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australianresourcefocus.com.au

LOGICAMMS

TAKING THE LEAD

bridging the gap meeting australia’s demand for labour

POWER TO THE PEOPLE MAN DIESEL & TURBO

BP OIL one year later

market leaders & market innovators INGAL EPS

MAY 2011


EDITOR’S CORNER

...there are promising signs on the horizon. Recent months in the resources sector have brought with them a renewed focus on innovation. Even in the wake of recent events, a number of the nation’s top firms are concentrating not just on rebuilding or maintaining their client bases but also on evolving into better and more sustainable versions of themselves. While the industry is likely to face challenges for several months to come, as mines continue to pump out contaminated water, companies continue to rebuild, and the public and private sectors alike struggle in the face of skills and labour shortages, there are promising signs on the horizon. Many sectors are seeing a surge in project development, and for a number of the firms we profile for you here, the recent months have engendered an environment conducive to reflection, evaluation and improvement - with new systems, new technologies, and an increased focus on staff recruitment, firms are taking initiative and weaving innovation and resiliency into their systems and processes. Australian Resource Focus is also evolving to serve you better. This month we are proud to debut our new look. We hope you’ll continue to enjoy the same in-depth features and company profiles you’ve come to expect, in a more modern and streamlined package, and we look forward to continuing to grow alongside Australia’s top firms.

Production Editor Tim Hocken

Director of Business Development Robert Chambers

Research Managers Cameron Walsh Caleb Richard Steven Morris

Senior Designer Jennifer Snow

Graphic Designer Fiona Miras

Director of Operations Christian Cooper

Contributing Editors Jaime McKee Robert Hoshowsky

Contributing Writers

EDITOR’S PICK This month’s Australian Resource Focus looks at innovative and creative firms, as well as some critical issues facing the industry. In Trans-Tasman Specialist, John Boley examines Energy Works’ integrated and multi-faceted approach to service delivery. With the company’s most experienced personnel involved in planning processes, the firm is able to apply its expertise throughout a project’s life-cycle to meet and exceed client expectations. In Bridging the Gap, contributing writer Emily Colombo - new to ARF this month - explores impending skills shortages in the resource sector, and the government’s plan to address them. And in The BP Oil Spill: One Year Later, Robert Hoshowsky takes a balanced and in-depth look at the ramifications of the Deepwater Horizon oil spill, one year on. With implications that reach far beyond the Gulf of Mexico, this disaster has proven to be a focus point for evaluation, learning, and disaster prevention in the oil and gas sector.

-Tim Hocken 4

Australian RESOURCE FOCUS | MAY 2011

John Boley Emily Colombo Aleisha Parr

Publisher Jeff Hocken

8th floor, 55 Hunter St Sydney NSW 2000 PO box 4836, Sydney NSW 2001 Ph: 02 8412 8119 ABN 93 143 238 126


INDUSTRY EVENTS Are you planning an event relating to Australia’s growing Resource Industry? To get your event listed in Australian Resource Focus, please contact us at least six to eight weeks before the event takes place at admin@focusmediagroup.com.au or call 02 8412 8119

Mine Rehabilitation and Closure 2011 28-30 June, Holiday Inn, Brisbane, QLD

Presentations will focus on developing effective closure plans to meet changing environmental and legislative regulations, and managing unforeseeable issues during the final closure stages. Environmental considerations to be discussed include water management structures, waste disposal, restoration of soil functionality, sustainability of tailings dams, and minimisation of impacts on local flora and fauna. Other topics encompass communication with government, effective reporting, bond relinquishment, and establishing community engagement.

Communication & Automations in Oil & Gas

26-27 July, Holiday Inn City Centre, Perth, WA Efficient communication and automation systems can increase productivity while decreasing safety risks at the reservoir site. With a focus on case studies from leading oil and gas companies, this event covers assessment of current systems, challenges of implementing new systems, building private networks, and process automation and instrumentation. Four practical workshops will expand the knowledge base with training on client-contractor relations, staff development, systems integration, and project forecasting.

For more information visit: minerehabilitation.com.au

For more information visit: caoilandgas.com.au

The Mine Managers Show East

Gas Turbines Australia 2011

5-7 July, Chateau Elan, Hunter Valley, NSW This meeting of mine managers from Australia’s largest mining projects is set to cover the newest mining innovations and technologies, and solutions regarding all aspects of mining management including safety, productivity, training, leadership, cost control, permit approval, community involvement, and more. Highlights include an additional leadership workshop, several technical showcase seminars, and plenty of opportunities to network with other leaders in the mining industry. For more information visit: terrapinn.com/2011/MineManagers/

Australian Uranium Conference

20-21 July, Esplanade Hotel, Fremantle, WA

26-27 July, Chifley on Lennons, Brisbane, QLD The proportion of Australian electricity generated by gas-fired power plants is anticipated to increase through coming decades and Gas Turbines 2011 allows industry leaders to share their experiences with the developing GT technologies. Speakers will discuss the sector’s long-term outlook, turbine maintenance and repair strategies, performance upgrades, and the impact of carbon policies on GT technologies. Spokesmen from GDF Suez Energy UK, Reliance Power LTD India, and PIA Pakistan will provide international insights. For more information visit: gasturbinesaustralia.com.au

Water Management in Mining 2011

26-27 July, Royal on the Park, Brisbane, QLD

Organised into two auditoriums, this conference features both corporate presentations and, technical and government presentations. Presentations from uranium exploration companies include market updates, investment opportunities, and industry developments. The technical sessions will cover a range of issues, such as legislative requirements for exploring and mining, environmental planning, instrument limitations, control of radiation exposure, and future projects. A 40-booth exhibition area will also be open for the duration of the conference.

The 2011 programme focuses on minimising water usage and reducing water quality degradation through technological development, water balance quantification, sustainability reporting, improved water recycles, treatment opportunities, and implementation of environmental management systems. Two interactive workshops will increase delegates’ understanding of water management rehabilitation plans and controlling biodiversity and ecosystem impact caused by mining operations.

For more information visit: verticalevents.com.au/uranium2011

For more information visit: watermgmtmining.com.au

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INSIDE FOCUS

36 26

48 4

editor’s corner

5

industry events

6

industry news

10 BESPOKE ENGINEERING

Ingal EPS 44 f  rom carbon capture to power generation

Process Group

G&G Mining

16 s  uperior coatings and engineering services

Brenco Group Pty 20 TAKING THE LEAD

LogiCamms 26 power to the people

36 MARKET LEADERS & MARKET INNNOVATORS

MAN Diesel & Turbo

32 bridging the gap: meeting australia’s demand for labour

48 trans-tasman specialist

EnergyWorks

54 bp  oil spill: one year later 58 homegrown business, international appeal

OSD Pipelines 64 t  here’s more to cylinders than meets the eye

Torque Industries Australian RESOURCE FOCUS | MAY 2011


INDUSTRY NEWS

More Misery at Pike River Since the devastating explosions that claimed the lives of 29 mine workers and contractors last November at New Zealand’s Pike River coal mine, families and friends of the deceased men have had to deal with the tragic loss of their loved ones. They are now experiencing yet another emotional upheaval, as a video of the inside of the mine site reveals what may be the body of one of the dead miners. In January, an inquiry into the explosions at the mine stated that the initial blast was so severe that none of the men could have survived. The reality, however, may be different, and families are leading the charge for the New Zealand government to remove the bodies from the mine and reunite them with their families for proper burial. In February, a series of videos were taken via borehole 47, and reveal what appears to be the body of a fully clothed person lying face-down in the mine, according to a forensic pathologist.

Controversial Bauxite Exploration In Queensland, some farmers are vowing to fight proposed access to their land for bauxite by a mining exploration company. In South Burnett, farmers have created the Kingaroy Concerned Citizens Group to deal with the issues. The farmers, fresh from their fight to stop an underground coal gasification trial in the area, are now facing the proposed exploration for bauxite, the principal ore of aluminum. Local farmers who believe their land is located on red volcanic soil are encouraged to attend meetings, fearing the possibility of strip mining of farmland for bauxite.

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Australian RESOURCE FOCUS | MAY 2011

For families of the dead men, the video is distressing. It reveals that the heat from the methane blast may not have been as great as was initially stated. Other images taken inside the mine also suggest a firefighting box had been opened, which would indicate that some of the men were still alive and opened it after surviving the initial explosion. This latest information – revealed to families of the miners during a recent meeting – has renewed calls to retrieve the bodies of the mine disaster victims. New Zealand Prime Minister John Key said that the discovery of the body changes little, and the mine is still much too dangerous for recovery teams to enter. To date, the government has spent $11 million in recovery attempts. Receivers have announced plans to sell the Pike River mine, and the highest-profile bidder, Solid Energy, stated it will continue recovery efforts, and make the mine financially viable once more.

Xstrata Signs Iron Ore Rail Deal Mining juggernaut Xstrata has signed an agreement with Queensland Rail (QR) and Pacific National to transport iron ore. The 10-year access agreement will see magnetite concentrate transported from the mining giant’s Ernest Henry copper mine to the Port of Townsville, making Xstrata Copper the first Queensland miner to export magnetite. The concentrate will be transported via rail from Concurs to the Port of Townsville. The deal is a welcome one, and has been praised by the Australasian Railway Association (ARA) as a means to deliver bulk iron and export dollars. In addition to an anticipated 160 new jobs for the region, the line is set to receive new technologies and 1,000 metre bulk mineral trains. With up to 90 wagons at 65 net tonne capacity, the new trains are able to transport over 1,000 tonnes per service, compared to the existing 750 metre trains. It is estimated that the Xstrata site will produce approximately 1.2 million tonnes of magnetite concentrate per annum at full capacity, destined for export to Asian markets. The announcement comes on the heels of a recently-completed $100 million investment program which saw improvements to the 1,030 kilometre-long Mount Isa Line.


Want a Mining Job? Come to SA With projected shortfalls of thousands of workers in Western Australia and Queensland, one company has initiated an aggressive advertising campaign to get miners to come to South Australia. Using billboards at Queensland and WA airports servicing remote mine sites, the ads are encouraging miners to come and work in the state. According to a report compiled by The Chamber of Minerals and Energy, the mining situation could be dire if more mining positions aren’t filled to make up for the shortage of skilled workers, with budgets and timeframes being adversely affected, making WA’s industry less competitive.

New $160 Million Contract for Rio Tinto Rio Tinto, a leading global supplier of iron ore, iron ore pellets and iron ore concentrates and a producer of pig iron, has announced a new contract exceeding $160 million for Pilbara construction works.

The concerns are genuine for both the resource and construction sectors. It is estimated WA needs to fund an additional 33,000 skilled workers by the end of 2012. In Queensland, it is estimated that about 18,000 more workers are needed. In addition to Oz Minerals, BHP is also seeking more workers for its expanding Olympic dam mine. Since many of WA’s residents are already employed, it is likely the bulk of the positions will comprise of foreign workers.

The one-year contract, a joint venture with the NRW/Eastern Guruma for construction works, is associated with the expansion of the Brockman 4 and Western Turner Syncline mines in the Pilbara region of Western Australia, and will see Brockman 4’s annual capacity expand significantly from 22 million tonnes to 40 million tonnes, while the Western Turner Syncline will increase to 15 million tonnes per year. Back in 2009, a $200 million contract was awarded for the construction and operation of the Western Turner Syncline mine. The move is being heralded as a positive step towards greater ties with the Indigenous business, and increased Aboriginal employment levels.

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INDUSTRY NEWS

The Cost of Natural Disasters: $5 Billion The numbers are in, and they’re not pretty. Compared to a year ago – before floods and cyclones ravaged the land – Queensland’s production is down 30 per cent. The cost of these natural disasters to the mining sector: $5 billion. According to The Queensland Resources Council (QRC), much of the loss comes from lost production and, with many mines still flooded, could yet increase. The flooding caused at least a dozen mines to be decommissioned, while about 75 per cent of operational mines are still working under special permits to pump out water, a slow process. The damage was severe from the floods that affected Queensland, which were soon followed by Cyclone Yasi in February, a category 5 storm. By the end, 35 people were dead, the state suffered billions of dollars in damages, and the tourist industry took a beating as vacation-seekers cancelled trips to the area. At present, about $22 million will be spent on marketing Queensland over the next twelve years to national and international markets as the process of rebuilding and recovery continues.

Aboriginals Fight to Preserve Site In their fight against mining expansion in the Upper Hunter, an Aboriginal group took its protest all the way to State Parliament. At issue is the approval of a diversion in Bowman’s Creek, where the mining is set to take place. The approval has pitted the mining company, Ashton Coal, against the Wonnarua people, who claim their sacred sites and artefacts will be destroyed if the company is allowed to mine as planned. Members of the Wonnarua have called on the Premier to overturn the decision, which would see mining for coal take in the Hunter Valley at Camberwell. Recently, police had to remove protestors from outside the offices of the Environment and Heritage department in Newcastle. For Aboriginals and activists, the issue is multifaceted. Diversion of the creek will ruin their sacred site and ancient objects, while others claim the mining project – which includes an open cut pit and an underground mine – will harm the environment.

