focus magazine / August-September 2021 / New Zealand

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focus LIFESTYLE AND BUSINESS MAGAZINE. INSPIRE. EMPOWER. MOTIVATE.

ISSUE 29 | AUGUST - SEPTEMBER 2021

RACHEL GRUNWELL health guru & wellness coach

THE FIRST WĀHINE MĀORI PILOT

ia Carr MakaFREE MEALS FOR TEENAGERS

WEEKEND GETAWAY TO

WHAKATĀNE AND ŌHOPE

IN THE ROYAL NZ AIR FORCE

Angela Swann-Cronin

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ALSO INSIDE:

TAURANGA ARTS FESTIVAL 2021, HOW TO NAVIGATE LIFE'S JOURNEY IN YOUR LATER YEARS, DEMYSTIFYING FOOD TRENDS, COLOURFUL VEGAN MEALS, HAVE WE LOST THE ART OF HOBBIES?

Take me h ome I’M FREE



Discover more in

Whakatāne

Whirinaki Te Pua-a-Tāne Conservation Park


focus | CONTENTS

22 CONTENTS

AUGUST- SEPTEMBER2021

32

COVER STORY

LIFE

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18

ANGELA SWANN-CRONIN

The first wāhine Māori pilot in the RNZAF

TAURANGA ARTS FESTIVAL 2021

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REGULARS 8

WHAT’S ON? Best events over the next two months

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FOCUS ON BOOKS New releases you’ll love

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ASK THE EXPERTS Identifying precious gem imposters and we find out what causes skin pigmentation

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BEAUTY Problem-solving boosters

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RECIPES

New Zealand’s original influencer launches Kura Kai

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AGEING WELL Finding value in life

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RACHEL GRUNWELL Walking the talk

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DR LIBBY WEAVER Demystifying food trends

BUSINESS 44

WOMEN & MONEY

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Colourful vegan meals

HAVE WE LOST THE ART OF HOBBIES?

38

How hobbies have turned into sidehustles

TRAVEL Weekend getaway to Whakatāne and Ōhope

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MAKAIA CARR


Editor’s Welcome

focus PUBLISHER Align Publishing EDITOR Dee Collins dee@focusmagazine.co.nz CREATIVE DIRECTOR Alex Spodyneiko ONLINE EDITOR Kseniia Spodyneiko kseniia@focusmagazine.co.nz SALES advertising@focusmagazine.co.nz COVER IMAGE Alex Spodyneiko FEATURE WRITERS Justine Laidlaw Kinsa Hays Dr Libby Weaver

Image by Vanessa Laval-Glad Hair and makeup by Sharyn Butters Clothes by Anna Stretton

PRINTING Print People CONTACT DETAILS 62 10th Avenue Tauranga 3110 P O Box 14004, Tauranga, 3143 Tel: (07) 578 6838 Mobile: 021 535 770 focusmagazine.co.nz facebook.com/focusmagazinenz DISTRIBUTION 5,000 free copies are delivered bi-monthly to high traffic areas such as high-end cafés and restaurants, hairdressers, fashion boutiques, waiting rooms and professional offices across BOP, Hamilton, Cambridge and surrounding areas. DIGITAL focus is available to view online and is supported by social media sites including Facebook, Instagram and YouTube. focus is a free magazine (subscriptions are available) and is published six times a year by Align Publishing. focus is subject to copyright in its entirety. All rights are reserved and reproduction in whole or in part, without the written consent of The Publisher (Align Publishing), is prohibited. Align Publishing and all its related companies and officers hereby disclaim, to the full extent permitted by law, all liability, damages, costs and expenses whatsoever arising from or in connection with information or other material in this magazine, any negligence of The Publisher, or any person’s actions in reliance thereon. Every effort is made to ensure the accuracy and correctness of the information contained within this magazine and inclusion of any copy must not be taken as an endorsement by The Publisher. Views expressed by contributors are personal views and they are not necessarily endorsed by The Publisher. Any dispute or complaint regarding placed advertisements must be made within seven days of publication. All material sent to focus (whether solicited or not) will not be returned unless otherwise agreed beforehand, and all rights, including copyright in such material will be assigned to Align Publishing upon receipt. The Publishers presume all letters and other material submitted to focus and related social media sites are intended for publication unless clearly labelled “not for publication”.

A

nd here we are in August! This year is flying by at record speed, and as you’re reading this we’re already making huge strides on our October/ November edition, which, by the way, will be our 5th Birthday issue! Recently, I enjoyed a quick trip to Christchurch to see my family and handed over the reins of the cover shoot and interview to Kseniia, my fabulous second-in-command. Kseniia and her husband, Alex, who is an amazing photographer and also designs each edition of focus, travelled to Rotorua for the photoshoot – I’m sure you’ll agree they did a fantastic job depicting the very inspirational Angela Swann-Cronin. Amongst all her stellar accomplishments, it is so reassuring to know that women like Angela are putting themselves out there as role models to the younger generation. My husband and I were invited to spend time exploring Whakatāne and Ōhope. Initially I wasn’t too sure what we would do for three days, but, I have to admit, I was pleasantly surprised with everything on offer – from tourist experiences, walking trails and beaches, to very good restaurants and cafés. The Eastern Bay of Plenty has so much to offer! The magazine is, as always, filled with fabulous articles that I’m sure you’ll enjoy reading, tucked up warmly with a cup of tea on a winter’s day.

focus

With gratitude,

LIFESTY LE AND BUS INSPIR E. EMPOWINESS MAGAZ INE. ER. MO TIVATE .

Dee

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THE FIRST WĀHIN MĀORIE PILOT IN

Editor & Founder Staycatio dee@focusmagazine.co.nz

29 | AUG

Angela S wann-Cro nin

ALSO INSI

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TAURANGA ARTS FEST LATER IVAL 2021, YEARS, DEMYSTIF HAVE WE HOW TO YING NAVI LOST THE ART OF FOOD TRENDS, GATE LIFE'S HOBBIES? COLOURFU JOURNEY IN YOUR L VEGA N MEA LS,

Take m I’M

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focus | DIGITAL

ONLINE IN AUGUST-SEPTEMBER YOUTUBE.COM/FOCUSMAGAZINENZ

“I’m so out of my comfort zone, it’s MORTIFYING,” laughs Angela with a colleague during the photoshoot at Rotorua airport. It’s obvious she’s more at ease piloting aircrafts than wearing false eyelashes and posing for the camera. But bringing awareness to women in aviation is important to her, so she powers through four hours of changing outfits and locations with a smile and a kind word for everyone around. Watch the behind-the-scenes video on our Youtube channel!

focusmagazine.co.nz/subscribe

FOCUSMAGAZINE.CO.NZ

SPRING CLEANING CHECKLIST: 25 TIPS TO DEEP CLEAN YOUR HOME

Ways you might be inadvertently harming the Earth’s ozone layer

The first five people to purchase an annual subscription to focus magazine for only $38 will receive a FREE BOOST LAB Hydro Boost Serum, valued at $34.95, with their first edition. This sulphate-, paraben-, fragrance-, oiland cruelty-free serum returns hydration and plumpness to your skin. It reduces the symptoms of sensitive, dry skin and strengthens its moisture barrier. 6 | focusmagazine.co.nz

ADD SOME SPICE INTO YOUR LIFE THIS

#ROMANCEAWARENESSMONTH!



focus | OUT & ABOUT

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BWN SPEAKER SERIES Day One of the BWN Speaker Series 2021, hosted by Tauranga Chamber of Commerce. Speakers included fashion designer Karen Walker, Jennifer Del Bel (Downlights), Jennifer Boggiss (Heilala Vanilla) and Clare Swallow (Mulberry St) Images SALINA GALVAN PHOTOGRAPHY 1. Laura Boucher, Roz Irwin (Tauranga Chamber of Commerce), Karen Walker, Anne Pankhurst (Tauranga Chamber of Commerce), Jennifer Del Bel (Downlights), Kirstin Mead (Tauranga Chamber of Commerce) 2. Donna Dinsdale, Anne-Marie Simon and Nicol Sanders O’Shea (Toi Ohomai Institute of Technology) 3. Melanie Lowe and Natasha Stocks (PMG Funds) 4. Lucy Instone and Samantha Wilkie (Bay Venues) 5. Vicki Beauchamp-Dixon and Sarah Hickey (Zespri International) 6. Eva Wolf (Eva Wolf Communications) and Rosie Crombie (Twinkle Twinkle) 7. Jane Simmons and Ciska Vogelzang (Aviska Services Ltd) 8. Deborah Peake (Tremains), Lisa Gilmour (ABC Business), Alisha Brady (enableMe) 9. Fiona Welten, Jo Fairweather (Baker Tilly Staples Rodway) and Michelle Dyer (Southern Cross Hort Ltd).

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OUT & ABOUT | focus

2 COSTUME & CAUSE: 1

AN EXHIBITION OF NEW ZEALAND MAKERS EXPLORING ISSUES AND HISTORIES THROUGH GARMENTS

A panel discussion preceded the opening of Costume and Cause, a new exhibition exploring 21st Century issues and histories through an intriguing use of techniques, such as embroidery, beading, raranga weaving, digital print, pattern cutting and construction. Curator Liz Cooper has brought together renowned makers Victoria McIntosh, Shona Tawhiao (Ngāi Te Rangi, Whakatōhea, Te Whānau ā Apanui) and Jo Torr for an exceptional exhibition.

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The exhibition runs until 20 August at the University of Waikato, Hamilton

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1. Robyn Longhurst, Liz Cooper, Jo Torr and Victoria McIntosh 2. Donna Campbell and Jo Torr 3. Joyce Stalker and Anne McKim 4. Peter Dornauf and Claire Mataira 5. Jill Thomas and Kay Hickman 6. Karen White and Linda Low

THE OPEN ROAD BECKONS. Discover a driving experience that is all about going the long way round. Visit Coombes Johnston BMW Tauranga to find out more. Coombes Johnston BMW Tauranga, 113 Hewletts Road, Mount Maunganui, Tauranga. (07) 575 5280 www.coombesjohnstonbmwtauranga.co.nz

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focus | WHAT'S ON?

WHAT'S ON? AUGUST-SEPTEMBER 2021

NEW ZEALAND MOUNTAIN FILM FESTIVAL 2021 7 August Tauranga Boys College, Tauranga mountainfilmfestival-tauranga.nz Watch some of the best mountain films from Aotearoa and abroad and meet Richard Watson and Shem Banbury – two outdoor enthusiasts who live in the Bay of Plenty.

WHAKAIPO LODGE WINTER CONCERT 7 August Whakaipo Lodge, Taupō whakaipolodge.co.nz The coolest little gig features four New Zealand singer/songwriters who perform each other’s songs without their usual bands. The event helps to raise funds for Greenlea Rescue Helicopter.

BITES OF THE BAY & WINERY 25 August 117 Newton Street, Mt Maunganui hinterlandtours.co.nz Up to five hours of driving all round Tauranga with an experienced guide, tasting delicious local produce (bread, cheese, smoked meats, gelato, honey, etc.) and visiting the only local winery for a relaxed degustation.

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TE PUNA QUARRY PARK PLANT SALE 8 August Te Puna Quarry Rd, Te Puna quarrypark.org.nz Loads of young trees, shrubs, bulbs, seeds and garden tools for you to choose from. All proceeds from the plant sale will go to support the Quarry Park! You can also donate your plants.


WHAT'S ON? | focus

LIKE A FINE WINE BURLESQUE COMPETITION 4 September Waikato Commerce Club, Hamilton facebook.com/ LikeAFineWineBurlesque

TAKAPOTO SHOW JUMPING WINTER SERIES 13-15 August Takapoto Estate, Cambridge facebook.com/takapotoestateshowjumping A free event with music, food and, of course, spectacular show jumping. While riders are competing, you can relax and enjoy a day out with family and friends.

An array of titillating, provocative, captivating, seductive and saucy performances by 11 burlesque performers over the age of 40 from all over New Zealand.

