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Pharma report February 2012

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Acknowledgements Focus Reports would like to thank Lauro Moretto and Nelson Mussolini (Sindusfarma), Odnir Finotti (Pro Genericos) and Luis Fernando Buainain (Abafarma) for information and contacts (the associations), to Dirceu Barbano (ANVISA) and for all the companies supporting the report.

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This report was prepared by Focus Reports Project Director: Arthur Thuot Project Coordinator: Mariuca Georgescu Contributors: Chiraz Bensemmane Corissa Koopmans Henrique Bezerra Project Supervisor: Ines Nandin

Contents Acknowledgements ................................................................................3 BRAZIL: A Bold Player Blooms .............................................................. 7 Shipping Up, Shaping Up ......................................................................12 Attack of the Taxes ...............................................................................15 Consolidation Nation.............................................................................16 Exportation Expectations .....................................................................18 Generic Sermon .....................................................................................19 Regulation Consternation......................................................................22 Eurasian Invasion...................................................................................24 Logically Biological................................................................................24 Awareness, Awareness, Awareness .....................................................27 Orphan Drugs: Please, Sir, Can We Have Some More? .......................28 Swing Your Partner: Doing the Samba Square-dance.........................28 Interview with Dirceu Barbano, President of ANVISA.......................34 Interview with Nelson Mussolini, Executive Director of SINDUSFARMA.................................................36 Interview with Claudio Bergamo, CEO of Hypermarcas ...................38 Interview with Avi Meizler President and Founder, Meizler Biopharma ....................................... 40 Interview with Heraldo Marchezini President, Sanofi Brazil ..........................................................................42

Copyright Š All rights reserved. No part of this publication maybe reproduced in any form or by any means, whether electronic, mechanical or otherwise including photocopying, recording or any information storage or retrieval system without prior written consent of Focus Reports. While every attempt is made to ensure the accuracy of the information contained in this report, neither Focus Reports, neither the authors accept any liabilities for errors and omissions. Opinions expressed in this report are not necessarily those of the authors.

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Interview with Martin Nelzow President, Boehringer Ingelheim .........................................................44 List of exclusive interviews available on pharma.focusreports.net........................................................................46 Directory..................................................................................................48 Index........................................................................................................50 Past reports ............................................................................................51

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country report

BRAZIL:

A Bold Player Blooms

“I

f I were to suggest a title for your report,” says Antônio Britto, “it would be, ‘Trying to Fly’.” Britto, a former state governor and federal minister, and currently executive president of Interfarma, the association representing researchbased pharma companies in Brazil, reflects a more optimistic view than in 2007. The last time Focus Reports visited the country, executives were rife with the old saw, “Brazil is the country of the future—and will always be.” Now, however, they speak in different terms. Brazil was the last country to enter the financial crisis, and the first to exit. As the host of both the 2014 World Cup and the XXXII Olympiad in 2016, and as a country cleaning out corruption from its highest offices, it is emerging from a decade which saw 40 million of its 200 million inhabitants joining the middle class, and creating a new block of “pharmerging” consumers.

Cover art by Sebastião Rodrigues. Courtesy of the artist.

This sponsored supplement was produced by Focus Reports. Project Director: Arthur Thuot Project Coordinator: Mariuca Georgescu Contributors: Chiraz Bensemmane Corissa Koopmans Henrique Bezerra Report Publisher: Ines Nandin For exclusive interviews and more info, please logon to or write to contact@focusreports.net

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Brazil report This bulging middle class, known as alike is the change in social class distri- is, interestingly, how the figures them“Class C” in Brazil, has been the main bution. Based on the increased stabil- selves are calculated, due to the fact that driver in Brazil’s retail pharmaceutical ity of the economic situation, including Brazil has adopted electronic invoicing. market, more than doubling to U$26 employment and GDP growth, we have IMS’s Paletta explains the importance billion and surpassing countries like seen Social Class D to move to C, and of the changes: “This had made the marthe UK and Canada to achieve a top 10 C to B.” In 2010, Class C exceeded 100 ket become more visible and most likely million, with Brazil’s biggest dramatically decreased informality. global ranking, projected to class comprising over half This means that we are seeing two elereach top 5 by 2015. Indeed, its population. “This helps ments to the growth figures. One is the this demographic shift is the increase access and impacts real growth, which is when you compare result of faster growth and the market’s growth, because 2011 to 2007 at the same base by looking progressive social policies unthese people have more in- at how many wholesalers or data providder eight years of a populist come, and if officially em- ers we had in our panel in 2007 versus the Lula government, resulting ployed also benefit from pri- same panel in 2011.” The other, which in record high average wages vate health insurance, which accounts for some 4% to 5% of the 18% ($R1,629, approx. U$931 per both contribute to better ac- year-over-year growth, “comes from the month) and record low un- Alexandre Padilha, minister of health cess to medicines and doc- smaller, regional wholesalers and pharemployment (6.4%), and less macy chains. They were not represented tors,” Paletta says. income inequality, with a deJosé Correia da Silva, president of before in our data panel. Now we can clining Gini coefficient, the international measure of wealth distribution, from the ABIQUIFi, an association which rep- measure the impact of those wholesalers help of programs like the Bolsa Família, resents the producers of pharmachemi- who were not in the panel. Therefore, the cal and pharmaceutical raw materials, market is certainly growing, but at 13% a conditional transfer payment scheme. Growth has pushed inflation, which states another important factor is the to 15% growth rate, though this is still an important growth.” is sitting at 6.3%, at the upper range of growth and the development Paletta speaks to the practhe Central Bank’s 2.5% to 6.5% target, of government healthcare tical repercussions for comeven with the dampening effects of a real expenditures: “The Brazilian panies operating in a rapidly which has hit recent highs of 1.58 reais government spends a lot of growing space: “This has to the dollar. Approaching record levels money on SUS (Sistema Únichanged market dynamics, since the currency first floated in 1999, co de Saúde/Unified Health because pharma companies the real was dubbed by Goldman Sachs System), which comprises used to rely solely on big as the world’s most overvalued in 2009, a healthcare infrastructure wholesalers and pharmacy and it has since appreciated by nearly and a strong centralization chains. Now they see op10% against the U.S. dollar. All this for the purchase and distri- Fernando Pimentel, minister of developportunity to go to the small despite macroeconomic controls by the bution of medicines.” regional wholesalers who These expenditures are ac- ment, industry and federal government—without which it’s foreign trade represent approximately 10% estimated the real would be worth 20% counted for in the R$15 bilmore—outlined by none other than Lu- lion (US$8.57 billion) institutional mar- of market volume, or some R$4 billion la’s successor, Dilma Rousseff, who re- ket, the counterpart to a US$26 billion (US$2.29 billion); however, to play in cently reiterated her commitment against retail spend which remains overwhelm- this market opportunity it is required speculators in a Financial Times op-ed ingly out of pocket. “The fact is, there is a completely different ‘go-to-market’ piece entitled, “Brazil will fight back a market of 200 million potential con- strategy and certainly a customized sumers that have just arrived to a medi- ‘business model’ because the market against the currency manipulators.” This staunch commitment to na- um level of medical attention. Part of the conditions are quite different.” Such conditions are influenced at tional development, and positive macro- reason for the increase is that the popueconomic indices, have created a perfect lation is so far from a level considered the highest level by Alexandre Padilha, storm for rising standards of living, in- normal by the standard of more wealthy minister of health, an MD with a hisclusive of expenditures on health. Nilton countries. To achieve a level of a Spain, tory of directing indigenous and malaria Paletta, country manager and VP, Latin or an Italy, Brazil must double again, at health projects, and whose tenure began along with the current administration’s America for IMS Health, explains the minimum,” Correia da Silva notes. One of the contributing factors to in January 2011. “The new government shift. “The one major factor influencing country growth and pharma growth perhaps seeing these figures double again believes that good health and qualS3 FOCUS REPORTS

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Brazil report

Reducing inequality widens class C, which is the first class to have the surplus to consume Average household income by economic class in 2011 (R$/month) 13,100

9,100

4,900 2,750 710

490 E Source: ABEP 2011

1,100

D

C2

1,650

C1

B2

B1

A2

A1

Increased generation of surplus and consumption capacity

ity of life can be achieved through the cooperation and collaboration of many government sectors and other partners,” he says. Padilha affirms that, al- Dirceu Barbano, though assuring director, ANVISA access is a challenge, health is a right, and therefore the issue must be addressed: “The Brazilian Constitution recognizes, under article 196, that ‘health is a right of all and a duty of the State.’ That means that addressing the social determinants of health is both a conceptual and a legal imperative for our government. Brazil firmly believes in universal ac- Nilton Paletta, country manager and cess and supports vp, Latin America, all initiatives that IMS Health

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Brazil report promote universal health care.” Padilha suggests sustainable and predictable financing, new technologies, and the close link between health indicators to social issues as pillars of the administration’s path to achieving the Constitution’s lofty goal. His counterpart at the Ministry of Development, Industry and Foreign Trade, Fernando Pimentel, suggests one way: following on the success of courting IBM and General Electric, who in 2010 invested hundreds of millions of dollars in local R&D facilities. Pimentel says it’s crucial to attract such interLauro Moretto, executive vp, national equivaSindusfarma lents in the phar-

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maceutical industry, although “Brazil eas where Brazil is already very strong, to go towards creating a pharhas difficulties that we need maceutical equivalent of an to overcome rapidly, espeEmbraer, Vale, or Petrobras. cially in areas of patents, “In health, there are areas and some specific types of where, because of the particuresearch, such as in genetics, larities of the country, there in live-cell organisms, and is good research, such as in access to biodiversity. Until infectious disease. We must these are resolved the answer better identify those centers to this question will be up in Nelson Mussolini, and approach them to create a the air.” executive vp closer relation between them Jose Bastos, president of Sindusfarma and industry, to improve the MSD, concurs, and refines Pivisibility of the work they do mentel’s approach: “Most important among these are the basics—the and further opportunities for cross-coleducational system. It’s good, but it needs laboration,” Bastos notes. to be a lot better, and produce many more people in the universities who can Shipping Up, Shaping Up perform research.” Bastos further stress- If growth is to continue, a big driver will es private/academic partnerships, such as be more remote locations in the North the kind spurred by the aforementioned and Northeast, where there is need to multinationals, as well as identifying ar- bridge not only gaps in policy, but more literal, physical gaps as well. For instance, Manaus, the largest city in the Brazil’s North region (which comprises 45% of the country’s surface area), is nearly 2,500 miles from São Paulo in the country’s industrial southern heartland—slightly farther than the distance from New York to Los Angeles. These areas, also the least developed, create an infrastructure bottleneck. Anecdotally, managers joke it costs more to ship from the interior to Brazil’s biggest port at Santos than it does from Santos to China. Looking at hard numbers, compared to the 1970s, the country as a whole actually counts fewer miles of railroad. Fortunately, the pharmaceutical industry in Brazil relies predominantly on road transport and air, such as Guarulhos International Airport, Brazil’s main hub located on the outskirts of São Paulo, though there are still issues; At- Jose Correia da Silva, president, Abiquifi lanta’s Hartsfield-

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Brazil report road. “It’s obvious there is work to be done when trucks are forced to drive Evolution of the Gini coefficient1 on two-lane highways, or even one0.609 way streets,” Mar0.595 0.590 0.583 tau notes. “When 0.537 0.530 we get that fixed, it’s an issue of airports reaching full capacity. The biggest worry right now is the following: What will happen—if they are at maximum capacity now— 1970 1960 1980 1990 2000 2010 during the World Gini coefficient is a measure of inequality where 0 equals perfect equality of income and 1 Cup in 2014, and Source: ABEP 2011 the Olympics in 2016?” The problem is not only the capacJackson airport, by itself, has more air ity per se. “Today there is pressure not traffic capacity than the whole of Brazil. Rafael Martau, as the commercial di- only on runways but associated transfer rector of Bomi Farma, the country’s larg- infrastructure. Due to ANVISA (Braest specialized healthcare logistics and zil’s FDA equivalent) requirements, distribution provider, whose fleet serves a many shipments are carefully climaterecently expanded primary facility (from controlled, which means that shipments nearly 800,000 square feet to over 900,000 must be rapidly transferred at the Insquare feet, with a further 160,000 square fraero (a Brazilian government corporafeet in the last year in Santa Catarina), tion responsible for Brazilian commeris qualified to speak on how he hits the cial airports) checkpoints upon landing,

Social inequality has reached its lowest level in 40 years

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or we risk losing the shipment. It’s a big challenge, and a big worry,” he says. Fortunately, according to Martau, in addition to public expenditures on roads and airports, “there are companies like Luft Group, of which Bomi Brazil is a part, which are family businesses with a consistent strategy of investing to take advantage of market growth. In fact, Luft Group Odnir Finotti, invests the most in president, health logistics in Pró Genéricos the country, and uses market demand as a way to spur growth and investment. In 2011 alone, Luft Group will invest over R$30 million (US$17 million), and in the past three years, we have invested R$170 million (US$97 million), in not only warehouses, but in truck fleets. By the end of 2011, we will have opened an affiliate in Recife to better serve clients in the fast-growing and remote Northeast of Brazil, because decentralization of stock is another way of absorbing growth.” And at Bomi there is much growth to absorb: in 2007, the company counted 16 clients. “Now, we have 52, and the complexity and quantity of our clients is increasing every day,” Martau says.

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Brazil report attack of the taxeS

and SINDUSFARMA is the body which The complexity and quantity of Mar- represents the SĂŁo Paulo industry in front tau’s clients is perhaps only matched by of the government, and negotiates with that of Brazil’s taxes. Somewhat coun- ANVISA, unions, and tax authorities, in terintuitively, the country maintains the a broad spectrum of influence. One of those areas of inhighest end-user tax burden fluence it hopes to impact is on medicines in the world, taxation. Nelson Mussolini, amounting to an average of executive vice president of the 33.9% on final prices. association, is mystified when SINDUSFARMA, foundasked to explain. “We don’t ed in 1933, represents all the understand why,â€? he says. pharmaceutical companies “It’s completely crazy. Lookin the state of SĂŁo Paulo, the ing at the rest of the world, country’s most economically the average rate is 6.3%. In important state, and a tradi- Claudio Bergamo many countries, like the U.S., tional center of industry from dos Santos, ceo, Hypermarcas Canada, and the U.K., the which 70% of Brazilian GDP number is 0%.â€? originates. The state accounts Amazingly, even veterinary products for some 80% of the pharmaceutical companies of the country, and associated are taxed at a lower rate, which gives hospital and academic infrastructure, rise to the common joke: If you go into

a pharmacy and bark, you pay a lower price for your medicines. Lauro Moretto, SINDUSFARMA’s other executive vice president, invokes a French muse, maybe in the hopes that the government will respond to another language: “I saw one proverb in a French review many years ago: ‘Rien n’est bon pour l’homme qui souffre,’ (Nothing is good for the man who suffers). Therefore, while there are still many people who suffer, what we are doing is not enough. And nor, Moretto says, is the government. According to him, they have no strategic plan. “When you return to the past, say 20 years, there was big inflation and big social problems,� Moretto notes. “These have been solved, but now we need to reorganize the government and decide how they will act with the

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Growth isn’t just about getting bigger, it’s about working together.

