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May 2012 - Issue 29

www.vida.com.mt

Perfect pastels Spring fashion’s candy colours - page 34

Hello, world Are podcasts the new medium of choice? - page 26

My thing A family heirloom with a difference - page 28

Mother’s Day messages

Messages of love and thanks from you!

- page 10

WIN! Green fingers

Beating bullying

Product designer

Talking photos

A SECURITY SYSTEM, BEAUTY TREATMENTS EVENT TICKETS, & MORE


editorial

vida.com.mt Issue 29 - May 2012

Here at VIDA, we’re always striving to improve. From bringing you the most interesting features, tips and inspiration on making the most out of life, to working hard on constantly bettering our aesthetic too. As you may have noticed, this issue of VIDA looks slightly different. Whereas still sticking to our characteristic design, the size is a little bigger, and the paper a little more durable. These changes are aimed at helping you get the most out of VIDA – enabling you to enjoy the content time and again. Why not keep the issue for reference later on? You never know when you might need to refer to it for anything from gardening tips, health and beauty hints and interior design ideas to financial advice and photography lessons. What’s more, you could keep VIDA for our regular features including the popular Triumphs and Tragedies series, Murder in Malta, Fashion Fairground, Movies of the month and our People interview. In this issue, we pay tribute to our ever-patient mothers through a selection of Mother’s Day themed features – the most emotional of which being penned by you, our readers! Another aspect we chose to focus on this month is technology. Whether you’re a technophile or a technophobe, you’re bound to have your gadgets of choice, so you’re sure to find something to tickle your fancy. Enjoy the issue.

Sarah Micallef

VIDA next month – Cooling down special

VIDA Magazine is a monthly lifestyle magazine distributed to all households in Malta. It aims to empower the people to lead a better, healthier and happier life. Publisher

Focused Knowledge Ltd Pitkali Road, Attard ATD 2214 Malta, Europe Tel: (+356) 2339 2403 Fax: (+356) 2141 9089 Editor Sarah Micallef editor@vida.com.mt Layout & Design Alexia Baldacchino Kevin Abela studio@vida.com.mt Advertising Sabrina Wingfield - swingfield@vida.com.mt Bryan Cherrett - bcherrett@vida.com.mt Clint Azzopardi - cazzopardi@vida.com.mt Tel: (+356) 2339 2333 sales@vida.com.mt

It is understood that all material supplied by agents (printed or otherwise) to promote their products is supplied with all necessary permissions for reproduction. Whilst great care and attention has been taken by the editorial team to ensure accuracy of text, advertising and other published matter, we disclaim all responsibility for any omissions and errors. The editor and publisher do not necessarily agree with views expressed in articles, adverts, letters, or other content appearing in this publication.

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Contents Shouting from the Hili top Messages to mum Juggling between motherhood and football Budding green fingers Being a positive parent Safe cosmetics for expectant mothers Much more than a plastic box Why not treat yourself to a new kitchen? Don’t suffer in silence Child’s play Shiny happy people Dream come true Podcasts: the new medium of choice? My thing Street style Fashion fairground May’s tragedies and triumphs Murder in Malta In the beginning... May the movies be with you Events this month Photos that speak Farewell Szymborska In good order Competitions Only for kids

39

9 10 11

24

12 14 15 16 18 20 22 23 24 26 28 30 32 40 42 43 44 46 48 50 51 63 64

18

51

40

44

Updates Letters Ask the experts Keeping it Short Thea Saliba

5 6 7

Not for Profit British Residents Association

Mother’s Day: a brief history

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32


letters

Your say

STAR LETTER Dear Editor, With an improvement in the weather and a proportional increase in healthconsciousness for summer, I have begun to move my exercise regime towards the shores, where the occasional mild swell sweeps directly in on to the beach and the hiss and sigh of the surf lulls even the most paranoid into sociability. On a recent cycle ride I decided to freewheel down a steep road that led to the sandy seaside. Applying the brakes at the crucial moment produced an ominous ping, and the salt-corroded brake cable twanged past my ear. As I careened past some tourists, someone shouted: “I think there is no road any more!” I promptly nicknamed this person The Megaphone. I shot on to the beach, hit a sand dune and somersaulted into a tangled heap. It was then that I looked up to see the tourists taking photos – the next viral sensation on Youtube or Facebook? I have my doubts. “I think she had trouble with the brakes”, announced The Megaphone. Men like this start wars! Later, as I sat by the bike removing sand and applying disinfectant, I had time to relax and look around. Little old foreign ladies in saggy elasticated cossies with big flowers on them (and what looked like giant inverted tulips on their heads) ran coquettishly in and out of the water shrieking girlishly. Another middle-aged man made little hops as he skimmed stones and yelled "Yee-Haaa!" – he wore a three-piece suit and shiny shoes. Throughout the day the light changed over the sea, transforming it from emerald to turquoise to silver, while the clouds shadow-danced across the unmistakable Maltese horizon – a combination of limestone, churches, (wires and scaffolding) and bird- or vehicle-song (depending on the level of urbanisation). On a warm spring day everything looks magnificent. Am I right in saying that no gym can equal this atmosphere for pre-summer calorieburning exercise? Rita Gauci Żejtun

A moment of silence Dear Editor, Firstly well done for the excellent work on VIDA. It is a delightful magazine and I always enjoy every bit of it! The reason I am writing is to let VIDA readers know about a new place that has opened. No, it's not a new restaurant nor a bar, and not even a nice clothes shop – it is the Chapel of Adoration that has recently opened in Swatar. I was on the way home after a long day at work the other day and saw a new place, actually mistaking it for someone's house. Upon entering, it took my breath away – it is one of the most beautiful places of adoration I have seen. In fact, I couldn't keep this place to myself and had to let others know about it. It is only a small room, but it is big in many other ways. A moment of silence in there is all you need to feel peaceful and calm. I encourage all those who are reading this who either live or work close by (or even if you are in the area) to go in and you will understand the reason for my letter. Words cannot explain it. It is true what they say – the best things in life are free! Romina Azzopardi Mellieħa

Stop the concrete pollution Dear Editor, I’m writing to raise awareness, not only on the filth and junk many people leave behind in the little areas of countryside we have left, but also with regards to the massive concrete pollution being littered everywhere without any proportionality or control. When I look around, all I see is massive cranes, dust and debris. I remember a few years back it was also like this, but now since we are extremely overpopulated, we can’t seem to find any other solution than to build up nice areas. Take a look at our coastline – all you see is built up eyesores, some three storeys, some two, some seven – it is disturbing. No wonder tourism figures are dwindling and hotels are closing down. All we have left is what nature gave us, until we pollute it even further and are left with nothing. It is of utmost importance for us to teach our children how to save the little we have left. Joe Briffa

Not quite a menace… Dear Editor,

WIN

STAR LETTER COMPETITION VIDA and Unitech are giving one lucky Star Letter writer the chance to win a full Intruder Alarm System worth up to an amazing €1000. The competition will run for the rest of the year, with the writers of the letters chosen as a Star Letter from each issue (May through to December) entering a draw to win. Unitech will also be giving each Star Letter writer a 10% discount. The overall winner will be announced on the January 2013 issue, so get writing!

T: 77773388 • 47, Cottoner Avenue, Fgura • unitech@go.net.mt Send your letters, questions to the experts and suggestions to The Editor, VIDA Magazine, Pitkali Road, Attard, ATD 2214, or by email on yoursay@vida.com.mt

Reference is made to the ‘Motorised bike mayhem’ letter that appeared in VIDA’s April issue, in which the author asked the authorities to impose a law on such bikes. I would like to inform your readers that such laws already exist and have been in force from 2004. To drive one of these bikes, an individual must be over 16 years old and wear a helmet, and the bike must be registered with Transport Malta whereby this authority is required to verify that the bike is roadworthy before it issues a registration number. The dealer then has to engrave this number on the bike frame and the engine. The user must also abide by traffic laws and the bike must be fitted with lights if driven at night. It is not fair for those who abide by the law to be treated as “youths who are fitting motors to bikes”. It’s the police’s duty to see that traffic laws are being obeyed and that the bike conforms to such laws. Noise and air pollution are kept to a minimum if the bike is kept to factory standard without having the silencer or part of it removed. Moreover, these bikes average a speed of 35km/h so there is no “heightened speed” when with a normal bike one can easily go over 50km/h. As for pollution, such bikes average a 60km distance using just a litre of unleaded fuel, which is far less when compared to a car. Jason Vella Qormi

May 2012 | Issue 29 | vida.com.mt

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ask the experts D. Tanti asked: I live in a house with a €50 perpetual ground rent annually. A few years ago, I phoned the person I normally paid the ground rent to, and his wife informed me that he had passed away and that I will have to start paying his son instead. Do I need to have any proof that his son is really the person I should be paying the ground rent to? I am finding it very difficult to pay the ground rent to his son, as he is always unavailable. Is it true that if the ground rent is not paid, the person to whom the ground rent is due can eventually take away my house? If this is the case, is there any way I can protect myself against such event? On the other hand, if I don’t pay the ground rent and a number of years go by, will the house eventually become free from ground rent payment?

When the dominus passes away, the emphyteuta has the right to ask for proof that the person claiming the ground rent is actually the person who is entitled to receive it. Such proof may consist of wills, contracts or other documents. Article 1517 of the Civil Code deals with the dissolution of emphyteusis in case of arrears, whereby the dominus may demand the dissolution of the emphyteusis and the reversion in his favour of the property together with any improvements made if the emphyteuta owes by way of groundrent a sum equal in amount to three yearly payments. Such a demand by the dominus must be made by a sworn application filed in the First Hall, Civil Court and generally, the Court will allow a reasonable time, according to the circumstances, for the payment of the arrears. If the ground rent is not paid for a number of years, the house will not automatically become free from ground rent payment. A perpetual ground-rent may be redeemed, by the payment of a sum equivalent to the amount of the ground-rent capitalised at the rate of five per cent, unless the contract establishing the groundrent, being a contract entered into before August 15th, 1981 provides for a different manner in which the redemption may be effected.

Dorianne Briffa asked: My mother, who is 58 years old, has a high cholesterol level and even though it’s not very high, her doctor prescribed pills to control it, given her age. To maintain a low cholesterol diet she switched to eating food containing soya. Despite this, upon looking at the nutritional value descriptions on these products, one may notice that, although they don’t have any cholesterol, they still contain high levels of saturated fat. Sometimes, the levels of saturated fat are even higher than those inherent in non-soya products, even though the nutritional information of these items does not specify cholesterol levels. Should my mother pay more attention to levels of cholesterol or saturated fat? What are the negative effects of saturated fat?

A diet rich in saturated fats will give rise to elevated cholesterol levels and increased risk of heart disease. Saturated fats contain carbon atoms saturated with hydrogen atoms. They are usually solid at room temperature. These fats are generally found in foods derived from animal sources (that is meat and dairy products), foods which have been fried or baked in excessive amounts of oil, as well as tropical plant oils such as palm and coconut oils. The daily intake of saturated fats should not exceed 7% of the total daily calories, or 16 grammes (based on a diet of 2000 calories per day). Alternatives to foods with an elevated content of saturated fats are foods that have high levels of monounsaturated or polyunsaturated fats such as vegetable oil based foods, fish and nuts. Replacing meats with beans and legumes helps reduce the amount of saturated fat intake while preserving protein intake. Dr Adrian Cordina MD, MMCFD

General Practitioner at the Primary Health Care Department, which provides health services in health centres, district clinics and the community

Dr Austin Gauci Maistre LL.B, LL.D

What is coeliac disease? Coeliac disease is a common disorder of the digestive system that damages the small intestine and interferes with the absorption of nutrients from food. It is a disorder that affects approximately 1% of individuals worldwide. People who have coeliac disease cannot tolerate gluten, a protein which is found mainly in wheat, rye and barley and which can also be found in everyday products such as medicines, vitamins, lip balms, glue on stamps and even envelopes. When people with coeliac disease eat foods or use products containing gluten, their immune system responds by damaging or destroying villi. These villi are tiny outgrowths lining the small intestine that allow nutrients to be absorbed through the walls of the small intestine into the bloodstream. Without healthy villi, nutrients are not absorbed properly and a person becomes malnourished. Symptoms of coeliac disease vary from person to person and may occur in the digestive system or in other parts of the body. Symptoms in adults include diarrhoea, weight loss, iron-deficiency anaemia, abnormal bleeding or weakened bones, bloating and pain in the abdominal region and excess gas, amongst others. People with coeliac disease may have no symptoms but can still develop complications of the disease over time. Coeliac disease is a genetic disorder, which means that it runs in families and therefore can be passed on from one generation to the 6

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Foods gluten is found in:

next. Sometimes the disease may become active later in life including after surgery, during pregnancy or even after childbirth. Blood tests can help your doctor diagnose the disease but a biopsy for the examination of tissue from your small intestine usually needs to be performed.