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Australian RESOURCE FOCUS | MAY 2011


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FOCUS ON: G&G Mining 10

BESPOKE ENGINEERING

Australian RESOURCE FOCUS | MAY 2011


G&G Mining Fabrication Pty Ltd is a family owned business that has been designing, manufacturing and refurbishing products of the highest quality for the mining industry since 1990. Written by John Boley G&G Mining Fabrication Pty Ltd is a family owned business that has been designing, manufacturing and refurbishing products of the highest quality for the mining industry since 1990. G&G Mining Fabrication has grown to be a highly successful operation that employs a large team of professionals ranging from experienced designers and tradespeople, through to sales and customer service professionals. G&G makes buckets, service modules and other vital items of minesite equipment and prides itself on what is essentially a bespoke approach, with almost all products individually tailored to a client’s specific requirements. Operating from the company’s headquarters near Perth airport in Western Australia, director Richard Ladny is presiding over expansion of the company which will extend its portfolio of in-house services. He told Australian Resource Focus that G&G works in an expanding but highly competitive sector within the mining industry. The company continues to grow and has finished a brand new workshop costing four to five million dollars. The facility features a new administration block worth one million dollars and permission is being obtained to build a further new workshop within the next three to five years. The company is

also about to build its own facility for paint and sandblasting, bringing these functions in-house. “We have been sub-contracting,” says Richard, “But the less you subcontract, the more you can control your own destiny. The reason for expanding and moving is to do everything in-house and be more self sufficient.”

The reason for expanding and moving is to do everything in-house and be more self sufficient. Mining is his background; Richard has had “a lot of exposure” to what’s required by the sector, and has witnessed the growth of the industry in the region. “As it has grown we have grown with it – it’s no different from any other industry, it’s all based on the service you provide for a customer and the understanding of the customer’s needs.” Richard agrees that the industry has grown more competitive as it has gotten bigger. “You have to have your wits about you all the time – you can’t be complacent.” He reckons that in his part of WA there are four to six serious competitors in this sector. G&G distinguishes itself from the others, he

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FOCUS ON: G&G Mining says, by its willingness to progress the design and specification of its products. “You can’t rest on your laurels with the same products year after year. We are continuously developing our products to make them more efficient and more economical for the customer to use and coming up with different ideas for the client so they can get maximum return on their dollar. Design is all part of it.

We are continuously developing our products to make them more efficient and more economical for the customer to use... “We constantly look at how we have done things – be it a tank or a bucket or a service module – and after it’s built we look at whether we can do this or that better, change this or that, and the client too has input.” G&G takes a lot of time and trouble to discuss modifications and pos-

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sible improvements with clients once products are in service to see if modifications or additions could make the item even more efficient. Richard says his staff members ask the question of clients: “What does it do now and what else would they like their product to do that it currently isn’t doing?” This might come as a surprise, given that G&G’s clients are not only OEMs such as Komatsu and contractors, such as Henry Walker, Leighton or NRW, but the mining giants themselves – including Rio Tinto and BHP Billiton. Surely they already have a very clear idea of what they need before they approach G&G? Not so, says Richard. They may have a clear idea, but they are always open to listen, discuss and consider modification to a design in the interests of enhanced efficiency in a specific mine location. And that enables G&G not only to advise, but also to learn. “We also have a look at their ideas. A lot of the stuff we do, we learn from our customers – it’s a two-way flow of information. “We often like to talk to the mine

Australian RESOURCE FOCUS | MAY 2011

operators and mine site superintendents. We go to site and go around to talk to the operators and service guys – ‘are you happy with the way it’s working?’ ‘What do you feel the equipment is lacking or is not doing?’”

A lot of the stuff we do, we learn from our customers – it’s a two-way flow of information. Buckets represent a considerable slice of the company’s business. At G&G Mining Fabrication you never get a product straight from the shelf, it seems. The company takes into account the operating machine and specific gravity of the material to be dug. The wear package is also designed especially to suit the operating machine weight limitation and the abrasion characteristics of the materials being moved. This ensures that customers not only get the right fit for their operating machine, but also the strongest bucket with the longest wear.


Service modules

As with other G&G product sectors, all buckets have been fully customised to suit the needs of each customer. Another significant share of business is service modules, the mobile service stations of the mine site that deliver maintenance and refuelling to the giant machinery that is so expensive and must be kept running almost non-stop. No two field service modules are the same and G&G understands that each customer and each mine site has its own specific requirements for servicing their own mining equipment. Usually the service module is required at shift-change when there may be an hour available to fill up with fuel and oils. Typically, a G&G

In advance of submitting a design, the company spends a lot of time with its customers to assess their requirements and understand what they want to achieve. Once the specifications have been agreed upon, the next step is a general arrangement drawing to ensure that customers have a good understanding of what they are getting for their investment. A basic service module specification list (a ‘wish list’) is available to prospective customers as a starting point. This includes everything from a basic six-tonne truck to a 100-tonne dump truck (Cat 777 & Komatsu 785). From here G&G can customise the chosen service module to suit specific requirements. Options are available depending on budget and usage requirements. For example, the chosen truck can be fitted with a pneumatic system (functional and cost effective) or a hydraulic system (ideal for high volume product flow). All service modules are fully customised to suit the needs of each customer.

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FOCUS ON: G&G Mining

“we are constantly looking for better ways to do business and better ways to develop equipment so it can be more efficient – in the way it digs, or how it sprays.” service module may carry anything up to 40,000 litres of diesel plus five or six oils in quantities from 2,000 to 4,000 litres. It may be any size from a straightforward sixwheeler to something that started life as a 100-tonne dump truck. The common design factor is maximum reliability and efficiency, because “while a digger is idle it’s not earning money.” Usually there is a generic equipment list “and we work with that to find what the client more specifically wants.” It may take half a dozen client

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meetings before G&G even starts ordering any items and it can easily take two to three months to finalise the specification of a new product before a client is entirely satisfied it’s “right”. Clearly, G&G’s experience in this field stands not only the company but its clients in good stead, in contrast to another approach that says ‘we can supply anything off the peg, but if you want anything modified it will cost you an arm and a leg’. Richard says “we are constantly looking for better ways to do busi-

Australian RESOURCE FOCUS | MAY 2011

ness and better ways to develop equipment so it can be more efficient – in the way it digs, or how it sprays.” Even a humble water cart, he says, can benefit from design improvement. “It’s a big tank that sprays water on the road and keeps the dust down. But water is a very precious commodity these days so we have to maximise the usage of it and use it smarter. So we are changing the way we build our water carts and the way they spray.” It’s a good example of the way G&G goes that ‘extra mile’ to ensure customer satisfaction.


Water Tank Modules and custom water tank design service As with all work that G&G Mining Fabrication undertakes, water tank modules are designed specifically to suit customer requirements. Modules can be fitted with any of the following: • Any size water cannon in any location (40mm, 65mm, 80mm & 100mm) •Rear mounted camera •Remote or radio controlled cannon operation •Any number of air or hydraulic operated sprays •Dribble bar •Fast discharge of water •Water level bar graph reads, (internal and external) •Water tank modules designed for underground use •Pause timers for spray pattern •Automatic pump shut off •External water level gauge •Enviro-spray system which regulates water flow based on truck speed (conserves water) All water tank modules are fully customised to suit the needs of each customer.

Field Service G&G’s field service work includes: •Tray repairs and reline •Bucket repairs •Water tank module repairs •Service module repairs •Fit hydraulic operated hand rails •General fabrication

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FOCUS ON: brenco surface engineering

Superior Coatings and Engineering Services

Brenco Group Pty Ltd For almost 50 years, Brenco Group Pty Ltd has provided innovative and superior-quality surface coating and engineering services to many of the world’s most recognised clients in aerospace, steel, oil and gas, mining, and the mineral processing industry. Written by Robert Hoshowsky For almost 50 years, Brenco Group Pty Ltd has provided innovative and superior-quality surface coating and engineering services to many of the world’s most recognised clients in aerospace, steel, oil and gas, mining, and the mineral processing industry. An integral part of Australia’s aviation industry since 1965, Brenco is approved and certified by a number of prestigious and highly respected businesses and organisations, including the Australian Government Department of Defence, RollsRoyce, Qantas, the Australian Government Civil Aviation Safety

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Authority, and Cameron International, to name a few. “Our market segment would be mining and mineral processing, oil and gas, aviation, and manufacturing,” says David Browne, CEO and Managing Director of the Brenco Group of Companies. A privatelyowned business, Brenco operates globally from three locations in Melbourne, Perth, and Brisbane. Having several locations ensures that both multi-national and local manufacturers and process industries receive the highest levels of service at international standards. There are countless reasons for

Australian RESOURCE FOCUS | MAY 2011

Brenco’s success over its decades in business, ranging from highly innovative products and services to globally-recognised levels of quality and service in maintenance and repairs. With highly-qualified technicians and fully-equipped machine and metallurgical laboratory facilities in Melbourne and Perth, the company is capable of handling all types of repair and maintenance processes.

Critical Repairs For its many clients in aviation, mining, oil and gas and other industries, Brenco realises that broken equipment, machinery or parts can


be costly, even dangerous, which is why the company has always maintained a policy of overcapacity, so it has the ability to repair products for major customers at all times. It is not uncommon for Brenco to receive shipments of critical parts from oil installations located in the Middle East or Singapore, and react immediately, professionally, and proactively.

“We work on them throughout the night, and we freight them back the next day or the day after to get them back in service,” says Mr Browne. “We provide a critical service, and our turn times for quality have been compared to the best in the world. Our company market base is continually growing, because of the way we react to their down-time situations.”

We provide a critical service, and our turn times for quality have been compared to the best in the world.

In other fields, such as aviation, getting parts repaired quickly is crucial. In an Aircraft on Ground (AOG) situation, Brenco works as fast as possible to get the aircraft up and running. It is a work ethic that has permeated all areas of Brenco Group. “We have the philosophy

whereby if there is a critical part of plane equipment that’s down, we’ll work on it right through until we complete the repair job, and get that done ASAP,” comments Mr Browne. “We’d don’t pop off at five, and get back at nine in the morning – we make sure we work until we get that done, and that applies to our customers locally, and also our export customers in Asia and the Middle East.” All of Brenco’s quality and planning systems have evolved from the company’s aviation background, which requires quick turnaround times. Brenco Aerospace Pty Ltd – a major division of the Brenco Group of companies – is continual-

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FOCUS ON: brenco surface engineering

ly involved in the repair and maintenance of critical aircraft parts, such as jet aircraft engines and the landing gear components found on turbine-powered aircraft. Back in 1946, Brenco began its business when it was incorporated in Melbourne. In those days, the company was primarily a toolmaker, creating specialised tooling developed for General Motors Holden, and later for the Ford Motor Company. A pioneer assisting with the development of Australia’s automotive industry, it wasn’t until 1965 that Brenco entered the aviation market. It was in that year that the nation’s first domestic jet fleets were introduced by TransAustralia Airlines (TAA), which later became Australian Airlines until it was eventually acquired by Qantas.

Plasma Spray The mid-Sixties were a key time in Brenco’s development, as the company established engine repair and maintenance facilities, along with the introduction of higher technology processing systems to Australia, including the region’s first Plasma Coating system. Developed from NASA’s program in the Sixties, Brenco’s “plasma spray” was born. Using an ionised gas (a plasma), the technology saw soaring temperatures of 16,500 degrees Celsius, with an inert flame capable of melting all refractory materials. As soon as the consumable material passed through the plasma process, it resulted in a coating that was cold, and did not distort the mechanical or chemical structure of the coated part. Another technology used by Brenco, a thermal process, includes hard chrome replacement of High Velocity Oxygen Fuel (HVOF). Hard, carbide-based materials are pro-

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pelled at high velocity to engine and landing gear components, at speeds up to Mach 5. To provide some perspective to just how fast these coatings are applied, an aircraft traveling at twice the speed of sound has a Mach number of 2. “This technology applies coatings at up to Mach 5, which is an enormous velocity,” says Mr Browne. The raw material – in this case, tungsten carbine – is in the melt pool (like a fuel gas), where the raw material is melted. “We then project this raw material through this expansion of gas, and then it thunders into the substrate at Mach 5, and embeds itself into the substrate for an inherent bond.” Using HVOF technology, the coating is extremely durable, and half a milimetre thick.

