhumvit Rd., Klongtoey, Klongtoey, Bangkok 10110 +66 2696-8500 Pacific Healthcare 36-38th and 42nd Fl., United Center Bldg., 323 Silom Rd., Silom, Bangrak, Bangkok 10500 +66 2665-4555 US Summit 52/184 Ramkamhaeng Rd., Hua Mark, Bangkapi, Bangkok 10240 +66 2734-4777 Zuellig 8-9th Fl. Ploenchit Center Bldg., 2 Sukhumvit Rd., Klongtoey, Bangkok 10110 +66 2656-9800

BIOTECH Bionet Asia 19 Soi Udomsuk 37, Sukhumvit 103 road,Bangjak, Prakanong, Bangkok 10260, +66 2361-8110 Eppendorf Dr. Gerhard Link Building 88, Krungthepkreetha Road, +66 2379-4212

I+Med 33/4 The 9th Tower, # B25, Rama 9 Road, Huay Kwang, Bangkok 10310 +66 2643-2558 Innova Biotech Boromrachonnani Road 71 +66 2884-6989 Siam Bioscience 44 Srijulsup Tower 18th Floor RamaI Road, Pathumwan +66 2613-9939

CRO Aclires 22nd Fl., Sathorn City Tower, 175 South Sathorn Rd., Sathorn, Bangkok 10120 +66 2412-1315 Covance 1 Q House Lumpini, Level 27th, South Sathorn Road, Tungmahamek +66 2610-3669 ICON Clinical Research Q House Lumpini 1 South Sathorn Rd., Level 27, Tungmahamek, Sathorn +66 2610-3671-5 INC Research 23/F M Thai Tower All Seasons Place 87 Wireless Road Lumpini, Phatumwan Bangkok, 10330 +66 2627-9413 Parexel 10 Flr., Zone AB, Q. House Sathorn Bld., 11 South Sathorn Rd., Tungmahamek, Sathorn +66 2679-2500 Pharmanet Clinical Trial Services 23/F, M Thai Tower, All Seasons Place 87 Wireless Road Lumpini, Phatumwan Bangkok 10330 +66 2627-9125 July 2012

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Quintiles 17th Floor, Room No. 4, Silom Complex Building 191 Silom Road, Kwaeng Silom Khet Bangrak, Bangkok 10500 +66 2686-2600 SGS 100 Nanglinchee Road, Chongnonsee Yannawa 10120 Bangkok +66 2678-1813

MEDICAL DEvICES

Boston Scientifc 20th Fl., Tisco Tower 48/47 North Sathorn Rd., Silom, Bangrak, Bangkok 10500 Carl Zeiss 8th Fl., Land and Tower, 230 Rajchadapisek Rd., Huaykwang, Bangkok 10320 +66 2274-0643-5 Covidien 14/F, Berli Jucker Bldg. 99 Soi Rubia, Sukhumvit 42 Rd. Prakanong, Klong Toei Bangkok 10110 +66 2367 1224 - 7

3M 12th Fl., Sermmit Tower 159 Asoke Rd., Klongtoey Nua, Wattana, Bangkok 10110 +66 2260-8577

GE Medical Systems 32nd Thanapoom Tower, 1550 New Petchburi Rd., Makasan, Rajthewi, Bangkok 10400 +66 2624-8444

Bausch & Lomb 98 Sathorn Square Office Tower, 19th Floor, Unit 1909-12, North Sathorn Road, Silom, Bangrak, Bangkok 10500 +66 2643-7888

Global Medical Solutions 1201/81 1st Fl., Ladprao 94 (Panchamit), Wangthonglang, Bangkok 10310 +66 2559-2740-5

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Kawasumi Laboratories Navanakorn Industrial Promotion Zone 4 55/26 Phaholyothin Road, Km. 46, Pathumthani 12120, +66 2529 2620-5 Medtronic 323 United Center Unit 2501-4 25th Fl., Silom Road, Silom, Bangrak District, Bangkok 10500 +66 2232-7400 Molnlycke Healthcare 124 Moo 7 Soi Wat Kamphang Rama II Rd Bangkhuntien Bangkok 10150 +66 2416 4940 - 4 Philips 26th-28th Fl., Thai Summit Tower, 1768 New Petchburi Rd., Bangkapi, Huaykwang, Bangkok 10320 +66 2614-3333 Siemens 35th Fl., Charn Issara Tower II, 2922/333 New Petchburi Rd., Bangkapi Huaykwang, Bangkok 10310 +66 2715-4000

FOCUS REPORTS


Pharma.FocusReports.net

COMPANy INDEx A.N.B. .......................................................... 6

Novartis ...................................................... 7

Astellas ..................................................... 19

Novo Nordisk............................................ 21

Bangkok Hospital Group ........................... 6

NSTDA ....................................................... 16

Bayer ......................................................... 13

Olic ...................................................... 18, 20

Biolab .............................................. 6, 18, 19

Pfizer ............................................... 6, 13, 18

Biotec .............................................. 9, 16, 17

PReMA .................................................. 8, 20

Boots ......................................................... 19

Quintiles ..................................................... 8

Fujisawa .................................................... 19

Sanofi .......................................................... 7

GPO ..................................... 7, 12, 13, 14, 15

Sanofi Pasteur Thailand....................... 9, 21

Great Eastern Drug ................................ 6, 7

Temasek Holdings ...................................... 8

IMS ........................................................ 8, 20

Thai FDA ....................................... 15, 18, 19

Interthai .................................................... 20

Thai Ministry of Finance .......................... 13

Invida .......................................................... 8

Thai Ministry of Public Health... 6, 9, 10, 11

KMUTT ................................................ 16, 17

Thai Office of Science and Technology... 17

Mahidol University .................................... 9

TGIST ......................................................... 17

Merck .......................................... 8, 9, 20, 21

TPMA......................................... 6, 14, 15, 19

Merck Millipore ........................................ 21

Unilab.......................................................... 6

NANOTEC .................................................. 13

World Health Organization ..................... 12

National Biopharmaceutical Facility ....... 16

Zuellig Group.............................................. 8

FOCUS REPORTS

July 2012

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PAST REPORTS

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July 2012

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FOCUS REPORTS

July 2012

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FOCUS REPORTS


Pharmaceuticals Thailand report 2012