The only treatment for coeliac disease is a gluten-free diet. Doctors may ask a newly diagnosed patient to work with a dietician on a gluten-free diet plan in order to make informed decisions about how to handle the disease. For most people, following this diet will stop the symptoms, heal existing intestinal damage and prevent further damage. Since coeliac disease is a genetic disorder, relatives of the coeliac are at a higher risk of having the defective gene, hence, they need to be tested as they may develop coeliac disease later in life.

• Durum, semolina, flour, pasta, cous-cous,

Wheat Barley Spelt Rye

• Beer, malt, baked goods • "Wheat-free" products • Breads

• Cereals, breads Kamut Oats • Usually contaminated with gluten grains. GF versions availale

References: The New England Journal of Medicine, 2007 Oct 25;357 (17):1731-43 www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/coeliacdisease.html (accessed on 28/02/12) http://digestive.niddk.nih.gov/ddiseases/pubs/ coeliac/ (accessed on 28/02/12) www.medicinenet.com/coeliac_disease/article. htm (accessed on 28/02/12)


updates Not Maltese voluntary organisations for profit British Residents’

Association Malta (BRA)

It all began… in about 1967 when a few ex-patriot British residents in Malta and Gozo began meeting as a prelude to the inaugural meeting of the British Residents’ Association at the Phoenicia Hotel, Floriana in February 1970. Their main purpose initially was to support each other in dealings with the local authorities.

Keeping it short

I was born on September 14th, 1991. My childhood dream was to have the opportunity to perform my original music in public. My proudest moment is when I receive high-flying academic results.

Our mission is… as per the Constitution of the BRA, “to foster friendly and harmonious relations between members of the Association and with the people of the Maltese Islands”. To serve this objective we endeavour to assist, advise and represent our members as appropriate and to interact whenever possible with local authorities and the general populace in the areas in which our six groups operate.

Representing Malta at the 2005 Junior Eurovision Song Contest was an unforgettable, fun and astonishing experience.

Our enemies… aren’t many, besides time, which sometimes robs us of the invaluable wisdom and experience of long-serving members.

Music is inspirational.

We have… six groups spread geographically around Malta

My new single, Let the Music Start It is a Dance-RnB track, with a positive message denoting that no one should give up in life.

and Gozo, making up a total of about 1,200 members with ages ranging from 19 to 103. In recent years, especially since Malta joined the European Union, younger British ex-patriots are coming to reside in Malta. This is being increasingly reflected in the membership of our Association.

Our greatest achievements are… serving the interests

and needs of British residents in Malta and Gozo for over 40 years and successfully communicating with all our members about essential welfare information in the broadest sense and about the varied forthcoming events and activities on offer within the Association. This is achieved through monthly newsletters issued by each of our six groups, through bi-monthly bulletins from our BRA council and via our website.

Our current projects include… special celebrations

organised by our Gozo group in conjunction with local agencies to mark the Diamond Jubilee of Queen Elizabeth II, the 70th anniversary of the award of the George Cross to the Islands and the safe arrival of the Ohio in the Grand Harbour as part of the Pedestal/Santa Maria Convoy. The events will take place in the historic setting of the Citadel in Rabat, Gozo and will include an exhibition, concerts and lectures.

Thea Saliba photo by Steve Muliett

Music in Malta is evolving.

Recording in Germany was enjoyable and exciting. My most memorable experience is the first time I performed in London’s West End. My favourite types of music are RnB and Dance. When I’m working on my music I forget all my problems. Juggling studying law and working on music is very hard, but I do my best to cope! Time management is a very important tool. Not many people know that I teach piano. I am ambitious and hard-working . I am not adventurous. I always try to help persons in need. I will never smoke. I wish the world was a safer place. My favourite food is sushi. My favourite film is The Notebook. Family is my support – my everything. Friends are a treasure. The best things in life are love, happiness and determination.

www.britishresidentsinmalta.org Know of a local voluntary organisation that could use the recognition? Contact the editor on editor@vida.com.mt

The future is unforeseeable. In the end we should live life day by day.

May 2012 | Issue 29 | vida.com.mt

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updates

Mother’s Day: a brief history

D

espite not needing a specific day to celebrate the importance of our mothers, Mother’s Day is the perfect excuse to spoil your mum and let her know just how much you appreciate her. But how did Mother’s Day first come about?

As with most things, the earliest history of Mother's Day dates back to ancient Greek and Roman annual spring festivals dedicated to maternal goddesses. A more recent history can be found in the UK in the 1600s, when Mothering Sunday was celebrated on the fourth Sunday of Lent. After a prayer service at mass to honour the Virgin Mother, children would buy gifts and flowers for their own mums. As you may know, Mother’s Day is celebrated on a different day here, as is the case in the US. This is because when the first English settlers arrived in America, they discontinued the tradition of Mothering Day due to their harsh living conditions. Originally celebrated by women’s peace groups, Mother’s Day in the US came much later, and wasn’t a holiday of cards, flowers and chocolates. The first Mother’s Day in fact honoured American sons who died in the Civil War. In 1868, Mothers Friendship Day was established as a ‘national memorial’ for mothers who had passed away before being notified that their sons were lost in combat. It was much later on May 8th, 1914 that the second Sunday in May became the official holiday of Mother’s Day. Nowadays, the sentiment tied to Mother’s Day in the US isn’t altogether different but it’s purpose has certainly changed. Whereas the holiday previously served to acknowledge loss, it is now more of a celebration of life and specifically, the givers of life – our mums.

BlackBerry Curve 9380 (Orlando) VIDA review

B

eing fans of BlackBerry and of smartphones in general here at VIDA (the ability to stay connected and respond to emails and make use of other online services on the go is invaluable in our line of work), we jumped at the chance of reviewing (read: excitedly playing with) Blackberry’s latest addition to the Curve series: Blackberry Curve 9380, better known as the Orlando. The first thing one familiar with the Curve series notices is the missing Qwerty, which has been dropped in favour of touch screen technology. This change is the most notable looks-wise, and whether it is for the better or worse depends largely on personal preference. Once you get past the new look, familiarity returns via the BlackBerry Operating System Version 7. The home screen features five panels, namely All, Favourites, Media, Downloads and Frequent, making navigating applications easy. The touch screen (type TFT 16 million colors with a resolution of 360×480 pixels) is sharp and clear, and the 5MP camera produces images (with or without flash) of a superb quality compared to the other phones in the Curve series. Another great feature of the Orlando is that it supports connections with NFC technology (Near Field Communication), which means the BlackBerry Orlando is able to exchange information faster. All in all, it is a fine addition to the Curve series, provided you are a fan of the touch screen.

The BlackBerry Curve 9380 (Orlando) was generously lent to VIDA by Vodafone. It is available at all their outlets and authorised resellers.

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column

Shouting from the Hili Top

You may have seen him on stage, heard him on the radio, or laughed at his lack of colour-coordination (he’s the one walking down the street with the orange shorts and pink shirt). He is loud, hairy, controversial and… well… different! He is Steve Hili and he is writing for VIDA.

Hugs away! Yesterday I hugged someone. I have of course hugged many people in my life, including an airport security man who told me that, even though I looked suspicious, he would not be conducting a cavity search. (I will never pretend to be Clint Eastwood at the bulky-luggage counter again.) Yesterday, however, it was different. Yesterday I hugged someone I had never met before. Ever. (All right I had never met airport security man either but he had a rubber glove hanging from his belt). The reason I hugged this person is still not entirely clear to me. There I was, at a friend’s house, minding my own business. Just hanging out near the bigilla and muttering, “Go ahead, make my day” to myself when Kat (the wife) tapped me on the shoulder. I spun round. “I was not hogging the bigilla, I promise...” Kat smiled her stop-talking-now smile and introduced her friend. A tall, attractive, muscular woman called Mandy. * And then, for no reason at all, Mandy tried to crush me to death. Or give me a friendly hug. Depends on your perspective. I had never seen this woman before in my life. Up until five seconds previously I did not know of her existence. We do not share a common bond. I do not think there was any attraction (although I was wearing a particularly loud Hawaiian shirt). There was no reason for us to get physical. Yet, there we were embracing away as if we had just won the lottery on a rollover week. (Actually, she was doing all the embracing; I was just sending positive thoughts to my spleen, encouraging it to make it through.) As I stood there, gasping for air and wishing that I had paid more attention to the internal bruising credit at First Aid class, I realised that in a strange way, it was not Mandy who was destroying my vital organs, but society at large.

Everybody hugs nowadays. It is how we express ourselves. How we say ‘hello’, ‘goodbye’, ‘good luck’, ‘I’m sorry’, ‘I’m happy’, or ‘my verruca is improving’. Hugging is expected. It is... what we do. All these thoughts flashed through my mind (just after my life did) during those precious oxygen-deprived seconds. She let me go. And then, all of a sudden, as the light at the end of the tunnel receded, she kissed me. Now, kissing strangers is of course an exercise wrought with danger. There are just so many variables. Do you just air-kiss or should there be actual contact? Do you start on the right cheek or the left? Should you kiss one cheek or both? (I knew a Spanish girl who used to insist on three pecks. I thought she wanted me. Turns out she just had a problem with translating numbers.) Do you kiss strangers like you kiss people you know? At what point does it stop being friendly and starts being sleazy? What with all these questions swirling around my head (as well as the dizziness caused by my previous hypoxia), the inevitable happened. She went for a cheek. I went for the same one. And we ended up crashing into each other. Lips first. In less than a minute, a strange woman had tried to kill me, and then kissed me on the lips in front of my wife! It was just like Fatal Attraction. With bigilla instead of a rabbit. And then, just like that, it was over. Mandy sauntered off to mingle with (and no doubt injure) other guests, whilst I was left to explain to Kat why I was whispering, “Glenn Close you have a lot to answer for” to myself. Amazingly Kat laughed and came in for a hug. I ran. *Name has been changed because I am scared of her.

For more Steve, tune in to the BIG Breakfast on XFM 100.2 on Monday to Friday from 06:30 onwards or follow him on Twitter @SteveHili.

May 2012 | Issue 29 | vida.com.mt

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special feature

Messages to mum On the occasion of Mother’s Day this month, VIDA gave you the chance to voice your special messages of love and thanks to your mum via our Facebook page – and aren’t you the poetic bunch! Here they are, straight from the heart...

Thanks for always being the

voice of reason

when I’m having a bad day. I will never be too old to value your advice! Mark Spiteri, 36

Mum, you've made me the person I am today. I can never deny that you've been the most important person in my life and nothing can ever change that. Happy Mother's Day. Johann Agius, 17

Thanks mum for being my hero. Thank you for every second you cared for and guided me to be who I am today. Now that I am a mother, I can understand the worries, sacrifices and something else I never did before… the love that a mother has for her children. It is the most protective, caring, emotional, powerful love that will ever exist on earth. I thank you with all my heart. I am so proud to tell people that you are my mother. Happy Mother’s Day.

Samantha Abela, 22

Even though I’m about to move pot, my roots will always stem from you. Thank you for always staying strong, even in the toughest of times – I love you, mum. Amelie Baldacchino, 30

Audrianne Magro, 31

Hey ma, you are my source of life. I want to thank you for always being there for me. You hold the key of our family and that makes you very special. I love you ma... Happy Mother's Day. John Cams, 34

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Thank you Mum for being strong and always having a smile on your face, for being optimistic even when Dad got sick and for nursing him until the final day. You are the most kindhearted woman I know and everyone who knows you knows that. You help everyone whether they are family or not. Thanks for being the great person that you are.

Mum, thanks for always being a shoulder to cry on (and a constant source of Kleenex), for being our best friend as well as our mother, and just for being you. We love you!

Mum, I’m proud to have you as my mother. You are a great example, and I hope that if one day I become a mum, I will resemble you. Nadine Genovese, 23

Jenny, 23 & Michelle Cefai, 19

We may have fights, but you will always be our mother. We would like you to know that we love you and hope you have the best Mother's Day yet... Stefanie, 22 & Gary-Lee Vella, 11


sports

Juggling between motherhood and football Nothing is impossible in life. Determination and will power are ingredients to success, even if circumstances may seem to be prohibitive. This is the case with Rosalie Cauchi, the 23-year old national team and Hibernians FC player, who combines motherhood and playing football.

The graceful Rosalie, a mother footballer, showing her young son Nathan the art of ball control.

In this respect she has struck a perfect partnership. Bearing a child, attending to the chores of motherhood, working as a PE teacher and playing the game she loves, are within the stride of this determined young woman. Motherhood and football, or juggling between the two so to speak, means an ability to shoulder multiple responsibilities. Here’s what she had to say about her different roles.

Do you find being a mother and playing football incompatible?

No. Having support at home is one of the mainstays of how I cope. Both give me great satisfaction. I go through a lot of sacrifices but I manage – where there’s a will there's a way. Do you get satisfaction from reaching certain levels in football and being a mother?

Football is a major part of my life and gives me great satisfaction, but motherhood is my main priority. This is why I work hard to make sure I succeed in both! How do you plan your day and mix it with training?