We then project this raw material through this expansion of gas, and then it thunders into the substrate at Mach 5, and embeds itself into the substrate for an inherent bond. Truly an innovator in thermal spray coatings, Brenco Surface Engineering Pty Ltd – a major division of the Brenco Group of companies – maintains and repairs high-cost capital equipment, including pumps, compressors, and turbines, and provides hard carbide-based coatings on original equipment used in drilling and exploration for the world’s mining and mineral processing industries. Recognised internationally for its quality and service, Brenco’s unique surface coatings help control of corrosion, erosion,

Australian RESOURCE FOCUS | MAY 2011

thermal fatigue, wear, and abrasion of industrial processing machinery. An Asia Pacific approved contractor to apply thermal spray surface coatings to oil and gas industry critical process equipment, Brenco also has licensees in the United States, Canada, and Europe for applying Brenco coatings in aluminum process environments where standard coatings fail. The right Brenco coating, says Mr Browne, is absolutely necessary for a component to function properly and safely. “It can be a rupture in a line, the seizing up of an engine part, or machine breakdown,” says Brenco Group’s CEO and Managing Director. “It could be a problem where there’s some corrosion in a critical part of a component, where the corrosion renders the whole machine unworkable. Our job is to prevent that, and to extend the life of components in installations by either impeding, slowing down, or entirely preventing that process.” Some companies, like oil and gas giant Cameron International, have a tremendous amount of trust in Brenco’s superior quality products and time-tested systems. “We are the only contractor approved by Cameron to work on their critical oil field equipment,” says Mr Browne, “and we provide coatings to protect these critical compo-


by Cameron, and were formally approved to work on their equipment. “Our relationship has evolved from there, from a single component to many components.”

From Rolls-Royce to Qantas

nents from wearing away, extending the life of these installations.” One example, says Mr Browne, is a “Christmas Tree,” used in petroleum and natural gas extraction. An assembly of various valves and fittings often used for an oil or gas well, it resembles a crude mechanical Christmas tree that sits on the ocean floor. Brenco coats the gate vales on these installations with a very hard carbide coating to stop wear, and to ensure that the critical nature of the installation remains on stream. Many of Brenco’s coatings are found on products used in the oil and gas industries in Southeast Asia, and the Middle East. Brenco’s relationship with Cameron International has been ongoing for the past seven years, and has grown steadily. “One thing led to another, and we became aware of the fact that there was a requirement to service various types of oil field equipment and components in this part of the world, but you had to have an approval from Cameron to be able to undertake the work,” says Mr Browne. Over several years, Brenco went through a Research and Development process, applying coatings to various samples and templates, and shipping them to Houston, Texas, where they were tested in a laboratory. During that period, Brenco achieved requirements set in place

Another one of the company’s divisions, Brenco Aerospace, received approval to repair jet engine components on Rolls-Royce power plants, and will be actively involved in repair and through-life engine support on the Adour Mk 871 jet engine fitted to the RAAF’s Hawk lead-in fighter, in cooperation with the propulsion unit of Qantas Defence Services. Just this past month, the company commissioned its latest investment in technology: a unique laser system that will work with the mining and minerals processing industry on exotic materials like titanium and tantalum. The company has employed several technicians to run the technology, and is in the process of establishing a metallurgical lab to provide laboratory services. The technology is the first of its kind in Western Australia.

It’s a major investment, the largest investment the Group has ever made. “Any exotic material that has a high cost factor, we’ll be either able to apply an overlay, or harden that material with the concentration of the laser beam,” says Mr Browne. “It’s a major investment, the largest investment the Group has ever made. To give that some comparison, the Brenco Group was incorporated back in 1946, so it’s taken all these years to make

that investment, but it’s a large one, and it’s going to make this technology available to industry, particularly in Western Australia, but in Australia generally, for mining and mineral processing, oil and gas, and aviation.” Whether the companies that come to them are involved in aviation, mining, mineral processing, or oil and gas or manufacturing, they will all be afforded the same level of professionalism and accountability that Brenco Group built into its aviation control systems decades ago. Quality was, and always will be, synonymous with the Brenco name. When Mr Browne purchased the company back in 1991 along with two partners, the prevailing philosophy was to slowly build the company from those days, and take a long-term approach to the business. “We haven’t changed from that approach. The first years of operation resulted in considerable growth, and led to a decision to create a separate company for the aircraft maintenance and repair business,” says Mr Browne, “so in 1994, Brenco Aerospace was incorporated.” Soon, separate management structures were created, with Brenco Aerospace incorporated in Queensland in 1995, followed by Brenco Surface Engineering in 1999. Prior to purchasing the company, David Browne worked as an accountant, and was a director at a number of companies, including Brenco. Ironically, his father worked at Brenco for 36 years as a tool-maker, and today, his own son works in one of the companies. “We’ve gone from father being on the shop floor, son being in a managerial role, to my son being in a technical role,” says Mr Browne, proudy.

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FOCUS ON: LOGICAMMS 20

LOGICAMMS TAKING THE LEAD

Australian RESOURCE FOCUS | MAY 2011


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FOCUS ON: LOGICAMMS

LogiCamms, specialists in engineering, project delivery and asset management services to the hydrocarbons, mining and materials, infrastructure and specialist industries, is poised to step forward in this exciting time of opportunity and growth. Written by Aleisha Parr Facing a seemingly insatiable global demand for energy and minerals, companies servicing the resource industry must rise to the occasion by growing and developing new products and capabilities or risk falling by the wayside as others take the lead. Australia in particular offers unprecedented opportunities within the sector to enable growth, including significant investments into infrastructure to meet the demands of a growing population and also industry needs especially within the iron ore, coal, uranium, coal seam gas, LNG, water and power industry sectors. LogiCamms, specialists in engineering, project delivery and asset management services to the hydrocarbons, mining and materi22

als, infrastructure and specialist industries, is poised to step forward in this exciting time of opportunity and growth.

taining capital works, site support engineering, plant optimisation, maintenance management, competency assurance, operational readiness and project completions.

Australia in particular offers unprecedented opportunities within the sector to enable growth

In order to ensure the successful delivery of these varied solutions, LogiCamms offers fit for purpose systems and processes, executing projects through its scalable project delivery framework. With this focussed attention, system, engineering management, document control, construction management, project cost control and scheduling, health, safety and environmental and quality assurance processes can all be monitored and maintained, ensuring the highest quality outcomes for each and every client.

In addition to its core competencies within the traditional EPCM services, LogiCamms offers a comprehensive suite of ongoing asset management services, providing for full plant lifecycle for its clients. These services include the provision of engineering and project management services for sus-

Australian RESOURCE FOCUS | MAY 2011


With major offices located in Perth, Brisbane and Adelaide as well as local offices in Melbourne, Whyalla, Mackay and Gladstone, LogiCamms is able to provide for its clients individualised attention whilst maintaining national coverage. Some of its key clients at present include Rio Tinto, BHP Billiton, Origin Energy, QGC, BMA, ThyssenKrupp, Incitec Pivot, Santos, Sandvik, BP, SA Water and Newcrest Mining. Reports Karsten Guster, Executive Director of M&A and Strategy for LogiCamms, “We are an upcoming, progressive company with a broad presence in Australia, boasting a number of growing sectors. We’re increasingly developing relationships with both blue chip and strategic clients and developing these relationships over a longer term basis.” With more than three hundred and fifty employees, LogiCamms is in the unique position to cater to the smaller tier projects up to around $50 million - a market increasingly vacated by the industry giants who aim for projects in the billion dol-

lar range to sustain their growth. Given that LogiCamms is a leaner company, meeting clients’ expectations and ensuring continued quality project delivery is essential. Says Mr Guster, “We have to place more emphasis on recruitment of very strong and very talented individuals because that’s obviously a differentiator rather than having a thousand man team.”

Given that LogiCamms is a leaner company, meeting clients’ expectations and ensuring continued quality project delivery is essential. This attitude has been enforced by the company’s recent appointment of its new Chairman, Peter Watson. Prior to joining the LogiCamms team, Mr Watson served as Chief Executive Officer for

Transfield Services from 1999 to 2009. In those ten years, he grew a business into a leading national company, which he subsequently transformed further into an international presence, creating an extraordinary number of jobs and delivering sustainable growth in millions of dollars of revenue a year. Also joining the board is Mr Giles Everist, former Chief Financial Officer at Monadelphous who brings with him significant experience in service and project based businesses spanning twenty years. David Humann, LogiCamms’ former Chairman, was quoted saying of the new appointments, “Peter and Giles represent highly credentialed Board members whose combined experience will add enormous value to the company as it strives towards delivering value for LogiCamms’ shareholders and its vision of becoming a market leader delivering outstanding customer solutions. We look forward to the future with optimism given the growth in our pipeline of opportunities”

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FOCUS ON: LOGICAMMS 24

...the products that we’ve developed are in response to market needs. To ensure that such quality outcomes are consistently obtained, LogiCamms has developed a strong focus on innovation within the industry, consistently securing high profile projects. Reports Mr Guster, “We are highly agile and we’re also quite an entrepreneurial, innovative company, and in that sense the products that we’ve developed are in response to market needs. Whereas other companies take a long time to deliver innovation to the market, we’re relatively quick because of our flat organisational structure where our senior executives are involved in the development of these products.”

The majority of new products evolved by LogiCamms in the last year have been in the area of Operational Readiness which is made up of the Maintenance Engineering , Competency Assurance and Completions disciplines. Although many of these products have been around for numerous years in different forms, LogiCamms has moved to consolidate these offerings through the recruitment of key industry personnel and the development of a comprehensive service underpinned by LogiCamms established relationships and experienced core engineering staff. Of particular note is LogiCamms’ development within the Competence Assurance realm, where the focus rests on meeting the demands of the upcoming skill shortages in the resources sector. Considering the number of upcom-

Australian RESOURCE FOCUS | MAY 2011

ing LNG projects alone currently slated for development in northern regions of Australia, an organisation’s ability to train and develop a competent workforce becomes a critical factor in achieving operational success. With the restrictions in the availability of personnel with current industry skills and the associated recruitment challenges there is a greater need for organisations to identify and implement training and recruitment strategies in order to guarantee a competent workforce is available to undertake future projects. LogiCamms has responded with a strong and growing Australian based Competency Assurance service offering to meet the needs of a diverse client base. Competency Assurance involves all aspects related with the recruitment, training and development of staff, from


the analysis of the training need to the development, implementation and management of a fit for purpose training solution. Currently, LogiCamms is at work on several projects, including the automation of the Victorian Desalination Plant, a processing plant for BHP Billiton at Olympic Dam, train loadout weigh scales for Rio Tinto Iron Ore and the delivery of a wharf conveyor for Citic Pacific Mining. Several of these projects are of a design and construct nature where LogiCamms has taken on the scope of the project from inception, to design, procurement, construction and commissioning. “The outlook for further significant projects across the industry sectors remains very positive,” reports Mr Guster, sharing his confidence in the continued growth of the company. “The immediate future for LogiCamms is encouraging,” he says, “as we anticipate growth in all aspects of our business, from iron ore and coal projects, to coal seam gas and through to the asset management services for plant operations.” As the industry continues to grow, so too shall LogiCamms, through its continued localised expansion into regional centres in Australia as well as into the international market.

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FOCUS ON: MAN DIESEL & TURBO

POWER TO THE PEOPLE

MAN Diesel & Turbo Australia provides a comprehensive range of diesel and gas engine solutions, from engine sales, service and spare parts through to turnkey power station projects, and serves blue-chip customers in the mining, marine, rail and industrial markets 26

Australian RESOURCE FOCUS | MAY 2011


Written by John Boley If you seek a brand that epitomises diesel power technology it would be hard to overlook the initials MAN. Originating as an iron works as far back as 1758, the current company took shape in 1908 after a merger of two companies into the “Maschinenfabrik AugsburgNürnberg AG”.

We provide solutions which have the lowest operating costs available for simple cycle power generation. MAN Diesel & Turbo Australia provides a comprehensive range of diesel and gas engine solutions, from engine sales, service and spare parts through to turnkey power station projects, and serves blue-chip customers in the mining, marine, rail and industrial markets across a territory that spans Australia, New Zealand and the South Pacific. MAN Diesel & Turbo Australia itself has a strong local history stretching back almost 100 years, and is a

fully owned subsidiary of the European parent, MAN Diesel & Turbo SE. Michael Masters, power plant sales engineer at MAN Diesel & Turbo Australia, proudly points out that MAN was the first company ever to produce a diesel engine – “when Dr Rudolph Diesel brought his patent to us.” Although the company is now virtually synonymous with the technology, he adds, it is also a specialist in gas and dual fuel power and this is assuming considerable importance as pressure mounts on mining companies to reduce costs, lower emissions and improve fuel efficiency. “We provide solutions which have the lowest operating costs available for simple cycle power generation. The superior performance is particularly evident in areas such as the Pilbara in Western Australia with its high ambient temperatures. Reductions in output and efficiency due to high ambient temperatures are much less of an issue with our generation technologies in comparison to gas turbines for example.” Michael is describing the sort of technology where the equation has to take account of operation over a life of perhaps 15 – 25 years. “Our

type of solution comes to the fore when considering the long-term. If you look at the iron ore sector, it’s long life – 15-25 years mine life, and the initial capital cost is eventually dwarfed over the life of a mine by other operating factors, of which fuel is a major one – perhaps as much as 95 percent of the total operating cost.”