S11 FOCUS REPORTS

important sectors, and how they will Sanofi, as well as domestic firms like promote and develop social organiza- Hypermarcas, which made 10 acquisitions. Lula’s took the direction of assist- tions in 2010, and acquired Mantecorp ing the people in the most need; now it’s (a top 5 domestic player) for US$1.5 billion. Perhaps no one else is better time to take the next step.” That next step was most clearly qualified to speak on Brazilian consolievinced in the first months of Rousseff’s dation than Claudio Bergamo, CEO of Hypermarcas, Brazil’s largterm, when she fulfilled a est consumer goods comcampaign promise to reduce pany, which with an annual taxes to bring medicines to turnover of over R$5 billion the most vulnerable. The re(US$2.86 billion), more than sult, in February 2011, was any of its national or interthe announced reduction of national competitors in the a copay in Farmácia Popucountry. Speaking about the lar (a government program pharma sector, Bergamo offering low-cost drugs for says, “Historically, the marlow-income citizens), for the Rubens Lima, genket was very fragmented, most important strategic ar- eral manager, Ipsen with more than 50% of toeas of diabetes and hypertension, in a program called “Saúde Não tal market in the hands of Brazilian companies. Hypermarcas saw the opTem Preço.” Assuming office in January 2011, portunity to consolidate many sucRousseff has stated the government’s cessful family owned companies that No. 1 priority is poverty reduction, and were going through succession issues. such programs will clearly contribute Previously, these companies competed against each other, not takto this end. Some 16 million ing advantage of the synerpeople, a staggering 59% gies that would have existed of whom live in the Northif they were grouped under east (which accounts for just the same platform.” 28% of the population), live Bergamo has fostered this on R$70 (US$40) or less per platform in Hypermarcas’ month. Therefore it is unsurrapid ascent, which has seen prising that, because of their close to 25 acquisitions since lower price, generics are exApril 2008, when it became pected to surpass 20% overHagop Barsoumian, public. He has continued to all market share by year-end, general manager, further develop many of these and have achieved 53% an- Chiesi companies—and together nual growth in the past year. Reducing corruption, which has seen in they have the country’s largest num2011 the resignation of six ministers, in- ber of product launches, supported by cluding those of agriculture, transport, “heavy investments on field sales forces, tourism, and most recently sports, will efficient operations, strong distribution, see Rousseff consolidating her govern- and demand generation,” Bergamo says. Now, however, with an average indusment to take that next step. try EBITDA hovering at 20, he is easing up on the buying spree. “There are still conSolidation nation Providing her a helpful example will be some opportunities remaining for furthe pharmaceutical industry’s consoli- ther consolidation, but we do believe we dation, plowing ahead in full force. Sig- have acquired the best assets available in nificant M&A activity in the past year the last years. Hypermarcas M&A strategy was includes MNCs like Amgen, Pfizer, and

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Brazil report

Top 25 Breakdown: More than meets the IMS Data Ranking by MaRket ShaRe ManUfactUReRS

MaRket ShaRe

08/2007 08/2008 08/2009 08/2010 08/2011 08/2007 08/2008 08/2009 08/2010 08/2011

EMS PHARMA

1

1

1

1

1

6.49

6.66

6.66

6.74

7.53

MEDLEY

4

4

4

2

2

5.30

5.41

5.12

5.76

6.90

ACHE

3

3

3

4

3

5.59

5.56

5.76

5.35

5.31

SANOFI-AVENTIS

2

2

2

3

4

6.49

6.18

6.18

5.60

4.78

EUROFARMA

8

7

5

5

5

3.35

3.57

4.07

3.92

3.97

NOVARTIS

6

5

6

6

6

4.26

4.23

4.03

3.85

3.61

NEO QUIMICA

36

34

27

9

7

0.72

0.87

1.21

2.47

3.45

MSD

7

8

8

8

8

3.71

3.54

3.16

2.79

2.52

PFIZER

5

6

7

7

9

4.43

4.03

3.63

3.33

2.52

BAYER PHARMA

9

9

9

10

10

3.22

3.00

2.74

2.46

2.23

ASTRAZENECA BRASIL

15

11

10

11

11

2.03

2.25

2.46

2.44

2.20

NYCOMED PHARMA LTD

11

12

12

12

12

2.35

2.20

2.08

2.02

1.92

TEUTO BRASILEIRO

44

41

34

21

13

0.46

0.55

0.87

1.59

1.87

BOEHRINGER ING

10

10

11

13

14

2.59

2.32

2.20

1.95

1.85

BIOLAB-SANUS FARMA

13

13

13

15

15

2.06

2.09

2.02

1.90

1.80

SANDOZ DO BRASIL

30

19

15

14

16

1.00

1.65

1.90

1.95

1.67

MERCK

18

18

19

18

17

1.79

1.72

1.77

1.68

1.65

D M IND.FTCA

12

14

16

16

18

2.28

2.04

1.89

1.74

1.62

ROCHE

14

16

18

20

19

2.06

1.94

1.84

1.62

1.55

MANTECORP I Q FARM

17

15

14

17

20

2.02

1.96

1.90

1.71

1.52

LEGRAND

47

37

38

29

21

0.44

0.66

0.66

1.11

1.49

ABBOTT

16

17

17

19

22

2.03

1.92

1.85

1.68

1.45

LIBBS

20

20

20

22

23

1.58

1.56

1.49

1.44

1.38

GERMED PHARMA

64

55

43

33

24

0.23

0.39

0.55

0.93

1.34

UNIAO QUIMICA F N

29

24

23

24

25

1.13

1.32

1.33

1.23

1.23

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Brazil report to acquire the best companies, which the company’s dominance: the best portfolio of businesses and could be further developed— brands in all major relevant and not ‘bargain’ situations. markets, being the No. 1 in Nowadays, if you go into a OTCs, No. 1 in branded gedrug store, there is not a sinnerics, No. 2 in Rx, No. 2 in gle section where Hypermardermo-cosmetics, No. 1 in cas doesn’t have a product— condoms, and No. 1 in sweetdiapers, cosmetics, men’s and eners, among others. women’s care etc—extending Eyeing the Top 25 players through OTC and generics. And, in many of these mar- Alexander Triebnigg, in Brazil (refer to chart on page S12. This retail data; kets, we have relevant market president, Novartis granular hospital records shares and leadership positions,” Bergamo notes, and highlights are not kept), one sees familiar faces:

Sanofi, Novartis, GSK, Pfizer—although none of these is ranked at or above its global position. But the real story is the rapid advancement of local players like Neo Quimica (No. 7), Teuto (No. 13), Germed (No. 24), and LeGrand (No. 21); the continued independence, despite acquisition attempts, of some of its marketshare leaders such as Cristalia and Mauricio Billi’s Europharma; and the surprising dominance of domestic firms, as well as the fact that few remain independent. EMS’s lead is even more dominant than a No. 1 position for the last five years suggest; Germed and LeGrand are both brands of EMS. Hypermarcas acquired Neo Química in 2009, and owns Mantecorp (No. 20), while Sanofi now owns Medley (No. 2), and Sandoz (No. 16) is, of course, under Novartis. With further “pharmarriages” likely in the works, this list will become even smaller—and even more inbred.

expoRtation expectationS Representing some 40% of the Latin American pharma market in value and consumer figures, Brazil is a natural hub for production— although currently exports are dwarfed by Rosa Maria imports to the Scavarelli, president, tune of over US$5 Theraskin billion per year, a deficit that is growing fast and will only grow along with Brazilian’s needs for more complex treatments manufactured abroad. With a strict regulatory body in ANVISA, manufactured products provide a regional regulation reference, which can help ease location decisions. However, the country has yet to develop a strong domestic API production level, and many say it has already missed the boat. However, others claim S13 FOCUS REPORTS

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Brazil report that internationalization, rather than and fast-growing domestic market is to family girl—so not every young man exportation and raw imports and ex- ask: Where else can I go? Where else can have her. Therefore I will pay a lot ports, should be the concern. Musso- can I grow and invest the money I have of attention to whom I will give her to, if she ever leaves the family.” lini breaks it down. “Looking at other earned here?” Still firmly in the family is Theraskin, This shift requires what Ogari Pacountries in the world—U.S., Canada, most of Europe, etc.—it’s normal for checo, president and founder of Cris- purveyor of high aggregate value prodtália, might rightly call ucts, which target the Class A and B, a negative pharmaceutical “radical innovation.” As an and bold plans to bring its dermatologitrade balance,” he says. Musinternational defender of cal expertise outside of Brazil, throughsolini, addressing the state of radical innovation at the lo- out Latin America and overseas. “Our API exports, notes, “It’s difcal level, he responds to the R&D has developed, and we plan to ferent in China, India, and difficulty of thinking outside develop even more, bringing more inIreland. It’s natural to import the box in Brazil. “Let’s sup- novation either with what we do here more pharmachemical prodpose that the four of us are ourselves, or through alliances and ucts than you export, because representatives from mul- partnerships with German, French, and you need capacity and econotinational companies, and American companies,” says president mies of scale,” he continues, Heraldo Marchezini, senior vp, Sanofi outside the door there are Rosa Maria Scavarelli. “We have cawhile discounting the notion Latin America, and many small companies pres- pacity, and we plan to expand this even that this is necessary in or- general manager, ent in the market. If we all more. If a company wants to be in this der to compete. “We don’t Sanofi Brazil agree the idea that radical market, and needs the profile Theraskin have markets for it in Brazil. has—not necessarily prodWe need to produce and export prod- innovations are extremely ucts with big volume, but ucts here for Latin America, Asia, and difficult to produce, that it ones with high degrees of inAfrica. These are our markets and it’s takes many years and around novation—we are the ones.” foolish to believe otherwise. Africa is an US$800 million to US$1 Scavarelli, whose father, easier and more comfortable market for billion to create a new molBasílio Scavarelli, the foundBrazil, where among other advantages, ecule, then very few of them er of the company, is 101 in countries like Angola and Mozam- will have the courage to do it. years old, gives perspective to So it will be only the four of bique, we speak the same language.” these potential partners: “He Indeed, it’s put succinctly by Alexan- us, because we have the cabegan in the pharmaceutical der Triebnigg the head of Novartis Bra- pacity and money to invest, Jose Bastos, presiindustry in 1930, and is still zil, the country’s third-largest healthcare who will go on this road of dent, MSD Brazil alive, in the office every day, company, and the largest global re- radical innovation. For this search-based pharmaceutical company, reason, most of the small companies do and making plans for the next 20 years! which has been in Brazil since 1937, and not even try to create innovations. But Our history is the best proof of what we may have gained an institutional insight sometimes, an exception can occur with are—so Theraskin is here to stay.” or two into the local psychology: “As a company like Cristália—which innoa general rule, it is not easy for Brazil- vations without spending US$800 mil- geneRic SeRMon ians to leave their country, but it is a key lion for a new molecule. This metaphor Many of the biggest current producers step in the development of a global per- that I am using is not the absolute truth; do so in generics, and Odnir Finotti, spective and a global career, and also of it is my personal truth as the founder of executive president of Pró Genéricos, coming back into a leadership position.” Cristália.” sheds a light on why this might be. “For Pacheco has also been courted in- the time being, 90% of the Brazilian [reTriebnigg encourages his colleagues “to think about Switzerland, a small coun- ternationally, and wryly observes, “I tail] market is out-of-pocket, therefore try, yet, with Roche and Novartis, home have decided that I should stop hav- all these people need to have access to to two of the world’s largest pharma- ing so many dinners; otherwise I will affordable and trustworthy medicines, ceutical companies.” Triebnigg explains never manage to stay fit.” Jokes aside, and this is what generics is all about. this unlikely occurrence: “Novartis and however, Pacheco says “Cristália is the Today, many more Brazilians have acRoche do not define themselves as local beautiful girl on the market at this mo- cess to pharmaceuticals, so people are but [rather] global companies. So the ment, which every young man wants taking better care of health than ever path to a sustainable future for leading to have. Besides being a beautiful girl, before thanks to generics,” he says. FurBrazilian companies in such an exciting Cristália is also a serious, responsible thermore, Finotti explains the rationale

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Brazil report for domestic firms targeted as acquisitions from international players: “It’s about market size and upside potential. We’re talking about the seventh-largest market in the world, and increasing. According to the latest data from IMS, by 2015, Brazil will be No. 3 in generics. It is a quite strong reason to acquire a generics company in Brazil. If you do not produce here, or control the columns that keep generics standing, you are not in the game. Brazilian companies learned very quickly how to play in generics. We can compete worldwide on the same base in cost of development and formulations, etc. In this, Brazil has the expertise. Some of the largest companies in Generics are not present in Brazil yet, for they cannot simply bring its entire portfolio from elsewhere. You need to be here—plant here, manufacturing, developing formulations, etc., here.” Case in point: Sanofi. With the Brazilian operations boasting the largest production outside the company’s historical French borders, Heraldo Marchezini, senior vice president for Latin America and general manager Brazil global operations, can boast of steering the crown jewel of the company’s emerging market portfolio. However, Sanofi is not merely a fair-weather friend. Speaking to the importance of long-term

This R&D unit is relying on strategic partnerships, to cover the full spectrum of R&D, but with a specialized look toward the most needed areas like laboratory, imaging, and early phase, and the current model only expected to expand in the future. “It is harder to detain all knowledge within a group or person, and collaborative processes tend to be more successful. GC-2 knows the risk of development and wishes to follow this path, to participate in the process from the very beginning, to help design it better from the very early phases, and also to share the inherent risks,” Kiffer concludes.

Scientific Knowledge Management

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Trying Trials at GC-2 Clinical research is a gelatinous backbone of Brazil, attracting approximately US$140 million of worldwide U$40 billion spend. Speaking to early phase clinical trial research, Carlos Kiffer, director of operations for GC-2, notes that, once upon a time, Carlos, Kiffer, “there were not many international president, GC-2 development programs coming to Brazil,” and that “Brazilian companies were not fully prepared to cover all the process.” On the other hand, Kiffer says, “we do have the basics with good discovery and innovation environments, the challenge now being to bring these discoveries into products. We are learning, though, and a lot has been covered. One of GC-2’s initiatives is our R&D unit, specifically though to help cover that gap.”

A clinical view with a business vision.

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commitment, and actually being Brazilian, Marchezini says, “There is an understanding one achieves from knowing where a country has been, and how we’ve gotten to where we are today. This is especially important in the pharma market, because there has been a tremendous transformation in recent years in the way it operates. If you would have come in the 1990s, you would have found many companies that had left Brazil due to a tough economic situation, and a complete lack of patents. (And, as an aside, this is why I don’t complain about ANVISA, having seen what we had in the past!) Underlying all these changes is a significant process you have to understand: the generics law, which was put in place in 2000; the patent law in 1996 when Brazil entered the WTO; and the Real Plan in 1993. These are elements that it’s possible to understand unconsciously, if you are Brazilian, about how the health is understood by policymakers, agencies, and the population. It’s interesting, because perhaps only in answering this question do you realize how important it is!” Other than the local touch, Marchezini highlights the

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Brazil report company’s adaptability to many different markets as a key success factor. “We have a really diversified approach, which spans from generics, to OTC, consumer goods, prescription, mature products, vaccines, Genzyme—the company goes from the basic to the very high tech, to oncology, and everything in between. The reality is that you have to adapt to local needs. Brazil has a demand for everything; it’s a matter of how you manage this. There’s much more volume, and our industrial presence is significant, because we have medicines that really fit into the vast majority of the population’s needs,” he concludes.

RegUlation conSteRnation

Japanese Knowledge Brought to Brazil The Japan-based Astellas, after Russia in 1992, China in 1994, and India in 2008, finally laid the last “BRIC” in its emerging markets house in 2009. Devaney Baccarin, the manager who has been there since day one, doesn’t mince words when talking about the reasoning behind the entry decision. “The answer is simple: great market potential. Brazil is the largest market in Latin America. Most of pharmaceutical markets in developed countries are quite stable and mature, increasing no more than 1% to 3% per year, while the Brazilian pharmaceutical market is increasing by double digits per year,” Baccarin notes. The company, whose raison d’être is to be a global category leader in areas such as urology, transplant, infectious diseases, and oncology, did face hurdles. “One was overcoming regulatory challenges and the other was how to attract talented people,” Baccarin says. “Brazil is very interesting in terms of market potential, but our regulatory regime is very challenging. Therefore the main barriers to surpass are to have registration, prepare for launching, and consolidate the team.” On the former point, Baccarin is quick to come to the government’s defense, and hopeful: “I believe there is a strong interest in improvements, because ANVISA knows how important it is for new companies to have a good regulatory environment. In the first year Astellas suffered through delays, and new products were not approved as planned until the end of the first fiscal year. We continue to have bureaucratic issues regarding importation. We believe some improvements are possible for more investments in clinical research, for example.”