Having a full time job as a PE teacher requires me to be away from my son all morning. Everything has to fit between work, home chores and the time for training. Had you ever thought that you would still keep playing football while being a wife and mother? I have always done everything in my power to balance the two. I cannot see myself not playing football. Football is my passion. I know that sometimes family and motherhood responsibilities suffer because of football commitments. Thankfully, I have support at home from Jonathan, my partner. That allows me to do this. Do you ever come up against conflicting duties?

Yes, many times. I have to decide whether it’s more worthwhile to spend some time at home or actually go for training, which I don’t like missing as I am fully committed to the game. Thankfully, I have very supportive coaches who know that family comes first, so when I

miss training they understand my situation. Apart from this, Jonathan is also into sports, and when we have conflicting training times, we decide who stays at home and who goes for training! Will having more children prevent you from playing football at this level? I am still young. I cannot see myself with another child at this moment in time, but I have fellow team mates like the Mosta FC goalkeeper, Sharon Costantino, who has two children and is still playing football. People like her inspire me. Everything happens only if you really want to make it happen. I am sure that if I were to have another child I would be determined to get back to football as quickly as possible. What is your daily programme?

It is based on how organised you are. Waking up early to do chores in the morning reduces the amount of things that need doing after work. After picking up my son from school at 14:30, I rush home to start cooking. This part is important, as I cannot eat very late due to training time. Making sure there is enough time for the family is of utmost importance but, unfortunately, we don’t have much of it since I work too. At least I have weekends and holidays off. What advice would you give to girls aspiring to become footballers and forming a family?

Determination! Being a mother is the best gift life can give and playing football is the best compensation for some difficulties motherhood can bring. I can’t see how one works without the other now! In my view, it is definitely possible to balance family time and football time.

The women’s department of the MFA encourages all girls who have an inclination towards football to signify their intention with the association and be part of this society by sending an email to footballgirls@mfa.com.mt or phoning 2338 6000.

by Claire Camilleri

May 2012 | Issue 29 | vida.com.mt

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environment

Budding green fingers Hands-on tips for your potted plants

T

hink Mother’s Day, think gifts in the midst of spring, and you’re very likely to find yourself heading to your local plant shop. Unfortunately for the plants, however, some of us can barely distinguish a rose bush from a weed. Ahead of this month’s MCAST Agribusiness Institute Open Weekend, VIDA meets lecturer and leading Maltese horticulturalist Dione Caruana, to get a few tips on how to make the right choices and what to do to avoid turning your floral investment into lifeless pots.

Whenever we’re tempted to introduce a touch of green into our homes, our first thought is to stop at the plant shop and take home the most striking plants we set our eyes on. After years of experience in the horticultural industry, Dione Caruana insists that growing plants in our homes is not as simple as it seems. “Growing plants is a discipline, just like looking after young children. You can’t have a child and choose to delay when to give them food and drink to suit your convenience. Luckily, plants are not as time-consuming as children,” he smiles, “but if you want your plants to survive and grow strong, you need to dedicate a few minutes every week to attend to their essential requirements, such as watering.” Knowing where the plant you’re about to buy will be placed during its growing life is the first consideration to keep in mind before visiting a plant shop. Colourful flowering plants look marvellous in the shop, but unless you have a spot with abundant direct

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sunlight, they’re not likely to last long. Dione explains that in places with little direct sunlight it would be safer to go for foliage plants like ferns, spatiphyllums, marantas or cissus. If you do have the right amount of light, this month is a very good time for flowering plants. “These plants should be bought during the warmer part of the year, as it is easier to provide them with ideal growing conditions. In winter, most flowering plants will react to the adverse conditions by aborting their flowers.” Once you’ve decided on the type of plant you wish to buy, you can look up the plant on the Internet (or in a gardening book) to learn more about its characteristics. “This will help you avoid basic mistakes,” Dione maintains. Armed with this information, your next step is to go to the shop, locate the variety you decided upon, and choose one from the lot. “Go for the biggest plant within a variety. If it is a flowering plant, choose the one whose flowers are still in


environment

The MCAST Agribusiness Institute Open Weekend Students and staff at the MCAST Agribusiness Institute are getting ready to welcome Maltese families to this year’s edition of the Agribusiness Open Weekend between Friday 25th and Sunday 27th May at the Institute’s premises, including its animal husbandry and farming facilities in Luqa Road, Qormi. This popular annual event aims to promote the different career opportunities offered by the Institute’s full-time and part-time courses, while highlighting the importance of agriculture in our daily lives. The public is invited to attend this event, where they can even bring their own pets for grooming and seek advice from the Institute’s lecturers. ‘The Farm-to-Fork Cycle’ is the main theme of this year’s Open Weekend. The process which food and drink products go through before reaching our tables is a crucial aspect of daily life that we rarely think about. Through this three-day event, the students will be inviting visitors to explore this important process through various enjoyable activities. These include tours

tight bud form, so that you can enjoy them as they bloom and have a longer flowering period. Beware of plants with many fully-opened flowers as they are often past their prime.”

safest time for repotting is during early spring and autumn, but if you manage to keep the root ball as one whole without breaking it up, you can repot all year round.”

Dione explains that once you buy the plant, it is important not to keep it in a car with closed windows for a long time. “Take it home as quickly as possible. On a sunny day, it gets very hot inside a car and most plants may not recover from such suffering.” When you bring it home, stand the plant in good light, but away from direct sunshine for the first two or three days. You may then proceed with placing it in its final position, where you intend it to stay. Don’t move the plant from one place to another too often. This will increase the air movement around the leaves, making it wither. “Use good quality rainwater, rather than tap water, to water your plants. Water from air conditioners and dehumidifier condensates is a good alternative as well.”

To learn more about how to care for your plants, you may also consider taking a short course in plant growing, which will give you a balanced dose of basic scientific principles and cultural requirements.

Repotting a plant in a bigger pot soon after you take it home is also recommended, especially if the plant came in a very small pot. “A good indication that a plant needs repotting is when the roots start to emerge from the holes at the base of the plant. The

MCAST offers various evening short courses related to plant growing and other practical horticultural disciplines throughout the year. “I strongly recommend these courses because they give you a wealth of knowledge, coupled with practical experience,” Dione says, “and by meeting other course participants interested in this field, you’ll also share ideas and make new friends.” “One last word of advice; when you get your plants, whatever happens, don’t give up. Try to keep track of all that you do to a plant, and when something goes wrong, retrace your steps and find out what can be improved. Some plants will undoubtedly fail you. This is not a problem. It is a natural part of a complicated process...called life. Happy gardening!”

of the Institute’s animal husbandry units and fields, including the exotic animals room, displays of fish aquaria, interactive presentations related to animal welfare, veterinary care, beekeeping, viticulture and winemaking, organic farming, rabbit and poultry keeping, herbalism, displays of fresh products with information on their production stages, olive oil tasting, presentations by local NGOs, as well as talks and workshops on other agricultural issues. The event will even include a sale of local food products, herbs and plants produced by the Institute throughout the year. The students will also be presenting an exhibition of artistic photography portraying animals and local landscapes. Opening times are on Friday from 10:00 to 14:00, on Saturday from 09:00 to 13:00 and from 16:00 to 20:00, and on Sunday from 09:00 to 18:00. For more information, contact the Agribusiness Institute on agribusiness@mcast.edu.mt or 2125 7006. www.mcast.edu.mt

What’s my plant? • In places with little light, go for sansevierias, aglonemas and chlorophytums. • If you’re a newbie plant grower, start with yucca, ivy, ficus, begonia, aspidistra, euonymus, ferns, hypoestes, monstera, geraniums, clivia, impatiens, kalanchoe, chrysanthemum, vinca, or capsicum. • If you know your stuff, try an exotic species like orchids, azaleas, kentia and anthuriums.

May 2012 | Issue 29 | vida.com.mt

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special feature

Being a positive parent Becoming a parent is a great challenge, which one keeps on carrying throughout their entire lives. Parenting poses a number of questions. What is the right parenting style to adopt with our children? How should we enforce discipline? What is the best way to communicate with our children? The list of questions is never-ending. For the past three years, the Foundation for Social Welfare Services has embarked on an annual informative campaign on Positive Parenting. Aġenzija Appoġġ and Aġenzija Sedqa within the same Foundation have been collaborating to create more awareness about the need to promote child upbringing free from violence, based on communication, recognition of children’s rights and a healthy family environment through positive parenting. What is positive parenting? Positive parenting refers to parental behaviour based on the child’s best interests that is nurturing, empowering, non-violent, and providing recognition and guidance that involves the setting of boundaries to enable the child’s full development. There is no unique good parenting style, but for the child to develop well, it is important that it is within a favourable atmosphere and positive family environment. Parenting does not only refer to the role of the natural parents of the child, but includes all those people who, at one point or another, will be taking care of the child. These can include grandparents, other siblings, or relatives, with whom the child would be spending time. One of the most important factors is the continuity in the upbringing of the child. This means that if, for example, the parents are working and the child is being taken care of by the grandparents, the child should receive the same treatment by both, pre-planned between all parties. The importance of recognition and guidance There are times when, for example, children would like to help us do our daily chores. However, more often than not, we end up doing everything on our own since it is

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much easier and less time-consuming for us. It is important to remember that children learn by doing, not by having parents do things for them. This also creates a sense of responsibility, which helps the child become independent. Other important aspects in parenting are rules and expectations. Parents need to explain the reasons behind the rules set and enforce the consequences of breaking them. Consequences set should be reasonable and realistic. It is useless to punish a child by prohibiting him/her from watching TV for a whole week, when you already know it will be difficult to enforce. This gentle but firm guidance is crucial because it helps children develop an internal sense of self-responsibility and values. Children inevitably make an endless number of mistakes. Parents have the important role of correcting and giving a good example. Be positive when correcting and talk out mistakes with your child whilst avoiding any criticism. It is essential to criticise the act and not the child, as this may affect their self-esteem. Proper discipline adds self-esteem. Children who are not disciplined and who do not have limits set grow up lacking self-esteem and tend to be more dependent on others. Moreover, if children act out as a result of discipline, or even threaten you, it is important not to give in to

such behaviour. If as a result of this, parents cancel the punishment or give the child what he or she wants, in the long run the child will start using these tactics to blackmail parents each time things do not turn out their own way. Parents should discuss with the child after they have calmed down and help manage their anger. Children have the right to grow up surrounded by respect and loving care. Their rights have to be safeguarded – children need to be guided when taking a decision, and need the support to grow up without unnecessary pressures, whilst developing their personality. This is possible through positive parenting, away from all types of abuse.

For more information on positive parenting and the yearly Blue Ribbon Campaign, the public may visit www.appogg.gov.mt. In the publication section of the same website, you may download a leaflet about Positive Parenting. You may also call Supportline 179 for further professional guidance. The Foundation for Social Welfare Services (www.fsws.gov.mt) incorporates Aġenzija Appoġġ, Aġenzija Sedqa (www.sedqa.gov.mt) and Aġenzija Sapport (www.sapport.gov.mt).


health & beauty

Safe cosmetics for expectant mothers

D

id you know that certain creams could be harmful to your baby? Most pregnant women are aware that what they eat is important to the wellbeing of their growing baby, but what many don’t know is that the cosmetics they apply during pregnancy may affect their baby as well. Research has shown that certain ingredients are dangerous for a developing foetus. These ingredients are absorbed into the bloodstream, making their way through the placenta and into the foetus. They could harm the baby and lead to pregnancy complications. Most of us slather on oceans of lotions every day, but we don’t think about what might be passing the skin barrier and being absorbed into our bodies. In fact, some of the topical ingredients within many cosmetics are absorbed into the bloodstream and reach your growing baby. Not all the ingredients within creams and body lotions are good for a developing baby, so every mother-to-be should make sure that she knows which of these to avoid. Here are a handful of ingredients considered potentially harmful during pregnancy:

Retinoids -

Retinoids are a form of vitamin A that is commonly used in anti-wrinkle and acne treatment products. Retinoids are also one of the skincare ingredients that experts recommend expectant mums should stay away from. Indeed, certain studies have shown that high doses of vitamin A during pregnancy can cause birth defects. If you’re pregnant, it is a good idea to make sure that any supplements/cosmetics you use contain vitamin A in the form of beta-carotene rather then retinol.

Salicylic acid -

This mild acid is used to treat skin disorders including acne. You can find it in a number of skin products such as cleansers and toners, but salicylic acid is another no-no for pregnant women. High doses of the acid in its oral form have been shown to cause birth defects and various pregnancy complications.

Soy -

Some mums-to-be seek out natural ingredients such as soy in their skincare products, but while soy-based lotions and facial products are generally safe to use, soy can make the ‘mask of pregnancy’ (dark splotches on facial skin) worse, as can oil of bergamot, which can be found in many organic products. Having said that, the ‘active soy’ found in some product lines is safe, because the estrogenic components have been taken out.