Dual fuel is getting a lot of interest in the mining sector – offering flexibility in case of any interruption to gas supply... Another issue is fuel flexibility. Although MAN is primarily associated with diesel engines, “The message is getting out to the market now that we also do gas power generation and dual fuel engines. Dual fuel is getting a lot of interest in the mining sector – offering flexibility in case of any interruption to gas supply, for example.” It is also the case that a dual-fuel unit can help in the early life of a

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FOCUS ON: MAN DIESEL & TURBO

mine, where perhaps a gas supply is still in build, or where there have been problems in obtaining the supply. In any case, the price premium is not prohibitive, says Michael, estimating a typical extra cost for dual-fuel capability at only around 10 percent - it’s easy to see why the technology is under consideration so widely.

The engines can switch over seamlessly from operating on gas to diesel without any loss of production... Since minimising downtime is almost as vital to a mine operation as are fuel costs, it is important to note that MAN’s dual fuel technol-

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ogy involves no stoppage and no manual switching when swapping fuel mode. The engines can switch over seamlessly from operating on gas to diesel without any loss of production, with everything looked after entirely automatically via MAN’s own SaCoS_One control system.

Alice Springs, in 2009, then three of MAN’s finest 10.9 MW engines, which will be primarily fuelled by natural gas, were delivered in 2010. They have been installed and are currently undergoing an extensive test and commissioning process, according to PowerWater itself.

An example of which MAN Diesel & Turbo Australia is justifiably proud is the Owen Springs power station that has recently been built for NT’s PowerWater outside Alice Springs to meet the town’s future forecast electricity demand. The $126 million power station at Brewer Estate is connected to the town by twin 66,000 volt transmission power lines. A greenfield site as recently as 2008, fuel pipelines and other support infrastructure have now been installed. The first generating unit, a 4 MW Taurus, was delivered to the site, 25 km south of

Owen Springs Power Station is expected to deliver electricity to Owen Springs mid-2011. It will be one of the highest-efficiency power stations for its size in the country and will enable the gradual retirement of units from Ron Goodin Power Station, in Alice Springs, over the next 10 years. MAN Diesel & Turbo Australia acted as EPC contractor for the whole project, which features the new 51/60DF dual-fuel engine. Construction of the power house, control room, switch room, administration centre, tank farm, pump house and

Australian RESOURCE FOCUS | MAY 2011


Owen Springs will be one of the highest-efficiency power stations for its size in the country

maintenance workshop buildings, was completed on schedule mid-2010. Power-house construction commenced in October 2009, utilising an innovative concrete-panel design to form the exterior and interior walls. These panels were formed on-site and are characterised by their excellent sound attenuation properties, low construction costs and fast installation. Once installed, a supporting steel framework was then erected and fastened, and the exterior painted to complete the building.

“Not only does this approach allow for a greater degree of accuracy and product control, but also results in improved site productivity,” The entire project was modelled using 3D CAD software which in turn generated the isometric

drawings necessary for pipework construction. “Not only does this approach allow for a greater degree of accuracy and product control, but also results in improved site productivity,” notes Paul Howarth, engineering manager at MAN Diesel & Turbo Australia. The company has also formed partnerships with local Australian suppliers and stakeholders as much of the equipment for the Owen Springs project must comply with Australian Standards. Niel Halvorsen, general manager of MAN Diesel & Turbo Australia, says: “For many of our clients, our local engineering capability and supplier relationships are perceived as highvalue attributes of our business.” The arrival of the first of Owen Springs’ three 10.9-MW generator sets marked a significant milestone in the project. The engine was originally loaded aboard a ship in Saint Nazaire, France in February 2010. It subsequently arrived in the NT capital Darwin in early April from where its 230 tonne bulk

was transported to the site using multiple prime-movers and a lowloading trailer. The land journey took some six days via a carefully planned 1,500 km route. PowerWater (PWC) is a Northern Territory government-owned corporation that services more than 80,000 customers and has 360 MW of existing power-generation capacity. The Owen Springs plant is based on three 10.9 MWe generator sets, each powered by a twelve-cylinder, vee-configuration 12V51/60DF engine. The generator sets will supply baseload power to the local grid in their gaseous-fuel mode, that is, burning natural gas ignited by a distillate fuel “micropilot”. At the time of signing the contract in 2008, PWC said: “MAN Diesel [& Turbo] Australia is an experienced company in power-station construction and its parent company in Germany specialises in dual-fuel engines in the size range required for this project. The contract specifications were technically complex as Power and Water was seeking

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FOCUS ON: MAN DIESEL & TURBO

world’s best practice in fuel efficiency and the lowest emissions of carbon dioxide per unit of electricity generated.” Michael Masters is keen to stress that MAN Diesel & Turbo is not merely a supplier of engines. “With this interest in dual fuel, we are looking at a variety of opportunities which will unfold over the course of the next couple of years – particularly in the iron ore sector where there is a real focus of looking long term for solutions. This industry is not just looking for power generation, he says, but also looking for a partner to be able to operate the plant, and provide spares and logistics and maintenance as well. “We can supply engines and generators for power projects but we are also squarely focused on building turnkey power plants.” The company sees itself as able to fulfil the role of a “trusted partner. We think there is a lot of value in that type of arrangement and that’s certainly the message we are getting from talking to the market about a range of projects. We are in discussion over a number of projects and the dual fuel technology has been pre-selected in a number of them,” says Michael. Several potential new clients are looking at MAN Diesel & Turbo as that “trusted partner” for decades to come. 30

Australian RESOURCE FOCUS | MAY 2011


P O W E R PA C K

For power-generation applications, the 51/60DF is available in a nine-cylinder, inline version and in veeconfiguration versions with 12, 14 and 18 cylinders. The engines have mechanical ratings of 1,000 kW per cylinder for 60 Hz power generation (514 rpm) and 975 kW for 50 Hz applications (500 rpm). These give an overall generator-set rating range of 8,560 to 17,550 kWe. With its fuel flexibility and low emissions, the MAN 51/60DF engine targets applications where operation on a back-up fuel is either essential or desirable. The engine’s fuel flexibility centres on the capability to operate on either gaseous or liquid fuel, and to switch between them seamlessly at full-rated output. In the gaseous-fuel mode, an air-gas mixture is ignited by injection of distillate diesel fuel. On the 51/60DF, the liquid fuel micro-pilot amounts to one percent of the quantity of liquid fuel needed to achieve fullrated output. It is injected via a common-rail system that allows flexible setting of injection timing, duration and pressure for each cylinder. This flexibility allows the engine to achieve low emissions and to respond rapidly to combustion knock signals on a cylinder-by-cylinder basis. In back-up, liquid-fuel mode, the 51/60DF engine operates as a normal diesel engine injecting distillate or heavy fuel oil (HFO) through a separate, normally dimensioned injector in a camshaft actuated, pump-line-nozzle system. At 500 mg/ mn3 at 5 percent O2 on gaseous fuel, the 51/60DF readily achieves emissions of oxides of nitrogen (NOx) in compliance with both Germany’s TA Luft clean-air regulations and the World Bank Pollution Prevention and Abatement Handbook.

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FOCUS ON: labour demand 32

Australian RESOURCE FOCUS | MAY 2011


Bridging the Gap:

Meeting Australia’s Demand for Labour The need for training in construction, industry, resource extraction and renewable energy is being targeted as a government priority for Australian companies to address the growing need for skilled workers while aiming to curtail over-reliance on migrant workers.

Written by Emily Colombo On March 15 the Australian government released a plan to meet the country’s current demands for a skilled labour force in the resource and construction sectors. The ‘Adult Apprenticeship Project’, which is built on 31 recommendations from the recent ‘Resourcing the Future’ report, will see adult trade apprenticeships being completed by experienced Australian workers in as little as 18 months and an additional $200 million being earmarked for training in high-demand sectors. The need for training in construction, industry, resource extraction and renewable energy is being targeted as a government priority for Australian companies to address the growing need for skilled workers while aiming to curtail over-reliance on migrant workers. It is estimated that the plan will see 39,000 Australian workers enter the labour force in the next 4 years, and is being touted as a positive first step in meeting this labour gap. The plan will work to offer employees to private industry, but in order to be successful will also rely on employers taking the step to invest in skills training of experienced workers. As such, the retraining will offer accreditation and certification for workers within the sector. An additional benefit of the program will see Australian workers profiting from the country’s recent construction boom, which helps to root revenue incountry, rather than in the pockets of migrant workers. Currently immigrant workers help to supplement the role of the Australian workforce and play an essential part in helping to deliver trained and experienced workers to the sectors where they are needed most.

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FOCUS ON: labour demand

Colin Barnett, West Australian Premier encourages additional steps to be taken in regards to restrictions on migrant labour, in order to meet the demands of industry and maintain pace with recent growth. His suggestions include a relaxation of English-language restrictions and furthering abilities for businesses to sponsor temporary work visas for out-of-country employees. Indeed, relying on out-of-country skilled workers can not only help to meet immediate labour needs, but also builds on the cultural diversity of Australia’s historically varied immigrant history.

Indeed, relying on out-of-country skilled workers can not only help to meet immediate labour needs, but also builds on the cultural diversity of Australia’s historically varied immigrant history. By relaxing the type of skills for which temporary employer-sponsored work visas are currently offered, foreign employees can help to be part of the solution for allowing Australian development to continue at its current rate, estimating a need for 150,000 skilled workers by the year 2017. So far, Australian government agrees in principle with this solution, however the details of what future policies will be rolled out remain to be seen. Currently the Ministry of Immigration reports 90% of skilled workers who come to Australia wind up in skilled labour employment positions, helping to keep the Australian workforce growing

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and offsetting the effects of an aging population on the economy. Given this success for the Ministry’s skilled migration scheme, it stands to reason that further supports will be developed in this area to assist in meeting the needs of industry. It should be noted that in order to qualify to hire migrant workers, employers must demonstrate vacancies which cannot be currently met by the resident workforce before they can act as visa sponsors for said positions. While some skeptics criticise the use of skilled migrant workers to meet this need, it is important for Australia to couple any further developments to its existing 457 visa program with increased protection and implementation of policy which protects migrant workers and their families, not only to ensure that human rights violations do not threaten these groups, but also to ensure that local labourers are not being undercut by cheaper labour sources. What remains to be proven is if the Adult Apprenticeship Plan will encourage new and increased volumes of workers to enter the resource and construction-based sectors. By focusing on the ac-

Australian RESOURCE FOCUS | MAY 2011

creditation of existing workers and putting the onus on employers, the plan does not see a direct increase in the number of Australians who will service the sector. Rather, it re-shifts the abilities of those already employed, and continues to leave the uneducated, untrained and inexperienced out of the booming Australian economy, and out of the profits to be made in this sector. In order to go above and beyond the current status quo of offering these paying positions to the already-employed or skilled workers from abroad, Australia could take further steps to encourage entrance into the workforce for those seeking to move from unemployment towards employment and from a lack of education towards education. Not only would such benefits help to reduce the country’s unemployment rates, but could also see a notable easing on Australian’s social service spending.

Australia will help to keep the gears of industry and resource extraction turning. By engaging new hands in the workforce, whether from citizens


or abroad, Australia will help to keep the gears of industry and resource extraction turning. The ‘Resourcing the Future’ Report, which provided recommendations on which the current plan is built, was commissioned in 2009 to explore means of addressing the need for this growing sector. Interestingly enough, the report was delivered to the Australian Minister of Immigration, Chris Bowen and commissioned to the National Resources Sector Employment Taskforce. Kudos to the taskforce for supporting the immigration of skilled labourers and for seeking solutions to the labour shortage locally within Australia’s own home-grown work force.

...build local skills and training while meeting industry needs through the use of guest workers... The plan has been touted as a ‘first step’ by the government towards achieving industry employment needs, but what remains to be shown are the further steps which will be taken after this initial program has been launched. Further exploration will be given to the current rules and regulations regarding the 457 visa offered for hiring on large-scale resource projects, and immigration will surely play a large part. In order to ensure that the needs of existing stakeholders are met, consultation is being given with a variety of industry representatives to find the necessary mix of policy needed to bridge immigrant and regional worker availability, while maintaining a focus on the training necessary to bring Australian workers up

to speed with current demands. It is projected that only projects which hit a particular budget value above a national guideline will be eligible to bring in workers from abroad, however this guideline has yet to be set, and it will take time before it will be possible to determine if the policies currently under development will be sufficient to meet the ever-widening labour gap. The balance between such policies which build local skills and training while meeting industry needs through the use of guest workers, has long been a challenge to the Australian government. In order to keep industry happy concessions must be made, while in order to root profit and increase the quality of life for Australians, easier integration into the workforce is a must. Regardless of the exact mix of policy and practices to be implemented, it will be necessary for ongoing evaluation to be conducted to measure how the newly developed Adult Apprenticeship Plan and the outcomes of immigration policy easing meets the needs of Australian business in the years to come.