Dirceu Barbano is the director president of ANVISA, and in 2011, he was re-elected to a second, and final, threeyear term, and will remain director until 2014. In this time frame, will he be able to shed the regulatory body’s reputation, which naysayers lament as lacking speed? “We’re speaking of two types hesitate for even half a second to opt for ringer Ingelheim prefers to be more creative.” of performance here,” he quips. “One is the public interest.” Nelzow elaborates on a special case With noble talk like that, comparelated to quality and rigor in our regunies are bound to be slightly study: “We have had two very interestlatory actions. The other is frightened. And the reputa- ing situations of submitting a truly inabout efficiency. ANVISA can tion of ANVISA as a red- novative drug, where Brazil would be accept that the performance tape-ridden bureaucracy is the second or third market in the world of rigor interferes with the eflegend. But it depends who with this particular compound. We apficiency, but not the other way you ask. Martin Nelzow, proached ANVISA and suggested, Why around. ANVISA counts over president of Boehringer In- not organize a panel? Call all the people 2,000 workers who seek to gelheim Brazil, the coun- you believe should have questions or preserve rigor while enhanctry’s fastest-growing MNC, issues, and we will also ask the people ing efficiency. There are cases is unambiguous. “I cannot from the medical societies, our researchthat indicate a way to make Giles Platford, ers, and technicians. We put blame the govthese two performances clos- general manager, all these people in one room ernment at all for er. This involves an improve- Nycomed Brazil for a one-day discussion and delaying registrament in norms, and searching it was done. In terms of infor a focus on health risks,” says Bar- tion; the opposite is true, in novation I cannot say that bano, former director of the committee fact.” According to Nelzow, ANVISA is delaying, and our that introduced Farmácia Popular. He Boehringer Ingelheim has relation with them has been elucidates the public stance: “We have a received all its registrations absolutely reasonable.” very clear orientation from the govern- before schedule. “It’s time to And clearly ANVISA has ment, and it is one you will hear from forget certain past prejudices. not stunted Boehringer Ingelthe Ministry of Health: Every time there Of course, one can always Devaney Baccarin, is a question of whether to put public- choose to submit the dossier, vp and general man- heim’s growth, posting yearover-year figures of 14% in or private-sector interests first, we don’t wait, and blame—but Boeh- ager, Astellas S17 FOCUS REPORTS

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Brazil report 2011, and boasting household brands such as Buscopan and Anador in the top-selling therapeutic classes of analgesics, and Micardis, an antihypertensive, also a No. 1 brand in growth in 2011. Rubens Lima, general manager of Ipsen Pharma Brazil, takes a different tack. “It’s important for Brazil to attract international investments, to better evaluate the impact of administrative burden and approval timelines, and align these standards to international benchmarks,” he says. “It’s a myth that there’s an inverse correlation between rigor and efficiency— the two are not linked. Look at the FDA: very rigourous, yet with much faster timelines, while ANVISA and MoH processes, even rigorous, are by

How Do You Make A Hormone? “I believe that the Brazilian pharmaceutical market has changed and improved a lot concerning regulatory demands. Nowadays it is much clearer, and we can follow all regulations,” says Laurena Magnoni, formerly acclaimed for her work with Levemir at Novo Nordisk, who now heads Besins’ Brazilian operations. Besins, a French family-owned company specializing in hormonal therapies and food Laurena de Lameida supplements, and one of the newest entrants to Brazil, will Magnon, regional have to get up to speed on ANVISA quickly. Hopefully, with director, Besins an award-winning manager with a long history in the local market, their learning curve will be very steep. “I am very enthusiastic about the situation of Besins in Brazil. We have a great opportunity, a great market, and we can certainly reach what the company expects us to,” says Magnoni, who looks forward to the first planned launch in Brazil, of Androgel, a patient-friendly natural testosterone gel developed under a novel technology, which sets it apart from the available alternatives of orals and injectables. This differentiation will be key to establishing Besins, according to Magnoni: “We have a long-term strategy to be within the top 100 pharmaceutical companies in Brazil, and we believe that with the products Besins has, it is possible.”

For GSK, increase access to medicines is offering more people the possibility of a better life.

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Brazil report far longer and lead to significant delays in product launches.” Roberto Alvarenga, general manager of Ferring Pharmaceuticals Brazil, weighs in nicely, noting, “I think the industry needs to be fair with the government. There are some mistakes from pharmaceutical companies. Sometimes the quality of the dossiers submitted is not good enough. We need to be fair here; often the industry fails in this basic regard. Companies need to, at minimum, prepare good enough dossiers to approve, although this is only a concern for some companies.” However, he puts a qualifier on his kindness, and stresses that, “yet another issue is I don’t believe the government has the right size, in terms of numbers and quality of staff, to evaluate all the submissions.”

eURaSian invaSion Giles Platford, formerly leader of the legacy Nycomed business in Brazil, and who, in October 2011, assumed the presidency of Takeda/Nycomed in Brazil, will preside over a mingling of cultures. The UK manager, with experience in China and Southeast Asia, heads a company which can now trace its roots back to Norway and Japan, and has strong prospects in Brazil. “Our Brazil operation became the second-largest affiliate worldwide for Nycomed in 2010, following a strong performance that positioned us as one of the fastest-growing multinationals in the Brazilian pharma market (IMS retail audit),” says Platford. He explains this success by highlighting the flagship product, Neosaldina, which ranks among the top 3 pharmaceutical products in the country. “Representing 25% of our total sales, and growing ahead of the branded analgesics market, certainly Neosaldina is an important driver for us. This is a brand that we have continued to reinvent year after year with creative marketing campaigns, and alternaS19 FOCUS REPORTS

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tive strategies to work with the point of sale (POS),” Platford says. “In fact, last year our Neosaldina campaign in Brazil was recognized by Nicholas Hall (a specialized OTC marketing company) as the best OTC marketing campaign worldwide. This was the first time a Brazilian brand has won this prestigious award, and I believe it is a testament to the creativity of our OTC marketing team,” he continues, which will do wonders to fill the state-of-the-art facilities in Jaguariúna, currently at 70% utilization on a three shift basis. With a modular design and 30 million units of capacity remaining, internal growth plans and potential contract manufacturing can both be accommodated, with cGMP certification and a track record of exports to the EU and various LATAM countries have attracted big names like J&J, P&G, and BMS.

right direction to increase access, and talks about the contribution his company can make: “The company has been very well-known and recognized as a company that innovates in the biotech segment, particularly in neurodegenerative diseases, more specifically in multiple sclerosis. Our vision of providing cutting-edge science to increase quality and length of life is always going to be the direction for the company. Research and development are important parts of our corporate DNA.” Piccolo points to the success of Tysabri’s launch in May, which was made part of the reimbursed MS medicines by the government to treat relapsing remitting forms of the disease, and looks forward to 2012, which will see the introduction of Fampyra, which lends patients increased walking capacity, and Avonex Pen, which is the self-injected version of Avonex, being the first alternative of an IM self injeclogically Biological With the passing of the legislative tion of an interferon. In 2013, Biogen amendment RDC 55/10 governing Idec also plans to launch the BG-12 biosimilars in December 2010, AN- which is the innovative oral form to VISA and its stakeholders are pinning treat MS, and farther out, looks to hopes on doing for the biologics mar- finalize its first effective therapeutic option for a highly threatket what the generics law ening neuro-degenerative of 1999 did for the generics disease, amyotrophic lateral market. When asked if he sclerosis (ALS). “Later, the shares this optimism, Francompany will also enter into cisco Piccolo, managing dithe haemophilia market, rector Biogen Idec Brazil, providing innovative forms comments: “Biogen Idec has of recombinant and longbeen very close to ANVISA acting FVIII and FIX,” Picand part of the discussions colo concludes. through Interfarma to pro- Francisco Piccolo, managing director, But what of manufacturvide our perspective on the Biogen Idec Brazil ing? “Brazilians usually prefer biosimilar and biological products ready for commerregulations the government is now just about to be finalizing. In cialization,” says Avi Meizler, an archiour view it’s always good to have in- tect by training and president and foundcreased access to the best therapy er of Meizler Biopharma. However, possible for patients. Our perspective Meizler is not a usual man—he’s decided is always trying to focus on the ben- to jump headlong into building a biotech efit of the patient that is going to be manufacturing plant. “Meizler wants benefitted by the regulation.” Piccolo to be among one of the first companies lauds the government for going in the in Brazil in the manufacture of biotech-

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Brazil report

Eenie, Meenie, Minie, Biominas “Let me start by saying that biotechnology in Brazil is really a new thing,” says Eduardo Emrich Soares, president of Biominas, a private institution that fosters the development of biotech-related businesses in Brazil. “You will not meet many large, consolidated companies here because there is no such market, especially in pharmaceuticals,” Soares says, accompanying the wind being let out of the collective sails of an entire sector. However, things aren’t quite as dour as that introduction provides, and Biominas, with over 20 years dedicated to its main objective of creating and developing businesses in life sciences in Brazil, sees some bright spots. A new niche dedicated venture fund is in the works, fully funded and soon to begin operations. And perhaps most importantly, Soares says, “Most of the international pharmaceutical companies are putting Brazil on their map not only for selling drugs, but to discover, identify, and develop technology.” One such firm is Ferring, whose general manager Roberto Alvarenga elaborates

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Eduardo Emrich Soares, president and ceo,Biominas

Roberto Alvarenga, general manager, Ferring Pharmaceuticals Brazil

on his company’s recent partnership: “Biominas is a kind of liaison between public institutions and the private sector. There is a lot of ongoing clinical activity within Brazil’s public institutions. They do not have all the investments necessary to speed up clinical investments, so they look for some other partnership in the private sector. Ferring is very interested to have partnerships with public institutions in the therapeutic areas we work with. Since we don’t have a manufacturing site in Brazil, and don’t invest a lot in clinical trials, we want this kind of partnership with a public institution. It’s a great opportunity on both sides.” Alvarenga will be looking for this opportunity to supercharge Ferring’s performance, if such a thing remains humanly possible: “For the last two years, Ferring Brazil has had the highest gross among all Ferring affiliates. We were able to grow sales 25% in 2008-2009, 35% in 2009-2010, and I believe we can achieve around 25% again this year. Ferring in Brazil intends to almost triple sales in two years.”

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Brazil report nology products, but even this wasn’t enough—and we have decided to also enter into development, which is even rarer in Brazil, which traditionally has not had the mentality for this,” Meizler says. On the back of these investments, he expects to, at minimum, quintuple the company’s size in the medium-term. And in what can surely be prefaced with the disclaimer of “no pun intended,” Meizler sums up his company’s strategic thrust as such: “To borrow an expression from my architecture days, Meizler is now building a solid foundation for the future.”

awaReneSS, awaReneSS, awaReneSS

Torrent: Indian Success, Brazilian Ways Orlando Famá, the head of Indian firm Torrent in Brazil, is self-effacing when talking of the affiliate’s success. “What happened with Torrent in Brazil is that we did not imagine that we would be so good in the beginning!” he says. “In the beginning we were doubling sales almost monthly. One of things we did to achieve this result was, my boss—a very smart man responsible for many countries as well as Brazil—he understood the pharmaceutical market. He understood the Brazilian culture, and he helped us to launch a company with a Brazilian profile even though we were an Indian company.”

Orlando Famá, president, Torrent

From its start in 2002, under Famá’s leadership the Brazilian affiliate became the company’s biggest by 2009, having launched 19 products in the cardiovascular (CVS), central nervous system (CNS) and Oral Anti-Diabetic segments. Famá stresses that India is completely different from Brazil. He refers to an earlier time when an anonymous assistant of an executive suggested an approach a la India. “He wanted me to handle the marketing like in India, with the same way of promoting, the same approach, the same strategy, and the same culture. He wanted us to have dinner with doctors in Indian restaurants!” Famá politely declined. “I told him we are not launching in India. We are not selling India. What we have to sell is the quality of our company and the quality of the products that we have. Let us show them that we have high quality with a lower price.”

One insidious problem haunting Brazilian healthcare is, perhaps anachronistically, alluded to by Schopenhauer: “Talent hits a target no one else can hit; Genius hits a target no one else can see.” If there’s truth to that, the genius will have to open policymakers’ eyes. As Piccolo claims that, even already allocated to hypertension and with a disease as well-known in North diabetes, only people suffering from America as multiple sclerosis, in Bra- hypertension and diabetes already zil, “awareness is still very poor in know that they have basic medicines general terms. It’s still very common supplied by the government. “Asthmatfor people to confuse multiple sclerosis ics,” he says, “do not realize they have access, and it will take some with simple sclerosis, which time to make them aware. is linked to some kind of Chiesi has the production dementia for the elderly capacity established, and population.” Piccolo points we think the demand will to education, awareness, increase over time. We will access to the right informabe prepared to supply the tion, and campaigns like government with our drug his company’s own “Viver because it is the basic drug Bem Faz Bem”—living well for asthma treatment.” makes you feel well—to Claudio Coracini, general manager, This preparation dates reach out to the 30,000 Bra- specialty pharma, back to 2004, when, Barsouzilians with multiple sclero- Shire mian says, “the federal govsis, of which only 10,000 are being treated with disease modi- ernment decided to buy a huge amount fying therapies. “We usually say this of sprays, and, at the time, Chiesi sold number should be doubled, at least. 1.6 million units to Brazil—basically The other 20,000 are simply not being sprays for the whole country. That was the time they decided to update their diagnosed,” Piccolo says. Hagop Barsoumian, general manag- plans and make investments.” However of Chiesi Brazil, says that although er, the situation changed. “After that, asthma competes for resources that are the federal government decided to no

longer buy directly, and the rights to purchase went to the cities. The federal government and the states put some money in, and then the cities were told to play their part. What you have today is underperforming, and the result is that asthma is still not well-treated in Brazil,” says Barsoumian. In ADHD (attention deficit hyperactivity disorder), the situation is once again repeated. “The treatment rate is very low in Brazil,” says Claudio Coracini, general manager of specialty pharmaceuticals at Shire Latin America. “It’s a relatively new disease, and awareness is low among stakeholders. Therefore it is our role to educate everyone involved around the disorder. On the other hand, it’s important to note that ADHD treatment has been growing at 30% average annually, compared to 12% growth in the pharmaceutical market overall. This is somewhat due to an increasing trend of parents becoming more comfortable bringing their children to doctors for ADHD treatment.” And though Cora-

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Brazil report cini is still in the early days after 2011’s launch of Venvanse, he believes that, “within five years, we expect Brazil to become the third or fourth market for Shire, and a top 5 ADHD market.” And if anyone could make it happen, it is Coracini, responsible for introducing Cialis in Brazil, which has remained in the top 3 best-selling drugs, and had far surpassed Pfizer’s Viagra long before sildenafil’s patent expired in 2010.

oRphan dRUgS: pleaSe, SiR, can we have SoMe MoRe? Claudio Santos, general manager of HGT (Human Genetic Therapies) and Coracini’s counterpart at Shire, has already illustrated the Dickensian desire for more, having grown from six people at the end of 2007, to nearly 100 at present. But Santos’ main focus is on another

orphan-related topic. “For HGT, one very important element is the basic regulatory framework, because there is none for orphan drugs or rare diseases. Today, the rules are the same for orphan drugs as with blockbuster drugs targeted to GPs, which means that there is significant investment and development that Claudio L. Santos, still needs to be senior regional done to improve director, medical the infrastructure affairs, Shire and regulatory framework around orphan drugs,” Santos says. Although there are some exceptions, notably Gaucher Disease, which

is already covered by the official health system, Santos wants to foster the development of official clinical protocols for diseases like MPS II and Fabry—not only for Shire’s therapeutical alternatives, but for all therapies available for lysosomal storage diseases. “We are working along with Interfarma because there is not a single focal point in the MoH or ANVISA to discuss orphan drugs,” Santos says. “It’s hard for us— because it simply doesn’t make sense.”

Swing yoUR paRtneR: doing the SaMBa SqUaRe-dance “Many companies are looking for good partners in Brazil. Why? The big companies are in Brazil. But many middle and small sized companies are looking for a certain kind of partner to enter in Brazil. What kind of part-

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Brazil report

Of Farms, Beaches … and Generics In Brazil, the saying goes that if you’re a paulista—born in São Paulo state— you’re probably a workaholic, restless, and reckless folk. No wonder most ex-pats prefer São Paulo when it comes to work and business; however, there is more to Brazil than skyscrapers, people wearing suits, and traffic jams. Even though about 80% of the pharmaceutical production is in São Paulo state, more than two-thirds of the Brazilian pharmaceutical consumption market is elsewhere. Osmosis bound, the industry is learning that spreading geographically and getting closer to the final market has its advantages. “Before, the demand in Brazil was concentrated in the South and Southwest; now this is changing dramatically,” explains Mr. Fernandes and Mr. Mansur, of DHL Brazil. According to them, “when Exel acquired Unidocks, it used to have only two sites, one in São Paulo and one in Rio. After the integration with DHL, there was another one in the Midwest city of Anapolis. Today DHL has seven sites and its presence and coverage of the vast Brazilian territory is much wider.” Major pharmaceuticals and medical devices companies are also finding important economic advantages to locate their activities elsewhere in Brazil. B.Braun, a German producer of a wide array of medical devices, is building a second facility in the state of Rio de Janeiro. “For a new company wanting to base itself in Brazil, the advantage of not being in São Paulo is that there you would compete with more than 1,000

ner? An ethical partner with experience. Then the question inevitably arises: Why not choose a Brazilian company?” asks Fernando Loaiza Sotomayor of Bagó Brazil. It seems like a logical question. “The answer,” he says, “is because most of the Bra-

companies for everything, from terrain and infrastructure to human resources. The assistance and support you get from the state of Rio is much greater than in São Paulo,” says Otto Braun, Managing Director of B.Braun Latin America. According to him, another important advantage is that Rio is the No. 1 site in Brazil for the oil and gas industry, whose plastic derivatives are essential for medical device companies.