Sunscreens - Just because you’re pregnant it doesn’t mean you

can’t hit the beach, but choose your sunscreen wisely! Many sunscreens contain oxybenzone, which might interfere with hormones within the body, and nano-sized ingredients, which are potentially linked to reproductive and developmental problems. If you realise you have used a product that contains one of these potentially harmful ingredients, don’t panic. Simply stop using the product now and pick one that is safe for you and your developing baby. If you are pregnant or breast-feeding: • Choose cosmetics specially formulated for mothers-to-be and breast-feeding women. • Make sure that any cosmetics you use do not disturb USG scans. • Apply creams with extra gentle flavour composition and without allergens.

By Katrina Pysz, mummy of 10 month old Eric and sole distributer of Perfecta Mama Cosmetics for Malta.

May 2012 | Issue 29 | vida.com.mt

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interview

Much more than a plastic box A lot of creativity and hard work goes into every compact for blusher, foundation and eye shadow. With 12 years of experience, this product designer knows the importance of the right mix of eye-catching design and innovative functionality. Jane Vella meets Philippe Parker, Senior Concept Designer at Toly Products Ltd to learn more about the work that goes into creating the compacts that hold every woman’s beauty secrets, and how he designs items which he’ll never use himself. Philippe moved to Malta from the UK upon marrying his Maltese wife, Lara. After reading for a degree in Industrial Design, he worked with various graphic design agencies in the UK and then in Malta, until finally he joined Toly, where he could really put his skills to the test. Philippe explains that every new concept begins with extensive research including desk research, conducting of online surveys, as well as projects in collaboration with MCAST Institute of Art and Design. This research gives the team valuable information about what women use, how they use it, and the new trends. “Through our research, we learn how a woman puts her make up on, and try to make it easier and more enjoyable,” says Philippe. I remark to him that their designs seem to carry a touch of femininity, with curves and a look of softness incorporated into the compacts. Philippe agrees, adding that although this is always their aim, they do try not to over feminise, as you are not

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necessarily going to appeal to women by going for the stereotype of pink and fluffy. In fact, he admits that he is often inspired by architecture. “I also like to go into shops sometimes, and ask about their make up cases, how the case opens and how it’s put on. It embarrasses my wife,” he admits with a smile. Trends change all the time, and as a fashion item, make up trends are no different. What’s more, the way a woman in one country puts on her make up may differ from another. “So it’s not just a case of looking at your competitors’ compacts, you have to look around you,” explains Philippe. He adds that technology also has a role to play in packaging. “Technology has moved in a way that what was once very complex is now part of every day life. This means it’s not just about shape, but about the technology within. This can also be applied to makeup compacts.” The initial process of product design begins with a brief, and a presentation of initial

ideas in 2D, based on the brief given. “We have to be sensitive to the brief even in the presentation of our design to clients. We will try to present them with the 'Ferrari' of compacts. If the client likes our ideas, we then create them in 3D format,” explains Philippe. He adds that the design process involves a lot of sketch work and discussion, in order to reach an agreement on the final direction. The design team must also liaise with the engineering team in order to make sure that they are happy with how the new product will work, that Toly can in fact manufacture it, and that it is viable. “So we need to strike a balance between ergonomics and aesthetics. In this regard it is good to have a basic knowledge about how production works. The challenge is making sure that the final design is as you had intended,” he says. The time taken from concept to launch depends on various factors, as Philippe points out. “A totally new idea will take an


interview

average of 18 months. Obviously, designs that we already have in stock will take much less,” he says. “Then it depends on the quantities, the location of where it will be made and finishes, which all vary the timeline and cost.” I ask him the age-old question: which wins out, functionality or looks? “We ask this question every time we put pen to paper. It really depends on the brand. Luxury brands, for example have a particular brand direction. The brand is like a personality,” he explains. “With experience and with instinct, we create a design we believe they will like, but we also need to try and surprise them – going beyond expectations.” In fact, Toly’s range varies from completely aesthetic designs to those that focus on innovation, with multi-purpose function in mind. Due to changing trends, the designer explains that you also need to recognise when you need to change. “With foresight, previous experience and research, you need to see what’s ahead, not just physical technology, but also the changing experiences of those who will use your products.” Philippe admits that there are always concepts that don’t make it to fruition. This does not mean that the concept is shelved

"Men are completely, as the design may be used in the future. more "These designs and adaptable to concepts are showcased skincare than for our clients' private viewing at each of the makeup" long list of important fairs and shows we participate in, two of which are Cosmoprof Bologna and Luxepack Monaco." Men’s cosmetics are also a new market, with skincare having really picked up. “Men are more adaptable to skincare than makeup; they are more comfortable with it. In this case, you would have to understand what a man would feel comfortable doing, whilst still feeling that he is using a product meant for men and not women,” explains Philippe. “I’m sure that if someone came up with the right formulations for makeup too, men would buy it in droves.” “Creating makeup compacts is so much more than just making a plastic box. It involves research, creativity, technical expertise, technological improvements and construction, taking into consideration factors such as branding and budgeting", Philippe concludes, "to keep it exciting, we keep coming up with new ideas to push our own boundaries and go beyond clients’ expectations.”

May 2012 | Issue 29 | vida.com.mt

17


homes

Interior Design

Why not treat yourself to a new kitchen? Planning your new kitchen Planning a new kitchen can seem (almost) as difficult as planning out your life in the long run. The success or failure of this task could have such an influence on the general happiness of the individuals who frequent the household. It really is worth your while to take a great deal of care with the design of this ‘central’ room. Most of us spend a lot of time in the kitchen, especially if you, your family members and friends enjoy the produce of a kitchen – food. When designing your kitchen, it is important to keep in mind that oftentimes, the simpler things are, the better they work. It is much easier to start with a well planned and simple layout comprising all the basic equipment and services located in the right places rather than a complex installation which is over-equipped with gadgets, most of which will hardly ever be used. No doubt, critics will tell you that no matter how well you manage your

planning, something will always turn out to be incorrect. This may be true, but always try to look on the bright side and all the good things that you have managed to achieve. The standard layout sequence or basic principle for any kitchen should be: storage, preparation, sink, cooker, serving and last but not least, eating! Dirty dishes will then return along this line, in a reverse order. The sequence may become a triangle (a very basic principle in kitchen planning), which is perfectly acceptable as it complies with the concept behind all kitchen layouts, and in so doing, creates the minimum of unnecessary journeys with your kitchen territory. Storage is fundamental to any kitchen, and hence the ideal way to establish the size of units required is to experiment by ‘fitting’ your various provisions and calculating according to the various sizes of containers, packaging and utensils. Conveniently, unit measurements have

now been standardised, and consequently pose few problems in obtaining the correct dimensions for height, depth and reach. The ‘heart’ of a kitchen, the cooker, as well as the refrigerator and sink, should preferably be no more than a step away from each other. Most equipment used regularly during cooking should ideally be within arm’s reach of the cooker. In today’s fast moving world, professional help is at hand, and most kitchen suppliers will be only too happy to assist you in your task at hand, provided that you feed them (excuse the pun) the required information and your personal requirements. Always keep in mind that the kitchen you plan, and the style and model that you choose, should all be down to your personal taste. This is the one main aspect of kitchen planning where you should be taking the decisions. Given the vast selection of options on the market, you will surely succeed in finding the kitchen to suit your requirements and comfort.

By Jean-Marc Bianchi, Interior Designer B.A. Interior Design Studies, Rome – Italy jmdesign@go.net.mt

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special report

Don’t suffer in silence

A victim's story “When I was at primary school, I fit in well. I used to get invited to lots of parties and always had a ‘cool’ amount of people at my own birthday parties. I was always surrounded by people during break time. I was a happy girl. However, in secondary school, especially now that I’ve begun Form III, things have changed. While I am still into cartoons, computer games and running, every other girl in class is interested in going out and impressing boys. They’re also generally very much into their appearance – their hair, weight and the way their bodies are changing. I feel like everyone around me is changing and growing, and that somehow I’ve been left behind. I feel miserable and lonely. I still don’t feel ready to go out with my classmates and I don’t feel confident enough to speak to boys. I am really scared and embarrassed about how my own body is changing. Unfortunately, the others are noticing this and I find myself alone in the playground more and more often. I hate the time between lessons most, because that’s when the girls start talking about last

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weekend or the next one, while I sit at my desk, waiting for the teacher, obviously alone. Sometimes they start whispering in groups. Sometimes I catch some looking my way and sniggering at me. It’s not the first time I’ve been asked if I’ve ever had a boyfriend, even though they know the answer. Sometimes I say ‘no’ and sometimes I walk away. Whichever the case, I’m teased. A girl even told me I’m too ugly to have one. I was invited to join them out, a few times, but I didn’t wear the same style of clothes the others wore, and was very quiet around boys. I was very self-conscious. Some of the girls later said that I wasn’t cool enough to hang out with them; that I was too quiet and shy, that my appearance and behaviour were ‘nerdy’. I don’t think I’m a nerd though – I just honestly believe I’m not ready yet, and have different interests for now. I don’t feel I’m missing out. I don’t want to make an effort, or to hurry, to be someone I’m not. I know there must be other girls like me out there. Could you be one of them?”

Bullying: the facts What is bullying?

B

ullying is a form of abuse. It consists of repeated acts over time, through which a person or group hurts someone else. Bullying comes in three main forms, namely emotional, verbal and physical. Emotional bullying takes place when an individual is made to feel bad, stupid, or lesser than others. Verbal bullying is when one is teased through words, or called mean names. Physical bullying is when someone is hit, kicked, punched, forced into fights and so on. Oftentimes, the victims of bullying are left out socially. Bullies might spread gossip, tell people not to spend time with the victim and bully other people who wish to be friends with the victim whilst criticising the victim's clothes, looks and character among other things. Staring at the victim, talking about them and mocking them are also forms of verbal and emotional bullying.


special report Why do people bully others? Bullies hurt other persons to feel more powerful than their targets or victims. Bullies may behave this way so as to be seen as popular or tough, or in order to get attention. They may bully out of jealousy or insecurity, or they may be very angry and are acting out because they themselves have their own problems and do not know how to cope with them.

What are the effects of bullying? The effects of bullying are serious. Victims of bullying can suffer from long-term emotional and behavioural problems. Bullying can cause loneliness, deep sadness, worry, low self-esteem and even illness.

How can I beat bullying? • Tell someone you trust.

Keeping quiet about it makes the bully’s life much easier! Make sure the person you tell does not give away what you told them, as bullies tend to bully even more if they find out someone has told on them.

• Try to attract an adult’s attention. If you are being bullied, try When and where does bullying occur most within schools? Bullying can happen anywhere. At school, it often occurs during PE, break time, in the hallways, bathrooms, on the school vans and while waiting for the vans, during classes that require group work and/or after school activities. A group of students might take advantage of a pupil, or leave out one student in particular. Sometimes bullies gain the loyalty of people who are watching, who go along with the bullies because they do not want to be the next victim. Despite this, bullying can take various forms, with bullies taking advantage of technology like mobile phones and the internet. Targets of bullying are often those who are seen as strange or different by their peers. This information was provided by Kellimni.com, an online support service formulated through a joint effort between SOS Malta, Salesians of Don Bosco, Aġenzija Żgħażagħ and Aġenzija Appoġġ and under the guidance of Child Helpline International. Kellimni.com is aimed at children and youths who want someone to listen to them and who can provide assistance. It will allow service users to express their concerns and talk about the issues directly affecting them, so that they will know that they are not alone. The Kellimni staff can be reached through email, chat and forums for support from www.kellimni.com.

to get someone’s help there and then, in such a way that the bullies will not notice you called someone.

• Get professional help. A

volunteer from Kellimni helpline will surely have a listening ear and some tips for you. You can also talk to your school counsellor or guidance teacher. These people can help you with being more assertive, staying safe in front of the bully, managing your anger towards the bully, and helping you increase your self-esteem and self-confidence.

• Don’t fight back. Try not to get

involved in violence. Usually bullies are stronger than their victims and often form part of a group, so it could be dangerous for you to try and fight them.

• Look strong and confident. Even if you don’t feel it, act strong and self-assured. Try not to look the bully in the eye and walk fast and straight, as if you have somewhere to go or someone to talk to.

• Stay safe! Try not to be alone, or close to the bullies, especially during break time, home time, while waiting for school to begin and other moments in which adults are not as present. • Find another victim of bullying. There is strength and safety

in numbers. Being friendly with someone who is going through a similar experience

could also help you find support and understanding.

• Laugh at yourself. If you are being bullied for the way you walk or talk, you can laugh at yourself and carry on acting as you had before. Bullies are mean because they know they can hurt you. If you don’t act hurt then they lose their point or purpose for bullying you. • Change? If you are bullied about

how you dress, see if you can change your style. Changing the outside does not mean that you, as a person, have to change on the inside. It might just help to remove attention from you, so the bullies can leave you alone.

• Do things you feel good about. If you are being bullied at

school, school becomes a horrible place. Therefore you need to find a place other than school, where you feel safe and good about yourself. Maybe you can start a sport, or keep up a hobby. This will help you find release, or be stress-free for at least some time during the day.

• Know your strengths.