THE AUCKLAND ART SHOW 16-19 September The Cloud, Auckland aucklandartshow.co.nz The North Island’s largest art sales event of the year. With artworks priced from $50 to $6,000, an on-site café and bar, complimentary wrapping service, courier service and all the artists being available for a chat, this is an experience not to be missed.

WHITIANGA OCEANS FESTIVAL 18 September Lyon Park, Whitianga oceansfestival.co.nz A celebration of seafood in The Coromandel. Savour a variety of seafood cooked by renowned chefs, food trucks and local community groups, listen to good music, participate in cooking classes and meet local food and beverage producers.

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focus | BOOKS

NEW TITLES Words DEE COLLINS

BLOOD ON VINES Madeleine Eskedahl The usually peaceful setting of Matakana is thrown into disarray when a severed hand is found under a house. It isn’t too long before the body is found elsewhere and someone else gets murdered. What do the past actions of a small group of friends have to do with the murders and who will be next? This book is a slow burner but it’s a good tale of revenge.

THE INVISIBLE SENTENCE: A FASCINATING MEMOIR FROM THE WIFE OF A PRISONER AND HOW HER FAMILY SURVIVED OUTSIDE THE PRISON WIRE Verna McFelin Verna McFelin and her four children have their lives turned upside down when her husband is arrested and sentenced to 11 years in prison following the kidnapping of Gloria Kong in Ōamaru in 1983. Verna soon learns that families also serve their own invisible sentences outside the wire as they are subjected to bureaucratic indifference, trauma, hardship, bullying and shame. Verna finds strength in adversity and, through her faith, carries on and creates Pillars – a charity that advocates for the rights of children of prisoners.

FOOD FOR THE SOUL Lucy Lord Whether you have 15 minutes or an hour to spend in the kitchen, Lucy Lord’s cookbook offers over 80 easy-to-follow recipes that aim to reignite your love of cooking. There’s a good mix of savoury and sweet options – the Slow-cooker pulled barbecue chicken sliders and Fluffy lemon ricotta pancakes I whipped up are both divine.

FOLDED Tina Clough

Tina Clough’s latest book once again features Hunter Grant and Dao – a now-married couple adept at solving crimes. Origami shapes are randomly dropped from an apartment window in Auckland and on closer inspection reveal tiny writing with pleas for help. A physics text book follows. Then the woman who has found them abruptly resigns from her job and disappears. The police are slow to react so Hunter Grant and Dao reluctantly become involved but quickly find themselves blocked by Inspector Bakker, who takes exception to their involvement. A great weekend read.

PRAGUE IN MY BONES: A MEMOIR Jindra Tichy Born in Czechoslovakia in 1937, Jindra Tichy experienced the deprivations of war and saw how lives were changed. From the

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Prague Uprising of 1944 through to post-war Czechoslovakia and the harsh communist regime, Jindra gives a compelling account of her life under repressive rule and the subsequent pain of escaping her homeland when Soviet troops invaded in 1968. Forced to flee, Jindra and her young son Peter were on the last train to leave before the border was closed. Joining her husband, Pavel, in England, she struggled to learn English but slowly regained her confidence and competence with the help of Jane Austin’s Emma. When Pavel was offered a post at Otago University she found herself uprooted once again but eventually became a lecturer at the university. Dunedin has been her home ever since. It was only after the Czech Velvet Revolution of 1989 that Jindra was finally able to return to Prague for a visit.

MENTAL FITNESS: BUILD YOUR MIND FOR STRENGTH AND RESILIENCE EVERY DAY Dr Paul Wood At 18, Paul Wood was in prison, but now, as a doctor of psychology, he uses his journey to illustrate the process of transformational change and how we can become the best versions of ourselves. The book provides deep insights and practical techniques to build our capacity to flourish through stress and adversity, cope under pressure, be happier with our lives, and develop habits that help us strive towards our potential and feel strong and resilient everyday – no matter what comes our way.

THE CAMBRIDGE CODE: ONE SIMPLE TEST TO UNCOVER WHO YOU ARE Dr Emma Loveridge and Dr Curly Moloney This book provides insight into your psychological profile, your innate preferences and traits in clear, easy-to-follow language. The guide includes exclusive access to a thirty-minute quiz that provides you with an instant profile of your subconscious – the DNA of your mind – and reveals the unconscious drivers that shape your daily thoughts, reactions, desires and choices. The results of the quiz will allow you to focus on areas that may need improvement or support.

WHAT HAPPENED TO YOU? Bruce D Perry and Oprah Winfrey Oprah Winfrey and renowned brain development and trauma expert Dr Bruce Perry discuss the impact of trauma and adverse experiences, and how healing must begin with a shift to asking, ‘what happened to you?’ rather than, ‘what’s wrong with you?’ This simple change in perspective can open up a new understanding for millions about why we do the things we do, why we are the way we are, and provides a path for repairing relationships, overcoming challenges and ultimately living a more fulfilling and better life. 


BOOKS | focus

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focus | ASK THE EXPERTS

ASK THE EXPERTS

How to identify precious gem imposters?

ANNA SEELYE

FRANCES ADRIAN JEWELLERY DESIGN francesadrian.co.nz

As gemmologists and valuers we are trained to be naturally suspicious of everything that comes under the microscope, and one of the most common things we see are gems and minerals that are posing as something else. There’s a lot of detective work to do as a gemmologist, especially when it comes to identifying synthetics and simulants. Sometimes you get a feeling that a gem just doesn’t look quite as it should, and identifying these is one of the most interesting aspects of the job. Synthetic gems are created in a laboratory but share virtually all of the same physical and optical properties as their natural counterparts. For example, synthetic sapphire has an obvious natural sapphire counterpart. Simulants, on the other hand, can be natural or manmade and are essentially gems posing as another material, without sharing those same properties. This is why we refer to a cubic zirconia as a simulant, not a synthetic – there’s no such thing as a natural CZ. Another example would be green coloured glass (manmade) or quartz (natural) posing as jadeite. Frances Adrian Jewellery Design offers a gem identification service using traditional, non-destructive testing techniques, so please reach out for more information.

What causes pigmentation?

There are many reasons why someone develops pigmentation, no matter what their skin colour. The most common cause is overexposure to the sun. Other causes include medications, scarring and hormones. How to treat this successfully? Firstly, we need to establish what caused the pigmentation in the first place. There is no such thing as a ‘quick fix’. What you see on the skin surface is only half the problem. There is still a lot more pigmentation sitting under the skin surface waiting to come through. So, it makes sense that simply treating the upper surface of the skin is not going to provide a long-term result. You also need to treat the

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pigmented cells under the skin surface. How? By introducing into your skincare a specific group of clinical-strength pigment lighteners, called tyrosinase inhibitors, followed by in-clinic treatments. However, the potency of these ingredients and treatments can cause sun sensitivity, which is why the colder months are the perfect time to introduce them. Long-term results require commitment, addressing the cause, and the ongoing use of a tyrosinase inhibitor. A consultation with a trained professional will save you money. And the number one priority – sun protection all year round.

KAREN SINCLAIR SKIN RESULTS skinresultsclinic.co.nz


www.scillachocolates.co.nz Phone 0800 724 552 info@scillachocolates.co.nz


focus | BEAUTY

Instant boost

IN THE WORLD OF SAME-DAY DELIVERY AND ULTRA-FAST FIBRE, WAITING SIX TO EIGHT WEEKS FOR YOUR SKINCARE TO WORK SEEMS OUTDATED. ENTER BOOSTERS – TARGETED PRODUCTS WITH A HIGHER CONCENTRATION OF SPECIFIC INGREDIENTS TO SOLVE YOUR SKINCARE PROBLEMS DOUBLE-QUICK. SMART RESPONSE SERUM, DERMALOGICA $255

LIVE PROBIOTIC HYDRATION SERUM, UNCONDITIONAL SKINCARE CO. $95

Three years of research resulted in this revolutionary serum that recognises your skin’s needs before you do. The smart active ingredients detect the exact problems of various skin zones and release specific actives to target these concerns.

Powered by a live probiotic, BLIS Q24®, isolated from a healthy skin, this game-changing serum was born out of an understanding that your skin is enough; it can heal itself. The serum works with your skin to balance your microbiome and restore its natural condition in 30 days.

DIVINE EYES FIRMING EYE GEL, THE EDIT $79 Infused with Gotu Kola and Barbados Cherry (high in amino acids and fatty acids to boost collagen production) and Macadamia and Cannabis Seed oils (high in antioxidants and Vitamin C to repair cells and protect the skin), it soothes, de-puffs and hydrates your most delicate skin.

3 PHASE ANTI BLEMISH BOOSTER, 111SKIN $189 Innovative serum targets all three phases of acne, reducing the frequency of breakouts, resolving existing blemishes and tackling post-inflammatory hyperpigmentation with deep hydration. Available at Mecca Maxima.

R45 THE REVERSAL 3-PHASE RETINOL BOOSTER SYSTEM, BEAUTYBIO $254 A bootcamp for your skin that ‘trains’ it to be able to handle the strongest, most transformative level of retinol with its 3-phase treatment. Wave goodbye to dark spots, clogged pores, wrinkles and dry skin. Available online at meccabeauty.co.nz

SUPERCHARGED SERUMS, BOOST LAB $34.95 each A range of seven super-serums uses the latest in skin technology to combat specific problems – uneven skin tone, sagging skin, blemishes, eye bags, etc. Serums create a pollution shield on your skin to prevent further damage. The first changes are noticeable in as little as two days!

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FIRMING BOOSTER, GLOW LAB $25 Reducing the appearance of fine lines and wrinkles and improving skin elasticity in just two weeks became possible with Glow Lab’s latest innovation. Rich in peptides and powered by Matrixyl® Synthe6™ and Specped® actives, this booster accelerates skin repair and improves collagen levels by at least 42% in just five days.



focus | STYLE

FEET ON

Lace-up Trek Boots TOSCA BLU $257.00

THE GROUND

STURDY AND COMFORTABLE, CHUNKY BOOTS ARE THE PERFECT COMPROMISE BETWEEN STYLE AND PRACTICALITY. ANKLE, MID-CALF AND KNEE-LENGTH ARE ALL THE RAGE THIS SEASON.

Kay Lace Up MI PIACI $280.00

Leather Ankle Boot MINX $235.00 Available at mavismick.co.nz

70s High Straight in Marin Park LEVI'S $169.90 Logo-Print Ankle Boots SUPERGA $170.00

1460 PASCAL 8 EYE BOOT DR MARTENS $319.00

PAIR WITH:

Paragon Green Backpack HEDGREN $257.00

Zia Acetate Earrings BELA:SONDER $29.99 Full Length Spray On Leggings VASSALLI $125.00

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Cutwork Trapeze Dress WITCHERY $229.90 Contour Ring JANE EPPSTEIN $209.00

Umbrella BLUNT X ELLEN PORTEUS $129.00


LIFE

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MAKAIA CARR

WHĀNAU COOKING FOR WHĀNAU

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ANGELA SWANN-CRONIN

THE FIRST WĀHINE MĀORI PILOT IN THE RNZAF

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RACHEL GRUNWELL WALKING THE TALK

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JUSTINE LAIDLAW, DEMYSTIFYING FOOD TRENDS, EASY VEGAN RECIPES, TAKING FUN SERIOUSLY, WHAKATĀNE GUIDE


focus | ART

SAVE THE DATE

Image by Brydie Photography

FOR TAURANGA’S FLAGSHIP EVENT

Teamwork: From left, Tauranga Arts Festival artistic director Gabrielle Vincent, general manager Nikki Hansen and board chair Kathryn Lellman.

THE ‘WHEN’ OF THE TAURANGA ARTS FESTIVAL MAGIC IS KNOWN – 10 DAYS AND NIGHTS FROM OCTOBER 21 TO 31 – BUT THE ‘HOW’ OF THE MAGIC IS HARDER TO EXPLAIN.