However promising, Drianno highlights that the growth of the local market is very concentrated in generics. “According to IMS, sales growth of international labs per unit is negative, even though in turnover it is still positive. If you compare it with the generics market, the figure is completely different. Therefore, companies need to be careful before making general assumptions about the Brazilian market,” he says. It’s thanks to Brazil’s fast-growing and savagely competitive generics market that companies move away from São Paulo in search of cheaper places to produce.

Servier offers another example of the advantages of having so much “space” for growth. Its vast facility in Rio de Janeiro, disguised as the main house of a colonial farm, has seen a lot of This is the case of Erowlabs, The Watinvestments in the past 10 years. After son Group’s arm in Brazil. According building an international center for to Denise Queiroz, Country Manager of therapeutic research in 2001 and SerErowlabs, the Brazilian generic market vier’s first Latin America manufacturing is worth around US$4.9 billion, but she facility in 2009, the company has shown warns that this market has a lot of impressive growth figures. players with a high concen“In the last two years, Servier tration in the hands of a few. has doubled its Brazilian In her words, “About 57% revenues. As the company is of the local generic market just beginning the fiscal year is concentrated in two big in October, we are expecting companies, and 80% is a 40% growth for the comconcentrated in the top six. ing year. The expectation is How can we compete in this to triple the turnover in the area? How can we make next three years,” celebrates a difference here in Brazil? Denise Queiroz, Guillaume Drianno, Country Erowlabs’ answer was to be general manager Manager of Servier. Havthe first in the market and of Erowlabs, The Watson Group ing all the fiscal incentives always follow a sharp price to produce in Rio, good strategy.” With such tight infrastructure, space availability, and a margins, relocating your operations to pool of talent more than happy to work hubs elsewhere, such as Anapolis or between forests, beaches, and a thriving Rio, might make the difference. city definitely helps.

Mr. Guillaume Drianno, country manager, Servier

zilian companies operate only in Brazil. The necessity today is to cover South America: treat all countries as a one. Who is in all of them? Of companies based in Latin America, only Bagó. Others may be in Argentina, Mexico, and

Brazil, but Bagó is present in Chile, Ecuador, Peru, Bolivia, Paraguay, etc.” Though present in oncology, cardiology, and OTC, Loaiza Sotomayor gives the example of Keflex, a former product of Eli Lilly’s, which after three unsuccessful launch attempts it finally decided to sell the brand in 2005. Two years later, Bagó owned Keflex, and

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Brazil report was told the impossible couldn’t be done: increasing sales on a product with 15 other branded generic competitors; decreasing all expenses, sampling, and distributor’s discount. Yet within one year Bagó was generating far more money for the product. “I don’t want a big factory or a big sales force. I want a big profit,” says Sotomayor. “I want to create a structure into which I can put

products, and each one will contribute profit. Recently, I visited one of Brazil’s largest generics companies. They were proud to have volumes in the millions and millions of units. But what’s their profit? 0.01%! Bagó is a micro-company by comparison, yet earns the same amount of profit. Brazilian people tend to have overarching ambitions—‘I want to be No. 1 in the world!’—while losing

sight of the true goal.” Other companies look to the government as strategic partners. As Cesar Rengifo, managing director Otto Phillipp Braun, of GlaxoSmith- managing director, Kline Brazil em- B.Braun phasizes, “GSK is always trying to follow the government agenda, and adapting the strategy toward what the Brazilian government needs and what we believe is the future, to work together to make good achievements in this direction,” which may sound like a modest assessment of a longstanding government collaboration dating back 20 years, with highprofile agreements making international impact, such as a multibillion-dollar tech transfer agreement to manufacture Synflorix, a pediatric pneumococcal vaccine. Speaking about Synflorix, Rengifo notes, “that deal is probably the most visible, but GSK has similar achievements in every area. When you have an agenda of diversification, you must take advantage of all the opportunities available in the market. We didn’t start at US$2.6 billion right away—we started 20 years ago with technology transfer.” And he points out that the Brazilian government uses the Hib Vaccine transfer, already a reality, as a benchmark standard. What’s next for GSK in this field? “Following Synflorix, GSK has moved further into R&D, and now corporate research on the

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Brazil report Dengue vaccine is a codevelopment with Fiocruz, and we remain very optimistic on that partnership,” says Rengifo. “We are in the enviable position of having a Cesar M. Rengifo, president, GSK headstart on other companies which may be trying to start partnerships from scratch.”

Such a headstart is clear when talking with Roche Brazil, which although has been in the country for over 80 years, and positioned as the No. 1 company in Latin America based on its primary care portfolio, has had to play catchup on the government side. Since 2009, Roche has repositioned itself in Brazil, restructuring, hiring, and increasing competitiveness—but, according to Adriano Treve, director president of Roche Brazil, “one key factor is that we started discussions and collabora-

tion with the government which we did not do before. The government is an important customer for us. It’s just that we had little experience to collaborate with Adriano Treve, the public sector.” director and president, Roche Talking about a r app ro c h e m e nt , and whether the government can move

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Brazil report competing head-to-head with generics—and winning the battle with our brands. We’ve shown that if we make adequate moves in line with the government and the market we can win the battle,” Rengifo concludes. Loaiza Sotomayor concurs on this cooperative spirit, and offers a friendly message to those looking to enter: “I invite them to know Brazil, a large and very nice country with a high level of competition. A place where you can learn a lot of concepts and strategies that are not in any book or university. Working here is a great experience that makes you a stronger and better person. Of course, this is mainly due to the great heart of the Brazilian people. It’s difficult, and often complicated, but you learn a lot. Some years here is more than a Harvard MBA!”

gic intent of the government closer to industry, Treve is quite sound. Politicians says, “The willingness is want to give more healthcare there for sure. The question, to the population, and they as everywhere in the world, recognize the need to move is about prices? There are faster and put money behind two opposing positions: the the decision, and that private government has no or little industry must work side by money to spend, and their side with the government to budgets are under pressure, Manuel Fernando make it happen. Of course, and we need to make sure we Loaiza Sotomayor, president, Bagó GSK is always pushing innogive access to patients to our vation, but at the heart of all products. If we go along our own paths we will never meet. So we we do is driving access for patients to need to meet somewhere in the middle our medicines and vaccines.” Addressing the ever-touchy issue so we can both achieve our goals.” Now, however, “the top priority is to of pricing, Rengifo seems nonchalant. have a good working relationship with “This has led to decisions like in antibiotics, where we decreased prices by the government.” Rengifo can offer advice based on 60% to open access to more patients,” his experience at the head of that learn- he says. “What we’ve found is that the ing curve. As he explains, “the strate- volumes compensate, and now we’re

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interview with: Dirceu Barbano – President, ANVISA

What is it about ANVISA that can be learned by some of the richest, most developed countries in the world? I think that there is something very significant that has happened in the regulatory activity here in ANVISA. ANVISA is twelve years old. Over these twelve years, and though it might seem as if we are only beginning our activities, we have presided over a period of rapid and significant changes here in Brazil. What’s important is what the agency, in this period, has inserted in this period of economic change. It poses an agenda of a dialogue in economic and industrial development. ANVISA makes a great contribution that combines economic development with the development of medicines and medical devices. This great change in industry has resulted in a greater competitiveness of the generics industry and innovation demands of the multinationals. Thus, the value of ANVISA is very significant for other countries.

Some point is Brazil’s world-class regulatory environment as the number one selling point while others say there is some unfortunate lack of speed. What’s ANVISA’s opinion on the matter? We’re speaking of two types of performance here. One is related to quality and rigour in our regulatory actions. The other is about efficiency. ANVISA can accept that the performance of rigour interferes with the efficiency, but not the other way around. ANVISA counts over 2,000 workers who seek to preserve rigour while enhancing efficiency. There are cases that indicate a way to make these two performances closer. This involves an improvement in norms, and searching for a focus on health risks. In the case of medical devices, ANVISA has identified lower 34

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risks of registration and in these instances has implemented a simplified registration process. This permits the team analyzing the relevant documents to allocate more time for products of greater risks. Two years ago, the standard for the approval of medical devices was one and a half years. Now, it’s 60 days, and there is a ceiling set, to a maximum of 120 days. In the case of implants, the limit is eight months. This is a lot faster than the past. With medicines, we are going through a similar process, with special norms for products with lower risks. Our priority is to work on registration of new products, and the associated analysis of clinical trial data. With generic drugs, the focus is on strategic products, with the highest priority assigned to new products which break monopolies and allow new products to compete at lower prices. The second priority in generics is those products which are in a less competitive market. Another priority is products considered strategic for the public health system. These are objects of the PPPs. The PPPs involve another strategy of the government, which is the possibility of the nationalization and vertical integration of the production chain. This involves a private pharmaceutical company, a private API company, and a public laboratory. We speak of a change in regulatory process towards risk assessment, alterations in the work processes, and also using information technology to simplify all of the steps mentioned. At the end of this year, ANVISA will start a process of electronic registration of new drugs. This will simplify the prior requirement of hard copies of documents.

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Meanwhile, some companies call for so-called “fast track” procedures. It’s important to note that this does not exist anywhere in the world! We have a very clear orientation from the government, and it is one you will hear from the Ministry of Health: every time there is a question of whether to put public or private sector interests first, we don’t hesitate for even half a second to opt for the public interest.

ANVISA needs to maintain a frank and open dialogue with companies

Recently the rights of Aché’s generic version of Lundbeck’s Lexapro which had been on the market since 2009 were repealed. You called it a “dangerous precedent”. How do you see this as an impediment to further growth?

economy continues to grow, and that this growth transforms, simultaneously, into greater social justice. President Dilma has a phrase that is very profound, though it appears very simple: “We want to live in a country that is effectively rich.” This means a country where people don’t feel deprived of necessities of health and education. My ambition is that we are in a condition to help. Helping means, on one hand, understanding that it’s possible to be rigourous in health regulation and at the same time support development. We must be as rigourous now as we have been over the past 10 years, because this is one of the values that have helped Brazilian companies as they move towards globalization. ANVISA needs to maintain a frank and open dialogue with companies. The more qualified the companies are, the more easily their products will be registered, the more easily they can grow their sales, the more easily people will have access to drugs. There’s another important task: ANVISA coordinates the system of health vigilance that involves 27 states and more than 5,500 municipalities. The entire network must understand its role, and that its centralized nature represents a strength. It is fundamental for ANVISA to support its development. I hope that in 2014 when you come back we will have advanced in these issues, in foreign industrial interest to perform more clinical trials in Brazil in addition to more and more steps of new product development. We hope Brazilian companies will continue growing in the generic markets, and commercializing biotechnology - even if they are copies - that can occupy an important share of the market. We also hope ANVISA continues to place itself among its worldwide peers as an institution closely linked with Brazilian industry that is no longer merely a national authority, but a trustworthy institution that is indeed responsible for the safety of these products appearing all over the world. And this path, as we understand it, always implies identifying strategic health authorities and establishing bilateral cooperation. Whether this be relations with our European equivalents in Sweden, France, or Portugal, where we have already had more progress, or Canada, Australia, and of course, the United States, as well as our ongoing partnerships with Latin American agencies.

The precedent is a very dangerous one, because it comes from the principle that these clinical trials for new product registration - which are also published in magazines and whose data are used daily so that physicians can prescribe the medicines properly and understand how they work - would be the

At the end of this year, ANVISA will start a process of electronic registration of new drugs property of the laboratories. In this sense, we reaffirm that in Brazil, generics are registered when they demonstrate bioequivalence to the reference products no longer protected by patents, and are therefore guaranteed safe and secure.

We first came to Brazil four years ago. If we were to return in four years, what would you hope we would see? In 2015, you will probably see me somewhere else - because of mandate requirements. In fact, my mandate is up for renewal this October, and can only last to a maximum of 2014. Therefore I welcome you back at 2014 for the best time to find me here! I have a number of ambitions, as much as a Brazilian citizen as the Director of ANVISA. ANVISA has a very important role to play for Brazil at this moment. We have a perspective that the

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interview with: Nelson Mussolini – Executive Director, SINDUSFARMA

Brazil has a 33.9% consumer tax on pharmaceuticals. Why does a country which is growing so quickly maintain such a high tax burden? We don’t understand why. It’s completely crazy. Looking at the rest of the world, the average rate is 6.3%. In many countries, like the US, Canada, and the UK, the number is 0%. I think it’s easier to collect taxes from the pharmaceutical industry. We have a very specific market, not a lot of companies, and a system to collect taxes more easily than others. Pharmaceuticals are sold only in pharmacies.

Starting January 1st, Brazil is led by a new President, Dilma Rousseff. What has been the reception to the change in leadership ? In the campaign, SINDUSFARMA talked with Dilma Rousseff about tax reform, because medicines are a first necessity for a healthy population. Of course, the government promised that this would be the first act of government, to change this tax. But, when they enter power, there are many bills to pay. The fact remains that pharmaceutical tax is a very important source of revenue. There is a further problem in the way taxes are levied. Brazil is a federation, but taxes the equivalent of VAT are partially collected at a state level. For example, of that 33.9%, states receive 18%.

What recommendations would you make - not only in changing the number, but in the way it is administered? The argument by the government in Brazil is that we need to have a big tax because people don’t comply in payment. 10 years ago, I might have agreed with this position. But now, 36

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there are many more information systems, such as those in the Treasury for instance. Now, Brazilians pay much more tax than 10 years ago. Why? Because more people pay tax. It’s our idea and our position that now the government can safely reduce taxes simply because more people pay them. Direct taxes, on the other hand, need to be stopped entirely. We pay taxes on investments. When you buy a machine to increase production, we again pay taxes. When we get a loan from the government to invest in production, we pay tax. This is a big issue. When you look at the total tax paid in Brazil compared to, say, Europe, it’s more or less the same. But in Europe, taxes are paid on profit, whereas in Brazil, taxes are paid on both profit and production. The “salami tributoria”, as we call it - the pie chart - is very complicated. The bureaucracy to pay taxes is very complicated. You need many people to manage the payments. At the end of the day, it comes down to whether a society would rather train its people to produce, or how to pay tax. Nevertheless there are also good sides to the Brazilian system, with a good situation with regard to regulation. For example, with ANVISA. Pharmaceutical companies have good plants, products, bioequivalence, and biopharmaceuticals. Our industry is competitive compared to other countries because the rules, in general, are the same. Another situation that’s good is stability, both political and economic, and that in Brazil problems in one sector do not

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We are not the country of the future – we are the country of now. contaminate the other, unlike China, Russia, Africa, or India. Looking at the BRIC countries - and I’m not saying this just because I’m Brazilian. It’s much more comfortable for capital. There are no problems with government bureaucracy like Russia or China, or the religious problems of India.

Whilst a country like China, exported over $20 billion in API in 2010, they, compared to Brazil, for the whole year, all pharmaceutical-related exports totaled $1.6 billion. Where’s the disconnect? The factor is price. Brazil has very high prices compared to China. Why? Because of social systems. In Brazil, the government supports the older man. In China, the son pays for his father. It’s completely different. The Brazilian government injects more or less $200 billion per year into the retirement system. China doesn’t put a dollar into comparable social issues. Instead, they put it into infrastructure like airports, roads, ports, and rail. We don’t have these same resources to allocate, and it’s a big issue. When our executives in FIESP in CNI (Confederation of National Industry) look at, and make comparisons with China, the first thing I say is “stop” - because it’s completely different. In China, the government is partner of all business. The government has money because they put money in infrastructure instead of people. We have a very stable situation compared to China. In 10 years, it’s very clear that China has to create systems to guarantee retirement, health, and other human welfare issues. In contrasting GDP growth as well, Brazil’s advances at 4-6% annually may be lower than a 10-12% in India, but you need to compare the same base.