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FOCUS ON: ingal eps 36

Australian RESOURCE FOCUS | MAY 2011


Market

Leaders & Market innovators With active representation across every Australian state and territory as well as the North Island of New Zealand, Ingal EPS is easily the nation’s largest and most reputable manufacturer of steel poles and columns. Written by Aleisha Parr With active representation across every Australian state and territory as well as the North Island of New Zealand, Ingal EPS is easily the nation’s largest and most reputable manufacturer of steel poles and columns. As a division of Industrial Galvanizers Corporation Pty Ltd, owned by the world’s largest steel pole manufacturer, Valmont Industries Inc, Ingal EPS has access to state of the art facilities and innovative technology. With three of these manufacturing facilities located in China, and two of its own manufacturing facilities located in Brisbane and Perth, Ingal EPS has a significant edge above the local competition, helping the company to continue to provide innovative solution oriented poles for a broad array of applications in both public and private sectors. The company specializes in steel pipes and mono poles, offering an extensive product range including street lighting poles, floodlighting poles, power poles (for distribution, sub transmission and transmission lines), lowering systems (for ease of maintenance), and special application poles including banner poles, camera poles, traffic signals and communication poles. Boasts Greg Wesson, General Manager for the Eastern Region, “We supply the full range of steel poles from small decorative ones right through to the 65 meter power transmission poles. So there are no poles that we don’t supply.”

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FOCUS ON: ingal eps

Ingal EPS supports the continuous development of new technologies and innovations, enhancing the state of the entire industry... F LO O D L I G H T I N G Track The Track range is most suited for stadium floodlighting where optimum lighting specifications need to be achieved. Designed with 16 sides for greater strength, the poles in this range can accommodate larger than normal sail areas to attain your lighting requirements. Boulevard The Boulevard range of Floodlighting Poles are the most flexible in terms of design. Ideally suited for medium sized floodlighting requirements such as commercial developments and recreational area applications, the range is available in tapered octagonal and tapered round poles. The range has been designed to allow for greater luminaire control gear space in the base of the pole, in order to accommodate multiple lighting fixtures. Park The Park range is suitable for large commercial applications such as floodlighting for sporting ovals and golf driving ranges. The design of this range allows for multiple lighting fixtures to be accommodated. Court The Court range is commonly used for floodlighting tennis and basketball courts, schools and carparks. The design of the square parallel tube pole caters for applications where architecturally a square profile is preferred to suit the mounting of rectangular luminaires, such as the shoebox type lighting fixture. Mall The simple design component of the Mall range is ideal for carpark, mall and pathway floodlighting. Mall poles are of a circular parallel pipe construction and are best suited for post top luminaires.

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Australian RESOURCE FOCUS | MAY 2011

Employing over one hundred and fifty staff throughout its offices, Ingal EPS brings to the industry four decades of highly specialised experience alongside its commitment to industry leading technology and quality of service and product. With ten in-house designers, Ingal EPS is capable of assisting clients throughout any project with individualised design, drafting and installation services. Special accessories such as foundation materials, adaptors, headframes and cross arms are also available from the company as required. Ingal EPS is the only Australian company who offers such a comprehensive selection, with a full range of structural poles including steel tapered sections as well as pipe, rectangular hollow section, square hollow section and unique aluminum extrusions, as well as a variety of innovative new poles including the hydraulic lift pole. The company has been an industry leader in terms of establishing significant benchmarks, such as for it 60 km/h and 110 km/h Impact Absorbing poles, as well as the largest steel poles ever installed throughout Australia and New Zealand. Proud of the remarkable capabilities of its in-house design team, Ingal EPS supports the continuous development of new technologies and innovations, enhancing the state of the entire industry


P OW E R POLES

Distribution and Sub Transmission and dazzling clients with its ever increasing capabilities.

“We are market leaders and we are market innovators .... We are the biggest and the best.” Says Mr Wesson, “We are market leaders and we are market innovators . . . We are the biggest and the best.” Most recently, Ingal EPS has designed and patented a new handsfree Seesaw pole, named the Swing Space Pole. This system works by way of a winch system which allows the pole to be raised and lowered. Created for use

with poles ranging from eighteen to forty meters in height – which would typically require at least two operators to manually raise and lower the pole – this new design is a hands-free system and can therefore be operated safely by just one operator.

“We are committed to remaining local manufacturers...” Another noteworthy undertaking for Ingal EPS has been its recent work on the $2 million new Gateway Bridge project in Queensland. The bridge, which will connect to the new seven kilometre section of Gateway Motorway to the north of the Brisbane River and the twelve kilometre Gateway Motorway up-

INGAL EPS Distribution and Sub Transmission poles are the lightest poles available across the full range of length and tip loads. All of the standard range conforms to AS/NZS standards, ASCE/SEI 48-05 and to the ENA Pole Supply and Performance Specification. The length and tip loads of the standard range make INGAL EPS steel poles a direct replacement for the most common timber and concrete poles and with significant advantages. Transmission INGAL EPS individually engineers all Power Transmission poles to suit the specific requirements of each project.

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FOCUS ON: ingal eps

grade on the south side of the river, required Ingal EPS to manufacture all of the architecturally designed poles, which the firm did locally within its Queensland factory. This touches on an important issue for Ingal EPS – its dedication to supporting Australian industry. Says Mr Wesson, “We are committed to remaining local manufacturers; there’s no intention for us closing that local manufacturing profile. We very much support local industry. We buy all our steel locally, from local sources because people prefer to support the local steel industry.” Also of great importance to Ingal EPS is its company safety culture. The firm is ISO 9001 rated and is certified by every mainroad authority around the country and in every state. It has been LTI free for twelve months now. Reports Greg Wesson, “Knowing the safety culture of our opposition, we believe that we are industry leaders in workplace health and safety. And that is our most important part of our local manufacturing culture - our health and safety.” With the market currently quite stable, Ingal EPS is free to continue to enhance its selection of quality pole products, with new patents pending and plans for continued expansion into aluminum poles sourced from its partners in Europe. Reports Mr Wesson, “Queensland at the moment has more projects on the go than any other state. As a result, Queensland is busier than they are on average, whereas in Victoria there are a lot less road infrastructure at the moment. We follow the major projects developments in terms of how busy we are, but the company as a whole, we are fairly stable in the market.”

...we believe that we are industry leaders in workplace health and safety. Ingal EPS is also currently taking steps in ensuring its continued growth within the resources industry, providing pole solutions for mining sites, one of Australia’s leading industries. For such innovators as Ingal EPS, the resources market will be fortunate to have you lighting the way.

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Australian RESOURCE FOCUS | MAY 2011


STREET LIGHTING Avenue

Impact Absorbing

INGAL EPS designs and manufactures street lighting poles for Category P & V lighting requirements. The Avenue range of poles are predominantly designed for Category P (pedestrian) and are ideally suited for use in residential subdivisions, commercial developments, recreational pathways and parks.

INGAL EPS have been designing and manufacturing Impact Absorbing poles since 1979, and were the first to have the designs tested to the relevant standard (AS/NZS 1158.1.3) for both 60 km/h and 110 km/h zones. Under design criteria and circumstances, the poles will stop a vehicle and minimise the force on the vehicle’s occupants.

Freeway The Freeway Street Light range was inspired by the need for greater outreach over wide roadways. The predominantly Category V (vehicular) designed poles are ideally suited for multi-laned roads. The range is an extension of the tapered octagonal Avenue range of poles, but utilises a heavy-duty shaft allowing for outreaches up to 4.5m in length.

Slip Base The revolutionary engineering design of Slip Base poles enables the pole to slip at the base and fall if a collision occurs. This ideally suits freeways and other high-speed roadways where the likelihood of a secondary accident, resulting from the falling pole, is accepted as being unlikely. The standard height and outreach lengths vary according to relevant authority specifications.

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FOCUS ON: ingal eps

HYSTER BUILT TOUGH THE MOST COM PREHENSIVE FORKLIFT RANGE With 140 different forklift models across a vast range and budget, Adaptalift Hyster offers a complete range of equipment, from powered pallet trucks to 52 tonne reach stackers, and a variety of fuel types. Adaptalift Hyster can supply the solution to accommodate any size load and budget. Since Hyster’s commencement in the 1920’s the company has led the way in design and reliability of its product range. A diverse product offering and a history of delivering handling solutions in some of the world’s toughest applications equip Hyster better than any other manufacturer to respond to the needs of demanding operations everywhere. Adaptalift Hyster’s range of counterbalanced forklifts is suited to a multitude of applications including loading/unloading, shuttling and storage of raw materials, finished goods and production materials. Different wheel/tyre and energy types cater for a full spectrum of indoor and outdoor operating environments. In addition to its extensive range, Adaptalift Hyster has the most flexible total forklift fleet management solution in the industry, with several top 20 companies taking advantage of its national network. This network incorporates 14 branches across Victoria, Queensland, NSW, South Australia, WA and Tasmania, with additional service centres Australiawide in all metropolitan and major regional areas. The company also has a commitment to expand this network nationally. Adaptalift Hyster’s product support is second to none. In addition to its 24/7 breakdown support, the company’s extensive mobile service fleet and factory-trained technicians have a direct online link through PDAs to ensure immediate parts and technical support are available, thereby keeping downtime to a minimum.

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FOCUS ON: PROCESS GROUP

From Carbon Capture to Power Generation Process Group has evolved into an entity known around the world as a leading supplier of technical solutions, systems, and packaged process equipment modules for leaders in the globe’s oil and gas, refining, carbon capture, petrochemical, and power generation industries. Written by Robert Hoshowsky Since it was established in 1978, Australian-based Process Group has evolved into an entity known around the world as a leading supplier of technical solutions, systems, and packaged process equipment modules for leaders in the globe’s oil and gas, refining, carbon capture, petrochemical, and power generation industries. With its head office in Melbourne,

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Process Group also has regional and representative offices in Abu Dhabi in the United Arab Emirates and Singapore to better serve its growing customer base. Unlike some other companies, Process Group is able to handle projects from inception to completion. Using its state of the art facilities – including fully integrated sales, design, engineering and fabrication workshops in all the compa-

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ny’s locations – a team of the same people is able to take charge of an entire project from one site, ensuring quality control all the way from design to final manufacture and commissioning. Highly trained technical specialists support engineers working in a variety of disciplines, such as civil, chemical, mechanical, electrical, instrument, and process engineering. Quality control is maintained throughout the process in all areas, from de-


PROCESS GROUP sign to engineering, and construction to completion. Working with recognised experts in water treatment, natural gas processing and carbon capturing, Process Group prides itself on working on a task to provide the best solutions for its clients. From oil and gas production to crude oil stabilisation and treatment, refining and petrochemical, carbon capture and geo-sequestration, energy and power generation, industrial water treatment, and solids handling, Process Group is able to provide strategic, innovative, and environmentally sustainable solutions across a vast range of technologies.

At Process Group, the mission remains as strong as ever: by allying with its clients, the company seeks to provide the best solutions to maximise benefits, exceed customer expectations, guarantee quality and delivery through a professionally managed design and fabrication processes, and maintain staff who are experienced, motivated, and committed to technical excellence and the finest craftsmanship. With such a wide range of service and expertise across so many industries, small wonder companies like Shell, Chevron, Exxon Mobil, Santos, and many others turn to Process Group for solutions to their oil and gas, refining, power generation, and carbon capture needs.

Quality Management At Process Group, the company is committed to maintaining an effective and efficient Quality Management System, which complies with the AS / NZS ISO 9001 Quality Management Systems and is fully certified by Lloyds. Directors, management and staff alike ensure all items manufactured or provided to clients by Process Group meet exacting specifications and the necessary requirements set down by clients. Along with maintaining a safe work environment, the company takes pride in emphasising quality awareness among its staff, along with ways to improve its management system, products, and efficiencies. To maintain a high

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FOCUS ON: PROCESS GROUP

degree of quality, Process Group seeks out products and services from other companies who share a commitment to top-notch supplies.