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M

uch of it, naturally, happens on a stage in the electric space between an audience and performer, but there’s also the more gentle magic of bringing those two together in the first place, of creating the right conditions for the snap, crackle and pop. This year’s gold, spun from the unprepossessing straw of Covid-19, has been created by an all-female team, only the second time in the festival’s 22-year history. “The fact the key roles are all filled by women is a happy coincidence,” says board chair Kathryn Lellman. “A generalisation – but one that’s true in our case – is that women work well collaboratively and are multi-taskers. Everyone is there for the good of the organisation.” Staff and board members are known to all pitch in during the festival, doing anything needed, from washing dishes to shifting furniture. “There are no egos in the team, Kathryn says, “not at board level and not on the ground.” Gabrielle Vincent, who is filling the new role of artistic director, laughs as she tries to summarise her year-plus of programming through the shock of lockdowns, closed borders and ongoing uncertainties. “On the one hand it’s been a baptism of fire,” she says, “but on the other, Covid-19 has meant a lot of new New Zealand work has been created. It’s been a joy to see our creatives respond so positively to what could have been a devastating time for them – and there are many on the programme who would normally be touring overseas.”


ART | focus

Presenting a ‘safe’ programme was never an option, Gabrielle says. “An arts festival should offer something fresh, different and new. Maybe your opinions will be challenged but we hope that’s a good thing. We want people to be thinking and talking about a show, the next day and in a month’s time – but, don’t worry, there is plenty of light and laughter too.” One silver lining for Gabrielle and speaker programmer Sandra Simpson has been our limited travel options. “I don’t think I’ve ever had a programme in place so quickly,” says Sandra, who has worked on the speaker programme since 2001. “I’ve been able to sign some New Zealand writers I’ve been chasing for a while, a ‘dream team’ I hope will be memorable for audiences.” The festival is overseen by a Trust Board, which has a governance role, as well as being an advocate for the arts in our community. Kathryn, a Tauranga lawyer, joined the board in about 2004 and has been chair since 2017. “I’d moved here from Auckland and felt the vacuum of events so was very excited when the arts festival started in 1999,” she says. “I think someone must have spotted how many shows I attended because I was shoulder tapped to join the board.” At the nuts and bolts end of the festival is general manager Nikki Hansen. “I think we all end up running on adrenaline for the entire 10 days,” she says, “but then we look at each other and just want to do it all again.” Nikki joined the festival in 2015 as sponsor liaison

Image by Brydie Photography

Technical/production manager Bonnie Burrill

but the next year also took on the major role of events manager at Toi Ohomai, including organising graduation ceremonies, before last year being appointed the festival’s general manager, a full-time role. “Even though I was juggling a young family and two jobs I could always see myself at the festival. I really wanted this job and I love it.” The specialised skills of technical/production manager Bonnie Burrill have seen her at most Tauranga festivals since 2011, although she missed 2019 to work at the city-wide Sydney Arts Festival, “too good an opportunity to pass up”. Her brief includes lighting, sound and staging requirements and she liaises with every production on their needs well in advance. “There shouldn’t be any surprises for them or my team.” By the time of the festival Bonnie is in overview mode as theatre, comedy and music productions roll in and out of three venues – the Addison Theatre and X Space at Baycourt Community and Arts Centre, and Carrus Crystal Palace that will again rise on the Baycourt lawn. “My intent is to have everything as organised as possible beforehand so I can fill any gap or deal with any hiccups, things like staff illness, late freight delivery and breakages.” Her biggest asset in a busy and demanding role? “Keeping a sense of humour.” 

Literary programmer Sandra Simpson

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focus | LIFE

MAKAIA CARR “Whānau cooking for whānau is a beautiful thing”

Words KSENIIA SPODYNEIKO

WITH ALMOST 200K FOLLOWERS ACROSS SOCIAL MEDIA PLATFORMS, PĀPĀMOA’S MAKAIA CARR IS ONE OF NEW ZEALAND’S ORIGINAL INFLUENCERS. WHAT MADE HER LEAVE BEHIND THE JOB SHE’D BEEN DOING SINCE 2012 AND LAUNCH KURA KAI – A CHARITY PROJECT ENCOURAGING KIWIS TO COOK FREE MEALS FOR TEENAGERS IN NEED?

KURA KAI WAS BORN DURING LOCKDOWN. WHAT SPARKED THE IDEA? Seeing how many families were affected by it – losing jobs, struggling to pay bills, finding themselves in situations they had never thought possible. In March last year, one of my followers from Tauranga, Gemma, reached out to me. She was on the PTA for a primary school where they have this thing called Compassionate Freezer – free food for families in need. But due to the lockdown, they found it impossible to refill it. She asked if I could encourage my Bay of Plenty followers to help. In two days she had 80 new meals! It was really nice to see how a little post could do something so big and help so many families. It was such an easy and wonderful way to help whānau, school and kids. I spent about a month thinking how I could expand this idea and make it the new focus of my online platforms. That’s when Kura Kai was born. With this initiative, we really wanted to focus on teenagers. It’s the most challenging age group for charities, as teenagers often feel embarrassed about needing help; they’re afraid to be seen as ‘not cool’. So, we raise money to put chest freezers into high schools. We dropped off our first freezer at Mana College in Porirua last May and now we’re in 30 high schools around the country. I use social media to reach out

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and build the community of volunteers – amazing women who have the time, love, energy and the resources to cook delicious family dinners like casseroles, lasagnas and curries. They buy their own ingredients and cook out of their own kitchens. It’s so simple, so community-based, so grassroots. It’s beautiful! You see so much aroha coming from everybody involved. I REMEMBER SEEING NEWS ABOUT TEENAGERS DROPPING OUT OF SCHOOL TO HELP THEIR FAMILIES WITH THE FINANCES DURING LOCKDOWN AND NOT COMING BACK TO FINISH THEIR STUDIES. HAVING MEALS SUPPLIED WOULD PROBABLY HELP THESE KIDS TO SOME EXTENT? That’s actually one of the issues that was on my mind when starting Kura Kai. For many teenagers, high school is their last opportunity for a free education or any education at all. Not being able to go all the way through to Year 13 and having to leave early, purely because they needed to work to assist their family, is something I really wanted to help change. I’ve been there before myself, so if providing free meals would be one more reason they could stay at school longer that would make me really happy!


WHAT DO YOU MEAN YOU’VE BEEN THERE BEFORE? I’m the eldest of six girls and for the first 8-10 years of my childhood, life was pretty good. But then my parents divorced and our life just got turned on its head. My mum really, really struggled but she was also a very proud woman and found it hard to accept support from other people or organisations. We were living off food vouchers and had a strict budget. Most of us had jobs and I sometimes skipped school to be able to earn more money. There are still so many families living in similar situations who are not able to overcome the barrier to get the help they need and deserve. YOU’RE REALLY PASSIONATE ABOUT HELPING OTHERS. BUT IT MUST HAVE BEEN A HUGE TRANSITION FROM WHAT YOU USED TO DO ONLINE TO WHAT YOU POST AND TALK ABOUT NOW. HOW DID YOUR AUDIENCE REACT? It was certainly a big change for my followers but it came very naturally to me. When I was an influencer, it was never truly organic for me; it was a job, a role. It was exciting in its own way and I’m happy I’ve helped so many good companies grow. But what I do now is probably what I was always supposed to do. Around the time of the lockdown #BlackLivesMatter became a really big topic online. This hit home hugely for me. I thought – stuff it, I’m going to say what I really want to say. Now is the time to talk about racism and Māori issues in New Zealand. If people unfollow me because they only want to see me promoting healthy food and fitness, so be it. I can’t NOT talk about it! That’s when I started being more myself online, showing who I really was. I wasn’t worried about that brand not liking my opinion, or this person not giving me the job. This issue is bigger than all of that! My passion lies in helping Māori in New Zealand and seeing how we can fix inequality and racial issues. I actually had a few different ideas of what I could do to help but Kura Kai felt so right in my heart and my audience responded to it really well. Whānau cooking for whānau, families cooking for families – it spoke to me and speaks to many people out there. Last year was tough and game-changing for many people. You could choose to remain silent, speak up or sit on the fence. I chose to have a voice and talk about what I believed in

and I think it opened the path to all these new projects. IT FEELS LIKE MANY SOCIAL MEDIA INFLUENCERS HAVE BEEN RE-EVALUATING THE MESSAGE THEY’RE SENDING OUT AND BECOMING MORE CONSCIOUS ABOUT WHAT THEY DO. HAVE YOU ALSO NOTICED THE POSITIVE CHANGE? Absolutely! The past year really rattled the cages. Lots of people have adapted or changed the ways they impact the world. It’s amazing to see so much more diversity online, more acceptance for different cultures. People are trying to be more socially responsible and are using their public profiles to help and encourage others to do the same. Women are realising that what they consume online has a huge impact on their mental health and self-confidence. Issues raised and audiences actively demanding better have forced influencers and brands to step up. What we’re seeing now is an incredible power shift from influencers holding too much power to audiences dictating what they want to see and how they want to see it. Followers have the power to question us, to speak up if they’re not happy with the way things are done. I think it’s great! It holds us – people with the big reach – to account. It brings standards and moderates the industry, which had gotten out of hand. For example, take the new ASA guidelines on having to identify advertisements on social media – it’s a good way to have more transparency online. YOUR NEW CAREER WASN’T THE ONLY BIG LIFE CHANGE FOR YOU IN 2020. YOU ALSO MOVED FROM AUCKLAND TO TAURANGA. HOW DO YOU LIKE LIVING HERE? I’m living a dream! Every morning I walk the dog along the beach. Every Wednesday I’m doing Level 4 Te Reo Māori. Having time and confidence to learn my language is the biggest self-love thing of the year for me! I also trialed for a netball team and now play for Pāpāmoa Beach Club regularly. I haven’t played for five years after surgery on my knee. Playing sports again at 41, studying for the first time since high school, cooking for Kura Kai in my kitchen – oh my goodness, I feel like a new person! It was the perfect time for me, as a woman, as a mum, as someone in the middle of changing her career path so drastically, to transition into a slower, calmer pace of life that we have here. 

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focus | COVER STORY

ANGELA SWANN-CRONIN FROM ROTORUA BECAME THE FIRST WĀHINE MĀORI PILOT IN THE ROYAL NEW ZEALAND AIR FORCE IN 1997. FROM ANTARCTICA TO AFGHANISTAN – SHE’S BEEN DEPLOYED ALL OVER THE WORLD. SHE RETIRED FROM THE AIR FORCE IN 2009 AND NOW FLIES THE Q300 AROUND AOTEAROA AS AN AIR NEW ZEALAND PILOT, ENCOURAGES THE NEXT GENERATION OF FEMALE PILOTS AND ADVOCATES FOR POSITIVE CHANGE IN MALEDOMINATED INDUSTRIES.

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Sk y b o u n d

COVER STORY | focus

WORDS: KSENIIA SPODYNEIKO IMAGES: ALEX SPODYNEIKO HAIR AND MAKEUP: LAURA LEMOS


focus | COVER STORY

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n a picturesque quiet street, with Lake Rotorua gleefully shimmering on one side and Hell’s Gate steaming and boiling on the other, sits a very special house. It’s a sustainable straw bale house that took Angela and her husband, Anton, eleven months to build. With natural colours and materials, graceful arches where you’d expect straight lines and massive exposed beams, it’s cosy and welcoming. It’s a true nest for a couple, their two teen kids and a dog named Mihi. The first thing you notice when walking inside is a giant drum set in the middle of the room. “I also enjoy play the guitar,” mentions Angela casually. The next room contains an easel with an almost finished painting of a horse that looks so real you wouldn’t be surprised to see it stepping out of the frame for a quick graze in Angela’s landscaped garden. “I was a very quiet young girl and that was how I expressed myself – through art and colour,” says Angela. “I used to sell my artworks but these days I just paint for my own wellbeing.” She’s no doubt a woman of many talents but if there is one passion that exceeds all others, it’s her love for flying. Both Angela and Anton currently commute from Rotorua to Tauranga Airport for work. Anton is an air traffic controller, while Angela pilots domestic flights. On the day we meet,

she’s getting ready to fly from Tauranga to Wellington then from Wellington to Invercargill, with a return flight via Blenheim the next day. Exciting as it might sound, for Angela it’s a daily routine. In fact, she’s more excited about the possibility of seeing the blood supermoon from her cockpit – a rare astronomical event that happened over New Zealand in May for the first time in 40 years. Despite their work being in Tauranga, the SwannCronins have no intentions to move. Their relatives are spread throughout the BOP and Waikato – Mount Maunganui, Ōhope Beach, Cambridge – so being centrally located is pretty convenient. The family has always been the most important thing for them. Angela, who is of Ngāti Porou and Rongowhakaata descent, says: “My wider whānau is on the East Coast but I grew up in Rotorua and I feel like an adopted daughter of the community here.” She always knew that one day she would return to settle down in this town. After the hectic globetrotting military days, Angela really values her newfound slower, more mindful pace of life. “I do yoga, gardening, take my dog for a jog. I always have so much going on in my life, it feels really nice when I have a day off to have a leisurely start, and make sure I take care of myself so I can better care for others.”