So are you part of those who believe in internationalization as opposed to merely imports vs. exports? Looking at other countries in the world - US, Canada, most of Europe, etc. - it’s normal for a negative pharmaceutical trade balance. It’s different in China, India, and Ireland. It’s natural to import more pharmachemical products than export, because you need capacity and economies of scale. It’s crazy to say that in order to compete we need to create a pharmachemical industry in Brazil. We don’t have markets for it in Brazil. We need

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to produce and export products here for Latin America, Asia, and Africa. These are our markets and it’s foolish to believe otherwise. Africa is an easier and more comfortable market for Brazil, where among other advantages, in countries like Angola and Mozambique, we speak the same language.

What is your final message to our readers? When you look at Brazil over the last four years, the changes are enormous, even in small percentage changes. If you have 4% of the poor people in Brazil change from what we call class E to class D, it has a significant change in the market, with only 10% of the population. On a global scale, international pharmaceutical companies are increasingly interested in Brazil. Why was Teuto bought by Pfizer? Market access. Market share. They are buying access to a poorer class. Because now, there is a new class of consumers. Higher

We have a stable government and financial situation, and our regulation is the same as the best countries. employment brings not only social security but private security, too. With private security, when you have a headache you go to the doctor. When you’re an employee and you have a headache, you go to the company medical centre. The final message to the international community is to look for Brazil. We are not the country of the future - we are the country of now. We have the market, we have the policies. We have a stable government and financial situation, and our regulation is the same as the best countries. When the market grows 20%, as it has in the last year and will do again this year, it’s a good sign for the future. If you had asked me these questions 10 years ago, my answer would be completely different, to put your money in another country. But if you look now, it’s a very good place to put your money. Capital likes stable countries. And now Brazil is a stable country.

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interview with: Claudio Bergamo – CEO, Hypermarcas

Hypermarcas is a huge, diversified corporation that sells everything from shampoo, to medicine. Would you consider it a consumer goods company that happens to sell pharmaceuticals, or the other way around? The company´s focus is on Health, Personal Care and Beauty products. In Brazil, the combination of these businesses under the same platform is quite synergetic. They share resources such as channels, clients, factories, media, raw materials, product development, among others. Also, their combination enables scale, quite critical nowadays. Recently, given the fast speed of the Company growth in the last years, we split the management into two major Business Units: Pharma and Consumer, while maintaining corporate functions and back office services shared. This structure allows Hypermarcas to focus more on specific organic growth opportunities, while taking advantage of synergies, efficiencies and scale, factors we consider critical to long term sustainable profitable growth.

You speak of the importance in having a uniquely Brazilian approach to Brazil. In In your view is there a difference in the way international companies approach Brazil? In fact, there are many international companies that have been in Brazil for many years - some have left, and some have stayed. But it all depends on how they view the country: Is Brazil a destination for their products and brands, or is it a regional emerging market with specific characteristics, where to compete they do more than reapplying existing strategies from developed markets? In fact, Brazil is a unique emerging enormous market that requires specific strategy to successfully

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compete. Historically, the market was very fragmented, with more than 50% of total market in the hands of Brazilian companies. Hypermarcas saw the opportunity to consolidate successful family owned companies going through succession issues. Previously, these companies competed against each other, not taking advantage of the synergies that would have existed if they were grouped under the same platform. The company performed many acquisitions - almost 25 since April 2008, when it became public - and continued to further develop many of these companies. As a result, Hypermarcas now has the best portfolio of businesses and brands in all major relevant markets, being the # 1 in OTCs, #1 in Branded Generics, #2 in RX, #2 in Dermo-Cosmetics, #1 in Condoms, #1 in Sweeteners, etc. The company delivers high levels of growth and high number of products launches, supported by heavy investments on field sales forces, efficient operations, strong distribution and demand generation.

Though we’ve seen a rash of M&A activity, with an average industry EBITDA hovering at 20, do you anticipate much room for near-term con-

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solidation in Brazil? There are still opportunities for further consolidation, but we believe we have acquired the best assets available in the last years. Hypermarcas M&A strategy was to acquire the best companies, which could be further developed - not “bargain” situations. Nowadays, if you go into a drug store, there is not a single section where Hypermarcas doesn’t have a product diapers, cosmetics, men’s and women’s care etc -, extending through OTC and generics. And, in many of these markets, we have relevant market shares and leadership positions.

You do not necessarily have to invent new molecules to do business in Brazil

What is the fastest moving channel in Brazil? It is the drug store channel. Historically, Brazil had hyperinflation until not long ago. Therefore, people used to go to hypermarkets at the beginning of each month to make their purchases, because they were afraid to erode the buying power of their salaries. This had resulted in the very fast development of the hypermarket concept. In the meantime, drug stores started to win market share at neighbourhood convenience format, becoming the option for consumers to shop, for not only drugs, but also personal care products. Nowadays, 40% of a drug store is personal care, so, positioning Hypermarcas in that environment was very important. After the acquisition of Mantecorp, on December of 2010, the company became the largest supplier for this channel.

What is the key differentiator at a product level? Is there innovation in product development as much as in brand and channel strategy? There are many products that Brazilians still don’t use, when compared to developed countries. As a result, you do not necessarily have to invent new molecules to do business in Brazil. It’s a different mindset and approach. In mature economies everyone seems to have everything - multiple cars, televisions and wide access to medicines, for example. Here in Brazil, there are many untapped needs to be fulfilled. We focus our products development more in innovation, as opposed to invention. For example, launching a new product with a different amount, a different package size, or different associations. This type of development is more concerned with consumer insights, doctor insights and market research, as opposed to scientific research. That given, Brazil still has many, many unfulfilled needs.

What are the biggest challenges at Hypermarcas? Hypermarcas has just passed through an intense wave of in-

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organic growth. Whenever a company sets such an ambitious target, like we did, it’s necessary to focus more on M&A strategy. At the moment, Hypermarcas is focusing more in an organic and consistent growth, consolidations of operations and development of a new organization structure

Brazil is a big country, but the size of the country itself imposes an eventual growth limit. What is the ceiling to Hypermarcas’ growth? What is next? In Brazil, people income will continue to grow for the next 15 to 20 years. The growth potential is huge, and given the unique platform we have developed, I can say that Hypermarcas is quite well prepared to “sail with the strong winds ahead”.

Where will that put Hypermarcas in the five or 10 year time horizon? Currently, Hypermarcas is a R$ 5 billion company in revenues. The company has the potential to double that in pure organic growth, excluding further M&A in the middle term

Hypermarcas has succeeded where many international companies have failed. What would you describe as the recipe for tackling the Brazilian market for our international readers? The recipe is this: use lots of common sense, think simple and act fast. We try to look at things like outsiders. And by looking from the outside, we see opportunities that people on the inside don’t. At Hypermarcas we have a basic orientation towards finding solution, not problems. Finding problems is easy. As an overall message about Brazil, I use to say that my generation grew up hearing that Brazil would be the country of the future. And, hopefully, now the future seems to have come. We believe that “The future is now” for Brazil.

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interview with: Avi Meizler - President and Founder, Meizler Biopharma

You moved from construction to Pharmaceuticals. Can you share that story for our readers? In the 1980s, Brazil experienced a difficult economic time. Projects and constructions were postponed: banks began to freeze investments, after a long period of rapid expansion where subsidiaries seemed to be launched nearly every day. My company’s best clients were banks, as well as manufacturers of paper and cellulose, and automotive firms like GM and Volkswagen. When the business in these sectors dramatically declined, I decided to make a shift to pharma. This shift was a result of pure accident and coincidence. In 1989, a partnership was made between six friends and business owners called Sixpar, which included a banker, lawyer, and even a local representative of Walt Disney. We all agreed Brazil had a high potential for industrialization, but what Brazil was missing was updated technologies. We recognized that if Brazil was to join a global market, which was a foreign concept at the time, there would be many opportunities to bring technologies to the country. Sixpar subsequently entered into some successful joint-ventures in energy, partnering universities and industry together. Then one day there was an opportunity in pharmaceuticals. Five of the partners said, “I don’t know, I don’t care, I don´t want it.” So I decided to take it on myself, together with a doctor and pharmacist, we studied the opportunity. And the rest is history.

Since then, Meizler has expanded into a laundry list of therapeutic areas, everything from biotechnology to hemoderivatives to and chronic disease treatment. Would you identify a focus linking these diverse therapeutic areas?

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Meizler’s focus is as much as possible on hospitals, institutions, public and private including MOH special program (e.g. haemophilia) needs. We don’t have a single product available to pharmacy. The fact is that we must be competitive in all the products, because the purchasing system here in hospitals is under tender - which is the same all over the world.

How important are Meizler’s international ambitions? To this end, we’ve seen partnerships with Activa-CRO and GP Pharm. Right now Meizler is at the beginning stages of its internationalization in Latin America, which has been happening for two years, and is looking to increase this international participation slowly and surely. Meizler, as a potential partner for pharmaceutical companies in Brazil or Latin America, is first and foremost a professional and ethical company. We give a lot of attention and respect to our customers, physicians and patients as well to detail, technical quality, and marketing and promotion There is another, new side of Meizler. At the beginning of 2010, Meizler decided to change the focus and vision, and

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ucts. Of course there is always risk, but we have confidence in this group, and we’ve reduced the risk by choosing the right people and partners.

Meizler, as a potential partner for pharmaceutical companies in Brazil or Latin America, is first and foremost a professional and ethical company. while we are keeping the main range of products and concentration on institutions as I mentioned, in parallel we have decided to build a biotech manufacturing plant. Meizler wants to be among one of the first companies in Brazil in the manufacture of biotechnology products, but even this wasn’t enough - and we have decided to also enter into development, which is even rarer in Brazil, which traditionally has not had the mentality for this. Brazilians usually prefer products ready for commercialization. However, Meizler decided to develop a recombinant genetic product, which is currently under development JV with European-Argentinean company. This dovetails nicely with a long-term participation in the market and the Brazilian government’s policy to foster local manufacturing.

Biotechnology development in Brazil sounds risky. What is it about Meizler that makes it competitive against companies which can do their development in the US, Germany, Singapore, and merely import that to Brazil at a later stage? Everything’s risky. It’s a calculated risk. First of all, Meizler was lucky to find the right people to make the development, because everything behind biotechnology is about knowledge. The group behind us makes us feel very comfortable, with 2530 years already in biotech, and a lot of successful experience in development, marketing, launching, and follow-up of prod-

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You had a long career in a completely different industry before pharmaceuticals. How would you define your management style, having experienced a diversity of managerial problems? I can define it in one word, independent of the field or activity: Leadership. With the right leadership, you can choose the right professional people to put around you, with each as the best in their field, activity, or specialty, and motivate and create leaders who can make decisions in turn. For this, you don’t have to be specialized, you can be a generalist but with leadership. This is my style. I’m an architect, and 21 years ago I entered a field I did not understand a thing about. The secret is to choose the right people, and not to make a single decision until you understand very well. You need to be convinced.

If we were to return to Meizler in five years, what could we expect to see? You would see a company at least five times as big as it is now. This will be achieved by expanding our biotechnology investments and continuing the expansion throughout Latin America. Several decisions made two years ago, which of course will take some time to come to fruition, will be the drivers of this growth. We shall scale up manufacturing, formulation, injectables, and API. As well, in January 2011, a new division was created in Meizler, a new line called Wellness. If all goes well, Meizler will soon be a top 5 dermocosmetic company, and we have already closed several contracts in breast implants in botox. Meizler is working with short, medium and long term plans. To borrow an expression from my architecture days, Meizler is now building a solid foundation for the future.

The secret is to choose the right people, and not to make a single decision until you understand very well. March 2012

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interview with: Heraldo Marchezini - President, Sanofi Brazil

Brazil appears to be the crown jewel of Sanofi’s portfolio, with the largest global production outside of Sanofi’s traditional home in France. What’s the perspective at ground level? As you correctly said, Sanofi stands very differently from other companies in emerging markets, for many reasons. Our historical presence is one, but mainly the difference is in our culture of understanding diversity and our adaptability to many different markets, which is definitely the case in Brazil. Historical presence notwithstanding, Sanofi has adapted a lot to local market demand. That’s a key element to understand why Sanofi in Brazil is the leading pharma company, and the only one really competing with other local players. The Brazilian affiliate also has the largest turnover in emerging markets for Sanofi. We have a really diversified approach, which spans from generics, to OTC, consumer goods, prescription, mature products, vaccines, Genzyme - the company goes from the basic to the very high tech, to oncology, and everything in between. The reality is that you have to adapt to local needs. Brazil has a demand for everything; it’s a matter of how you manage this. There’s much more volume, and our industrial presence is significant, because we have medicines that really fit to the vast majority of the population’s needs.

Can you speak to the attractiveness of allocating investments not only towards serving a strong domestic market, but towards stimulating the kind of innovation that can be exported around the world? I think this is the next phase of Brazil, and that’s exactly why the government is so keen to develop it. There are some areas in the economy that were faster to evolve in pharma and

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Sanofi in Brazil is the leading pharma company, and the only one really competing with other local players health science. Sanofi is searching out and scouting for these areas, with the Biominas partnership for example, but it’s important not to forget that we’ve invested elsewhere, such as phase III, phase IIb, and phase IIa trials. Sanofi, in addition to developing several clinical trials centres of expertise in diabetes and oncology, is also looking to tropical diseases. You mention the vaccine relationship with Butantan, which is an important case for flu vaccines. The Brazilian subsidiary also contributes to the Sanofi Access to Medicines Program. Treatment for Leishmaniose, a tropical disease, is sold at cost, as the meglumine antimoniate is considered by the WHO to be an essential drug in treatments, for which the world production centre is located in the city of Suzano, in Brazil. Overall, Sanofi really wants to be at the vanguard of what can be done in terms of research, and look to cooperate with projects. Indeed, it’s a natural phase of Brazil, and a very legitimate point on the government’s side to develop local innovation.

You mentioned that life here at Sanofi is never boring, what makes you personally most excited?

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You may not notice, but over 95% of our portfolio, in addition to being locally produced, is out of patent - yet we are growing in double digits, reaching nearly 20% in recent years. You may interview companies who say they are top growth companies in Brazil, but it’s important to ask about their percentage of patents, and what will happen the moment they lose their patent protection. Brazil has a different market set-up, and a growing but still very small reimbursement scheme, so we have to work out the business in a different way, especially considering the strength and importance of highly competitive local players. In doing so, there are many challenges. First of all, everyone wants to claim to be number one, but if you look at the IMS data, retail and non-retail, you’ll see that Sanofi is by far the number one company. We really want to keep growing, address the market reality, keep bringing new products, from the top end to the most basic, which can fit to the market reality. We have worked very hard and developed centers locally to bring just that, and innovation can be anything from a new CHC product, to the introduction of Jevtana, which was just launched in Brazil and is a significant improvement for patients with prostate cancer. At the same time we have Lantus, which is bringing significant growth to the company, and on top of that has changed the lives of many diabetics. Having said that, there are dozens of generic products being developed in Medley to match what will be the off-patent needs of the population and the emerging middle-class that will demand generics.

How is Sanofi likely to look in Brazil five years from now? Chris Viehbacher’s arrival in 2008 was instrumental in pushing ahead a deep transformation in our organization. At that time, our subsidiary was seeking to reinforce its position in some fast growing segments in the Brazilian market, such as generics and biosimilars. The diversification strategy encouraged by

There are some areas in the economy that were faster to evolve in pharma and health science. FOCUS REPORTS

Over 95% of our portfolio, in addition to being locally produced, is out of patent – yet we are growing in double digits Chris fostered this dynamics to fit to the local needs as much as possible. What will be next is a continuation of this process - how fast we understand the emerging Brazilian middle-class demand, how we can improve talents that keep bringing new ideas about how to tackle the future of Brazil, which will also change. There are already changes in the health system; how will it look 10 years from now? We have to anticipate this far in advance, so when the changes do take place, we can already be ahead of our competitors and ready to go. Our ambition is how to be prepared not only for tomorrow, but for long-term. Fortunately, Sanofi has a unique position, and from there we are in the best possible moment for this future and already thinking what the next chapter will be.

You have an interesting piece of furniture in your office - a signed basketball. What’s the story? This basketball was signed by Oscar Schmidt, who was, and is, the best Brazilian basketball player of all-time. Now he works in television, and sometimes as a coach. He is most famous for winning the gold medal at the Pan-American Games in Indianapolis in 1987 versus the USA. He led the only team in that tournament that beat the USA. He’s an amazing man, and also gives motivational speeches. From time to time we invite Oscar, who is a tremendously inspiring man, to talk about passion, and how the Brazilian team could have ever beaten the Americans at home. It’s especially impressive because in that particular gold medal game, the Brazilians were losing at halftime, and were able to, amazingly, beat them! He’s in the basketball Hall of Fame.