Prominent Global Locations To ensure quality, service, and uniformity to clients, the company maintains its new head office in Melbourne. Combining office and fabrication resources in one prime location ensures stellar management and engineering overviews of projects. Recently, the company initiated an expansion at its Melbourne site, a new $2.2 million, 1,250 square metre fully-enclosed workshop. The new facility was inspired by the ongoing demands placed upon Process Group to provide specialised process packages for projects in the oil, gas, and energy industries in Australia, New Zealand, and New Guinea. The new workshop will focus on welding and related fabrication of pipe spooling, skid bases, and pressure vessels, while the company’s existing workshop, at 2,250 square metres, will be dedicated to module assembly. The move confirms the company’s ability to serve the nation’s growing demand for oil, gas, and energy industry products and services, and by integrating design and manufacturing resources into a unique, single facility, Process Group will be better able to compete against international companies in the same specialised market.

Process Group will be better able to compete against international companies in the same specialised market.

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In Abu Dhabi, the company is able to serve its clients from its new, purpose-constructed facility, strategically located in the International City Abu Dhabi (ICAD) Industrial zone. Just like the company’s headquarters in Melbourne, the Abu Dhabi regional office maintains the same high degree of quality, and offers its customers all the trained staff and modern equipment necessary to handle all sorts of engineering oversight. Much like the Melbourne location, the Abu Dhabi site provides excellent access to freeways, ensuring easy access for goods and services.

The company remains proud of its “global footprint” and its abilities to offer quality service and provide solutions for clients in over 20 countries around the world... The company’s third facility – the representative office in Singapore – is able to provide clients with direct and local sales and project engineering staff and support throughout Southeast Asia. The firm’s Singapore staff also supervises fabrication in Indonesia and Malaysia, and offers crucial sales service and project engineering assistance to clients throughout Asia. At the Process Group, all business activities for Australia, New Zealand, Southeast Asia, and China are managed through the head office in Australia, including engineering and fabrication undertaken in Southeast Asia. The company remains proud of its “global footprint” and its abilities

Australian RESOURCE FOCUS | MAY 2011

to offer quality service and provide solutions for clients in over 20 countries around the world through high-tech facilities in Australia and Abu Dhabi in the UAE. Able to manage integrated sales, engineering design and fabrication from one site start to finish using the same team, Process Group proudly serves numerous clients in China, Japan, Oman, Iran, the UAE, the United States, Norway, India, the United Kingdom, Thailand, Australia, Pakistan, New Zealand, Indonesia, Malaysia, Sudan, Singapore, and other nations, and is able to meet individual on-site development and construction requirements anywhere on the planet.

A Wide Range At Process Group, the company offers an extensive range of products, services, and technologies to its clients, such as solids management. When oil and gas are produced, solids can appear in the processing equipment. The company is able to help clients effectively manages these solids through recovery, removal cyclones, gas cyclones, and other solids recovery systems, and help them identify which solids, such as sand, cause the greatest problems, and how to remove these solids from the production train, and provide costeffective protection against damage caused by erosion. Technologies used in this process, such as desander cyclones, continuously separate solids from produced water, condensate, or gas streams. In the processing of natural gas from wells, a number of impurities and contaminants – such as moisture (water), H2S, CO2, BTEX, and hydrocarbon liquids – must be removed in order for the gas to meet typical specifications for use as commercial fuel, or feedstock for


LNG plants, gas turbines, industrial, domestic use, and the like. Process Group offers a range of technologies to separate and remove contaminants from gas, including glycol dehydration and regeneration (teg, meg & deg), molecular sieve dehydration, gas sweetening (CO2 and/or H2O removal via amines), hydrocarbon dew point control, and fuel gas conditioning. Depending on the needs of the client and specific gas processing requirements, the company has the expertise to design and create customised solutions, including glycol to dehydrate gas streams and dew point control units. In the area of water treatment, Process Group is similarly able to offer its customers a wide range of solutions. According to strict environmental regulations, water from oil fields must be properly processed and discharged. The company is able to offer water treatment services and technologies to remove solids, including oil removal cyclones, induced gas floatation, nut shell filters, cpi units, spare parts and retrofits, magnetic descalers, and site testing and surveys. Some systems, like deoiling hydro-

cyclones, are compact, cost-effective, are proven technologies, and require little maintenance.

...carbon capture has become a necessity to minimise greenhouse gases. With coal being the primary source of fuel for over 80 per cent of Australia’s electricity, carbon capture has become a necessity to minimise greenhouse gases. The Process Group offers technologies that can be quickly retrofitted to virtually any exhaust gas system, such as coal or gas-fired boilers, gas turbines, blast furnaces, and cement kiln off-gas. Designing and building carbon capture plants tailored to the specific needs of every client, the company also provides expertise in processing the captured carbon dioxide for various purposes, including liquefaction for commercial use, wastewater ph control, enhanced oil/gas recovery, mineral sequestration, and geo-sequestration. Maintaining its role as a prominent provider of solutions and systems

to the world’s oil and gas, refining, carbon capture and power generation sectors, the Process Group is continually researching and developing programs and technologies to improve its existing line of products, and create new ones. Along with a complete range of design and fabrication services, the company offers process development, pilot plant design, in-situ field testing, and parts and service support for all of equipment supplied by its operations in Australia, Singapore, and Abu Dhabi, including refurbishment of existing equipment and/or process packages, providing service personnel to commission equipment supplied by process group, troubleshooting of equipment and/or processes supplied by Process Group or others, spare parts support for equipment supplied, optimised maintenance schedules, equipment integrity assessment, and more. Whatever the gas, oil, carbon capture, petrochemical or power generation need, Process Group has the skilled staff, service and technology to handle industry demands in Australia and abroad.

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FOCUS ON: energyworks

TRANS-TASMAN SPECIALIST EnergyWorks constructs and maintains everything from the oil and gas well head up to and including power stations, with facilities such as head piping and equipment, gathering pipelines, production stations, export pipelines, metering stations, power stations and storage facilities.

Written by John Boley Interest in the expansion of Queensland’s oil, gas and resources sector is not confined to the state itself. On the other side of the Tasman, for example, companies specialising in services to the industry are gearing themselves to deal with an unprecedented volume of business. One of them is EnergyWorks, based in Taranaki, one of the likely sites of a liquefied natural gas receiving terminal. EnergyWorks’ managing director Dallas Chadwick told Australian Resource Focus there is likely to be a shortage of gas and oil industry experience in Queensland as the existing domestic service industry is stretched to provide enough input during the development phases, especially of the coal seam gas exploitation. Three hours east, EnergyWorks is poised to add its resources to Australian counterparts, and Mr Chadwick believes there is a very concrete advantage for the foreseeable future in the form of the exchange rates between the neighbours.

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“It’s a significant cost advantage, both on materials and on labour,” he said. Originally established in 1972 as Inglewood Engineering and rebranded in 2005, EnergyWorks Limited has grown within the energy sector in Taranaki to become one of New Zealand’s leading specialised multi-disciplined engineering companies. EnergyWorks constructs and maintains everything from the oil and gas well head up to and including power stations, with facilities such as head piping and equipment, gathering pipelines, production stations, export pipelines, metering stations, power stations and storage facilities. EnergyWorks’ new facilities are located on Connett Road, Bell Block, New Plymouth, Taranaki. This location is in New Plymouth’s main industrial area, just five minutes from New Plymouth airport, adjacent to the main road north and the main haul route to Port Taranaki,

Australian RESOURCE FOCUS | MAY 2011

and handy to all of Taranaki’s major industries. The company also has a multi-discipline project management and construction team already on the ground in Queensland specialising in the oil and gas sector, and has also worked in allied fields such as on the recycled water project for the western corridor in Brisbane.

...cost and schedule control are central to the company’s project delivery capability. In terms of project planning, procurement and pricing, cost and schedule control are central to the company’s project delivery capability. Its project management systems integrate engineering and procurement with construction through cost and procurement management software which is used in conjunction with planning


EnergyWorks

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FOCUS ON: energyworks

Project: Stratford Power Station Peaker Project Date: 2009/2010 Client: United Group Ltd Location: Stratford, New Zealand

Scope: Assembly and installation of the 2 x LMS 100 Turbine Units consisting of Main Generators (80 tonne), Auxiliary Skids (22 tonne), Intercooler Vessels (20 tonne), Water Skids (12 tonne) and the larger modules that make up the Air Filter Assembly, Exhaust/Silencer, Supercore and significant volumes of inter-connecting componentry.

Project: Kupe Slug Catcher

Date: 2009 Client: Origin Energy Resources (KUPE) Ltd Location: South Taranaki, New Zealand

Scope: Installation of the four 1200 diameter x 101 metre long x 80 ton Slug Catcher Barrels. Scope included the assembly, welding, testing and painting of the Slug Catcher Barrels and associated work.

and project reporting systems. EnergyWorks’ most experienced construction personnel are involved in the planning process, able to apply their experience throughout a project’s life-cycle to identify opportunities for cost and time savings. EnergyWorks’ management team consists of project managers and construction engineers as well as specialists in planning, estimating, cost management, procurement, quality assurance and HSE. The company can take responsibility for the entire project delivery process from feasibility through to completion, influencing the engineering design process to ensure early recognition of procurement and construction priorities, and providing cost effective, constructable designs. The firm strives for excellence in quality and safety management – “it is intrinsic in our culture to go out of our way to ensure our performance in these areas consistently meets or exceeds client expectations.”

The company can take responsibility for the entire project delivery process from feasibility through to completion... EnergyWorks has its New Plymouth facility which employs more than 100 skilled tradespeople and fabricates primarily for the local oil and gas industry, with clients including Todd Energy, Shell and Origin Energy. The exacting quality standards required by the oil and gas industry are provided through an ISO9001 accredited quality management system. All fabricated items are supplied with a comprehensive Manufacturer’s Data Report which includes the required material traceability, weld procedures, welder records and NDT reports. EnergyWorks provides a one-stop shop for the procurement, fabrication and installation of piping. Its large 70 m x 40 m piping shop equipped with Vernon pipe cutter, 4 x 5 tonne gantry cranes, rotators, STT welding unit, boom mounted FCAW units, fume extraction and hydrotest bay is set up for efficiently handling large volumes of pipe spooling. In addition, EnergyWorks manufactures pressure vessels and skid mounted equipment typically for the oil and gas industry, including glycol skids, coalescers, heater separator units, flare stacks, heat exchangers, desuperheaters. The company has extensive hydrotesting experience, including small spools, pressure equipment, piping systems, valves, bunker lines and cross country pipelines, and has a

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Australian RESOURCE FOCUS | MAY 2011


specialist hydrotesting bay in the workshop and specialist hydrotesting equipment for the field, including chart recorders, test gauges, deadweight testers and electronic equipment. There is also the equipment and expertise to pig and dry pipelines.

EnergyWorks provides a one-stop shop for the procurement, fabrication and installation of piping. EnergyWorks has its own industrial coatings division which includes a 15 m x 6 m x 4 m grit room, paint shed, metal spray unit and numerous items of plant for its mobile operation. This division allows EnergyWorks to provide a fast turnaround in shut down situations. The mobile operation provides the finishing touches for field installations as well as plant maintenance services of facilities throughout the North Island. In addition there is the EnergyWorks Industrial Coatings Division, which specialises in underground pipeline construction field joint coatings including fusion bonded epoxy, shrink wrap sleeves and tape coatings. The company has very experienced piping and equipment installation crews, having worked regularly on most oil & gas facilities in taranaki and fuel handling facilities in New Zealand. The company also has personnel experienced in power station and gas field maintenance work. These personnel include planners, inspectors and managers as well as trades staff. There is even extensive experience, through the New Plymouth operation, in large gas turbine maintenance, the company having successfully completed several C- inspection shutdowns for a 350 MW gas-fired power station. The Pipeline Construction Division is set up with specialist pipeline construction procedures and equipment. There are modern Cat 561M pipelayers, Cat 320DL excavator, Vacuworx RC10 Vac Lift, CRC Evans 6 – 20 inch Centurion Pipe Bender, mobile welders, coating and testing equipment. EnergyWorks Pipeline Construction Division’s team is very experienced in all aspects of onshore pipeline construction. Pipelines recently completed projects include oil & gas gather-

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FOCUS ON: energyworks

Project: Ahuroa Gas Storage Project Date: 2009 Client: Origin Energy Location: Ahuroa, Tariki, New Zealand

Scope: Demolition of existing piping on the Compressor Skid and installation of Gas Compressor. Work included venting piping, discharge gas piping, fuel gas piping, starter gas piping, skid drains and lube lines and structural works.