Keeping a list of all the things you do well or like about yourself and your life for you to read everyday can really lift your spirits. Remember to list if you are a good friend, a caring person, musical, artistic, good at sports, helpful – these are all good qualities that will remind you about the good points in your life and of the things that make it good to be you. Lastly, if you are being bullied, always remember that you are not the problem! There is nothing wrong with being you. Be comfortable with yourself and others will be, too. The ones who aren’t do not have much value in your life, anyway.

May 2012 | Issue 29 | vida.com.mt

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special feature

Child’s play Play Safety Ltd on the safety of local playgrounds

L

ast month, Play Safety Ltd, a private company specialising in playground inspection was launched. Simon Micallef explains how this came about.

“Back in late 2008, Pierre Cuschieri became at the time the only registered local Operational Inspector certified by the UK’s Register of Play Inspectors International (RPII)”. It took a further two years for Play Safety Ltd to be born due to developments within the market, Simon maintains, “but we were the first to start lobbying for playground safety with the authorities concerned.” The company is operating under license from the Royal Society for the Prevention of Accidents, RoSPA, which is a UK registered charity established over 90 years ago. The inspection programme established by Play Safety emphasises regular routine, operational and annual inspections, which are to be carried out systematically throughout the year.

Services offered by Play Safety to this end include assistance in the planning and design process, on-site inspections, postinstallation inspections, risk assessment and education, as well as promoting safety in play areas, all against an indemnity insurance of €6,000,000 – the largest amount carried locally by anyone doing these types of inspections. Indeed, on the part of Play Safety Ltd, Simon declares that their main aim is to create awareness of the importance of continually safe play areas locally. “Playground operators whose playing fields have never been inspected, along with those whose playgrounds have been inspected some time ago must keep in mind that inspections have to be done regularly.” Pierre adds, “Procedure EN1176 stipulated by the European Standards for Play Equipment states that there should be a three-tier inspection system comprising routine, operational and annual inspections. This means that the play area in question needs to be

continually assessed to ensure it meets the EU’s safety standards.” Elaborating on the three-tier inspection, Pierre explains that a routine inspection involves visually checking equipment for faults and ensuring the surrounding areas are free from hazardous debris; an operational inspection comprises checking the efficiency of the equipment including welding joints and rotating parts, and checking for smoothness of surfaces, tightened bolts and damaged components; with an annual inspection being an overall inspection of all aspects mentioned. Having said this, they do not believe in removing every single element of danger either. “We believe that areas where children play should be as safe as necessary not as possible, because if you remove all elements of risk, children will not necessarily benefit. Children need risk in order to learn how to tackle risks they may face later on in life. The objective is to keep the risk controlled.” rospamalta@gmail.com

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real life

Life,ove&

Shiny happy people by Claire Camilleri

N

ow that the unusually cold winter we had in Malta this year has finally come to an end, my spirits are rising. I have always been a summer fan. Something about the air, the lack of rain or wind (except for my birthday week usually!), and the fact that we get to go out more during the spring and summer months, makes me feel happier during this time of the year. What a few people experience during winter however is far different to my mere dislike of those bleak wintery months. Some people’s moods are greatly affected by the weather, to the extent that a number of them actually suffer from a disorder called Seasonal Affective Disorder or SAD. This is a form of depression that occurs during specific seasons of the year, more commonly when the individual has less exposure to sunlight. It is a mood disorder in which people who have normal mental health throughout most of the year experience symptoms of depression such as a change in appetite, weight gain or loss, fatigue, reduced energy, irritability, and avoidance of social situations during a specific season year after year. It is also known as winter/summer depression, winter/summer blues or seasonal depression. Fortunately however, for those who despise winter the way I do – not to the extent of depression – there may actually be a few ways of getting through the gloomy days. Since many of us leave work when it is dark, we don’t get to enjoy any sort of sunlight. This can

have a huge effect on your mood for the rest of the day, especially if it happens on a daily basis. Getting up and going for a walk, weather permitting of course, can help start your day with a little bit of sunshine, adding some light not only to your day but also to your mood. Savour your de-light-ful weekend and get out of the house. Unless the authorities advise otherwise, getting out when the weather is not so perfect may not be a bad idea. Think of outdoorsy winter activities such as hikes and walks, or organise a group activity such as paintball or camping. Most of the time getting wet can be half the fun. Dress up warmly and you’re good to go! In Malta we are blessed with a few sunny days in winter and a very mild, sunny spring. Snatch up the opportunity on these days. If you’re stuck at work, take your lunch out with you and eat it in the sun or hit an outdoor coffee shop, and if you’re not at work the list of things to do to enjoy the lovely weather is never ending. On days when the weather doesn’t permit us to leave the house, it’s no use moping around hoping for brighter days. Come up with fun things to do indoors that will keep your mind occupied and content. Whether it’s a DVD with a loved one, a board game with a group of friends, or a night of knitting, anything you enjoy is good enough to keep you happy until the sun comes out again.

May 2012 | Issue 29 | vida.com.mt

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interview

Dream come true

S

ome might say that only those who do not dream, fail to succeed. Little did sisters Bettina and Philippa Cassar know that what appeared to be an impossible dream, would result in them winning US Alchemy Songwriting Competition’s Youth Division Award. Matthew Mamo meets Bettina, who, along with her sister, made their dream a reality. As Bettina Cassar recalls, her mother bringing an old piano home was what first put her on the road to success. “When my mother brought the piano home, aged six years old, I used to play around with it and proudly announce I wrote a song.” Coming from a family of “amazing musicians”, Bettina and Philippa found motivation in their mother, who taught them music and enriched their hopes of pursuing a musical career. “My mother taught my sister her first four chords on the guitar at the age of six and then followed it up herself. I’ve been going to piano lessons since I was seven. I learnt all the theory and music stuff.” Bettina explains that, with her sister stealing the show at home, she found comfort in

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her music as a way of expressing herself. “I guess music was always the easiest way to express myself. My sister has always been the loud, crazy one in the family so songs were my outlet.” “I used to hide my lyrics. I was really shy about sharing them with anyone," says Bettina. “One day, when I was in Form 4 I wrote a song for a good friend of mine when she was going through a rough time. I realised my songs could help and encourage people even if I was shy and critical of them.” In her sister Philippa, Bettina found a partner with whom to share her work and turn it into music. “I am more into playing the piano, writing lyrics and music for the songs. Philippa takes vocal training very seriously. So we help each other out – I teach her music theory and she gives me vocal help! I always show my songs to my sister. She is very encouraging but also comfortable enough to be very critical.” Through online forums, Philippa and Bettina saw adverts for the Alchemy Songwriting Competition held in Arkansas in the US last year, and decided to enroll as a duo under

the name of their band: Phyllis & Bertie with their song Tom Dick and Harry. “We got an email a few days later saying that we were nominated for the top 10. We were asked to go to America a week later to participate in the final showcase (a live show in front of the judges).” Phyllis & Bertie went on to dominate the Youth Division Section, but it wasn’t all plain sailing for the sisters. “We had loads of problems with the recording. We did it all at home with the help of a home recording book, finishing just a few hours before the closing date! To get there we had to go through four crazy flight connections! The first flight was delayed for an hour and we almost missed our last plane.”

Bettina explains that she is now looking to expand her musical capabilities, writing new songs and, along with her sister, continuing her service for Youths For Jesus whilst completing “The her course in Music and judges Communications at the really liked us, University of Malta.

we got a lot of positive feedback.”


interview

Alchemy Song Writing Competition The Alchemy Song Writing Competition is an annual competition aimed at giving the opportunity to up-andcoming songwriters and lyricists who want to showcase their talent in front of professional judges. Accepting any style of music from hip hop to folk, jazz and rock, the Alchemy Songwriting Competition is all about originality and serves as a stepping stone for future talents to get their voices heard. The competition encourages art, music and creativity through financial backing, with all entrance fees supporting this cause. “I’ve always felt like there is so much musical talent out there to be heard”, Alchemy judge Kris Allen says, “and I’m excited to be a part of shedding some light on these undiscovered artists.”

May 2012 | Issue 29 | vida.com.mt

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technology

Podcasts: the new medium of choice? by Rachel Agius

W

hat better way to learn about a person than to look through their music collection? Learning about someone's musical taste can reveal plenty about their personality, perhaps even revealing whether or not their White Stripes would get along with your Janis Joplin. While in the past this necessitated the browsing of a record or CD library, now thousands of songs are nestled neatly in the average backpack or briefcase, in slender mp3 players that can do almost everything aside from make toast. But whether it's Beyonce, Mozart or Michael Jackson that takes up the most virtual memory, the wonderful world of the internet has brought us something just as portable and equally telling as anyone's musical anthology. Podcasts are, very simply put, radio programs for your music player. The huge popularity of Apple's iPod as the mp3 player of choice contributed to the 'pod' portion of the neologism while the similarity to traditional radio broadcasting proffered the 'cast'. In 2003, Apple released a version of iTunes with the built-in capacity to retrieve and store podcast files from their sources – and these sources can be very varied indeed. From topical discussion to daily news to comedy, there is so much to choose from that finding time to listen to all of them might become a problem. Suddenly, sitting in traffic is not a total waste of time. Incidentally, the car is often the preferred location for some alone time with one's podcasts. There is no need to take your eyes off the road, there's plenty of opportunity to voice your disagreement in complete privacy (although you should remember to close the windows) and they offer a good way to take your mind off the clattering old Fiat in front of you which seems, by way of its obnoxious belching of fumes, to be solely responsible for global warming. Podcasts are by nature an interactive medium. Anyone with basic recording equipment and a little imagination can make and publish a podcast, which means that a listener can often become a producer in their own right. Because it is free, podcasting can reach a wide audience and the easy organisation and storage of the audio files means that listeners can have access to an entire archive of episodes within minutes. This episodic nature of podcasts recalls both traditional television and radio broadcasts as well as the more recent vlog or video blog, which found its place on You Tube and other video sites. In fact, it seems to bridge the gap between the two – podcasts are often broadcast according to a schedule just

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technology like radio shows but their searchability and dependence on an internet connection places them side by side with other usergenerated content like vlogs. The ease with which these episodes are created and distributed means that literally anything under the sun can be the topic of conversation. There is a large selection of podcasts that feature everyday people telling stories about their experiences of everyday life, others that read out short stories by well-known authors and new talent. Plays are acted out much like they would be in the good old days when we tuned in to evening radio dramas. Amateurs and academics alike discuss everything from astronomy to automobiles, review books and films and even break down concepts in subjects like philosophy and engineering for the purpose of educating the layperson. Advice columnists have gone from print to website to podcast, playing recorded questions from listeners and offering their two cents ‘on the air’. And because of the growing interest in the medium, new podcasts can be released daily, covering news, sports and music in what is fast becoming a competitor with radio. The question remains as to why podcasts have become so popular. They are, for all intents and purposes, disposable – the files are often deleted once listened to – and by necessity slightly anachronistic; breaking news cannot be broadcast as it happens, making it old news by the time it reaches the listener. Perhaps it is the reliability of the episodes, that comforting knowledge that every day, week or fortnight you can listen, without fail, to your favourite podcast with the ability to pause, rewind and skip, without the risk of missing the broadcast entirely as is often a concern with radio. Maybe it is the changing nature of our relationship with our technology – the internet is a connecting force that offers us solace from the stresses of every day life and having fresh, interesting material delivered straight to your computer makes it just that bit more personal. Or it could simply be the freedom to listen to what you want, when you want, that appeals, a matter of technology evolving in sync with our lifestyles, which seem to be gaining momentum every day. Whatever the reason, podcasts seem to have carved a niche for themselves with the internet user and look set to stick around for a while, to entertain, inform and enlighten.

May 2012 | Issue 29 | vida.com.mt

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real life

My thing Rachel Galea’s precious possession is a gold cameo ring that’s been in her family, albeit in more than one form, for a number of generations. What is perhaps most interesting about it is that the ring has a twin – which is currently in her aunt’s possession. This is the ring’s story.

Originally, the two rings were a pair of earrings that belonged to my paternal grandmother. She only ever wore them on special occasions. In the Second World War, my grandmother (who was just 23 years old at the time) lost a great deal of her personal items when her house was brought down by the bombings, but luckily, this pair of earrings were amongst the few of her possessions that remained and survived the ordeal. Her untimely death some years later left my grandfather in possession of this pair of cameo earrings. In ordinary circumstances, custom would dictate that they would be passed down to a daughter, as gold was an important part of a daughter’s dowry and my father’s side of the family used to invest in gold like many did in the past. This however, was not to be – he could not pass them on to any of his four children as they were all boys. As it happens, his youngest son was about to get married, and so my grandfather decided to give the cameo earrings to his youngest son’s future mother-in law as a gift. It was then that the earrings underwent their transformation. His future motherin-law (my maternal grandmother) decided to have the pair of earrings made into two identical rings, so she took them to a goldsmith in Ħamrun and it was done. She then gave each ring

to her two daughters. One of the daughters – my mother – went on to pass it down a further generation, and that is how it has now come to be mine. Looking into the history of cameos, I discovered that, whereas scholars don’t really know much about the origin of the earliest cameos, they are thought to date back as early as the ancient civilisations of Egypt, Greece and Rome. Interestingly, images carved into cameos were generally moral or ethical scenes, mythical events or important leaders. Cameos were most commonly worn as a status symbol, and during the Elizabethan period (mid to late 1500s) they were actually worn by both sexes as a sign of prosperity. Later on, when cameo stone carving was replaced by shell carving, the price of this type of jewellery was reduced, making it more affordable to common folk like me! The ring is of great sentimental value to me and I only ever wear it on special occasions. Luckily, I am a fan of gold and don’t fancy silver much, so I do wear it for more than its sentimental value – I like the way it looks too. I’ve never met my grandmother from my father’s side, as she died when my father was still in his teens, but knowing the story of the ring’s origins gives the ring added personal value for me, as it forms a link between myself and the grandmother I never had the chance of getting to know.