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interview with: Martin Nelzow – President, Boehringer Ingelheim

You came to Boehringer Ingelheim in 2009 - what are some of the most exciting milestones and achievements you have presided over during this time? Looking back on almost three years, my assignment was to open this company and to integrate it more with Brazil. We have a quite enlightened office where we put people together, hire top talent from the market to enter into new areas like oncology and diabetes, and the hospital and governmental businesses. Actually I am also from outside and the first Brazilian as general manager Boehringer Ingelheim is one of the few companies who have retained an OTC business in Brazil. Many companies have decided to focus on either OTC or prescription. What we believe here in Brazil is that there’s no clear separation between prescription and CHC. There’s an overlap here. What Boehringer Ingelheim has done is on one hand invest more in the CHC business, create a trade and point of sales area. We visit 12,000 pharmacies - this is something new. On the other hand we have been visiting medical doctors with more focus on 25.000 MD rather than 50.000 before. As the result of this in 2011, Boehringer Ingelheim is the multinational with the best performance.

What do you mean by performance? AstraZeneca and Nycomed are number one and two in terms of growth. Exactly - in 2010. In that year, we grew around 6%. Now in 2011 we grew 14%. We changed the way we work and the focus on the Brazilian part of Boehringer Ingelheim. We have very Brazilian brands, like Buscopan and Anador doing well, besides Micardis (our antihypertensive drug) is the number 1

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brand in growth this year.

What is Boehringer Ingelheim’s policy in terms of bringing the latest innovations to the Brazilian market? What we are doing is launching tremendous brands and compounds coming from our research in Germany. Boehringer Ingelheim invests 2.5 billion Euros every year in R&D, which is more than the sales of the biggest Brazilian company, so of course from this commitment comes a nice portfolio and pipeline which we’re submitting as fast as possible. Boehringer Ingelheim has been very encouraged and committed with Brazil to launch new innovations, rather than adopt a wait-and-see approach and launch in different countries first.

One area of added value is clearly the $75 million in recent investments in the Itapecerica da Serra plant. What’s the strategic motivation for these allocations? This plant is the plant for Brazil, of course, and also for other countries in Latin America. We also export for Europe. It’s quite

Boehringer Ingelheim has been very encouraged and committed with Brazil to launch new innovations FOCUS REPORTS


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we need good people with good backgrounds working in a way where ideas can flow a competent plant, with a lot of responsibility for exporting to other countries, alongside some contract manufacturing. With great brands like Anador and Buscopan growing at 30%, a great plant is essential.

What can you tell about your management style? In this office I sit together with my directors, 10 metres from a trainee or a junior manager. We see each other, we talk with each other. On the other part of the building is a library, coffee machines with tables and chairs, and massage area. I really believe that if people are in their best shape - and I mean that across all dimensions - we will really get high-performance. In a company like Boehringer Ingelheim, launching the products we’re launching, investing the money we’re investing, we need good people with good backgrounds working in a way where ideas can flow. This company has 1,000 employees. If we wait for the normal processes to get to know information you can forget it. What we created is an office that works like a network. I really believe a lot in this network idea. Second, we try to hire people with very strong academic and professional track records. Speaking to Generation Y: they are not working in departments anymore. They are working on projects, on challenges. They may say, “I want to be part of the launch of Pradaxa that will change the lives of patients and reduce the main cause of death in Brazil.” That’s the story with one of our launches which is great! For Anador, which is an analgesic: “We want to have it in every home in Brazil. Let’s do it!” This moves people much more than saying, “today you’re a Junior Manager, and in two years, we’ll create a career plan, and then you will stay two years in Germany...”. I really believe in the realization of the people and from what I have seen, people produce much

FOCUS REPORTS

more than I can imagine. Give them confidence, trust, and freedom, and that’s how we really can create new approaches and change. Take the example of Buscopan. The product, an anti-spasmodic, had a 60% market share. We were by far the leader. Some other company might have chosen to forget about increasing market share. But now we have 75%. And the market is growing 20% per year.

Where do you want to bring Boehringer Ingelheim in Brazil? First, we want to double the company in 5 years. I don’t think Boehringer will enter where it’s not competitive, such as in generics. We have quite innovative brands and we’ll be quite successful with them. Second is OTC. We are gaining market share already, and this year we are already among the top OTC companies even compared with the nationals. During my discussions with my team, we talk about how to fly even more of our CHC brands, how to introduce all-new products. Boehringer Ingelheim has a plenty of diabetes products to enter in the market. We have probably the biggest product in Brazil that will be Pradaxa, and other products in oncology, coming.

On a personal note, what is your main motivation after spending more than 20 years in the chemical and pharmaceutical industry? This morning, we launched our diabetes franchise. We hired 200 reps exclusively for the launch of the first brand. To enter the diabetes market is something fantastic. Diabetes is not anymore a disease - it’s an epidemic. If at Boehringer Ingelheim I can participate on a project like this, it motivates me. If we are going to launch Pradaxa product to reduce stroke, the main cause of death in Brazil, I think it’s something great. So too is working with innovative, interesting, and dynamic people in a nice environment.

we want to double the company in 5 years March 2012

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Exclusive interviews More interviews available on www.pharma.focusreports.net:

Jose Antonio Alas President, Eli Lilly Brazil

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Devaney Baccarin Vice President and General Manager, Astellas

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Jose Bastos President, MSD Brazil

Otto Philipp Braun Managing Director, B. Braun

Bruno Chassot President, Zodiac Pharmaceuticos

Claudio Coracini General Manager Specialty Pharma, Shire Brasil – Mexico

Guillaume Drianno Country Manager, Servier Brazil

Orlando Famá Jr. President, Torrent

Rogério Mansur Senior Director of DHL Life Sciences Operations

Odnir Finotti President, ProGenericos

Carlos Kiffer President, GC-2

Rubens Lima General Manager, Ipsen

Laurena de Lameida Magnoni Regional Director, Besins

Rafael Martau Commercial Director, Bomi Brazil

Samuel Mauricio Vice President, Octapharma Brazil

Stephen Merrick President, BristolMyers Squibb Brazil

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March 2012

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Gustavo Mizraje General Manager, Novo Nordisk Brazil

Maria del Pilar Mu単oz Director of Sustainability and New Business, Eurofarma

Nilton Paletta President for Latin America, IMS

Rubens Pedrosa President, AstraZeneca Brazil

Francisco Piccolo Managing Director, Biogen Idec Brazil

Fernando Pimentel Minister of Development and Industry Brazil

Giles Platford General Manager, Nycomed Brazil

Denise QUEIROZ General Manager, Erowlabs - The Watson Group

Cesar M. Rengifo President, GSK Brazil

Claudio L. Santos Senior Regional Director, Medical Affairs, Shire

Marisa Sanvito Executive Director, Quintiles Brazil

Rosa Maria Scavarelli CEO, Theraskin

Jose Correia Da Silva President of ABIQUIFi, the Pharma Chemicals Industry Association

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Manuel Fernando Loaiza Sotomayor President of Bago

Paula Goldenstein Strassman CEO, PGS/Medical Statistics

Adriano Treve Director President, Roche Brazil

Alexander Triebnigg President, Novartis Brazil

March 2012

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Company directory FEDERAL GOVERNMENT ABDI Agencia Brasileira de Desenvolvimiento Industrial www.abdi.com.br SBN Quadra 1 - Bloco B - Ed. CNC - 14º andar Brasilia +55 (61) 3962-8700 +55 (61) 3962-8715 ANVISA www.portal.anvisa.gov.br Setor de Indústria e Abastecimento (SIA) - Trecho 5, Área Especial 57, Brasília (DF) CEP: 71205-050 APEX www.apexbrasil.com.br SBN Quadra 02 Lote 11 - Ed. Apex- CEP 70040-020 | Brasilia-DF +55 (61) 3426-0202 BNDES www.bndes.gov.br Avenida República do Chile, 100 | Rio de Janeiro - RJ 20031-917 +55 (21) 2172-7447 CMED www1.cmedresearch.com/ info@cmedresearch.com Comissão Nacional de Ética em Pesquisa (CONEP) www.conselho.saude.gov.br/comissao/ eticapesq.htm conep@saude.gov.br Esplanada dos Ministérios Bl. G Ed. Anexo Ala B Sl. 13-B Brasilia DF +55 (61) 3315-2951 +55 (61) 3226-6453 Conselho De Saude Suplementar www.ans.gov.br Augusto Severo, 84 Glória Rio de Janeiro/ RJ - CEP: 20021-040 Conselho National De Saude www.condelho.saude.gov.br 48

March 2012

Consellho Nacional de Ciencia y Tecnologia www.cnpq.br presidencia@cnpq.br SHIS QI 1 Conjunto B - Bloco D, 2º andar, Edifício Santos Dumont, Lago Sul, DF, CEP 71605-190 +55 (61) 2108-9402 +55 (61) 2108-9487 Fiocruz ( Oswaldo Cruz Founsation) www.fiocruz.br Av. Brasil, 4365 - Manguinhos, 21040360 Rio de Janeiro +55 (21) 2598-4242 Ministerio Da Saude (Ministry Of Health) www.saude.gov.br Esplanada dos Ministérios - Bloco G Brasília +55 (61) 3315-2425 Ministry of Science and Technology www.mct.gov.br ministro@mct.gov.br Esplanada dos Ministérios, Bloco E, Brasilia +55 (61) 3317-7505 +55 (61) 3317-7997

ASSOCIATIONS ABAFARMA www.abafarma.com.br sac@abafarma.com.br Rua Machado Bittencourt, 205 Cj.56 +55 (61) 5080-3636 +55 (61) 5080-3635 ABCFARMA www.abcfarma.org.br presidencia@abcfarma.org.br Rua Santa Isabel, 160 - 5º Andar - Cj.51 Vila Buarque - São Paulo - SP +55 (11) 3223-8677 +55 (11) 3331-2088

ABIMIP www.abimip.org.br Rua Alvorada 1280. Itaim Bibi, SP +55 (11) 3897 9721 ABIQUIF www.abiquifi.org.br jcs@abiquifi.org.br Avenida Calógeras, 15 / 10° Andar Cep 20030-070 - Centro - Rio De Janeiro - RJ +55 (21) 2220-3005 Rio +55 (11) 3897-9779 Sao Paulo +55 (21) 2524-6506 ALANAC www.alanac.org.br Rua Sansão Alves dos Santos, 433 - 8º andar - cep 04571-090 +55 (11) 5506 8522 AMCHAM (American Chamber of Commerce) www.amcham.com.br amcham.saopaulo@amchambrasil.com.br Rua da Paz, 1431 CEP: 04713-001 - Chácara Santo Antonio - SP +55 (11) 3324-0194 +55 (11) 5180-3777 Associação Dos Laboratórios Farmacêuticos Oficiais Do Brasil Alfob www.alfob.com.br Setor Comercial Sul SCS - Quadra 2 Bloco C - Edifício Serra Dourada - 5º andar - Sala 511 BRASILIA +55 (61) 3225-4456 +55 (61) 3323-9501 CIESP www.ciesp.com.br atendimento@ciesp.org.br Av. Paulista, 1313 - São Paulo / SP - Cep: 01311-923 FOCUS REPORTS


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FIESP - Federação Das Indústrias Do Estado De São Paulo www.fiesp.com.br relacionamento@fiesp.org.br Av. Paulista, 1313 - Edifício Sede FIESP CEP: 01311-923 - São Paulo – SP +55 (11) 3549-4499 Interfarma www.interfarma.org.br Rua Verbo Divino, 1488 – 7º andar – Cjtº. 7ª Chácara Santo Antônio - São Paulo/SP Telefone: (11) 5180-2380 +55 (11) 5183-4247 Pro Genericos www.progenericos.org.br Rua Alvorada, 1280 CEP : 04550-004 São Paulo - SP +55 (11) 3897-9767 +55 (11) 3845-0742

Pharmaceutical companies Aché Laboratórios Farmacêuticos S.A. www.ache.com.Br ache@ache.com.br Rodovia Pres Dutra Km 222, 2 Porto Da Igreja - Cep 07034-904 Guarulhos - Sp +55 (11) 6461-6000 +55 (11) 6461-6144 Actelion www.actelion.com.br Praia de Botafogo 501 1° Andar Bloco Corcovado 22250-040 Rio de Janeiro - RJ +55 (11) 3266 6213 Adapt Produtos Oftalmológicos Ltda www.adaptltda.com.br/ sac@adaptltda.com.br Rua Pio XI, 832 – Alto Da Lapa Cep: 05060-000 – São Paulo Sp +55 (11) 5099-1900 Airela Indústria Farmacêutica Ltda www.airela.com.br/ Rua Luiz Spiandorelli Neto, 60 – Sala 907 – Jardim Paiquerê, CEP: 13271-570 – Valinhos SP +55 (19) 3518-0300 FOCUS REPORTS

Alcon www.alconlabs.com.br Avenida Das Nações Unidas, 12495, 3º Andar Brooklin, Sao Paulo +55 (11) 3732-4000 +55 (11) 3732-4171

Baxter www.baxter.com/ Alfredo Egídio De Souza Aranha, 100 Bloco C, 7° Andar, Ch. Sto. Antonio - Sp +55 (11) 5694-8500 +55 (11) 5694-8540

Allergan www.allergan.com/index.htm Av. Dr. Cardoso De Melo, 1955 13° andar - Edifício Brasílio Machado Vila Olímpia 04548-005 - São Paulo-SP, BRASI +55 (11) 3048-0500

Bayer www.bayer.com/ Rua Domingos Jorge, 1100 Prédio 9501 - 10º Andar - Socorro Cep: 04779-900 - São Paulo - Sp +55 (11) 5694-7002

Amgen www.amgen.com Av. Das Nações Unidas, 14.171 Rochaverá Corporate Towers Marble Tower - 15º Andar Cep: 04794-000 - São Paulo - Sp +55 (11) 3568-2078

Beker www.beker.com.br beker@beker.com.br Estrada Louis Pasteur, 263 - Embu/ SP CEP: 06835-080 +55 (11) 4781-0101

Antibióticos Do Brasil Ltda www.ablbrasil.com.br mtakano@ablbrasil.com.br Rodovia General Milton Tavares De Souza (Sp-332), Km 135 , Itapavussu, Cosmópolis - SP +55 (19) 3872-9000 +55 (11) 3872-9479 Apsen www.apsen.com.br apsen@apsen.com.br Aché Laboratórios Farmacêuticos S.A. Rodovia Pres Dutra Km 222, 2 Porto Da Igreja - Cep 07034-904 Guarulhos - SP +55 (11) 5645-5011 Astellas www.astellas.eu/ Avenida Das Nações Unidas, 14.171 Rochaverá Corporate Towers Torre Marble - 3º Andar, Cj. 302 Cep: 04794-000 - São Paulo - Sp +55 (11) 3027-4500 Aster Produtos Médicos Ltda www.aster.com.br Avenida Independência, 2541 - Caixa Postal 328 Éden Sorocaba - SP +55 (15) 3235-5600 Astra Zeneca www.astrazeneca.com/Home Rodovia Raposo Tavares Km 26,9 (Moinho Velho) Cep: 06707-000 - Cotia - Sp +55 (11) 3737-1200

Besins Healthcare Brasil www.besins-healthcare.com Rua São Sebastião, 305 - Alto Da Boa Vista Cep: 04708-000 – São Paulo - Sp +55 (11) 5525-2430 Biogen www.biogenidec.com.br Edifício Olímpia Trade Av. Dr. Cardoso De Melo, 1.184 17º Andar - Vila Olímpia Cep: 04548-004 - São Paulo - Sp +55 (11) 3568-3400 Biomarin www.bmrn.com/ biomarin-europe@bmrn.com Rua James Joule, 92 - Cj. 42 - Cidade Monções Cep: 04576-080 - São Paulo - Sp +55 (11) 3555-0055 Biominas www.biominas.org.br/ Av. Dr Chucri Zaidan, 920, 9º andar Brooklin Novo - Market Place Torre I CEP: 04.583-904 I São Paulo, SP, Brasil T +55 (11) 3048-4200 Blanver Farmoquímica Ltda www.blanver.com.br/ Rua Joaquim Faustino, 201- Jardim São Paulo 06767-330 - Taboão Da Serra - Sp +55 (11) 4138-8200 March 2012