Colonel Merryl Tengesdal is the first and only AfricanAmerican woman to fly the United States Air Force's U-2 spy plane, which flies at over 21,000m altitude and is considered to be one of the most difficult aircrafts to pilot.

In 2019, 1st Lieutenant Chantal Kallas and 1st Lieutenant Rita Zaher became the first official female military pilots in the Lebanese Army. Women are not allowed to work on the front line in the army there but the rule is not applied to Air Force personnel.

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First Lieutenant Misa Matsushima is the first woman in Japan to pilot a fighter type aircraft. She obtained her licence in October 2016 after the Ministry of Defence opened the fighter pilot specialisation to female candidates in 2015.

Images by Eloise Alanna, USAF official photo, Japanese Ministry of Defence

Angela with her family during her time in the RNZAF


GLOBALLY, ONLY:

COVER STORY | focus

6.84%

of all pilots are female 8.2%

Female boat captains

15%

Female police officers

31.8%

Female doctors and surgeons

BECOMING A PILOT It all started with a TV ad for the Air Force when Angela was only 14. “I just fell in love with all the adventures and challenges it promised.” She failed the first two attempts to get into the Air Force straight out of school but didn’t give up and was accepted on her third try. “Never let your dreams go! I would never have been able to afford a flight school, and flying was something I really wanted to do, so the military became a different avenue to my goal. It’s only one of many pathways to flying in New Zealand but it’s certainly the most competitive. You need to be really tough skinned to succeed. I wasn’t initially but I developed it.” Training and flying uncovered another – this time, physical – obstacle for Angela. “I had a lot of ear infections as a child, so now I have severe scarring in my ear. For a long time, I thought it was normal to experience pain with the altitude change!” She later had surgery done and though the situation has improved, Angela still has to manage and monitor her condition. For many, this might’ve been too much, but Angela barely even mentions the negatives. Instead, her eyes sparkle and lips curl in a fond smile as she reminisces about her years in the military: “Those were incredible times, doing amazing things with amazing people all around the world. There is so much to this job – Weapons and Nuclear Biological Chemical Warfare training, practising defensive aircraft maneuvers, researching tactical airfields, arranging diplomatic clearances, flight planning through foreign airspace and working with coalition forces. I just loved that sense of teamwork and excitement, which sounds a bit bizarre when you’re operating in a war zone, but I was never afraid. We were close as a team and had equipment and personnel available to protect us and the aircraft. Prior to deployment we trained, and trained, and trained.” Angela flew her C-130 Hercules to Antarctica, Afghanistan, Kyrgyzstan, and all over the globe with a small team that included a co-pilot, flight engineer, navigator and loadmaster. She had also been deployed to Canada for three years, where she had her first child. PAVING THE WAY FOR WOMEN IN AVIATION What was it like being the only wāhine Māori pilot in the Royal New Zealand Air Force? “I had no idea I was going to be the first, but initially I was yelled at a lot,” she admits. “I’ve heard military training has changed quite a bit since I was there. And back then, coming from a family with two sisters, graduating from an all-girl school, and suddenly finding myself surrounded by men – it was a cultural shock.” Angela faced at times what she calls ‘subtle discrimination’ – things like being unintentionally excluded from conversations or activities such as ‘boys trips’. “In male-dominated industries, men may not even realise they’re doing it, but it can hurt. I think it can be one of the reasons women are not attracted to these jobs – we all want to feel like we ‘belong’.” At first, Angela tried to blend in with her co-workers. “It’s a normal survival tactic. Don’t get me wrong, I had a lot of fun too! But it wasn’t all roses. There were moments of loneliness, moments of personal and professional sadness. These difficult times have led to my involvement in the industry’s mental wellness programs”. focusmagazine.co.nz

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focus | COVER STORY

Later on, she realised that the best she could do to improve the situation for the future generation of female pilots was to make herself available as a role model. “I now go into schools, into communities, so people can see that a pilot is not just a white male that society is so accustomed to. They can also be a Māori wāhine! They can look just like you. If you can see it – you can be it.” She also works with several worldwide groups uniting women in aviation, including an Air New Zealand network WINGs (Women Inspiring the Next Generation) to attract and retain more women in aviation and to identify and eliminate the barriers they’re facing. “Take the language we use in our manuals, for example. A lot of it has always been ‘he’. It wasn’t a barrier for me but it can be for others. We can do better! Let’s try and make aviation more inclusive. Not just for women but for other minorities as well.” Another barrier Angela points out is having kids. “When you have children, you stop flying during some parts of the pregnancy and post natal, therefore you stop accumulating flight hours. In most aviation jobs, your flight hours are the indication of your experience, so women who choose to have children during their aviation career would always be behind their male peers. We can make the same money but our male peers would accumulate more hours and, as a result, move ahead in their careers more quickly.” Angela had children during her military days and was put into a ground job while she wasn’t flying – something that’s not easily done in most civil aviation jobs. “In civil aviation, if you’re a pilot and you’re not able to fly, typically there is no other job for you, which, of course, is a huge financial barrier for women.” These days, you can often find Angela and other WINGs members at various air shows or aviation forums. They are always open for a chat. She also mentors young women willing to follow in her footsteps. “A lady who I helped mentor over the years is now in training to become a pilot. It’s great to see her developing. She has the same excitement in her eyes I had 20 years ago.” “We need women at all levels,” says Angela. “We have to sit at the table when the big decisions are made, otherwise those decisions might not be favourable for us.” To be able to share her perspective as a Māori woman on a whole new level, last year Angela started her governance journey. She’s now a Director for SRSL (Search and Rescue Services Ltd) which operates predominantly rescue helicopter services south of the Bombay Hills to Wellington. She’s really excited about this new chapter of her life and hopes it will give her an opportunity to make a difference, while also spending more time at home, with her family. To summarise her journey Angela shares a whānau whakataukī (proverb) that she lives by – Whakapupungia nga moemoea, kia tipu ai hei Taonga – Nurture your dreams so they may flourish as prized possessions. 

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BODY MECHANIX A multi-faceted health clinic

IN THE SAME WAY YOUR CAR REQUIRES SERVICING AND TUNING, BODY MECHANIX OFFERS A WIDE RANGE OF SERVICES INCLUDING PHYSIOTHERAPY, MYOFASCIAL RELEASE, PODIATRY, MASSAGE AND BOWEN SERVICES TO ENSURE YOUR BODY PERFORMS OPTIMALLY. SOLGAR HEALTH AND WELLBEING SUPPLEMENTS ARE ON OFFER AS WELL AS CUSTOMMADE ORTHOTICS AND INSOLES, AND ORTHOTIC SHOES. FOUNDED BY NOEL SMITH 20 YEARS AGO AND NOW OWNED BY LISA HAZEL AND AL PEARSON, THE SERVICES AT THE TAURANGA-BASED CLINIC ARE IN HIGH DEMAND. ACC REGISTERED, SOUTHERN CROSS AFFILIATED, BARTERCARD AND QOIN ACCEPTED.

PODIATRY – LIZ HOSKING AND DANI SUTCLIFFE

Our two podiatrists are experienced practitioners who specialise in foot care and lower limb conditions and can help people of all ages – from young children to the elderly – and from the mobility-compromised to athletes: • Foot pain • ACC-related injuries • Planter fasciitis • Verruca • Diabetic care • Arthritic-related pain • Footwear assessment • Leg length discrepancies • Orthotics prescription and review

• Heel pain • Neuroma • Foot and ankle injuries • Children’s foot pain • Nail care – thick/ ingrown/ fungal or just difficult-to-cut nails • Ingrown toe nail surgery • Corns/callouses • Shin splints

The Body Mechanix team (l to r) Dani Sutcliffe, Lisa Hazel, Noel Smith, Jo Buchanan, Lisa Anderson and Liz Hosking

PHYSIOTHERAPY – NOEL SMITH

Noel was the original owner of Body Mechanix but decided to focus entirely on his profession. His hands-on approach to treat injuries and correct underlying causes is his objective. Noel uses a number of modalities to rid clients of pain and restore full mobility and function: • Spinal and joint manipulation/ mobilisation • Soft tissue release • Muscle balancing • Dry-needle acupuncture • Rehabilitation programmes • Correcting underlying causes or triggers • Nutritional clinic to identify any related food or health pain triggers e.g. fibromyalgia • Acute and chronic spinal/joint injuries • Sports injuries • Headaches/migraines

• Biomechanical problems • Orthopaedic rehab • Post-surgical conditions • Women’s health • Growth-related disorders • Occupational injuries • Ergonomic assessments • Autoimmune conditions, such as fibromyalgia, polymyalgia, chronic fatigue • Osteoporosis • Digestive-related pain disorders • Exercise prescription • Arthritis

MASSAGE AND BOWEN THERAPY – JO BUCHANAN

One of the oldest healing arts, massage, has varied and far-reaching benefits – from reduced muscle tension and improved circulation to stimulation of the lymphatic system and the reduction of stress hormones and increased joint mobility and flexibility. Jo also uses Bowen therapy – a hands-on healing modality that resets the body to a state of wellbeing. However, one doesn’t need to be unwell to reap the benefits of massage or Bowen therapy.

923 Cameron Road (Opposite Tauranga Girls’ College) Gate Pa, Tauranga T: 07 578 6080 • bodymechanix.co.nz

Open Monday-Friday 8.30am-5.00pm, with late nights Tuesday and Wednesday


10 focus | HEALTH

Healing Principles

Applicable to All

Images by Vanessa Laval-Glad

Words JUSTINE LAIDLAW

HAVE YOU EVER: • Walked into a room and felt the hairs on the back of your neck stand up and you immediately want to leave again? • Met someone for the first time, looked in their eyes and just trusted them right away? • Suddenly thought of a friend you haven’t seen in a long time only to have that person get in contact with you? These are perfect examples of your intuition trying to communicate with you, but are you listening to it? Justine and her husband Graeme

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HEALTH | focus

I

ntuition is a natural-born instinct and we were once very connected to this sense – our survival depended on it! If we felt that a storm was brewing our intuition would urge us to seek shelter as soon as possible. It is the ability to just know something with no apparent analytical reasoning and it helps us to bridge the gap between the conscious and unconscious parts of our brains. Today we are overloaded with outside data, and the deep, intuitive sense at the back of our brains that guide us away from danger is often ignored. We’ve also learnt to disregard our intuitive impulses because society has deemed it ‘crazy’ to follow an intuitive impulse that is difficult to explain or defies rational logic. Expressing that you have a strong gut feeling about something is not always received positively in this day and age, but this is slowly changing. Justine Laidlaw acted on her intuition when she was diagnosed with stage three aggressive colon cancer in 2013. Three aspects of intuition that she believes were a major key to her recovery are: • Our bodies innately know how to heal themselves. • There are many ways to access your intuition. • Everyone has positive changes they need to make – physically, mentally and spiritually. Often we ignore the messages that our bodies are desperately sending us. They are longing to be treated well

and let us know with all those niggles, sensitive stomachs or other health issues. Justine decided to be happy and fully present in her life. She was resolved to spend whatever time she had left living as naturally as possible and for as long as she could. Part of this was embracing the ten key healing factors that everyone should adopt for optimal wellbeing in this world of chronic illnesses. 10 KEY HEALING FACTORS: Body: • Eat nutrient-dense wholefoods • Empower yourself with your decisions • Exercise regularly • Take herbs and supplements to correct any nutritional deficiencies, support your immune system and optimise digestion Mind and Emotions: • Release suppressed emotions • Increase positive emotions • Embrace social support • Have a strong reason to live and exciting plans for your future Spirit: • Listen to and follow your intuition much more closely • Deepen your spiritual connection in your individual belief system or find something that stimulates your ‘soul’. These ten healing factors are

from the research of Dr Kelly Turner, who is a New York author of Radical Remission (recently updated to Radical HOPE). Dr Turner’s work is based on exceptional survivors of cancer and chronic illness where a decade of research went into what the medical field terms ‘spontaneous remissions’. Dr Turner was examining how someone could be sent home to finish their days in peace only to walk back into their doctor’s office a year later alive and well. Sometimes the people in remission were even healthier than they were long before their initial diagnosis. It became crystal clear to Dr Turner as she interviewed these survivors that there was nothing spontaneous about it. They spoke of making significant lifestyle and emotional changes in order to heal themselves and their so-called miracle healings occurred because they made radical shifts in their body, mind and spirit. These are the areas of our lives that form the foundation for our healing according to Justine. Gut feelings are usually physical manifestations of our intuition. With patience and practice you’ll start to understand when you’re receiving a gut feeling that should be trusted. Over time these feelings will get stronger, clearer and you'll feel better equipped to act on them. So remember, you may not be dealing with any illness or injury at present but every positive change you make to your life right now will help you to a healthier and happier future. 