Project: Jemena Yarwun Off Take Station Metering and Pressure Reduction Skids

ing lines from well heads to production stations, onshore export pipelines, offshore export pipeline (HDD section), bunker pipelines, fuel distribution pipelines, pipeline diversions and specialist river crossings. EnergyWorks provides mechanical support to Alstom Switzerland and Contact Energy for the 350MW Taranaki Combined Cycle Power Station. As such it has successfully completed several major mechanical maintenance outages and plant upgrades. EnergyWorks also provides mechanical support to Trust Power on its Hydro Power Stations. EnergyWorks is currently installing two LMS100 Gas Turbine Generators for Contact Energy’s Stratford Peaker Project. Current projects of the firm’s include LPG recovery, storage and truck loading facilities for Todd Energy (piping and equipment fabrication, testing, coatings and process plant installation) and Manutahi Permanent Oil Facilities for Origin Energy (fabrication, testing, coating and installation of well site above ground and underground piping, with multiple cross country underground pipelines between well sites).

We know and understand construction in this industry and how to produce excellent results in the field.

Date: 2009/2010 Client: Jemena Location: Gladstone, Australia

Scope: Design, procure, build, package and export 1 x Gas Metering Skid and 1 x Gas Pressure Reduction Skid. These skids were packaged in 1 x 40 foot container and shipped to Queensland, Australia.

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Australian RESOURCE FOCUS | MAY 2011

The company’s roots are in the construction of piping systems and the installation of mechanical equipment for the oil and gas industry. “With over 20 years operating in the gas field construction industry, we have considerable experience and resource depth to draw on. We know and understand construction in this industry and how to produce excellent results in the field. We manage, under subcontract, selected companies in the civil, electrical and instrumentation disciplines so that we can ensure the important interfaces between all construction disciplines are properly coordinated and prioritised.”


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FOCUS ON: The bp oil spill

The BP Oil Spill:

One Year Later In the year since the spill, questions remain about the long-term effects on the environment, the oil industry, marine life, and the future of the economy for those living and working along the affected coastline.

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Australian RESOURCE FOCUS | MAY 2011


Written by Robert Hoshowsky Across the globe, the first anniversary of the BP oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico was remembered by many in their own unique way. In Florida’s St. Petersburg, dozens of surfers gathered on a beach, and some paddled into the water with 12 flowers: one to honour each of the 11 oil rig workers killed in the explosion aboard the Deepwater Horizon, and one for the marine life affected by the disaster. In New Orleans, religious leaders and environmentalists lit candles in front of the city’s Jackson Square to commemorate the men killed in the explosion, and to remember the way

life used to be on the water’s edge, before April 20, 2010, when the worst oil spill in America’s history began. In the year since the spill, questions remain about the long-term effects on the environment, the oil industry, marine life, and the future of the economy for those living and working along the affected coastline. For months, the world anxiously watched underwater video of thick clouds of black oil bursting into the ocean, seemingly without end. Several attempts to stop the flow failed, and the oil continued to gush until July 15. Two more months passed until relief wells were used to permanently close

the well, which was declared “effectively dead” on September 19, 2010. By the time the last drop escaped, about 170 million gallons of crude oil, and 200,000 metric tons of methane gas, spilled into the Gulf, affecting over 1,600 kilometers of coastline.

Fishermen, Shrimpers Working Again Fortunately, life in and around the Gulf of Mexico has improved since the disaster. Things may not be back to normal, but they certainly are better. Closures that kept fishing boats out of the water for months have been lifted, and many

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FOCUS ON: The bp oil spill

fishermen and shrimpers are back to work. Beaches which were considered moderately or heavy oiled have dropped to 106 kilometers from 1,690 kilometers last year at the peak of the spill, and tourists are coming back to the Gulf.

there is a tremendous amount of fallout affecting people, nature, and commerce. Despite promising signs like these, there is a tremendous amount of fallout affecting people, nature, and commerce. Some shrimpers who were hired to help after the spill are now complaining of illness due to petrochemical ex-

posure. Lawsuits against BP and other companies are still coming in, with one of the latest from Carnival Cruise Lines. The major company filed suit exactly one year to the day after the spill against BP PLC and others for an unspecified amount. Citing “economic losses and damages” as a result of the oil leak, the company claims ships operating out of Mobile and New Orleans were affected, and bookings lost as a result.

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The greatest impact remains on nature, marine and wildlife habitats. About four months after the gushing oil was capped, almost 11,000 square kilometers of the Gulf were closed once more following the discovery of tar balls in shrimpers’ nets. Earlier this year, more tar balls washed ashore, amid reports of marshlands still covered in oil and crude oil still lying deep underwater. In February, increases in the number of dead dolphins was reported after a number washed up in Louisiana, Florida, and other locations. Although the increase in dead and stranded dolphins began prior to the April 2010 explosion and blowout, scientists remain concerned about the reasons for the higher than normal mortality rate.

NOAA Gathering Data At the present time, over 60 federally-funded studies are underway to assess the damage along the Gulf coast and the result to the area’s wildlife populations. The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) was on the scene immediately after the Deepwater Horizon explosion and spill. A year ago, NOAA scientists incorporated data collected from satellites, aircraft, ships, buoys, and gliders for emergency response; today, they are gathering information for the Gulf Coast’s long-term restoration, including weather, oil trajectory forecasts, and a great deal more. Recently, the NOAA commenced an aerial census along the length of the coast. Included in the census are dolphins, along with whales and other marine mammals. Dolphins from areas drastically affected by the spill, such as Louisiana’s Barataria Bay, are being caught, tagged, and compared to dolphins

Australian RESOURCE FOCUS | MAY 2011

from Sarasota Bay, Florida, an area unaffected by the oil leak. Along with turtles, whales, and dolphins, scientists remain concerned about potential damage to the sea floor, raising fears about oil deep below the visible surface. Robot subs have reported sunken oil covering coral, and dead patches of sea floor, prompting one expert to comment, “The oil isn’t gone; it’s just not where we can see it.”

Six Aspects to the Spill Along with the NOAA, others have taken up the charge investigating the BP oil disaster. Recently, experts at the not-for-profit environmental action group Natural Resources Defense Council (NRDC) created a year-end report, The BP Oil Disaster at One Year: A Straightforward Assessment of What We Know, What We Don’t, and What Questions Need to be Answered. The detailed report covers six identifiable areas of the disaster: Understanding the Science, Assessing Impacts on Marine Mammals, Making the Most of the Natural Resources Damage Assessment, Identifying and Addressing Public Health Concerns, Grasping the Regional Economic Impacts, and Rising to Meet the Challenge.

BP has assumed most of the responsibility for the oil cleanup. As one of the greatest ecological emergencies in American history, BP has assumed most of the responsibility for the oil cleanup. On the anniversary of the tragedy, BP employees worldwide observed a minute of silence for the loss of their fellow workers, as the com-


pany maintains its commitment to strengthen safety practices and risk management across the company.

Congress has yet to pass a single piece of legislation to hold polluters accountable or restore the Gulf Despite assurances that safety measures will be in place to avoid future oil spills, many are questioning the need for deepwater oil drilling, and what appears to be a lackadaisical attitude by U.S. politicians towards prevention of other disasters. Instead of passing legislation to hold polluters accountable and limit drilling, Republicans are doing the opposite, trying to force through three bills that would see offshore drilling expanded, and make drilling easier, but not safer. Assuming they pass, these bills could actually expedite drilling permits in the Gulf, the Atlantic Coast, the Arctic Ocean, and other environmentally-sensitive areas without thorough analysis. Perhaps most surprising of all is that in the wake of the spill, Congress has yet to pass a single piece of legislation to hold polluters accountable or restore the Gulf Recently, Frances Beinecke, President of the Natural Resources Defense Council and a member of President Obama’s National Commission on the Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill and Offshore Drilling, commented on the BP disaster, the worst peacetime oil spill in world history. “Today Americans have the right to ask: are we any safer than we were last April?” questions Beinecke. “At the broadest level, the answer is no. Industry continues to resist reform. Congress is working to expand drilling rather than improve

its safety. And our nation is just as dependent on oil as it was a year ago. The best way to memorialise this disaster is by taking the lessons learned from it to heart. That means restoring the Gulf of Mexico to health and ensuring the people of the region, who are bearing the brunt of the harm, are not forgotten. It means strengthening safety regulations for the offshore drilling industry. And it means moving to clean energy sources that cannot spill, run out, or devastate entire ecosystems and economies.”

BP: A Changed Company? Improvements to safety procedures was at the top of the agenda at a recent meeting of BP PLC board members and top executives in London. The meeting, which took place less than a week before the April 20th anniversary of the explosion and fire aboard the Deepwater Horizon, has compelled BP to reassess its safety procedures through corporate organizational changes. “Clearly after a very troubled and demanding 12 months, BP is a changed company,” said BP Chairman, Carl-Henric Svanberg. “The full board will continue to maintain close oversight of matters related to safety. In the past 12 months, BP has been through a crisis almost unprecedented in corporate history. We will do all we can to prevent such an accident from happening again.” As many will remember, BP’s Chief Executive at the time of the accident was Tony Hayward, who was replaced last year by Bob Dudley. Since the oil spill, BP has paid over $5 billion to businesses, individuals, and government groups. At the peak of the disaster, over 48,000 people were involved. Since that time, the company has created a 500-person strong safety and operational risk organisation. Along with

other developments, the company has revamped its management structure, with the introduction of three divisions – exploration, developments, and production – all of which report directly to Dudley. This chance, says the company’s Chief Executive, will bring staff together to share knowledge, and “create greater clarity and accountability.” Other key developments include the company reviewing risk management for all of its wells, and assigning a global wells organisation to take on the responsibility for drilling all BP wells.

“create greater clarity and accountability.” Although it has been a year since the oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico, images of oil-slicked birds and millions of gallons of crude oil escaping deep underwater will not soon be forgotten. Balls of tar are still washing up on beaches, and environmentalists are upset with BP planning to be back drilling in the Gulf later this year at its Thunderhorse and Atlantis fields. Although no shallow or deep water permits have been received yet, and the company is still paying out damages, the world waits and hopes that strengthened safety procedures will prevent an accident like the one that took place last year from happening again in our lifetimes.

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FOCUS ON: OSD PIPELINES

HOMEGROWN BUSINESS

OSD Pipelines offers the largest and most comprehensive pipeline and facilities capabilities in Australia with a robust and dedicated staff of industry experts.

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INTERNATIONAL APPEAL

Written by Aleisha Parr “It’s easy to find people to do a project; it’s hard to find people who know pipelines,” says Brian O’Sullivan, Founder and Managing Director for OSD Pipelines. He is speaking of course, of the state of the industry at the moment, and not of his own company, which offers the largest and most comprehensive pipeline and facilities capabilities in Australia with a robust and dedicated staff of industry experts. OSD Pipelines operates in all mediums, including oil and gas, water and slurry, and mineral slurry. Says

Mr O’Sullivan, “That’s a very important designation that we do all of the products because globally there are only a handful of companies with slurry pipeline expertise and we are one of them. In fact, I don’t know any other company in the world that does what we do – just focus on pipelines.”

“It’s easy to find people to do a project; it’s hard to find people who know pipelines”

The company delivers to each client an end to end package, with dedicated and focused expertise from the concept phase through to detailed design, construction management, and operations. In the area of Project Development, OSD Pipelines employs its specialist skills to identify and manage development issues, resolve project challenges, and add value to clients’ businesses. A mobile team of professionals serves OSD Pipelines’ clients throughout the Project Execution phase, with particular specialisation in the areas of: pumping, compression, storage

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FOCUS ON: OSD PIPELINES

The company delivers to each client an end to end package, with dedicated and focused expertise from the concept phase through to detailed design, construction management, and operations. (with all related control systems), metering, pressure regulation, SCADA / telecommunications, facilities, and utilities development. To ensure that each project continues to be profitable for its clients, OSD Pipelines also provides a complete range of Asset Services available to clients in Australia, and internationally through its offices in Canada and Chile, with plans for future expansion into the Middle East.

The merger helped boost OSD Pipelines’ capabilities enormously... These capabilities are enabled by OSD Pipeline’s continued commitment to growth and internal development, as well as by its expansion techniques, exemplified in its recent merger with GWB, a detailed 60

engineering business with an outstanding reputation. The merger helped boost OSD Pipelines’ capabilities enormously in the detailed engineering area, thus supporting the pipeline business through utilisation of established pipeline facilities including slurry pumping stations, tanks, gas compressor stations, end of line tanks and terminals. The merger enabled the firm to continue its national expansion across Australia in the oil and gas industry. Says Mr O’Sullivan of the new relationship forged, “Why GWB? Because we like to deal with people that have good reputations and good management, and that know how to look after their clients.”

is by relationships; internally, in our organisation, and externally, through our clients. We don’t work for companies, our people work for other people. The OSD Way is all about not having to change who you are when you go to work ... its triple bottom line is integrity and truth, competent behaviours, and profitability.”