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Blausiegel Indústria E Comércio Ltda www.blausiegel.net Rodovia Raposo Tavares, Km 30,5, 2833 , Barro Branco -Cotia - SP +55 (11) 4615-9400 +55 (11) 4615-9415 Boehringer Ingelheim www.boehringer-ingelheim.com.br Avenida Das Nações Unidas, 14.171 Rochaverá Corporate Towers Torre Marble - 18º Andar Cep: 04794-000 - São Paulo - Sp +55 (11) 4949-4700 Brainfarma www.brainfarma.com.br/ 18114 - CEP 04626-970 - São Paulo - SP +55 (11) 3897-4122 Brasterapica www.brasterapica.com.br/ R: Olegário Cunha Lobo, 25 Atibaia Jardim - Atibaia - SP Cep: 12942-730 +55 (11) 4414-7788 Bristol Myers Squibb WWW.BRISTOL.COM.BR Rua Carlos Gomes, 924 Santo Amaro - Cep 04743-903 São Paulo - Sp +55 (11) 3882-2000 +55 (11) 246-0151 Bunker Indústria Farmacêutica Ltda www.bunker.com.br Rua Anibal Dos A. Carvalho, 212, Cidade Dutra - SP +55 (11) 5666-0266 +55 (11) 5666-0739 Catalent Brasil Ltda www.catalent.com info@catalent.com Avenida Jerome Case, 1277 – Éden Cep: 18087-220 Sorocaba Sp +55 (15) 3235-3513 Chiesi www.chiesi.com.br cientifico@chiesi.com.br Rua Alexandre Dumas, 1658 12º E 13º Andares - Chácara Santo Antônio Cep: 04717-004 - São Paulo - Sp +55 (11) 3095-2300 50

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Cifarma www.cifarma.com.br/ Av. das Industrias 3651, 33040-130 Belo Horizonte, MG +55 (0) 31 36414100

Evolabis www.evolabis.com.br R. Urussuí, 92 , Conj. 101. Cep: 04542050 - Itaim Bibi - Sao Paulo / SP +55 (11) 3168-0718

Cimed Ind De Medicamentos Ltda www.cimed.ind.br Av. Angelica 2510 5ºandar Higianopolis - São Paulo - Sp +55 (11) 2244-7200

Ezequiel Dias Foundation FUNED www.funed.mg.gov.br/ marina.castro@funed.mg.gov.br Street Earl Pereira Carneiro no. 80 Gameleira - Belo Horizonte / MG - CEP 30510-010

Cristália Pharmaceutical Chemicals Ltda. www.cristalia.com.br Highway Itapira - Lindoia, Km 14 13970-970 - Itapira - Sp +55 (19) 3843-9500 Croda do Brazil Ltda. www.croda.com.br/ Rua Croda, 580 - Distrito Industrial 13054-710 - Campinas - Sp +55 (19) 3765-3500 Daiichi Sankyo www.daiichisankyo.com.br Av. Dr. Chucri Zaidan, 920 - 15º And. Mkt Place - Torre I - Vila Cordeiro Cep: 04583-110 - São Paulo - Sp +55 (11) 5186-4500 Divcom Pharma Indústria Farmacêutica Ltda www.divcom.com.br/divcom/ Rua Luiz Gonzaga D’Avila, 108 São Paulo, 04829-060 +55 (11) 5924-3408 Eli Lilly www.lilly.com.br Av. Morumbi, 8264 - Brooklin Cep: 04703-002 - São Paulo - Sp +55 (11) 2144-6911 EMS SIGMA PHARMA ( EMS Group) www.ems.com.br Ems Rodovia Sp 101 – Km 08 Parque Odimar - Hortolândia – Sp Erowlabs www.erowlabs.com.br Rua Barão De Petrópolis, 311 Rio Comprido - Rio De Janeiro - Rj +55 (21) 3293-9500

Farmacia e Laboratório Homeopatico Almeida Prado Ltda www.homeopatiaalmeidaprado.com.br Praça Benedito Calixto,121 Bairro Pinheiros São Paulo /SP, Cep 05406-040 +55 (11) 3891-1295 FBM Industria Farmacêutica www.fbmfarma.com.br Vp 1B Módulo 9/21 Quadra 8B Daia, Anápolis-Go. +55 (62) 3333-3500 FK Biotec www.fkbiotec.com.br/ CEP: 91.040-600 Porto Alegre - RS Rua da Várzea, 22 +55 (11) 3352.6863 Fontovit Laboratórios Ltda www.fontovit.com.br Rua Antônio Chagas, 862,Sao Paulo - SP CEP 04714001 +55 (11) 5182-9604 Foundation for Popular Medicines FURP www.furp.sp.gov.br Rua Endres, 35, Itapegica - Guarulhos - SP +55 (11) 6423-6000 +55 (11) 6421-6063 Galderma Brasil Ltda www.galderma.com.br Rua Surubim, 373 – 4º Andar Cid. Monções – 04571-050 São Paulo – Sp +55 (11) 3524-6300 Genix Pharmaceutical Industries Ltd. www.genixpharma.com/ info@genixpharma.com FOCUS REPORTS


Pharma.FocusReports.net

Vp 1E Quadra 03 Mod. 1.2 Daia 75132-040 - Anapolis - Go +55 (62) 4014-9000 Genomma Lab www.genommalab.com.br Av Das Nacoes Unidas, 12.551 04578000 Sao Paulo +55 (11) 5255-5081 Genzyme Do Brasil Ltda www.genzyme.com.br Rua Padre Chico, 224 Vila Pompéia - Cep 05008-010 São Paulo - Sp +55 (11) 3874-9950 +55 (11) 3872-6631 GlaxoSmithKline Brazil LTDa www.gsk.com.br Estrada dos Bandeirantes, 8464 Jacarepaguá CEP: 22783-110 - Rio de Janeiro - RJ +55 (11) 2141-6000 Glenmark Pharmaceuticals www.glenmarkpharma.com info@glenmarkpharma.com Rua Frei Liberato De Gries, 548 (Rua Sem Saída) - Jd. Arpoador Cep: 05572-210 São Paulo Sp +55 (11) 5504-2700 Greenpharma Química E Farmacêutica Ltda www.greenpharma.com.br/home/ greenpharma@greenpharma.com.br QUADRA 2-A - Módulos 32 / 35 - DAIA, CEP 75133600 - Anápolis - Goiás +55 (0) 62 3106400

Hebron - Infan Ind. Química Farmacêutica Nacional S.A. www.infan.com.br Av. Lins Petit, 320, 10º e 11º andares Salas 1001 a 1004 e 1101 a 1104 – Boa Vista, CEP: 50070-230 Recife PE +55 (81) 2123-1800 Heel Do Brasil Biomédica Ltda. www.hebron.com.br/ Alameda Tocantins, 630 - G8 - Alphaville 06455-020 - Barueri - SP +55 (11) 4208-3585 Hipolabor Farmacêutica/Sanval Comércio E Indústria Ltda www.hipolabor.com.br/ sac@hipolabor.com.br Rua Nicolau Alayon, 441 – Interlagos Cep: 04802-000 São Paulo SP +55 (11) 5693-4400 Hypermarcas www.hypermarcas.com.br Av. Fernando Cerqueira Cesar Coimbra, 1000 – Centro Empresarial Tamboré Alphaville, CEP: 06465-090 Barueri SP +55 (11) 4166-1000 Inpharma Laboratórios Ltda www.inpharma.com.br inpharma@inpharma.com.br Rua Da Paz, 1839 - Chác. Sto. Antônio Cep: 04713-002 São Paulo SP +55 (11) 5187-2400 Institute of Technology in Medicines Far Manguinhos Av. Comandante Guaranys, nº 447 Jacarepaguá/RJ +55 (11) 3348-5050

Beaufour Ipsen Farmacêutica Ltda www.ipsen.com Av. Eng. Luis Carlos Berrini, 1.297 Cj. 61 - Cidade Monções Cep: 04571-010 - São Paulo - Sp +55 (11) 2645-3092 Isdin Produtos Farmacêuticos Ltda Rua Do Rócio, 84 – 1º Andar – Vila Olímpia 04552-000 São Paulo SP +55 (11) 3018-8700 ITF Chemical Ltda. www.itfchemical.com.br/ Rua Beta, 574 - Área Industrial Norte Complexo Petroquí;Mico De Camaçari 42810-300 - Camaçari - BA +55 (11) 3634-2903 Jansen Farmacêutica Ltda www.janssen-cilag.com.br sac@janbr.jnj.com Rua Gerivatiba, 207 - 11º Andar Butantã, CEP: 05501-900 São Paulo SP +55 (11) 3030-4721 +55 (11) 3030-4933 Johnson & Johnson www.jnj.com St. Paul Street Gerivatiba, 207 Butantã São Paulo - SP CEP 05501-900 JP Industria Farmaceutica www.fontovit.com.br sac@jpfarma.com.br Av. Presidente Castelo Branco, 14095-902 Ribeirão Preto - SP +55 (16) 3512-3500

Grifols Brasil Ltda www.grifols.com/portal/en/grifols/home Rua Umuarama, 263 – Vila Perneta CEP: 83325-000 – Pinhais Pr +55 (41) 3668-2444

Instituto Biochímico Indústria Farmacêutica Ltda. www.biochimico.ind.br/ Rod. Presidente Dutra, Km 310 - Penedo N. S. Fátima - RJ - 27580-000 +55 (24) 3355-9300

Kley Hertz www.kleyhertz.com.br/ Rua Santa Mônica, 1701 - Bairro Industrial São José, Zip code 06715-865, Cotia, SP +55 (11) 4616-9274 +55 (11) 3346-8488

Guerbet Produtos Radiológicos Ltda www.guerbet.com.br fale.conosco@guerbet-group.com Rua André Rocha, 3000 – Jacarepaguá 22710-561 – Rio De Janeiro-RJ +55 (21) 2444-9999

Instituto Butantan www.butantan.gov.br ouvidoria@butantan.gov.br Avenida Vital, 1500, Butantan São Paulo - SP 05503-900 +55 (11) 3726-7222

Laboratório Centroflora Ltda www.centroflora.com.br Rodovia Eduardo Zuccari Km 21,5 Zona Rural -Botucatu - SP +55 (14) 3811-3520 +55 (14) 3815-3772

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Laboratório Farmacêutico Caresse Ltda www.caresse.com.br/ caresse@caresse.com.br Rua José Faganelo, 242 – Jardim Jussara Cep - 16020-000 Araçatuba SP +55 (18) 3631-8990 Laboratório Gross www.gross.com.br/ sac@gross.com.br R. Padre Ildefonso Peñalba, 389 - Todos os Santos Rio de Janeiro/RJ 20775-020 Laboratório Simões www.labsimoes.com.br/ Rua Pereira de Almeida 90 a 104, Praça da Bandeira, Rio de Janeiro - RJ CEP: 20.260-100 +55 (21) 2502-7000 Laboratório Tayuyna Ltda www.advfarma.com.br/medicamentos/ Rua Ampélio Gazeta, 889 Parque Industrial Fritz Berzin Cep: 13460-000 Nova Odessa SP +55 (19) 3476-8550 Laboratório Teuto Brasileiro S/A www.teuto.com.br VP 7-D módulo 11 - Quadra 13 - DAIA CEP: 75.132-140 Anápolis - Goiás +55 (71) 3342-5895 +55 (71) 3342-5895 Laboratórios B. Braun S/A www.bbraun.com.br/ atendimento.br @ bbraun.com Rua Carneiro Da Cunha, 303 Cj.111 Ao 117 - Saúde Cep: 04144-000 São Paulo Sp +55 (11) 5581-5404 Laboratórios Bagó Do Brasil S.A www.bago.com.br sac@bago.com.br Rua Cônego Felipe 365 Taquara – CEP 22713- 010 Rio de Janeiro - RJ +55 (21) 2159-2600 52

March 2012

Laboratórios Baldacci Sa www.lbaldacci.com.br Rua Pedro De Toledo, 520 Vila Clementino São Paulo - SP +55 (11) 5085-4444 +55 (11) 5549-4371

Marjan Farma www.marjan.com.br marjan@marjan.com.br Rua Gibraltar, 165 - Santo Amaro Cep: 04755-070 São Paulo SP +55 (11) 5642-9888

Laboratórios Ferrer Do Brasil Ltda www.ferrergrupo.com Av. Engenheiro Luiz Carlos Berrini, 1511 – Conj. 32 Brooklin Novo - São Paulo – SP – Cep: 04571-011 +55 (11) 2476-7042

Meizler Biopharma S/A www.meizler.com.br Av Prof Vicente Rao, 90 São Paulo-Sp Cep: 04706-900 +55 (11) 4195-6613

Laboratórios Ferring Ltda www.ferring.com.br Praça São Marcos, 624, 1ª Andar Vila Ida São Paulo - Sp +55 (11) 3024-7500 +55 (11) 3024-7522

Mepha Do Brazil Ltda. Estrada do Bandeirantes 4015, CuriçicaJacarepagua, Rio de Janeiro CEP 22775112 +55 (21) 4452-274 +55 (21) 4451-032

La Roche Posay www.laroche-posay.com Av. Eng. Billings, 1729 - Jaguaré, São Paulo, 05321-010

Merck www.merck.com.br/genericos Estrada dos Bandeirantes, 1099 Jacarepaguá - Rio de Janeiro – RJ

Latinofarma Indústrias Farmacêuticas Ltda www.latinofarma.com.br/ sac@latinofarma.com.br Rua Doutor Tomas Sepe, 489 - Jardim Da Glória Cep: 06711-270 Cotia Sp +55 (11) 4612-0819 Leo Pharma Ltda www.leo-pharma.com Avenida Eng. Luis Carlos Berrini, 1645 Conj. 71 Cidade Monções - Cep 04571-011São Paulo - Sp +55 (11) 5502-5829 Lundbeck Brasil Ltda www.br.lundbeck.com brazil@lundbeck.com Rua Lauro Muller, 116 - 22º And 2202 - Torre Do Rio Sul - Botafogo Cep: 22290-160 - Rio De Janeiro - Rj +55 (11) 3873-3000 Luper www.luper.com.br Av. Francisco Samuel Lucchesi Filho, 1039A, Braganca Paulista +55 (11) 4035-7700

Milletroux www.milletroux.com.br/ Praia de Botafogo 440 - 25º andar Rio de Janeiro RJ - CEP 22250-040 +55 (21) 2538-4444 Moksha8 www.moksha8.com Av. Ibirapuera, 2332 Tower1 - 13Th Floor Indianópolis - 04028-002 São Paulo, Sp, Brasil +55 (11) 3041 9300 Msd www.msd.com.br Rua Alexandre Dumas, 2510 Chácara Santo Antõnio -São Paulo - Sp +55 (11) 5189-7700 +55 (11) 5182-7165 Multilab Indústria E Comércio De Produtos Farmacêuticos Ltda. www.multilab.com.br Complexo Fabril, Rs 401, Km 30, Nº 1009, Cep 967000-000,São Jerônimo/RS +55 (11) 3651.5114 FOCUS REPORTS


Pharma.FocusReports.net

Natulab www.natulab.com.br/ natulab@natulab.com.br Rua H cj Urbis II, 8 - Santo Antônio de Jesus, BA +55 (75) 3311 5550 Nature S Plus FTCA Nikkho (Zydus Nikkho Farmacêutica Ltda) www.nikkho.com.br Rua Jaime Perdigão, 431 / 445 CEP: 21920-240 Rio De Janeiro RJ +55 (21) 3393-4266 Novartis www.novartis.com.br Novartis Biociências S.A. Av Prof Vicente Rao, 90 São Paulo-Sp Cep: 04706-900 +55 (11) 5532-7122 +55 (11) 5532-4172 +55 (11) 5532-7942 Novo Nordisk www.novonordisk.com.br Av. Francisco Matarazzo, 1500 – 12º Andar – Ed. New York – Bairro Água Branca – São Paulo – Sp +55 (11) 3868-9100 +55 (11) 3868-9111 Nycomed www.nycomed.com.br Rua Estilo Barroco, 721 - Santo Amaro Cep: 04709-011 - São Paulo - Sp +55 (11) 5188-4400 Octafarma www.octapharma.com.br Avenida Ayrton Senna, 1850 Loja 118 Barra Da Tijuca - Cep 22775-001 Rio De Janeiro - Rj +55 (21) 24303183 +55 (21) 2430-3183 Opem Pharmaceuticals www.opempharma.com.br Rua Frei Caneca, 356 01307-000, Consolação - São Paulo +55 (11) 3123-6800 Ophthalmos www.ophthalmos.com.br Rua Nhandirobas, 471 – Parque Jabaquara Cep: 03449-030 São Paulo SP +55 (11) 5011-3344 FOCUS REPORTS