JUSTINE LAIDLAW Justine works alongside other integrative practitioners at the Godfrey Medical Clinic in Tauranga. She is qualified as a functional medicine cancer coach, in breast screening and ozone therapy. She also facilitates group coaching and healing workshops online for people with chronic illnesses. At the two-year post-diagnosis mark she was declared NED (no evidence of disease) and her latest CT scan in May 2020 is still clear. Justine acknowledges her decision was not for everyone and would never try to influence your individual health journey choices. However she is available to provide you with support and complement your other healthcare professionals’ treatments with her experience, training and cheerful positive attitude. Feel free to get in touch with her. The Natural Bird 021 1124359 • justine@thenaturalbird.co.nz • thenaturalbird.co.nz

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Finding value in life AGE ISN’T JUST ABOUT LONGEVITY BUT THE ART OF LIVING WELL AND ENHANCING YOUR HAPPINESS AND SENSE OF FULFILMENT. IN DR DOUG WILSON’S BOOK AGEING WELL: HOW TO NAVIGATE LIFE’S JOURNEY IN YOUR LATER YEARS, HE COVERS A WIDE RANGE OF TOPICS AN AGEING POPULATION MAY FACE.

Extract taken from Ageing Well by Dr Doug Wilson, Calico Publishing, RRP $39.95, calicopublishing.co.nz

PURPOSE AND RELEVANCE A sense of purpose substitutes for the depression of feeling irrelevant. Doesn’t matter what it is. But you need a reason for getting out of bed each day. You need a purpose. Waking up each day with nothing much to live for or to enjoy is rather a bleak commentary on the lives of some folk. A purpose doesn’t have to be dramatic, or flag-waving, or life-changing. Purpose is something that you plan for each day, that has a consequence, such as the joy and pleasure for other individuals. It can be as modest as taking responsibility for a meal, either over a period of time or the occasional one-offs such as Sunday lunch. If the family visits their older relative, there’s planning on who’s coming, what’s the menu, how the house will be prepared, and the conversation. The purpose is to prepare for a task at hand, one that benefits other people than yourself.

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Anything will do. It does not have to be a high-profile charity. But an interest or helping a friend, or family member or spouse, is good. Tending a garden to have the joy of the beauty of flowers or fresh vegetables you can share is an achievement to satisfy. Hobbies, volunteering, travel, biography, sports, anything. Make it your own. Religious communities. Generate joy and satisfaction. Engage in your community. If you have an elderly friend who complains, as many do, of their little purpose in life, encourage them to boost their personal relationships, to join a club, to attend a religious community, to identify some books that may support their personal attitude to life, and talk about it. Irrelevance is a very negative attitude as a consequence of lack of purpose. As we strive towards an active and happier old age, we always need the stimulus of purpose, particularly one that brings joy to others. EXPRESSING GRATITUDE Gratitude is a behaviour that supports purpose. Taking the time to think of all that you are grateful for, people and things, has a wonderful effect on mood and positivity. WELLNESS PROGRAMMES There are many businesses and programmes that target lifestyle and other wellness measures with proven health interventions and gains. They serve as a valuable and worthy support for those seeking a beneficial change in their lives, adopting a serious approach to their remaining


LIFE | focus

years for their healthiest state possible. As this current guide endeavours to set out, there is a massive jungle of ideas and claims of health benefits, and life-changing actions, that can be pursued, along with life-extension advice. Many of them make spurious claims, tagged with philosophies or earnest advocacy for one or other of the new diets, or naturopathic practices, or even the bizarre homeopathic approach, long proven as being useless. ACTION: Despite the wellness programme arena being captured by commerce, the notion itself is sound and usually very beneficial, offering you the chance to take time out and meet new people, learn new selfimprovement skills, learn to relax, meditate, exercise, accept yourself and more. But do your homework if you are heading to a wellness retreat or engaging with a wellness programme. They provide a body-refreshing spell, and you are likely to feel better after that. But find a good one. MENTORING You may be older but almost certainly not useless. Many organisations, charities and small businesses are desperate for help from experienced individuals who can act as mentors for less-trained employees. Depending on your background, you may find this is a wondrous new vocation, and the organisation to which you link may bless themselves they found you. Let it be known that you are actively

interested in mentoring; there are also business organisations which market such opportunities. It is a situation where everybody gains. VOLUNTEERING Church groups abound and numerous charities are always on the lookout for volunteers to help. For the volunteer, this can be like an entirely new career, working with individuals and organisations. You are working with like-minded people and are respected and accorded status. In many countries, local websites summarise where volunteers are needed and what tasks and skills they are seeking. The act of volunteering brings fresh engagement, social networks, application and responsibility, and above all a sense of purpose. There are probably few human activities that are so health promoting, altruistic and meaningful. BENEFITS OF TECHNOLOGY In many situations, technology has a huge positive impact on the elderly community. Communication with friends and family is a positive. The internet is a golden gift for advancing years, let alone for the rest of society. Entertainment is streamed into houses. You can be the centre of your social network. Even if your family and friends are in other countries, it is simple to communicate with them on a regular basis, including seeing them move around on the screen. Home movies can be produced on your

mobile phone. Complex hobbies can be pursued with enthusiasm and support using the internet to identify people of like interests and share ideas and projects. There is no excuse for being cut off, other than failing to pay the bills. ACTION: Make the best use of these technological advances to greatly improve your life. NEGATIVE ASPECTS OF TECHNOLOGY Many individuals become obsessed with their capacity to communicate with their friends, and others, and more life is spent interacting with a screen. Online scams seek to extract cash from gullible individuals. More and more societal and bureaucratic interactions are online and many older individuals are unable to manage these activities without help. Banking and paying bills are online. Filling in forms are increasingly digital. Asking questions of most agencies directs you to a digital voice which has no idea what you are calling about. For some it is like losing your way in a strange country, demanding you use a strange foreign language, which is really what it is. ACTION: Get a kid to show you, Grandma. Somehow you need to find a helper to assist you here as the digitation of our lives is only going to increase. There are courses available for older computer users to get up to speed in many areas. 

If you’re thinking of a change in lifestyle – Althorp Village has it all! We offer you:

Open for viewing: 7days 10am-4pm

ü Independent Lifestyle Living ü Fun, Friendship, Security ü A Social and Friendly Environment ü Resort Style Facilities ü A wide Range of Social Activities If you want the most out of life and to live in a social and friendly environment, come visit us at Althorp Lifestyle Village in sunny Tauranga!

For more information contact Claire Keen on 07 543 4008 or 021 061 7247 9 Grantston Drive, Pyes Pa, Tauranga www.althorpvillage.co.nz


focus | LIFE

WALKING WALKING THE THE TALK TALK

ROTORUA-BORN RACHEL GRUNWELL HAS BEEN ON A PHENOMENAL WELLBEING JOURNEY OVER THE PAST DECADE, AND NOW SHE’S INSPIRING OTHERS TO FOLLOW HER PATH. 34 | focusmagazine.co.nz


IT’S

hard not to smile when you spend time with Rachel Grunwell. The fresh-faced wellness coach is not only a walking, talking picture of health, she is also bubbling with an infectious enthusiasm that would prompt even the laziest among us to join her on a jog around the block. But it hasn’t always been this way. Rewind 10 years and the mum-of-three was a very different person. “I was a stressed out, sugar-addicted, caffeine-fuelled journalist,” laughs the 45-yearold, who began her career at the Rotorua Daily Post. “I wasn’t fit, I wasn’t strong and I was always really self-conscious.” It was her media work exploring wellness trends that prompted the award-winning reporter to take stock of her own life, and embark on a new career direction. What began with a decision to train as a yoga instructor led to a qualification as a personal trainer, and evolved into a mission to transform the lives of Kiwis nationwide, through coaching, motivational talks and the success of her wellness bible Balance – Food, Health and Happiness. “The unique thing I do is look at all the wellness pieces of the puzzle – I can help clients with how they move, eat, think, sleep and manage stress,” explains Rachel, who hosts Mindful Moments Retreats at Rotorua’s Polynesian Spa. “I can help people to run a marathon or build muscle, lose weight or get more balance.” THE RIGHT TRACK By her own admission, the former Lakes High student was the most unlikely person to reinvent herself as a health guru. As a teen Rachel was the kid who avoided exercise, and as a new mum she was the one unable to catch her breath on the school run. “All my life I thought people were like the Lady Gaga song Born This Way – that to be super fit and healthy you had to have different genes,” she admits. “What I love about sharing my journey is that if I can, you can. I don’t have any talent for these things, but I’m okay at sucking at stuff. I have the attitude that I want to get better, so I just keep going.” It was that attitude that saw her building up from puffing her way around the block for 10 minutes, to running 25 marathons. From being unable to even hoist up a bar in the gym, to deadlifting 101kg. From being overwhelmed by myriad health messaging, to having a library of 800 wellness books and writing her own. And from being selfconscious about her figure to rocking a bikini. “I’m in the best shape of my life,” enthuses Rachel, who now lives in Auckland but refers to the Bay of Plenty as her ‘heart home’. “I have transformed myself, I know the power of it and how it changes your life. To be able to help others with it is a life-long purpose.” One of the ways Rachel motivates others is by encouraging them to be role models for the next generation. She has certainly seen how her journey has impacted on her kids Zach, 16, Lachie, 14, and nine-year-old Finn. She not only sets the barometer for them health wise, but also educates them through her philanthropic work. A supporter of The Cambodia Charitable Trust, Rachel is also an ambassador of Achilles, a charity which helps those with disabilities take part in mainstream athletics; and she has run many marathons as the support person for these runners. “To give back is really important, and I think it’s a great lesson for my kids to see that,” says Rachel. “A big thing in achieving happiness is taking time to give back.” And moving forward, giving back and spreading the message is her focus. “I’d love to do more workplace wellness workshops,” explains Rachel, who is also a sought-after content and recipe developer, creating healthy dishes for the likes of Vitamix. “I love working with teams to elevate their health and happiness levels, and manage stress better. After all, a happier workforce is more productive, so it’s wellness work that can impact a company’s bottom line.” 

LIFE | focus

RACHEL’S

EASY WAYS TO ACHIEVE

BALANCE

• Consider where you’re spending your energy. Where energy goes, energy flows, so put every energy into your dream and focus on your own life – rather than caring what anyone else thinks or does. • Tune into the power of play. People get stressed and anxious, and need to bring back what gives them joy and makes them feel good. • Eat more protein. This is important for satiety – feeling fuller for longer. It will help you quit snacks and build muscle, which boosts your metabolism. • Showing up is everything. It doesn’t matter how well you do, if you practice, you will get better. • Tap into the group effect. Exercise is more fun if you do it with a friend, it becomes less about the run and all about the catch up. It also forces you to show up.