Do you, or someone you know, have a treasured ‘thing’? Send us your suggestion to My Thing, VIDA Magazine, Pitkali Road, Attard, ATD 2214 or by email to yoursay@vida.com.mt for a chance to showcase the item that means most to you – we’d love to hear about it!

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fashion

Street Style Bright pops of colour are the order of the day on Maltese streets as the sun finally begins to make an appearance. Gone are the black coats and grey knits of winter, and boy do these ladies know it!

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Alessia Sciberras, 17 Student Blazer Stradivarius Top & shoes New Look Jeans Peacocks

Diandra Sammut, 17 Student Outfit Stradivarius

Lisa Munsterlijelm, 25 Student Cardigan from Sweden Outfit from Finland

Jade Zammit Stevens, 16 Student Boots Oasis Shorts & scarf Stradivarius Top & jacket Zara Bag Asos

vida.com.mt | Issue 29 | May 2012

Anna Munsterlijelm, 27 Journalist Bag Lumi, Finland Dress from New York Sandals Vagabond

Celine Spiteri, 16 Student Jeans Stradivarius Shoes Aldo Jacket Jane Norman Bag Zara


fashion

Tropical paradise No need to go on a tropical holiday when you can wear the outfit equivalent to lying back in a deckchair surrounded by palm trees and sipping piña colada out of a hollowed out coconut. You could even throw in one of those racy mermaid-shaped plastic stirrers. Make like a tropical bird of paradise this summer with one of these printed beauties.

1 2

3

1: River Island 2: Dorothy Perkins 3: Miss Selfridge

Label we Guess Guess was never my favourite brand. A couple of years ago, it didn’t even come close. That is until, headed by Maurice Marciano, it began to take a new direction – a 50s inspired, Monroesque one. Piqued interest became steady admiration with their Spring 2012 accessories campaign and even more still with their 30th anniversary capsule collection last month, which showed the turn toward vintage styling was not a onetime fluke. Bravo, Guess!

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Fashion Fa Spotlight on Designer: Following the highly anticipated ‘big reveal’ that Belgian designer Raf Simons will be filling John Galliano’s extraordinary shoes as Christian Dior’s artistic director, I rushed to find out more about the designer known for the minimalist aesthetic he brought to Jil Sander. Seeing as Galliano’s designers for Dior cannot be described as minimalist by any stretch of the imagination, the fashion world is on tenterhooks about what we’ll be seeing in his first offering – Dior’s Haute Couture collection this July. Despite highprofile rivals including Marc Jacobs, head designer at Louis Vuitton, and Alber Elbaz of Lanvin being considered, it may have come as a surprise to a few that top dog at Dior was given to this relatively newer face. Starting out in menswear back in 1995, Raf Simons was appointed creative director at Jil Sander in 2005. Praised for his “calm conceptualism” by Sarah Mower of Style.com, he went on to launch his menswear line Raf by Raf Simons the following year. With more than a year having passed since Galliano’s untimely ousting from Dior due to anti-Semitic remarks, the 66-year-old luxury brand took its time to make a decision on who would take his place. Now that Simons’ appointment has been made public, it is no secret that many did not consider him a candidate for Dior – his minimalist aesthetic represented at Jil Sander seems to clash with the house’s femininity.


fashion

airground

by Sarah Micallef

Raf Simons

Pointy courts This is not to say we’ve seen the end of round-toe platforms, but love it or hate it, the pointy toe court is back on the shoe scene. Ranging in heel height from kitten (shudder) to skyscraper heights, the emphasis is on the point. If you want extra style points, go for a metal toecap.

1 2

In spite of this however, in an interview with WWD, the newly appointed creative director affirms a lot more than minimalism can be expected of his work at Dior. “I don't think it's wrong to call me a minimalist. It's wrong to call me a minimalist only. I am also a romantic person.” So will we be seeing a newly modernised Dior? “My aim is a very modern Dior, but at the end of the day, I also look back,” Simons told the New York Times, going on to maintain, “I find that period between 1947 and 1957 extremely attractive, and there was a lot of modernity.” From this, one can gauge that he doesn’t have a complete departure from Dior’s roots in mind.

3

Reassuringly for Dior fans, Simons maintains that he will be respecting and embracing the luxury house’s heritage, adapting his own aesthetic to suit his new position. Whereas to many, following in the footsteps of one of fashion’s biggest names may seem daunting, Simons may be seen to take a rational approach, stating “I'm interested in creativity, the evolution of creativity and relationship between creativity and the times we live in.” Despite the apparent difference in aesthetic, if one were to consider his history in avant-garde men’s fashion and his inclusion of more feminine shapes at Jil Sander, Raf Simons for Dior might ultimately turn out to be a perfect fit – only time will tell.

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1: 2: 3: 3:

Topshop New Look Mango Dorothy Perkins

Celebs Pastel hair One of the celeb trends I wholeheartedly condone (and have a burning desire to try out) is pastel hair. I’m loving anything from delicate powder blue to cotton candy pink and punchy lilac right now, and despite not being everyone’s cup of tea (and, let's face it, really suiting precious few), when it’s done right it’s hair colour heaven. Are you brave enough? Katy Perry

Kelly Osbourne

Lady Gaga

May 2012 | Issue 29 | vida.com.mt

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Sweet like Candy Creative director: Sarah Micallef Focused Knowledge T: 2339 2403 Photography: Jacob Sammut Carabez Pearl Works T: 7985 7733 Hair: Lara Steer, D Salon T: 2137 1245, dsalon@maltanet.net Makeup: Diandra Mattei using Givenchy T: 7982 8414 Model: Nikki Zarb-Cousin @ Supernovamodel.com

Jumper Mango Bracelets New Look


Jacket Topshop Dress Mango


Dress & waistcoat Topshop Bracelets New Look Shoes Dorothy Perkins


Jumper Mango, Bracelets New Look

Dress Miss Selfridge, Earrings New Look, Necklace Accessorize

Top Dorothy Perkins, Trousers & bracelet Mango, Ring Accessorize

Dress Miss Selfridge


Dress Miss Selfridge Earrings & shoes New Look Necklaces Accessorize


Top Dorothy Perkins Trousers & Bracelet Mango Sandals New Look Ring Accessorize


culture

May’s tragedies and triumphs

by Martin Morana

The Great Siege of 1565 On May 18th 1565, a gargantuan Ottoman fleet made up of some 130 galleys and more than 200 smaller vessels approached Malta’s shores to lay siege on the inhabitants of the Maltese Islands. The fleet eventually landed its 30,000 troops at Marsaxlokk Bay, as well as a huge amount of guns and other weaponry. From there, the troops marched towards Marsa and Marsamxett to set up camp, and once settled, trained their guns on both Fort St Elmo, located at the tip of the peninsula (today known as Valletta) and Fort St Angelo, located on Ta’ Hammona at the tip of the Birgu peninsula. A few days later, the Turkish admirals ordered their troops to start pounding the tiny fort of St Elmo, Xebb-er-Ras peninsula, with its garrison made up of several hundred men, so as to completely take over the strategic position of the peninsula which dominated the ports of Marsamxett and the Grand Harbour. After a month of fierce fighting, Fort St Elmo fell to the enemy, but not without heavy losses for both sides. Hundreds of knights from the Order of St John as well as Maltese and foreign soldiers who defended the fort died, with only a handful remaining when the janissaries entered the fort. After this, the Turkish army began focusing its attacks on Fort St Michael in Senglea and Fort St Angelo at Birgu’s headland. The Turks continued their incessant bombardment alternated with assaults by their elite force of janissaries who stormed the two peninsulas from various points, to wear the defenders down. The Order’s chroniclers – Giacomo Bosio and Balbi da Coregio – documented many stories of the heroic deeds of the defenders. The Maltese inhabitants, along with hundreds of mercenary soldiers tenaciously aided the Knights in their bid to maintain the fortifications and keep the enemy at bay. Some attempts were also made to bring foreign troops over from Sicily to assist the besieged.

The statue of Malta erected in Birgu by the Order of St John in 1706 to commemorate the Great Siege.

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Finally on September 7th, a military force of some 9,000 men (known as the Gran Soccorso) reached Malta. The Turkish admirals, by now weary of their long siege on Malta’s fortifications, heavily demoralised and with troops facing starvation, reluctantly decided to pack up and scurry off onto their galleys to return back to their bases in Constantinople and North Africa. On September 8th, the church bells rejoiced the lifting of the siege after six long months of terror and untold hardship. The Great Siege may be considered to have been a huge boost to the morale of both the Order of St John and the Maltese population at large – a heroic epic between a David and a Goliath. It was, however, a pyrrhic victory indeed. As in many battles that are waged throughout history, much blood was shed by both attackers and defenders – thousands of soldiers and civilians died throughout the course of the siege. However, this was not to be another Rhodes for the Order. This was to be the pivotal point for the Grand Master and his retinue to decide once and for all that Malta was to be their home for good.


culture Malta – the nurse of the Mediterranean The ‘Great War to end all wars’ had started in June of 1914. In August of the same year, the Ottoman Empire entered into an alliance with Germany. This was seen as a threat to the Allies insofar as to their passageway to Russia via the Dardanelles, the Middle East and India, which were suddenly jeopardised. Therefore in February 1915, the scene of military engagement spread to the Straits of the Dardanelles as the British and French sent their navies and troops to land in Gallipoli. The battle there stalled into a stalemate as the Ottoman defences were stronger than anticipated and many Allied Forces, which included Australian and New Zealand troops known as ANZAC, dug themselves inside trenches.

CJoe Morana The facade of Australia Hall in Pembroke built in 1516 to serve the convalescing ANZAC military personnel wounded in the Gallipoli campaign.

By May of 1915 Malta started to receive the first of thousands of wounded soldiers. Thousands of Maltese had enlisted with the British Navy as well as with a ‘labour unit’ on land that was to provide logistical support to the military offensive. In the course of this campaign some 590 Maltese died. Thousands of French, British and ANZAC soldiers died or were wounded. Many of the wounded were brought over to Malta, which thereafter was nicknamed the ‘nurse of the Mediterranean’ for its role as a nursing refuge for the troops fighting in the Mediterranean. Some 30 military hospitals were set up ad hoc out of what were otherwise normal residences or public buildings of some size. During this time, whenever the wounded disembarked from their ships, Maltese people would line up the streets to see them being carried away to the hospital. They often presented these soldiers with cigarettes, sweets and even flowers as a sign of welcome and respect. It is said that Malta nursed some 135,000 wounded soldiers during this war. Many succumbed to their wounds and indeed some 1,500 were buried in Malta, most of them in the Pieta Military Cemetery and at the Kalkara Cemetery.

Bishop Baldassare Cagliares (1615 – 1633) Cagliares was the first bishop ever to be born in Malta. He was born in Valletta in 1575. Prior to his election to the bishopric, he had been employed by the Order of St John as its auditor. On being appointed bishop, he decided that his palace should shift from Birgu to Valletta, and in spite of his being nominated by the Knights as the bishop of Malta, relations with the Order soon turned sour. Indeed, his plans to shift his residence to a location so close to the Palace of the Grand Master in Valletta was not appreciated by the Grand Master of the time, Alof de Wignacourt. Following Cagliares, it was much later in 1831 that another bishop of Maltese birth was appointed. This was Mons Francesco Saverio Caruana who was approved by the British authorities, mainly because he had been the leader of the Maltese militias during the blockade of the French in 1798-1800. Escutcheon situated above the entrance to the Archbishop's Palace in Valletta.

Internees and deportees In May of 1940, during World War II some 120 persons were rounded up by the police on instructions by the British authorities and turned in to be detained under arrest as long as the war against the Axis powers continued. These detainees were arrested for fear of possible subversive actions that might jeopardise the security of the Islands in favour of the Italians. Indeed, all those arrested were perceived as sympathisers of the Italian government and its ideals. Amongst these inmates there were such distinct persons as Malta’s Chief Justice Sir Arturo Mercieca, his wife, daughter and son, the Nationalist Party leader Dr Enrico Mizzi, Herbert Ganado, the editor of the Maltese Church’s newspaper 'Leħen is-Sewwa' and many others. Most of these were at first detained at Fort San Salvatore, located on the outskirts of Birgu. When the fort was bombed, the detainees were moved to Corradino Prisons. The detainees protested vehemently at being treated in the same category as criminals, as well as at the fact that Corradino was also very much at risk of being hit by enemy fire. They were then shifted to St Agatha’s convent in Rabat. Eventually, 43 of these internees were deported to Uganda in February of 1942, where they were to remain until the end of the war in 1945.