This attitude toward business is evident in all of the company’s policies, and is clearly set out in its business philosophy model, the OSD Way. Explains Mr O’Sullivan, “Our general approach to business

He continues, “We recognise that our clients like a service provider they can rely on, that they can trust and that they can have ongoing relationships with to do good work. And that’s what our company is built on, that’s why we have

Australian RESOURCE FOCUS | MAY 2011

...its triple bottom line is integrity and truth, competent behaviours, and profitability


people in OSD who... want to be here for the long haul. That’s why I’m absolutely delighted to have such a great team of people in the company. And, because they’re good people and aspire to the OSD Way and methodologies, it’s much easier for them then to interrelate with our clients as people.” A team such as that doesn’t grow in strength without proper nurturing and support, two areas which OSD Pipelines excel in. The company offers a variety of workplace initiatives and opportunities to help enable individuals to pursue both personal and professional growth, including its own professional industry specific training program, PIPEd. Through this initiative, individuals can gain significant and relevant knowledge and experience to help them grow as a person and develop as a professional. Mr O’Sullivan explains the significance of “The Living Workplace” as the groundwork for the OSD Way philosophy. He explains, “I cannot subscribe to any workplace that has people changing who they are when they go to work. It’s all

summed up in the belief that we work to live, we don’t live to work. And I enjoy work because we love what we’re doing, but at the end of the day, it’s all about living and having our families, and being a part of our communities.”

Environment and Community involvement are both exceedingly important to OSD Pipelines Environment and Community involvement are both exceedingly important to OSD Pipelines, who not only support two very worthy charities (the Special Olympics and the Muscular Dystrophy Foundation), but who also take a front seat in ensuring all work projects have minimal negative impacts. On every project the company undertakes, a Charter of Respect is drawn up, outlining with careful consideration the ways in which the community might be affected, in terms of the people, the land-

Kirkuk Pipeline Project Location: Kurdistan Region, Iraq Client: Addax Petroleum International Limited Capital Cost of Project: USD$ 141,000,000 OSD’s Scope: A$ 5,000,000 Duration: Seven Months

OSD Pipelines was awarded a FEED study for this project in August 2008. Scope of work for the project included design of the Taq Taw oil storage and pumping facility, the pipeline system, and the receival site at Kirkuk. Additionally, OSD Pipelines completed a number of safety studies, site route investigations, capital and operating cost estimates and project schedules, and further studies regarding logistic sna transport, pre-commissioning and commissioning and impacts of varying oil quality.

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FOCUS ON: OSD PIPELINES

“With what we do, we need to look after these precious resources - be they environmental flora and fauna or people - because if we truly operate by the OSD Way and our Charter of Respect, then that’s what we must do.” owners, the traditional owners and the environment itself. Explain Mr O’Sullivan, “With what we do, we need to look after these precious resources - be they environmental flora and fauna or people - because if we truly operate by the OSD Way and our Charter of Respect, then that’s what we must do.” This dedication channels through to the company’s Quality Management Systems, which are continually under review so as to ensure that all standards of health and safety and environmental conser-

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vancy are met or exceeded. Says Mr O’Sullivan, “It’s very important to have vigour in that area and it’s easy for other companies to let that slip in the pursuit of just churning out work. But we can’t do that because we’re here for the long haul. If we’ve got relationships with companies that we’ve worked with for many years, we need to keep up our standards.” The relationships nurtured by OSD Pipelines truly do have lasting power. In nearly thirteen years of business, of the company’s first five

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clients back in 1998, OSD Pipelines has worked together with three of them on anywhere from thirty to fifty projects each. At the moment, the market is rapidly expanding for pipeline work and services. The Middle East is providing new opportunities for international business, already experienced by OSD Pipelines through its recent, highly successful work in Kurdistan on the first detailed engineering project undertaken in the area. Domestically, Brian O’Sullivan sees key growth to be


in the areas of natural gas exports and slurry and water pipeline to mining areas. To meet these demands, OSD Pipelines has developed in-house an entire range of slurry pipeline design algorithms, as well as its slurry Rheology laboratory in Perth. Currently, OSD Pipelines is at work on a definitive Feasibility study for Zamin Resource in Uruguay, regarding return water in the Magnetite Pipliens and with Minera Esperanza in Northern Chile for the start-up of copper concentrate and seawater slurry pipelines, two important slurry pipeline projects. Reports Mr O’Sullivan, “Our greatest focus and where we see the world changing globally for our industry is in the increase in transportation of minerals by slurry; that’s a key part of our global expansion program.”

Yurralyi Maya Power Station Fuel Gas System Location: Pilbara Region, Western Australia Client: Rio Tinto Project: EPC project for 8” gas pipeline and associated facilities Duration: Dec 2008 - Mar 2010 OSD Pipelines recently completed this commission for RIO Tinto as part of the major 320 expansion program geared toward increasing iron ore production. Project scope of work included the design, supply, installation and commission of an 8” gas pipeline and associated facilities connecting the Dampier to Bunbury Natural gas Pipeline to the Yurralyi Maya Power Station. Despite an accelerated timeline, OSD Pipelines successfully completed the project in March 2010, greatly impressing the client, leading to a new engagement for future work in the Pilbara Region with Rio Tinto.

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FOCUS ON: Torque industries

There’s More to Cylinders

than Meets the Eye... Written by John Boley On the one hand we have a company with considerable experience – in this case in hydraulics, pneumatics, filtration, automation and waste handling – that seeks to expand and offer its expertise to more business sectors. On the other hand we have an area of Australia where the mining and resources industry is expanding fast as more exploration and exploitation are allowed. Sounds promising, doesn’t it?

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The Torque Industries story began in Adelaide, South Australia, in 1985, in the solid form of Torque Hydraulics, primarily supplying parts and components to industry. The business evolved and diversified to include complete motion and control system design, build, supply, install, commission and maintenance, as well as repair, both in-house and on-site. Solid business growth and greater diversity of services required larger premises, so in 2004 Torque Hydraulics relocated to its current 3,000m2

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head office in Catholic Park, northwest of the state capital’s CBD.

The company considers itself “fortunate” to have developed excellent relationships with loyal customers In 2008 Torque Hydraulics acquired Hydra-Pac Waste Systems, a specialist designer and manufacturer


Torque Hydraulics primarily supplies parts and components to industry. The business evolved and diversified to include complete motion and control system design, build, supply, install, commission and maintenance, as well as repair, both in-house and on-site.

of vertical and horizontal baling equipment with over 30 years industry experience, heralding the formation of Torque Industries Pty Ltd. The company considers itself “fortunate” to have developed excellent relationships with loyal customers ranging from the “individual off the street” to large corporations. Torque Industries has designed and supplied turnkey solutions to all Australian states as well as the US, India, UAE, Korea, Vietnam and Singapore.

Torque Industries general manager Leigh Thompson explains that there is no geographic boundary to the firm’s offerings. “Although we are an SA company, the technologies and skills we have are inherent.” He acknowledges that it might be difficult to put together a convincing case to be competitive in on-site service out in Western Australia, for example, but in terms of projects, Torque has a capacity for working right through from initial design concept to installation and “the actual unit itself can be

built anywhere. We are available to work on designs in Queensland if the opportunities arise.”

Torque has a capacity for working right through from initial design concept to installation Growth is in the company’s sights for the near future, especially in the resources sector. Torque has

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FOCUS ON: Torque industries

gone through a large expansion phase, notably with the acquisition of a waste handling company (see sidebar) which has applications in almost every industry as well as mining and resources. Leigh stresses the desire of Torque Industries to grow in the mining sector as the sector itself expands and believes its expertise in engineering and designing for a range of other industries is a plus for mining companies too, “because of the transferability of skills.” “This is a company with expertise that would be of advantage to the mining sector. Resources is a large part of our business but not as large as we would like it to be. The sector in SA is growing now, whereas ten years or so ago it was quite small. It’s growing as they allow more mines to open. Because of the state we live in, Torque was founded in agricultural industries, but mining has become bigger for us each year.” It’s easy to believe the physics and engineering of hydraulics and related disciplines are essentially the same in any industry. But does mining see it that way? Do the mining companies appreciate the point? “I guess they do appreciate the breadth of the sector,” says Leigh. Essentially, hydraulic systems and automation systems are all the same, he believes – “they all just drive something, they don’t change whatever the industry. It’s just the size

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T o r q u e H yd r a - Pac

Waste: Reduce, Reuse, Recycle, Rethink. That’s the thinking behind Torque Industries’ acquisition of Hydra-Pac, a range of fully-automated baling machines. “We bought it because the machines are hydraulically driven and we make them from scratch in Australia and sell domestically and abroad,” comments general manager Leigh Thompson. How we manage waste does require a rethink, he says, and HydraPac can help clients in many industries including the resources sector to take steps to reduce, reuse, recycle and rethink their approach to waste management, possibly even saving money along the way. Hydra-Pac designs and builds: •Vertical balers - ideal for supermarkets and high volume cardboard users •Horizontal balers - manual/auto-tie for paper, cardboard, plastics; capacities to suit demand •Conveyors - for product transfer, incline pit hopper and sorting platforms •Drum crushers - reduction of steel/plastic containers; save space, time and money •Glass crushers - reduction of glass bottles/containers; capacities to 12 tonne/hour •Specific purpose equipment – mobile/trailer mounted baler, petrol/diesel, paper fluffers, plastic bottle densifiers, can slashers and bin lifters

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FOCUS ON: Torque industries

that changes – in the mining industry much of the machinery is larger, the hydraulics are on a larger scale. That’s the main difference from something like agricultural machinery.” Mining companies are often used to thinking they are the biggest, so is equipment supplied to this sector the largest in Torque’s arsenal? “Yes and no – certainly on mobile equipment it tends to be the biggest, but we have built power units, for example, for much bigger applications than in the mining industry – large marine vessels, large power units in manufacturing, right up to one megawatt – we’ve done large-scale applications outside mining as well.” Mining probably has more largescale projects consistently “but there are other ‘big’ sectors – we

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are currently building a very largescale power unit for a defence application, for example.”

Hydraulics is very diverse with a lot of different modes of operation. Hydraulics is very diverse with a lot of different modes of operation. In automation you may have a system that is normally run by a plc, a program, but in mining there is still a lot of manual hydraulics – “pull the lever and make something go up and down.” That said, Leigh believes that “in the manufacturing sector of mining they need a lot of automation to drive conveyor systems and similar applications that are run through plc programming.

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“They do mix, such as with pneumatics – hydraulics with pneumatic actuators that might actuate the hydraulic valves through a pilot control system. They do go hand in hand but you can also have them quite separate – a pneumatic system totally on its own with no hydraulics or an automation system that is driving electric drives, not hydraulic.” Torque Industries has structured itself so the different specialists in the company can work independently or come together for an integrated project. Mining companies often know exactly what they want but sometimes they come seeking advice. On basic hydraulics – such as rebuilding a hydraulic cylinder or strip-down-and-repair a pressure compensated piston pump – they may just ask for a simple service


job. “But they also want solutions to problems they have, and that’s when they will call on us to find one. We have a full engineering section and they can come up with a solution from start to finish, tailored to a customer’s individual requirement. Then we have a different department that deals with the routine maintenance and repair of equipment, getting a system back to a program maintenance schedule. The business is very diverse – hydraulics is a very big industry and customers vary from top to bottom and so do their requirements.”

Torque Industries has structured itself so the different specialists in the company can work independently or come together for an integrated project. Torque is not just yet an automatic choice in the mining sector, Leigh admits, “although in mineral sands

mining we have done some very large projects for a large US company as well as in Australia for dredging systems, and so in that part of the mining sector we are very well known. But in hard rock mining and other areas where the industry has hitherto not been big in SA we would not necessarily be known as a first port of call for the mining companies – yet. We’re growing with the region’s industry.” There are, Leigh points out, an awful lot of hydraulic cylinders in the mining industry – in every machine that goes up and down, and “those cylinders wear and leak all the time given the conditions they work in.” Many people, he says, think no further than simply renewing the seal. But “it’s more complex than that - you get wear on the rod, on the barrel of the piston and the gland in the cylinder. We have the capability in our machine shop that when we strip down, we do the measurements – bore, piston, gland – and we work out the distance between the two main surfaces where the seal goes, and if the wear is greater than the crush you can put on the seal to seal it we will machine a new rod

or gland, or hone the barrel if we need to, or re-chrome the rod.” In short, there is more to refurbishing a cylinder than many people think. “We can completely rebuild cylinders from scrap, basically. It’s quite a unique thing in itself.”

...there is more to refurbishing a cylinder than many people think. Torque Industries has a service division that can provide simple componentry, service and maintenance (there are six vans, each equipped with all the requisite equipment for site visits) as well as the design division to design systems in-house. “We can deal with anything from one kilowatt right up to a megawatt,” says Leigh. “We like to sit down with a customer’s staff and build it from scratch. Then we send our own technicians to install and troubleshoot it and make sure it’s right, and then we write all the manuals on it so the customer has a full turnkey solution.”

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Australian Resource Focus - May Edition  

Australian Resource Focus - 2011 May Edition

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