For more from Rachel, head to her website, inspiredhealth.co.nz check out her book, Balance (Beatnik Publishing), and find her on Instagram @rachelgrunwell. focusmagazine.co.nz

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focus | FOOD

DEMYSTIFYING FOOD TRENDS Words DR LIBBY WEAVER

FOOD TRENDS … JUST WHEN WE THINK WE’VE HEARD THEM ALL, THERE’S A NEW KID ON THE BLOCK CLAIMING TO BE THE SAVING GRACE FOR ALL HEALTH CONCERNS. MANY PEOPLE ARE FOREVER LOOKING FOR ANSWERS – THEY WANT TO KNOW EXACTLY WHAT TO EAT AND WHICH ‘PILL’ WILL SOLVE EVERYTHING. THEY ARE LOOKING FOR A PRESCRIPTION, A GUARANTEE THAT IF THEY FOLLOW THE RULES, THEY’LL BE ‘FIXED’ ONCE AND FOR ALL.

It is understandable why food has become so confusing. One day you might read that low fat yoghurt is good for your health and the next that it’s not, and that kale is far more beneficial. One way to decipher the mixed messages is to consider if a food is nourishing, rather than healthy. Food is not actually healthy. People are or they aren’t. Food is nutritious or it isn’t. Seeing food through this lens can help us to bring more common sense and ease to food choices.

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The way to not get caught up in food and nutrition fads is to remember that when it comes to food, nature gets it right, and it is potentially human intervention that can get it so wrong. In other words, what have become known as ultra-processed foods, are not really ‘foods’ at all, often made from fake food substances and offering very little, if any, nutritional value. Yet when we choose predominantly whole, real foods, our health is rewarded from the nutrient density they provide.

Education is part of any health journey and change process. Sometimes we don’t understand what’s going on for us and we need assistance to get to the heart of it. But when we continue to seek authority, jumping from one expert to the next, without also looking inward for our own answers and paying attention to what our body is communicating through symptoms, we are doing ourselves a great disservice. There is no one set way to approach


FOOD | focus

health that works for all of us. It might suit your friend to be vegan, but when you try it, you feel completely exhausted no matter how much or how frequently you eat, and you are always iron deficient. Our body gives us messages all the time, trying to help us understand what it needs. Try to look at the symptoms you experience as messages offering you feedback about your choices. Is that headache you get most afternoons at 3pm from a lack of pain killers? (I’m joking!) Or is it your body prompting you to eat afternoon tea or up your hydration or to slow your breathing or to take a break from your computer and go outside and change your posture? When you tune in, you’ll likely hear a response bubble up, guiding you forward. It’s your choice (of course) how you eat, whereas it’s my job to make sure people get everything they need from the way they eat. Let’s examine some common ways of eating and their subsequent potential for nutrient deficiencies: VEGETARIAN • Iron: If you’re a menstruating female, you need 18mg of iron per day. With eggs being one of the richest vegetarian sources of iron at 0.7mg of iron per egg—you can see how easily a deficiency can occur when you need 18mg every day. • Zinc: you require 8-14mg per day. Sunflower and pumpkin seeds are some of the only vegetarian sources of zinc and they contain 0.9 mg zinc per 100 grams—taking into consideration how little seeds weigh. VEGAN • Iron and zinc are common deficiencies (as outlined above). • Vitamin B12: stores will generally last between two and five years, and as animal foods are the only source, supplementation is essential before stores run out. • Calcium: if you drink caffeinated drinks or soft drinks, your requirement for calcium will be higher than if you don’t. Calcium is widely spread throughout plant foods but a focus on eating enough is important given adult women need 1000-1300mg per day. • Omega 3 essential fats: the body can convert EPA (one type of essential fat) from plants into DHA (another essential fat) found in algae and fish,

yet in many people this is inefficiently done. Sources of EPA include flaxseeds, chia seeds, and walnuts. LOW-CARB • If you eat a very low-carb diet in any form, you need to ensure you obtain enough B group vitamins. LOW-FAT • Essential fats: the omega-3 and omega-6 essential fatty acids are just that—essential! • Fat soluble vitamins: Vitamins A, D, E and K are widely spread throughout foods that contain fat. As you can see it’s important to ensure you are obtaining all of the nutrients your body needs for optimal health and function and in some situations where dietary intake in insufficient, supplementation is required. This is one reason I formulated the Bio Blends plant-based (rather than synthetically-made) supplement range. Zinc, for example, contributes to hundreds of processes inside your body including the creation of over 300 enzymes, many of which are necessary for great digestion, the foundation of all health. Yet this is one of the most common dietary mineral deficiencies. Obtaining adequate zinc in our diets can be a task in itself, let alone when we follow a restricted way of eating. If you’re still asking “what am I supposed to eat?”, I gently offer you

these guiding principles: • Eat mostly whole, real foods • Stop counting calories and if you need to count anything, count nutrients • Consider how your food has been grown and produced—not just for your health but also for that of your family, the planet, and other animals • All whole, real foods are superstars! Try not to get caught up in food trends and fads • Consider ‘how’ you’re eating and do your best to eat in a calm state to maximise nutrient uptake • Ensure the meat you eat is organic and pasture-fed, not grain-fed • If a particular way of eating suits your body or your beliefs, ensure you are obtaining all the nutrients your body needs for optimal health and function • Consider whether you need to supplement your nutrient intake— you may wish to consider Bio Blends Organic Daily Greens and Radiant Reds powder for a daily nutrient boost. Allow your inner wisdom to guide your choices. Apply common sense. Be so kind to yourself and remember that it is what you do every day that impacts on your health, not what you occasionally do – hot chips twice a week has very different effects to hot chips 10 times a year. No long term, sustained change I have ever witnessed has stemmed from a headspace of deprivation. Live each day in touch with how precious life is, how precious you are — and treat yourself accordingly. 

Dr Libby Weaver (PhD) is a nutritional biochemist, speaker and best-selling author of 13 books. Bio Blends sources the highest quality ingredients and selects certified organic ingredients wherever this is possible. Each ingredient goes through a stringent selection process, that includes proof of the presence of the target nutrients and bioactive substances, and a thorough check to ensure there are no heavy metals or pesticide residues. To find out more, visit bioblends.com

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R AINBOW ME AL S FOOD SHOULD BE NUTRITIOUS AND DELICIOUS – THAT MUCH IS OBVIOUS. BUT IT CERTAINLY DOESN’T HURT WHEN IT LOOKS PRETTY AS WELL!

V on Wheels is New Zealand’s first vegan meal delivery service. Their colourful, gourmet, nutrient-dense meals are made fresh from scratch before they’re frozen, sustainably packaged and sent to hungry humans nationwide.


FOOD | focus

OIL-FREE, GLUTEN-FREE VEGAN PUMPKIN NOODLE SOUP INGREDIENTS: • 1 small yellow onion, peeled and diced • 3 cloves garlic, grated • 3 Tbsp red curry paste • 1 Tbsp grated ginger • 1 Tbsp grated lemongrass • 2 cups pumpkin, cut in chucks and boiled • 1 can full-fat coconut milk • 100g cooked Thai noodles or rice noodles • ¼ cup minced fresh cilantro (coriander) • Chopped peanuts for topping (optional) • Toasted pumpkin seeds for topping (optional)

GLUTEN-FREE VEGAN FALAFEL WRAP INGREDIENTS: • 4 large 25cm gluten-free wraps • ½ cup beetroot hummus • Large handful baby spinach • ½ large avocado, thinly sliced • 1 cup shredded or baked carrot • 12 baked mini falafels • ½ cup of edamame beans • ½ cup toasted sunflower and pumpkin seeds • 8 toothpicks

METHOD: 1. Spread hummus evenly across each of the four wraps, leaving about an inch around the edges. 2. Add a strip of baby spinach, carrots, edamame, seeds and three falafels. Roll the wrap tightly, ensuring that all the ingredients stay inside. 3. Secure with toothpicks and slice wrap in half. Serve and enjoy!

METHOD: 1. Add a splash of water and salt in a pot and set over medium-high heat. When it's hot, add the onions. Cook for about 3 minutes or just until they start to soften. 2. Add in the garlic, red curry paste, ginger, and lemongrass. Sauté for about a minute to combine the flavours. 3. Stir in the pumpkin and coconut milk. Lower the heat and simmer for 10 minutes. 4. Add in the cooked noodles and let them warm up for a few minutes. 5. Stir in minced cilantro and serve hot with a sprinkle of chopped peanuts and pumpkin seeds.

TIP

Use 100% wholegrain wraps for a higher fibre option.

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Bus in Zadar, Croatia (1994)

Face painting in Bosnia (1996) Abandoned tank in Bosnia (1996) Simone aged 28, Croatian Coast during Bananas 4 Split tour (1994)

Simone and children after show near Gorazde, Bosnia

Taking Fun

Getting ready for a song at Messy Church at Holy Trinity last year

Simone and puppet during Dobrakadabra tour of Bosnia

Seriously

SIMONE VAN KAN, HUMANITARIAN ADVENTURER, NEVER ANTICIPATED JOURNEYING TO SARAJEVO TO BRING AID AND ENTERTAINMENT TO CHILDREN IN WAR-TORN BOSNIA. SHE WAS FIRST ENTICED BY A BOYFRIEND’S VISION AND HER GROUP’S COLLECTIVE ENTHUSIASM FOR A PLAN TO HELP OUT IN ORPHANAGES EN ROUTE BACK HOME TO NEW ZEALAND, FOLLOWING HER OE. Words KINSA HAYS • Images SIMONE VAN KAN

“We fundraised in London,” says Simone, co-founder of the ‘most rockn-roll aid agency of the 90s’ ” Then we bought a red London double-decker bus for impact, and to fit in more people and gear.” They linked with other aid agencies for contacts, but when they reached the Ionaseni orphanage, in Romania,

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the shocking spectacle of abandoned children kept Simone hiding away at first and focusing on admin. That changed when she left the bus for a two-month stint at the orphanage with Moona, a Scottish guy who’d been there for years. “It transformed me,” Simone said. “He taught me that the children had

names and personalities. We’d hug and hang out together, which opened up a link with them that drew me back several times in the years to come. The peacefulness of the place, horse and cart transport, washing with water from the well, interacting with the locals – it brings you down to earth,” she told me. “Neither did it hurt having


a summer romance.” Months later she re-joined the London bus in Poland, but when it broke down (a regular occurrence) in Russia and their visas ran out, the first Serious Road Trip was abandoned. Simone experienced vulnerable moments heading back to Romania on her own; stuck once at the border at night with an expired visa in the company of dodgy-looking black marketeers. “You have to think on your feet,” she said. “Without mobile phones and few phone connections, you learn to rely on your wits. When you face circumstances like this and get through them, you’re emboldened.” Encounters like these brought Simone out of her shell. By the next Serious Road Trip, she was courageous enough to instigate her own projects, and perform alongside Irish Johnnie, a professional clown. The volunteer group also had to locate a roadworthy vehicle and the all-important driver, find a guitarist, plan itineraries, get permits and find costumes. In pre-arranged venues, they dressed up and performed twice a day, six days a week for two months, becoming adaptable and versatile. Simone clowned, twirled poi, learned to juggle and face-paint. “Our shows brought fun and laughter into grim situations, in refugee camps or orphanages in remote areas of Romania. Children there might not have experienced life outside those four walls,” Simone reflected, “but children unable to communicate could still understand humour, laughing at Johnnie’s slapstick comedy. Their reactions egged us on. All we needed was a few words of the local language. At some orphanages the children only wanted to be held. We’d play guitar, pick them up and dance with them and they wouldn’t want to be put down. These were moments of pure love. We realised we were making a difference.” In Bosnia, in the 90s, it was a different story. They entered in convoys on a ceasefire, though there was still danger. The children in these orphanages were traumatised by the genocide and ethnic cleansing, often carried out by neighbours. They’d lost parents, seen them killed even as they escaped. Schools had re-opened, but only for half-days. Volunteers brought in food parcels and undertook a ‘Meals in Schools’ programme in an effort to entice pupils back after years of war. “On a later return visit,” says Simone, “the teachers told us how much the children had enjoyed the show. They’d drawn balloons and clowns instead of guns and tanks.” On their Dobrakadabra Tour in Bosnia, they developed a new act. Simone had been introduced to puppets as a child, and the life-size boy and girl puppets revived her interest. When they returned to the London aid bases, fundraising and organising for the next trip would begin. Team members slept on the floor in shared quarters. “It was bedlam,” she reports, “but we were inspired to do what we did, so we could make a difference. Still, after five years I knew I had to find a better way forward for my own well-being.” In New Zealand she met her soon-to-be husband and travelled with him around Europe, including serious training with puppet masters in Berlin, Bochum and Paris, before they settled for ten years in Dartmoor in the UK. Simone took on gigs as a puppeteer and wrote The Serious Road Trip, first launched in London. Now the couple are settled with their daughter in Tauranga where Simone works for the Holy Trinity Church. The puppets wait in a cupboard to re-emerge! “What I learned was to live in the present. People are people everywhere, and love, arohanui, truly makes the world go around. God helped us on our journeys and, as a Christian, it’s appropriate to be working for Him now.” 