Dr Enrico Mizzi, who was leader of the Nationalist Party and later Prime Minister of Malta was interned and deported to Uganda between 1940 and 1945.

May 2012 | Issue 29 | vida.com.mt

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murder cases

Murder in Malta by Edward Attard

The infanticide committed by Ġużeppa Buttigieg

Ġ

użeppa Buttigieg was the first woman in Malta convicted of the crime of infanticide, which up until 1947 was considered a homicide and although punishable by death, the four women condemned to death for infanticide at the time were all reprieved. The 1947 amendment of the criminal code stated that: 'Where a woman by any willful act or omission causes the death of her child under the age of twelve months, but at the time of the act or omission the balance of her mind was disturbed by reason of her not having fully recovered from the effects of giving birth to the child or by reason of the effects of the lactation consequent upon the birth of the child, then, notwithstanding that the circumstances were such that but for this section the offence would have amounted to willful homicide, shall be guilty of infanticide and shall be liable to the punishment of imprisonment for a term not exceeding twenty years'. Only the mother of the child can be charged with infanticide and any other person assisting in the act of killing is liable to be charged with willful homicide. Ġużeppa, aged 21, gave birth to a child at the Central Hospital in Floriana on March 24th, 1856 and for unknown reasons the child was baptised five months

The Auberge d'Auvergne, which served as court building between 1853 and 1941.

later. The married woman lived in Żurrieq and worked as a housemaid in Valletta. Mary Zammit, also of Żurrieq, fostered the child for some time after the birth. Some time in September 1856, Ġużeppa asked for her child back because she had no money to pay for her child's care. Zammit gave her the child wrapped in a lace garment, which some time later provided the clue to the solution of the crime. Later that month, while a farmer was crossing a field in Ħal Millieri (limits of Żurrieq), he came across a well and as he looked into it, he saw something floating in the water. At first he thought that a dog had fallen or had been thrown in, but after spotting the lace garment, he realised that it was a baby. When the baby was recovered from the water it was found to be in an advanced stage of decomposition, and from the post-mortem examination it was revealed

that the baby had been dead for days. As the child was unidentifiable, the police exhibited the lace garment at the Żurrieq police station and requested the inhabitants of the nearby villages to help in solving this atrocious crime. When the lace garment was identified by Mary Zammit as the garment she had previously seen Ġużeppa's child wrapped in, Ġużeppa Buttigieg was arrested and charged with the murder of her child. The trial, presided by Dr Antonio Micallef, was held on December 15th, 1856 with Dr Francesco Grungo as defence counsel. The accused was found guilty as charged with a unanimous guilty verdict and was sentenced to death. Governor Sir William Reid postponed the sentence, as Ġużeppa was certified pregnant. Later she was reprieved and received a life sentence. When in prison however, she did not give birth to a child and it appeared that the woman was not pregnant at all.

VIDA would like to thank the author of Murder in Malta Edward Attard as well as the book’s publishers Book Distributors Ltd of San Ġwann. BDL Books is giving VIDA readers a special 50% discount on Murder in Malta. Simply visit www.bdlbooks.com and enter the coupon code 'VIDA' while checking out to receive your discount.

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motoring

In the beginning... by Joe Anastasi

M

otorsport is not a new sport in Malta. Indeed, it finds its beginnings well before World War II when speedway races were regularly held at the Empire Stadium in Gzira. Shortly after the war, the Malta Motorcycle and Car Club was formed, but since no speed event permits were ever issued, the club’s activities centred mainly around social gatherings, club nights and the like. In the late ‘50s the British Forces Motoring Club set up a branch in Malta to organise skilled driving tests and navigational rallies for forces personnel. In 1961 the BFMC ventured further, requesting permits from the police authorities to organise a hill climb at Miżieb. These were issued without any problems, to the amazement of the local enthusiasts whose similar requests had always fallen on deaf ears. Thus the first ‘speed event’ on public roads was held. For the record, it was won by a Sergeant Penny driving an Austin Healey ‘Frogeye’ Sprite. The Mizieb hill climb was to become an annual event, and all sorts of strings were pulled to allow Maltese citizens to participate. It was eventually decided to allow any Maltese citizen who had at some time worn a military uniform to participate. Suddenly, your boy scouts uniform became a very valuable piece of equipment, and the likes of pioneers Aldo Laferla, Alex Agius Cesareo, the late Paul Ripard, Mario Said and others soon started entering this annual event… and winning. Aldo Laferla won it in 1963, Mario Said in 1964, and John Pace Asciak in 1965, the first year in which I personally participated, aged 18. It was also to be the last year it was held for some time.

Available from John Bull Tel: 21571025, 99448738

British services personnel were never very interested in such events, preferring navigational rallies to racing. The priority of the Maltese on the other hand was racing, and in 1965 the Malta Auto Sport Club was formed, with the late Salvino Caruana as it’s first president. ‘Sur Salv’ moved heaven and earth to reestablish speed events but the Maltese authorities were not to be convinced. In desperation he turned to Gozo, and his friend the late Henry Fiteni, the Commissioner for Gozo. Together they discussed the various avenues and came up with two great events – the Nadur Hill Climb in September, won by Charles Spiteri, and just one month later the first and only Gozo Circuit Race, co-incidentally also my first win! You could say that this was the beginning of it all, for it was the first time speed events had been organised in Malta by a Maltese club, the MASC. Up to that point, any Maltese enthusiasts wishing to race motorcars had only one alternative, and that was to go abroad. One Maltese driver did so successfully in the 50s – Count Louis Manduca raced regularly and successfully in England between 1952 and 1956. Permits for racing on public roads were not issued for some years, and out of sheer frustration I too followed Count Manduca and looked beyond our shores for my racing in 1972. Inexperienced and underfinanced, I joined Sicilian Matteo Sgarlata to race in the world’s most gruelling endurance race – the famous Targa Florio. Looking back, it was the best thing I could have done, but that’s as far as it got, for my car developed mechanical problems during qualifying, and I was reduced to a spectator for the rest of the weekend – a perfect baptism of fire.

Joe Anastasi started competing in local Motorsport in 1964 with a Mini Cooper S. Apart from participating in and winning a number of local championships, Joe also took part in numerous races in Sicily, including the famous Targa Florio, winning on seven occasions. Now retired, Joe helps Malta's young drivers to compete in Motorsport events in Sicily, where they have been very successful.

May 2012 | Issue 29 | vida.com.mt

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cinema

May the movies be with you

by Mark Camilleri

Film of the month

The Dictator Whether you love him or hate him, Sacha Baron Cohen has made quite a loud and prominent splash in the world of film and comedy. After many years of very intelligent and gutsy hilarity on TV, he reached new heights of fame with the worldwide success of Borat – the film that nearly everyone found offensive, but most also found fresh and extremely funny. Due to the nature of his undercover pranks, the worry was that fame would compromise his antics, but he looked so different as his other character, Brüno, that he managed to pull off equally shocking antics a few years later. Brüno was ultimately a lesser film, and as always there were numerous doubts as to the veracity of all the pranks, but it was still peppered with moments of pure genius. Baron Cohen's third major alter ego, Ali G, had already had a feature film outing prior to Borat. Baron Cohen then delved into other projects, showing his acting skills in films such as Tim Burton's Sweeney Todd and Martin Scorsese's Hugo, where he displayed a different form of comedic talent. He also provided hilarious voice-over work for the Madagascar films ("Hurry up, before we come to our senses!"), and has Les Misérables and Tarantino's Django Unchained lined up next.

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Thankfully, he is still being given the chance to make big, flashy, silly films, and this one looks like it could provide all the fun of Borat and Brüno, without requiring him to go undercover. He portrays the dictator of the fictional republic of Wadiya – a role clearly based upon some of the big names whose gold-plated bubbles were burst during the Arab spring. The subject matter is ripe for ridicule, and the timing couldn't have been better, with the whole Gaddafi saga ending as the film was being made. Baron Cohen has used the modern day dictators' love for show and colour in the marketing of the film, with garish posters of his character, General Aladeen, plastered all over billboards, and press conferences given from golden thrones. He can be as over the top as he wishes, and still not be too far from the truth. Whilst not forgetting that the dictators in question have of course caused countless suffering and injustice, it's hard not to see a supposedly serious photo of Gaddafi standing among G8 world leaders in a golden outfit and sunglasses, and wonder why this comedy wasn't made earlier.


cinema Salmon Fishing in the Yemen

American Pie: Reunion I was in just the right frame of mind, and age bracket, when American Pie burst onto the scene back in 1999, reviving the crude high-school sex comedy, and tapping into teenagers’ hopes and dreams. I remember laughing until it genuinely hurt, in a cinema packed with young people doing likewise, and I was back in line when the two sequels followed, having grown fond of these normal-looking and often hapless teenagers. But when recently, for a number of reasons, I found myself re-watching the original film, much of the magic had inevitably worn off. The jokes weren’t that great, but they reminded me of the catch phrases and reenactments they had stirred up back at the turn of the millenium. Nostalgia is a powerful beast, and that is evidently what the filmmakers are banking on here. After the first three films most of the main cast dispersed, but the American Pie brand name lived on in four (four!) straight-to-video offshoots. I tried to watch one of them recently but failed miserably. Now, to finish things off with a warm apple bang, the entire original cast is back, reunited both as actors and characters for what will undoubtedly be a wild reunion party. The desperate lads are all back - Jim (Jason Biggs), Oz (Chris Klein), Kevin (Thomas Ian Nicholas), Finch (Eddie Kaye Thomas), and Stifler (Seann William Scott), as well as ‘band camp’ Michelle (Alyson Hannigan), Vicky (Tara Reid, who has had a pretty rocky thirteen years), Heather (Mena Suvari), and of course, emblazoned in our teenage memory forever, Shannon Elizabeth as exchange student Nadia. Two older stars are also back - Jim's dad Noah (Eugene Levy) and Stifler’s mom Jeanine (Jennifer Coolidge). It’s not hard to imagine what the reunion will be like, and we can expect this film to follow the successful formula of the earlier films. So it will hopefully be good, in a familiar and comforting way. Like apple pie, I guess.

Despite sounding like a rather unexciting documentary, this is actually a romantic comedy. Ewan McGregor (Moulin Rouge!, Beginners) stars as a fishing expert with Asperger’s syndrome. A wealthy Yemeni sends the lovely Emily Blunt (The Devil Wears Prada) to convince him to somehow establish salmon fishing in the arid environment of Yemen. I’m sure it’s one of those stories that is much better than the two-sentence summary would lead you to expect, and the book by Paul Torday was much praised on its release back in 2006. There’s a good chance the screenplay is even better, since it was adapted by Simon Beaufoy, who has penned the wonderful lines of The Full Monty, Closer and more recently Slumdog Millionaire and 127 Hours. The film also stars the classy Kirstin Scott Thomas (The Horse Whisperer, The English Patient) and is directed by Lasse Hallström, who started off directing most of ABBA’s music videos, but then moved into feature films and was behind The Cider House Rules and Chocolat.

How I Spent My Summer Vacation Much like Tom Cruise, Mel Gibson is slowly climbing back to his place on the mountain of artistic respect after a few off-screen incidents tarnished his reputation and undermined all of the great work he had done before. I genuinely hope he succeeds, because he’s starred in and made quite a few excellent films, and hopefully there’ll be more. He wrote and produced this film for himself to star in, reviving the dark character he portrayed in Payback, which saw him acting against type to much acclaim. His shady character is now stuck in a Mexican prison, befriending a local boy while he plots his escape. The film also stars Peter Stormare (Prison Break, Fargo) and Bob Gunton, the man behind one of cinema’s most hated prison wardens (The Shawshank Redemption).

The Lucky One Author Nicholas Sparks has built quite a reputation for making us feel all squishy inside, and writing stories that can be quite devastating, both on page and on the screen, such as the unabashed emotions of Message in a Bottle and The Notebook. This latest adaptation for the screen is about a soldier returning from duty in the Middle East, convinced that he was kept alive by a photo of a woman he’s never met. Unsurprisingly, the woman is quite easy on the eye, and he sets off to find her. Zac Efron (High School Musical) stars alongside newcomer Taylor Schilling, and the film is directed by Scott Hicks, of Shine and Snow Falling on Cedars fame.

www.MarksMovieMarks.com – Release dates are subject to change. All films released locally by KRS Film Distirbutors Ltd.