Parti Dondaduzzi www.pratidonaduzzi.com.br Rua: Mitsugoro Tanaka, Nº 145, Centro Industrial Nilton Arruda,CEP: 85903-630, TOLEDO/PR Pfizer www.pfizer.com.br Rua Alexandre Dumas, 1860 Chácara Santo Antônio - SP Pharlab www.pharlab.com.br Lagoa da Prata, Rua São Francisco, 1.300, Minas Gerais +55 (31) 3261-9090 Pharma Nostra (Pharma Nostra Comercial Ltda) www.pharmanostra.com.br/ Matriz - RJ Rua Aquidabã, 1.144 - Méier Rio de Janeiro - RJ CEP 20720-293 +55 (21) 2141-1555 Pharmaceutical Laboratory of Alagoas LIFAL www.lifal.al.gov.br/ faleconosco@lifal.al.gov.br Q.6 - Tabuleiro do Martins MaceióAlagoas-Cep: 57081-455 +55 (82) 3334-1991 +55 (82) 3372-0622 Pharmadeal (Pharmadeal Ltda – Business Development & Clinical Research) www.pharmadeal.com.br/ Pharmadeal@pharmadeal.com.br Rua Haddock Lobo 846 Cj. 601 Torre Beta São Paulo - SP - Zipcode: 01414-000 +55 (11) 3085-2709 PharmaScience www.pharmascience.com/international/ aparavey@pharmascience.com Rua Gustavo Narkevitiz, 06 - Jabaquara São Paulo/SP - 04.303-220 +55 (11) 2577-3086 +55 (11) 9919-3090

Prati-Donaduzzi & Cia Ltda www.pratidonaduzzi.com.br Rua Mitsugoro Tanaka, 145 – Centro Indl. Nilton Arruda Cep: 85903-630 Toledo Pr +55 (11) 2103-1166 Profarma www.profarma.com.br Av. das Américas, 500 bloco 12 salas 205 a 208 Barra da Tijuca | RJ | 22640-100 | +55 (21) 4009-0200 +55 (21) 2491-4082 Ranbaxy www.ranbaxy.com.br Rua Alexandre Dumas, 2220, 1º Andar Chácara Santo Antônio - Cep 04717-004 São Paulo - SP +55 (11) 5189-9700 +55 (11) 5182-2140 Recepta Biopharma www.receptabiopharma.com.br recepta@receptabiopharma.com.br Rua Tabapuã, 1123 conj 36 Itaim Bibi - São Paulo, SP CEP 04533 - 014 Brasil +55 (11) 3709-2140 Reckitt Benckiser www.rb.com Rodovia Raposo Tavares, 8015 - Km 18 Cep: 05577-900 - São Paulo – Sp +55 (11) 3783-7000 Roche www.roche.com.br Avenida Engenheiro Billings, 1729 Jaguaré -São Paulo - Sp +55 (11) 3719-4566 +55 (11) 3719-4981 Royton Química Farmacêutica www.royton.com.br sac@royton.com.br Royton Química Farmacêutica Ltda Av. Casa Grande, 850 - Jardim Piraporinha Cep: 09961-350 +55 (11) 2107-9000 March 2012

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Sancargo Logística De Cargas Ltda www.sancargo.com.br Rua Antonio Rodrigues Filho, 462 – Vila Aeroporto Cep: 07170-042 Guarulhos Sp +55 (11) 2431-8002

Support Farma www.supportfarma.com.br contato@supportfarma.com.br Rua Tijuco Preto, 1376 Cep: 03316-000 Tatuapé São Paulo - SP +55 (11) 2227-8800

Sanofi Aventis www.sanofi-aventis.com.br Avenida Major Sylvio De Magalhães Padilha, 5.200 Edifício Atlanta - Morumbi 05693-000 - São Paulo - Sp +55 (11) 3759-6000 +55 (11) 3759-6000

Takeda www.takeda.com Av. Nações Unidas, 12.551 17º Andar - Sala 1.711 - Brooklin Novo Cep: 04578-000 - São Paulo - Sp +55 (11) 3443-1423

SANVAL COMÉRCIO E INDÚSTRIA LTDA www.sanval.com.br Rua Lagrange, 401 Capela Do Socorro -São Paulo - SP +55 (11) 5693-4400 +55 (11) 5521-3667 Serpac Comércio E Indústria Ltda www.serpac.com.br serpac@serpac.com.br Av. Berna, 193/207 – Vila Friburgo Cep: 04774-020 São Paulo SP +55 (11) 5521-9419 Servier www.servier.com Av. Paulista 1439, Conjunto 144 01311-200 - São Paulo - SP +55 (21) 2142-1402 +55 (21) 2142-1404 Shire (Shire Farmacêutica Brasil Ltda) www.shire.com.br sac@shire.com.br Edifício Rochaverá Towers Av. Das Nações Unidas, 14.171 Torre Ebony - 5º Andar, Conjunto 501 Brooklin Novo - Cep: 04794-000 - São Paulo - Sp +55 (11) 3014-7300 Stiefel (Laboratórios Stiefel Ltda) R. Profº João Cavalheiro Salem 1081/1301 - Bonsucesso Cep: 07243-580 - Guarulhos - Sp +55 (11) 2404-8000 54

March 2012

Teva Farmacêutica Ltda www.tevabrasil.com.br Rua James Joule, 92 - 15º Andar Cidade Monções Cep: 04576-080 São Paulo Sp +55 (11) 5105-5750 +55 (11) 5105-5779 Theraskin Brazil www.theraskin.com.br Marginal Direita da Via Anchieta, KM 13,5 CEP: 09696-005 - São Bernardo do Campo (SP) Torrent Pharmaceuticals www.torrentpharma.com Rua Florida 1738, 5th floor, Cidade Moncoes, Sao Paulo - SP - 04565-001, Brasil Trb Pharma Indústria Química E Farmacêutica Ltda www.Trbpharma.com.br Av. Giuseppina Vianelli Di Napoli, 1100 Barão Geraldo Cep: 13086-903 Campinas SP +55 (19) 3787-3000 UCI Farma www.uci-farma.com.br Rua Do Cruzeiro, 374 Villa Duzi Sao Bernardo Do Campo +55 (11) 4332-2022 +55 (11) 4125-5253 United Medical Ltda www.unitedmedical.com.br unitedmedical@unitedmedical.com.br Av. Dos Imarés, 401 – Moema Cep: 04085-000 São Paulo SP +55 (11) 5090-7233

Vedat www.vedat.com.br Rua da Congregação, 56 · Embu · SP · 06816-902 +55 (11) 2133 1212Consultants/

Service Providers

Cegedim www.cegedim.com Rua Helena, 235 - 11° andar, Vila Olímpia, SP, São Paulo, CEP 04552-050 +55 (11) 3103-0457 Colbras Indústria E Comércio Ltda www.colbras.com.br Estrada Dos Estudantes, 349 , Rio Cotia , Cotia - SP +55 (11) 4612-8940 +55 (11) 4702-3529 IMS Health www.imshealth.com Rua Alexandre Dumas, 1711, 1 andar Edifício Birmann 12,Chácara Santo Antônio São Paulo Brasil +55 (11) 5185-1561 +55 (11) 55 11 5185-1560 +55 (11) 5182-1328 KPMG www.kpmg.com citizenship@kpmg.com Rua Sete de Setembro 1950 Centro 13560-180 São Carlos SP +55 (11) 2183-3000 Lopes Muniz Avogados Av Brg Faria Lima, 1656 an 5, Pinheiros São Paulo - SP +55 (11) 3032-8641 Meizler Comércio International SA www.meizler.com.br Alameda Juruá, 149 Alphaville - Barueri - SP +55 (11) 4195-6613 +55 (11) 4195-6621 API Producers ABL Distrito Industrial Duque de Caxias Xerém. CEP: 25250-000 RJ FOCUS REPORTS


Pharma.FocusReports.net

Nortec Química S.A. www.nortecquimica.com.br nortecquimica@nortecquimica.com.br Rua Dezessete, 200 Distrito Industrial Duque de Caxias Xerém Duque de Caxias CEP: 25250-000 - RJ - Brasi +55 (21) 3651-7300 +55 (21) 2679-1615 Sintefina Av. Brigadeiro Faria Lima, 2152 - Jardim Paulistano Sao Paulo, 01451-000 +55 (11) 3813-8581 +55 (11) 3815-6823

CRO Abracro www.abracro.org.br info@abracro.org.br +55 (11) 5090-8955 Chiltern www.chiltern.com Rua das Fiandeiras 929 - 5º andar Sao Paulo - SP 04545 006 +55 (11) 3046-2277 Covance www.covance.com Av. Brigadeiro Faria Lima, 3015 São Paulo Eurotrials www.eurotrials.com office@eurotrials.com Al. Santos, 787 cj 31 - Cerqueira César 01419-001São Paulo Brasil +55 (11) 3842-6888 GC2 www.gcdois.com.br Av. Nações Unidas, 12.399 | 12º andar Conjunto 125 A | Edifício Landmark CEP04578 000 | São Paulo | SP i3 a empresa de especialistas www.abracro.org.br info@abracro.org.br Rua Alexandre Dumas, 2100 an 2 São Paulo - SP +55 (11) 5181-5631 FOCUS REPORTS

INC Av. Paulista 726 - 9th Floor Conjunto 904 - Bela Vista CEP: 0130-910 Sao Paulo - SP +55 (11) 3254-7600 Intrials www.intrials.com.br R. Joaquim Floriano, 913 - 2º - Itaim Bibi SP - 04534-013 +55 (11) 3073-6770 Medpace www.medpace.com info.br@ medpace.com Av. Maria Coelho Aguiar 215 Bloco B, 2° andar – Jd São Luiz 05804-900 São Paulo – SP Brasil +55 (11) 3741-3662 Omnicare www.omnicare.com Rua Baronesa de Itu 788 Santa Cecilia Sao Paulo CP 01231 Parexel www.parexel.com Av. Brig. Faria Lima 1309 8o. andar 01452-002 São Paulo - SP +55 (11) 2141-2666 PGS / Medical Statistics Rua Deputado Lacerda Franco, 300. SP, São Paulo 05418000 +55 (11) 3030-4299 PharmaNet Development Group www.pharmanet.com pni@pharmanet.com Avenida das Nações Unidas 11.857 - 9º andar - conj. 91/92 CEP 04578-000 Brooklin Paulista São Paulo - SP +55 (11) 3506-5400 PPD www.ppdi.com Rua Leopoldo Couto de Magalhães Jr., 758, 7° 04542-000 São Paulo SP +55 (11) 4504 4700

DISTRIBUTION COMPANIES Athos Farma www.athosfarma.com.br Av. das Américas, 700 –bl 03 sl-314 Bara de Tijuca Rio de Janeiro +55 (21) 2122-0100 Atlas Audifar www.audifar.com.br Av. H. A. Castelo Branco, antigo 130 atual 3.413 CEP 07.040-030 Guarhulos +55 (11) 2117-9550 Bomi www.bomifarma.com.br info@bomigroup.com Av. Portugal, 1100 – Itaqui CEP: 06696060 Itapevi SP +55 (11) 4143-7100 DHL Brazil www.dhl.com.br Avenida Ceci, 1900 – Bloco 03 - Tamboré, CEP 06460-120 – Barueri-SP +55 (11) 2142-6000 +55 (11) 2142-6100 Farmed Panarello www.panarello.com.br Rua Bernardo Sayão, 191 CEP 03022-070 SP +55 (11) 2107-2000 Profarma Av. das Américas, 500 - Barra da Tijuca Rio de Janeiro - RJ, 22640-100 +55 (21) 4009-0200 Sagra www.sagra.com.br Rua André Benedito, 484 CEP. 14096-640 SP +55 (16) 2101-9000 Santa Cruz www.stcruz.com.br Rua Olimpíadas, 100 12º andar Cep 04551-000 SP +55 (11) 3040-7500 March 2012

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Servimed www.servimed.com.br Avenida Nações Unidas, 37 Bairro:Jardim Panoram, 17.047-903- Bauru- SP +55 (14) 2106-2000

HOSPITALS Hospital Das Clínicas Da Faculdade De Medicina Da Universidade De São Paulo Av. Dr. Enéas de Carvalho Aguiar, 255 Cerqueira César - 05403-000 / São Paulo - Brasil +55 (11) 2661-0000 Hospital Israelita Albert Eistein www.einstein.br international@einstein.br Avenida Albert Einstein, 627 - Morumbi, Sao Paulo +55 (11) 2151-0464 Hospital Sirio Libanes www.hospitalsiriolibanes.org.br Rua Cel Nicolau do Santos, 69 Bela Vista - São Paulo - S.P. CEP: 01308-050 +55 (11) 3155-0200

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IAMSPE www.iamspe.sp.gov.br faleconosco@iamspe.sp.gov.br Avenida Ibirapuera981 Villa Clementino Sao Paulo +55 (11) 5088-8696

Fresenius Medical Care Ltda www.fmc-ag.com.br Rua Moreira, 891 , Roseira - Jaguariúna - SP +55 (19) 3847-9700 +55 (19) 3847-9714

INCA Praça Cruz Vermelha, 23 - Centro 20230-130 - Rio de Janeiro - RJ +55 (11) 3207-1000

Brazil Covidien do Brasil Ltda. www.covidien.com/ Av. Das Nacoes Unidas 12995 Andar 23 – Brooklyn Paulista Sao Paulo Brasil 04578000 +55 (11) 2187-6200

MEDICAL DEVICES GE Healthcare - Diagnósticos Médicos www.gehealthcare.com Rua Domingos Marchetti, 192 - Limão CEP: 02712-150 - São Paulo - SP +55 (11) 3933-7300 Aster Produtos Médicos Ltda www.aster.com.br Avenida Independência, 2541 - Caixa Postal 328 Éden Sorocaba - SP +55 (11) 3235-5600

Hospira Produtos Hospitalares Ltda www.hospira.com.br vendas.br@hospira.com Av. Engenheiro Luís Carlos Berrini, 901 1º Andar – Ed. HDI - Cidade Monções CEP: 04571-000 São Paulo SP +55 (11) 5508-3122

FOCUS REPORTS


Pharma.FocusReports.net

Company index ABIQUIFi ...................................................... 8

Infraero...................................................... 13

Amgen....................................................... 16

Interfarma ............................................. 7, 24

ANVISA............ 13, 15, 18, 20, 22, 23, 24, 28

Ipsen Pharma............................................. 23

Astellas ..................................................... 22

J&J.............................................................. 24

Bag贸 Brazil..................................... 29, 30, 33

LeGrand..................................................... 18

B.Braun................................................ 29, 30

Luft Group................................................. 13

Biominas.................................................... 26

Medley....................................................... 18

Besins......................................................... 23

Meizler Biopharma.............................. 24, 27

Biogen Idec.......................................... 24, 27

Ministry of Development,

BMS............................................................ 24 Bomi Farma................................................ 13 Boehringer Ingelheim............................... 22 Central Bank................................................ 8 Chiesi Brazil............................................... 27 Cristalia................................................ 18, 19 Embraer .................................................... 12 Eli Lilly........................................................ 29 EMS............................................................ 18 Erowlabs.................................................... 29 Eurofarma.................................................. 18 Ferring Pharmaceuticals........................... 24 Fiocruz........................................................ 31

Industry and Foreign Trade...................... 12 Ministry of Health........................... 8, 10, 22 MSD............................................................ 12 Neo Quimica.............................................. 18 Novartis............................................... 18, 19 Nycomed.................................................... 24 Petrobras................................................... 12 Pfizer.............................................. 16, 18, 28 P&G............................................................ 24 Pr贸 Gen茅ricos...................................... 19, 20 Roche............................................. 19, 31, 33 Sandoz....................................................... 18

GC-2............................................................ 20

Sanofi............................................. 16, 18, 20

Germed...................................................... 18

Servier........................................................ 29

General Electric ........................................ 12

Shire Latin America............................. 27, 28

Genzyme.................................................... 22

SINDUSFARMA.......................................... 15

GSK........................................... 18, 30, 31, 33

Teuto.......................................................... 18

Goldman Sachs ........................................... 8

Theraskin................................................... 19

Hypermarcas........................................ 16, 18

Torrent....................................................... 27

IBM............................................................. 12

Vale ........................................................... 12

IMS Health....................................... 8, 24, 29

WTO........................................................... 20

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Pharmaceuticals Brazil report 2012