The Serious Road Trip is available in hardback from good bookshops, as a Kindle eBook from Amazon, or direct from the author, simone_mines@hotmail.com.


WEEKEND GETAWAY TO

Whakatāne and Ōhope WHAKATĀNE USED TO HUM WITH BUSLOADS OF TOURISTS POURING IN TO VISIT WHAKAARI (WHITE ISLAND) BUT, OF COURSE, WITH THE CATASTROPHIC EVENTS AT THE END OF 2019 AND THE SUBSEQUENT COVID OUTBREAK, THE EASTERN BAY OF PLENTY HAS HAD A TOUGH TIME. Words DEE COLLINS • Images DEE COLLINS, BRENNAN THOMAS

My husband and I were invited to spend a few nights in the area to see how the tourism industry has revitalised the region with a campaign that shows there is more to Whakatāne than just Whakaari. For instance, did you know that Whakatāne was officially crowned the Niwa Sunshine Capital for 2020 and that Ōhope Beach was recently voted New Zealand’s best beach in a NZ Herald Reader poll? I have to admit that before we left Tauranga the question was, what on earth was there to do in Whakatāne and Ōhope for three days in winter? As it turns out, we were very pleasantly surprised with what was on offer and we’ll definitely revisit soon.

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TRAVEL | focus

EXPERIENCE MOUTOHORĀ/WHALE ISLAND

Moutohorā/Whale Island is one of Aotearoa’s best-kept secrets and is under the protection of DOC (Department of Conservation). The four-hour guided tour includes a 15-minute boat trip with almost guaranteed sightings of seals and penguins languishing on the island’s shores, an educational walk around a section of the pestfree oasis and the opportunity to see a number of New Zealand’s rare and endangered plants, birds and reptiles. The island tour usually ends with a swim but it was a tad too cold so we dug our own private hot spring at the secluded hot water beach Onepū/Sulphur Bay. For those keen on snorkeling or diving, Moutohorā has exceptional opportunities, particularly around SeaFire, a ship specially sunk to create an artificial reef.

MATAATUA WHARENUI –

THE HOUSE THAT CAME HOME After more than 130 years away, New Zealand’s only repatriated and most-travelled Māori meeting house has returned home to Ngāti Awa iwi. The memorable tour around the magnificent structure includes an award-winning sound and light show that brings to life the carvings and legends of Ngāti Awa.

STAY ONE88 ON COMMERCE

Centrally located in Whakatāne and only a 5-minute drive to Ōhope Beach, One88 offers a choice of modern, clean and comfortable one or two-bedroom suites. The super king beds with quality linen are super-comfy, and all suites have fully-equipped kitchenettes, smart TVs, unlimited WiFi and, big bonus, double-glazed windows, so nothing will disturb you. The rooms are serviced daily and the on-site managers, Liz and Malcolm, excel at making you feel welcome and ensuring that everything is up to their high standards.

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focus | TRAVEL

EAT

MOXI CAFÉ

Started by two locals who wanted to serve great coffee, Ōhope’s newest eatery offers a range of fresh, tasty food options to suit all dietary preferences… and their coffee is very good. The use of shipping containers, metal louvre roofs and wooden floors work together to give the café a cosy industrial feel.

CADERA

MEXICAN BAR & RESTAURANT

Located in Ōhope Beach village, Cadera is a popular destination on most nights, with its colourful interior and subtle Mexican music playing in the background. The Chilli Garlic Prawns and Beef Chimichangas were delicious but, judging from the number of tacos and burritos pouring out of the kitchen, I imagine those could be favourites too.

CYCLE TRACKS AND WALKWAYS The district is well-known for its superb walking and cycling tracks. They range from easy to difficult and from 15 minutes to a full day. The Ngā Tapuwae o Toi, or the 'Footprints of Toi', is a great walking trail that includes pa sites of major historic significance, native forest, fantastic coastal views and rural vistas.

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VMAC RIDES

Rather than lugging your e-bikes around the region, take the easy route and hire an e-bike from VMac Rides who offer a drop off/pick up service for customers in the area. The bikes are in great condition and helmets are supplied. If you have youngsters, hire e-Scooters for them and e-bikes for yourself. The Ōhope Harbourside Trail runs along one of New Zealand’s most unspoiled estuaries, Ōhiwa Harbour, where you’ll see a multitude of birdlife. The e-bikes, of course, made this trip an absolute breeze. 


BUSINESS

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WOMEN & MONEY

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LET’S GET YOUR BUSINESS THRIVING

48

HAVE WE LOST THE ART OF HOBBIES?


focus | BUSINESS

WOMEN money

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BUSINESS | focus

JANET XUCCOA’S LATEST BOOK, WOMEN & MONEY: MASTERING THE STRUGGLE, IS FOR ALL WOMEN WANTING TO TAKE CONTROL OF THEIR FINANCES, BECOME FINANCIALLY INDEPENDENT, AND ADOPT A WHOLE-LIFE APPROACH TO MONEY AND WEALTH. A SUCCESSFUL PROFESSIONAL AND INVESTOR, JANET SHARES FINANCIAL INSIGHTS REVEALING HOW MONEY WORKS AND WHAT IS REQUIRED WHEN INVESTING IN ASSETS TO CREATE FINANCIAL WELLBEING. HERE IS AN EXTRACT FROM THE CHAPTER: MONEY, YOU AND YOUR PARTNER.

P

ersonalities, race, culture, spiritual beliefs, upbringing and education are all interlinking factors that shape the values and attitudes we hold about money. These, in turn, affect our own behaviour in relation to our spending, saving and investment habits. Understanding ourselves, our behaviours and motives and the money decisions we make takes huge insight. Add another person into the mix and fertile ground for disagreements exist. In fact, research has shown money is one of the main topics of contention couples face. Much anguish and conflict over money could be avoided if couples would only discuss the subject early on in their relationships. Women don’t bring this topic to light because they think to do so is unromantic. Alternatively, they don’t wish to be branded impolite or be labelled a gold digger. Given the lack of open communication, it should come as no surprise that as a relationship develops and behaviour patterns are established, conflict over money arises. To avoid escalating differences, I’ve seen many women remain silent, refusing to broach the subject. Even when conflict isn’t present, frequently women leave the responsibility of managing finances entirely to their significant other, labouring under the mistaken belief their partner is financially more capable and thus equipped to make better quality financial decisions than they could ever hope to make. Regardless of circumstance and reason, the consequence of not having a voice and not participating in the monetary aspects of a relationship puts women at a distinct disadvantage. It can leave a woman uninformed, subject to control and open to vulnerability. This is especially so when you consider the increasingly high rate of divorces that transpire. Divorce aside, statistics show men die before women. The outcome for a woman dealing with her partner’s death

is very similar to that of a divorced woman – she is placed in the position of having little knowledge about money and investments (or the lack thereof) if she has not participated in the financial facets of the relationship whilst her partner was alive. To help you build a romantic relationship free of conflict over money and at the same time, a strong financial foundation, I’ve written this chapter. It contains suggestions to assist you in the fiscal activities you’ll engage in as you build your future together. When people decide to live together, naturally they feel excited about their decision. They’re embarking on the serious commitment of building their future, full of promise, with each other. At this point, their predominant thoughts involve where they’re going to live and how much closet space they’re going to get. Not a lot of thinking time is given over to the subject of money. Whilst money itself isn’t the sole determining factor of a successful relationship, a lack of money can certainly add an ingredient of stress. Tensions and fighting can result, threatening your connection and ultimately your relationship. To minimise the arguments that may occur, I advocate sitting down with your partner and having an honest and open discussion about finances before cohabitation. In particular, I recommend you: • Discuss the money beliefs and values you possess. You should gain an understanding of each other’s risk profile and the personal investment philosophies you have from this discussion. If you’re going to create a financial future together, you’ll need to learn this information. • Explore the financial goals and time frames each of you has. It’s best to know prior to becoming entwined if your aspirations are complimentary and what time frames you have around your own goals. You’ll also want to know if your goals are going to be separate or joint. For instance,

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Image by pch.vector / Freepik

focus | BUSINESS

you don’t want to embark on living with someone thinking that in the near future you’ll be buying a home and having a family when your partner is planning a world travel itinerary for the best part of the next three years. Nor do you want to find yourself in the position of spending all your money on buying furniture, which by the way depreciates in value, whilst your partner spends their own funds on acquiring investments which they have no intention of sharing with you. • Share information about your current asset and debt positions. You may find your perceptions don’t corroborate with financial reality. • Disclose your current respective incomes and expenses. This is vital because in today’s age it’s a common occurrence to find people have legal obligations that require regular payments such as student debt repayments and child support payments. You want to be aware of such commitments before you set your joint financial plans. • Agree on the apportionment of living expenses. If there is a discrepancy between incomes, it can be burdensome if the party on the lower income has to meet 50% of all common expenses. This can lead to hardship being felt by one party and eventually, resentment can creep into the relationship. Best to know upfront the expectations each of you have around meeting expenses. • Decide how you’re going to deal with money as a couple. For example, will both of your incomes be considered joint money? Will you have a joint account to pay for shared expenses and hold the balance of your income in your own account for personal spending? Determine an arrangement that works well for both of you. • Reach an agreement regarding the assets you wish to remain your separate property. Nowadays, many people own assets before they enter into a relationship. If you want those assets to remain solely yours, you need to obtain legal

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advice and document your agreement. Often ownership arrangements and intentions are structured using Trusts, Prenuptial Agreements and Relationship Property Agreements. If you don’t address this issue, devastating loss may result. Ignore this advice at your peril. I encourage you to have a financial discussion incorporating the above recommendations prior to setting up house together. The reasons for this are several-fold: first, you need an awareness of the other’s current financial position in order to plan a financial future together; second, you’ll be able to establish how each of you regards money which will help you deal with financial differences when they occur; lastly, discussing money highlights your financial similarities and identifies where your differences lie, which assists in building financial compatibility. In this respect, research has shown financial compatibility is a principal ingredient of determining the overall compatibility of couples. Accordingly, to increase your levels of compatibility, you should ensure your financial thinking and behaviours are aligned. 

Edited extract from Women & Money: Mastering the Struggle by Janet Xuccoa, Cheshire Publishing, RRP $34.95


BUSINESS | focus

LET’S GET YOUR BUSINESS THRIVING

Words MICHELLE MORTLOCK

G

rowing a successful business is a balancing act and we need to keep on making adjustments to ensure it continues to grow in a healthy way. In the same way we do personal health checks, we must also ensure our business is running in peak condition. An essential place to start is the working capital cycle, which is made up of the following components:

The key to making more money is to continue to cycle your cash into a product or service to sell, then get your customers to pay you. The more times you do this each year, the more money you make. To kick-start your health check on your business I recommend you start with these questions: CASH • Are you making enough sales per day to meet your daily sales targets? • Do you have expenses you need to eliminate or reduce? • Do you have a monthly budget in place

and are you monitoring it? • Do you have high interest debt to pay that you need to refinance? • Are you up to date with IRD payments? STOCK/SERVICE • Do you know your target market? • Are you getting repeat customers? • Are you adding enough margin to each product to cover costs of production? • Is your product visible in the market place? • Do you have the correct product in stock? Some stock may need to be moved to make way for products that are selling faster or have higher profit margins. • Do you have a variety of packages to suit all budgets? • Do you have a marketing programme in place? • Do you upsell products? • Can you get discounts for payment before delivery? SALES • Is your debt collection process working properly? • Are your terms and conditions communicated at time of sale? • Do you need to get deposits on large customised orders? • Are you making it easy for people to pay you? Making some simple changes in these areas can significantly change how quickly your working capital cycle turns and with each turn more money is available to the business.

ACCOUNTING | TAXATION | TRUSTS | ADVISORS | CONSULTANCY

07 578 5803 • michelle@elevationaccountants.nz • elevationaccountants.nz

I’m sure you’ve heard the golden rule of ‘cash is king’. This is absolutely true, and making a start on those questions will help you to grow your business. After you have attended to speeding up the working capital cycle, the next health check is on yourself! As the business owner you need to be in tip top condition to move your business forward, and this is where the juggling act really begins. Through my work with struggling business owners I’ve observed three main areas they need to monitor in relation to their own health: 1. Work/life balance – you need to learn when to outsource/employ staff. 2. Physical health – are you strong enough to cope with the work? What could you use or do to prevent injuries? 3. Mental health – this always starts with: ‘Are you truly passionate about what you do?’ If you’re truly passionate, the setbacks won’t hold you back as you’ll quickly recover and move forward again. I recommend you address all three areas simultaneously as a weakness in any area can severely impact how successful your business is and how quickly it grows. My challenge to you is to review both the business and personal health check and find out what is holding your business back.

I’m offering focus readers a 2-hour health check for only $399 – normally $499. We will review all these areas and set up a powerful plan so you can move forward. Email michelle@ elevationaccountants.nz to set up a time to ensure your business has a bright and healthy future. focusmagazine.co.nz

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focus | BUSINESS

HAVE WE LOST

THE ART OF HOBBIES? IN AN ERA WHERE IT’S POSSIBLE TO MONETISE ABSOLUTELY ANYTHING, HAVE WE FORGOTTEN WHAT IT’S LIKE TO DO SOMETHING JUST FOR FUN WITHOUT EXPECTING ANYTHING IN RETURN? KSENIIA SPODYNEIKO TRIES TO FIGURE OUT WHEN SIDEHUSTLES BECAME THE NEW HOBBIES AND WHETHER HAVING A HOBBY IS A THING OF THE PAST. Words KSENIIA SPODYNEIKO • Images FREEPIK

‘OMG, you should charge for that!’ is the phrase I hear way too often when admitting I have an almost photographic memory when it comes to books. While I might not be able to recite an entire page after a quick skim (I had a friend like that at school and no one could ever convince me she wasn’t an alien), I can always find the exact place where this or that phrase was used, notice if the author repeats the same catchy word twice, no matter how many chapters separate the repetitions, or spot little plot inconsistencies missed by betareaders. Does it mean I can make money beta-reading? Yes. But the mere idea of opening a book because I have to, not because I choose to, raises my hackles. Reading has always been my sanctuary, my escape from over-peopling. It’s a private thing. A hobby. Remember when we used to have those before everything became a side-hustle? The frequency of hearing advice about charging money for reading underscores how little thought is given to actual hobbies these days. Like there is no value in doing something if you don’t earn from it. A GENERATION OF SIDE-HUSTLERS Modern culture is defined by how well we’re monetising all parts of our life. Travel a lot? Publish digital guides. DIY-ed your interior design? Move on to decorating other people’s homes. Lost 10kg? Share your workouts on YouTube. Cooking, scrapbooking, oil-making, wardrobe organising – the

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BUSINESS | focus

ease with which we can turn literally anything into a parttime job or even a full-on business these days is astounding. Technology and social media have made it all possible. If you have a phone and a WiFi connection, you’re half-way there! The term ‘side-hustling’ has been around since the 1950s but the process is at an all-time high today, with one in three Kiwis making extra cash outside their main jobs. There has never been a moment in history when turning your passion into a thriving business was that easy. Confucius’ “Choose a job you love and you'll never have to work a day in your life” has literally become an unofficial motto of our generation. Indeed, earning from doing something you love has many perks. Hello, additional income and financial security, being your own boss, truly enjoying your job, working your own hours and from a location of your own choice. But let’s not forget the downsides – devoting time to your side-hustle even when you don’t feel like it, switching your attention from pleasure to profit, constantly comparing yourself to your competitors, feeling insecure, pushing yourself above and beyond. We often overlook these things because we’re either too focused on the ideal future where we’ll ‘never have to work’ or simply because we had no idea about the responsibilities that come with starting a business (nothing to be ashamed of – we all learn as we go!). Probably that’s why after Confucius came Adam J. Kurtz, author of Things Are What You Make of Them, who rewrote the old saying into the one more relatable to our reality: “Do what you love and you’ll work super f*cking hard all the time with no separation or any boundaries and also take everything extremely personally.” Funny? Of course. But it’s also the truth we don’t talk about often enough – a private hobby won’t give you FOMO or career anxiety. WHAT ARE TODAY’S HOBBIES? There is something about the word ‘hobby’ itself that speaks of ‘the good ol’ days’, of our grandpa collecting stamps or pinning butterflies to a board. There is no glamour, no world adoration in stamps or pinned butterflies. Not surprisingly, we don’t want to do those things. If hobbies are

2021 TRENDING

SIDE-HUSTLES: Teaching English online Online workshops Refurbishing old furniture Creating spreadsheets or templates Being a party/wedding planner Taking online surveys Pet sitting Being a personal shopper Social media managing Life coaching

our ‘personal brand’, we’d rather be globetrotters, skydivers or long-exposure photographers – something for others to envy and admire. Instead of mourning the loss of hobbies, maybe it’s time we simply redefine what hobbies are? Yes, some of the traditional hobbies are now seen as side-hustles, but no matter how much you love what you do, you can’t work 24/7, so there should still be something you do when you need some down time, some relaxation and brainless fun. After all, ‘hobby’ always meant a pleasant, enjoyable way to spend one’s leisure time and something one doesn’t mind doing repetitively. Like bingeing Netflix! Can watching TV shows be the 21st Century version of a hobby? Why not! Or going to the gym? Unless you’re being paid for working out in a flashy lululemon outfit, you don’t do it for money. In fact, you’re spending money and your free time to sweat. Congratulations, you obviously have a hobby! Do you listen to criminal podcasts while driving? Now, that’s quite a hobby! Well done. Our life and habits have changed so drastically in the past few decades, we sometimes have to play a catchup game with the new reality. Hobbies have always existed as an entertainment, a getaway from hard work. Watching Netflix or cat videos on TikTok haven’t been on the cards for long but it doesn’t make recharging the batteries this way any less meaningful. Hobbies are not supposed to pay your rent. You don’t have to monetise the joy. Allow yourself to do something simply because it makes you feel good. That’s enough.  focusmagazine.co.nz

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focus | GIVEAWAYS

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We let you get on with your business while we get on with your accounts and tax returns.

Megan Tomalin – SBA Tauranga.

SBA Tauranga provides a wide range of accounting and taxation services for individuals, sole traders, partnerships, small companies, trusts, and rental property owners. Our aim is for our fees to be affordable and our services accessible. Whatever your accounting needs

– SBA Tauranga can help.

T: 07 578 8959 | sba.co.nz/tauranga

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ISSUE 27 | APRIL - MAY 2021

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We’re already hard at work on our 5th Birthday and Breast Cancer Awareness edition which comes out at the end of September. 5,000 FREE magazines are distributed every two months to high foot traffic, hot-spot areas throughout the region. The magazine is also available digitally on our website to give continued exposure for advertisers. If you would like to be in this bumper issue, we would love to catch up and have a chat about our special offer and how we can work together. Contact us at info@focusmagazine.co.nz for more information

M: 021 535 770 | dee@focusmagazine.co.nz

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@LauraRosaMakeupArtist @Lauralemosmakeup

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ISRAEL RANDELL

CURATOR AT WHAKATĀNE MUSEUM AND ARTS

ISRAEL RANDELL IS A MULTI-DISCIPLINARY ARTIST OF COOK ISLAND (RAROTONGA) AND MĀORI (TAINUI, NGĀTI KAHUNGUNU) DESCENT, WHOSE FASCINATING TECHNIQUES COMBINE IMAGE, LIGHT AND SOUND TO FUEL CULTURAL CONVERSATIONS THROUGH SPACE. TELL US A BIT ABOUT YOURSELF I’m a mother, artist, curator and writer. I’m interested in showcasing artists who push boundaries with their materials and ideas. I’m currently more interested in writing and curatorial practice as opposed to making art myself. DID YOU ALWAYS KNOW YOU WANTED TO WORK IN THE CREATIVE SPACE? Initially I wanted to be a journalist, so I’ve always been interested in storytelling. I’ve only just started my career in the creative space and I’m definitely loving this side of the arts. I like the role curators play in advocating for the arts and artists, and at this point in my life I want to focus on other people’s practice rather than my own so I’m really enjoying working in this space. I actually never thought I’d ever work in the arts but now that I’m here I would hate to work in any other sector. TELL US ABOUT YOUR ART I work with a range of media and I get really excited responding to different spaces and thinking about how an audience would move through that space. I usually create installations but I also love making video-based media and installations using light. WHAT WAS YOUR CONCEPT FOR YOUR WORK THAT SAW YOU WIN THE TAURANGA ART GALLERY 2020 MILES ART AWARDS? The work was called Wahi Ngaro and it refers to the hidden

54 | focusmagazine.co.nz

realm, an in-between space. The triangles represent the wharetangata, which is a womb space and, to me, this symbology refers to that moment between being and nonbeing; an in-between space where there is still infinite potential. These triangles also reference whakapapa (genealogy) and are used throughout taaniko patterns. WHAT ADVICE CAN YOU GIVE PEOPLE WHO MAY BE STRUGGLING IN THE CREATIVE SPACE? Find your people who you can call and ask for advice, or vent to, or share your victories with. It’s so important to have people in your corner to support you through whatever you come up against and that’s so true in the creative space. It’s not easy pursuing the arts in any capacity so it’s good to surround yourself with great people who you can lean on. I’ve had awesome mentors throughout my journey who have helped shape the person I am today and who continue to offer guidance when I’m unsure. WHAT ARE YOU CURRENTLY WORKING ON/STUDYING? At the moment I’m working on some small projects while I’m on maternity leave. Mostly I’m doing a lot of writing and interviews, organising some initiatives for rangatahi and planning some exciting things for the gallery in 2022. I’ve taken a pause on making anything this year but I’m really excited about a few projects I’m involved in which are coming out very soon. 



Staycation in lakeside luxury Five-star boutique luxury lodge On the shores of Lake Rotorua, overlooking the sacred island of Mokoia, sits Peppers on the Point – a luxury 5-star rated boutique lodge. Choose accommodation from lakeview lodge suites, self-contained cottage suites or apartment style. Unwind and relax on five acres of peaceful, tranquil and beautifully manicured grounds, and enjoy the many onsite activities – from tennis, massages and feeding the petting animals to reading a book at the lake edge. Enjoy fine dining in the à la carte Mains Restaurant. Breakfast is served daily, and lunches or picnics can be pre-arranged. It’s hard to believe the property is only minutes from the centre of Rotorua and within easy commute to the many adventure activities and cultural experiences in this destination.

07 348 4868 | info@onthepoint.co.nz | peppersonthepoint.co.nz