May 2012 | Issue 29 | vida.com.mt

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events

Events

Boogie Nights by MOTIV8 Events MFCC – Ta’ Qali June 2nd – 22:00

Theatre

Sports

Culture & History

Thursday 3rd

Feast of the Cross - Birkirkara T: 2144 4725

The Motiv8 crew hosted their signature Maltese retro night, Boogie Nights on Saturday, March 3rd at MFCC in Ta’ Qali. What started off a couple of years ago between a group of close friends has now become a well attended event with 8,000 punters of all ages, virtually all dressed up in line with the theme with afro wigs, make up, platform shoes, bellbottoms and shiny shirts. The DJs OwenB and Mahoney collectively known as Gin & Tonic made sure the crowd danced their way into the night to the ‘70s Funk and Disco sound from the likes of the Bee Gees, Jacksons, Diana Ross, Sister Sledge, Cerrone and Abba. DJ Sandro took over the decks later in the night and the crowd went wild with a mix of ‘70s rock and upbeat disco tunes. Also performing live on the night were the Zoo crew, the Blues Brothers and Center Stage. The venue decoration was in accordance to the theme of the night with plenty of orange, yellow, green, pink and blue. The elevated stage hosted a chequered dancefloor and large displays. On the side, the VIP area featured the Boogie Car where punters had a laugh getting filmed against a rolling background giving the impression of a moving car. All summed up it was a fun night out for all present and a trip down memory lane for those who experienced the original ‘70s nightlife. The next instalment of Boogie Nights will be held on June 2nd. Follow us on Facebook for the most up-to-date listings and info. www.facebook.com/BoogieNightsMalta

1 View 100 Versions

Gallery Last Touch – Mosta

Dates: April 13th to May 4th Opening times: Monday to Tuesday, Thursday to Friday 09:00-19:00, Wednesday & Saturday 09:00-13:00 T: 9944 9546

Exhibitions in May

Victor Agius’ Open Studio

Bishop R. Farrugia Street – Xagħra – Gozo Dates: April 7th to May 20th Opening times: Saturdays 18:00 – 20:00 and Sundays 10:30 – 12:30 T: 79594508

Peasant Costumes: Insights into Rural Life and Society

Ministry for Gozo – St Francis Square – Victoria – Gozo Dates: May 11th – June 30th T: 2215 6400/2156 1482 www.gozo.gov.mt

Anna Runefelt – Limited Edition Prints

Palazzo de Piro Cultural Centre – Mdina Dates: February 1st to May 31st E: events@xarapalace.com.mt

“...fis-Skiet” Painting Exhibition

Camilleri Paris Mode – Rabat Dates: April 25th to May 25th www.frederickgingell.com

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Friday 4th

Una Serata Napolitana Sagristija Vault - Valletta Waterfront - 19:30 E: bookings@baroccomalta.com

Piano Concerto by Yozef Ormeny - Manoel Theatre Valletta - 20:00 E: bookings@teatrumanoel.com.mt An American in Paris - MCC Valletta - 20:00 www.mcc.com.mt Culturefest - Bormla E: bormla.lc@gov.mt

Modern Songlines of Walkabout - St James Cavalier - Valletta - 20:00 www.sjcav.com

Puttinu Cares Football Marathon - Marsa Sports Complex - Marsa - 10:00 E: marathon@puttinucares.org Saturday 5th

She Stoops to Conquer - St James Cavalier - Valletta - 20:00 - www.sjcav.com Mamma Mia Dance Show Teatru Aurora - Victoria - Gozo - 20:00 - M: 9944 7625 An American in Paris - MCC Valletta - 20:00 www.mcc.com.mt Culturefest - Bormla E: bormla.lc@gov.mt

The Annual Great Spring Horticulture Show - San Anton Gardens - Attard - 14:00 to 22:00 - E: hortmalta@gmail.com Puttinu Cares Football Marathon - Marsa Sports Complex - Marsa - 10:00 E: marathon@puttinucares.org NightFest at Ħaż-Żebbuġ Sunday 6th

Feast of St George Preca Swatar - T: 2149 8757

Blood Donation Mobile Unit - Tal Virtu' - Next to Seminary - Rabat - 08:30 to 13:00 T: 2206 6209

In Guardia Parade - Fort St Elmo - Valletta - 11:00 E: info@visitmalta.com

Clubbing

Music

Puttinu Cares Football Marathon - Marsa Sports Complex - Marsa - 10:00 E: marathon@puttinucares.org Scouts & Guides Annual Rally - St George's Square - Valletta - 10:00

Light, Hope and Music - Manoel Theatre - Valletta - 20:00 E: bookings@teatrumanoel. com.mt The Annual Great Spring Horticulture Show - San Anton Gardens - Attard - 08:00 to 21:00 - E: hortmalta@gmail.com Mayfair Book Fair, Exhibitions & Demonstrations – St Peter & St Paul Square - Nadur - Gozo T: 2155 8080 Monday 7th

Mayfair Book Fair, Exhibitions & Demonstrations - St Peter & St Paul Square - Nadur - Gozo T: 2155 8080

Tuesday 8th

Songs of Love, Songs of War - Manoel Theatre - Valletta - 19:30 E: bookings@teatrumanoel.com.mt

Friday 11th

Changing of the Guard - St George’s Square - Valletta 10:00

German Film Evening: Fassbinder’s Classics - Messina Palace - Valletta - 18:30 www.germanmaltesecircle.org Saturday 12th

Agriculture & Traditions - Dingli Cliffs - Dingli - 06:00 to 18:00 E: dingli.lc@gov.mt A Traditional Maltese Wedding - Bubaqra - Żurrieq - 19:15 E: zurrieq.lc@gov.mt

I Grandi Operisti Italiani Manoel Theatre - Valletta - 19:30 E: bookings@teatrumanoel.com.mt Concert - La Scala Opera Singers in Malta - Manoel Theatre - Valletta E: bookings@teatrumanoel.com.mt Lejla fil-Belt Hompesch Żabbar - 19:00 - T: 2166 4466 Sunday 13th

Mother's Day


events

this month Fund Raising

Blood Drive

LoveSexy Beach Festival - Buġibba Bay - Amazonia 09:00 - W: www.facebook.com/ lovesexyevents Blood Donation Mobile Unit Next to Market Square - Żejtun - 08:30 to 13:00 - T: 2206 6209

In Guardia Parade - Fort St Elmo - Valletta - 11:00 E: info@visitmalta.com Agriculture & Traditions - Dingli Cliffs - Dingli - 06:00 to 18:00 E: dingli.lc@gov.mt Monday 14th

Toi Toi 22 - Manoel Theatre Valletta - 12:00 & 13:15 E: bookings@teatrumanoel.com.mt

Wednesday 16th

Le Fille Mal Gardee - Eden Cinemas - St George’s Bay - St Julians - 20:15 www.edenculture.com.mt Friday 18th

Desire Under the Elms - Manoel Theatre - Valletta - 20:00 E: bookings@teatrumanoel.com.mt The Voca People - MFCC - Ta' Qali - 20:45 E: info@showsmalta.com

Kids & Family

Fairs

May

2012

Ghost Writer by David Tristram St James Cavalier – Valletta

May 11th, 12th, 13th, 18th, 19th, 20th, 25th and 27th Others

Festa Lapsi - Xagħra - Gozo E: xaghra.lc@gov.mt Tuesday 22nd

Feast of St Augustine - Valletta T: 2123 8861 Feast of St Paul - Munxar - Gozo - T: 2156 4503

Thursday 24th

Piano Recital by Alexei Gale - Manoel Theatre - Valletta - 20:00 E: bookings@teatrumanoel.com.mt

Friday 25th

MPO Concert Series - Manoel Theatre - Valletta - 19:30 E: bookings@teatrumanoel.com.mt AFM Military Band Display & Changing of the Guards - City Gate - Valletta - 10:00

Sunday 27th

Blood Donation Mobile Unit - Next to Parish Church Siġġiewi - 08:30 to 13:00 T: 2206 6209

In Guardia Parade - Fort St Elmo - Valletta - 11:00 E: info@visitmalta.com

DnA Theatre Productions and FM Productions have banded together to produce the whodunit Ghost Writer by David Tristram. The ensemble cast for this comedy thriller consists of Alan Montanaro, Edward Mercieca, Denise Mulholland, Marika Fenech – back on stage after an absence of numerous years, Taryn Butler - who makes her debut on the Maltese stage after 20 years in UK theatre, and Stefan Farrugia. The play is directed by Polly March. After the last-night party of a production of Hamlet, actress Ruby Pinfold is found dead in bed of an overdose. Her husband Edward remains deeply affected. Unable to face the emotional torment of living in the house he shared with Ruby, he moves in with one of his oldest actor friends Alex. The play commences on the first anniversary of Ruby’s death. May she rest in peace. Or will she? Ticket prices are at €15 for the opening weekend, and €17 for subsequent performances. For bookings call 2122 3216 / 2122 3200; email boxoffice@sjcav.org or visit www.sjcav.org. The Vida team does its utmost to publish the most updated information in these pages. We can not, however, take any responsibility for details omitted or changed by third parties after going to print.

Saturday 19th

MPO Movie Spectacular - The Movie Classics - MCC - Valletta 20:00 - www.mcc.com.mt

Desire Under the Elms - Manoel Theatre - Valletta - 20:00 E: bookings@teatrumanoel.com.mt The Voca People - MFCC Ta' Qali - 20:45 E: info@showsmalta.com

Festa Lapsi - Xagħra - Gozo E: xaghra.lc@gov.mt Sunday 20th

Feast of the Annunciation Ħal Tarxien - T: 2182 8153

Blood Donation Mobile Unit Next to Parish Church - Mġarr - 08:30 to 13:00 - T: 2206 6209

Desire Under the Elms - Manoel Theatre - Valletta - 20:00 E: bookings@teatrumanoel.com.mt Spring Ricottafeast 2012 Kirkop - 10:00 E: kirkop.lc@gov.mt

Alarme - Fort St Elmo - Valletta 11:00 - E: info@visitmalta.com

To include your events in this page email all details to events@vida.com.mt or call 2339 2236 by May 11th.

May 2012 | Issue 29 | vida.com.mt

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photography

Photos that speak

photos by Andrew Galea Debono

by Andrew Galea Debono

T

echnique is a very important aspect of photography, but it is only one facet of what makes a good photographer. Transmitting emotions to the viewer is another essential aspect. Whether you are taking photographs for an awareness raising campaign or doing a fashion shoot, the question you should ask is: what am I trying to say with this photo and what feelings am I trying to elicit? Sometimes, a photo is technically perfect but somehow leaves the viewer empty. In this case, you may have gotten the technique right, but the photo may still be completely devoid of any emotion or passion. There could be many reasons for this: if there are persons in the photo, their expressions may be bland or they may not be doing anything of interest; a landscape may have nothing which makes it stand out from the rest. In order to capture the right moment in which something is happening, you may need a lot of patience and a keen sense of observation. Having said this, photography can go further still, going beyond simply eliciting emotions. It can be a powerful medium through which one could pass on a message. A photo can instil sentiments of patriotism, hope, love, anger, protest, injustice. At times, this can occur spontaneously but at other times it can be deliberate on the part of the photographer. As a simple example, if you are asked to take a photo to be used on a Mother’s Day card, there are many ways to go about it. For example, you may try to visually capture the love between a mother and her child, or the happiness that a mother brings to her children. Your choice of shot may be based on your personal experience or the memory of something you have seen

before. This is when photography becomes more than a technical activity and encourages you to look within yourself. If you decide to photograph a mother and child, the key would be their expressions and the way they physically relate to each other in the photo. For example, you can see from the first photo above that the child is very close to the mother. You can feel the attachment of the child towards her, as well as the happiness in the mother’s genuine smile. In the second photo, you do not see the mother but a baby and dog looking up in excitement. The Mother’s Day theme makes you presume that they are both looking at the mother. You could also choose to express a Mother’s Day message in a metaphorical way – for example you could photograph a river to representing the infinity of a mother’s love, or something more straightforward such as a balloon in the shape of a heart. It is important to avoid ideas that are overcomplicated and would only be understood by yourself as well as going to the other extreme with something banal and overused. Once you get used to visually passing on a message, you can use photography to express yourself on any issue. You may want to pass on a social or environmental message close to your heart, for example, as is the case in the third photo, which was taken in Southern Sudan and tries to capture the sadness left by 20 years of war mixed with the hope for a new beginning. This is the type of photography which photographers often feel closest to their hearts, as it gives them a chance to reveal something personal about themselves and the way they think, whilst at the same time grabbing the viewers’ attention.

www.andrewgaleadebono.com | www.flickr.com/photos/14601421@N00/

Photography with a message competition

Have you been paying attention? This month’s photography competition requires you to implement the techniques given in this lesson to produce a photo that speaks. They say an image is worth 1000 words, so prove it. Send your entries to snap@vida.com.mt or by post to the address below by no later than June 9th and you could win the fantastic prize from Living Colours! If posting entries physically and want the prints/ CD returned please include a self-addressed envelope and post to: Photography Competition, Vida Magazine, Pitkali Road, Attard, ATD2214.

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Win a voucher worth €100 for a deluxe canvas print (50x100cm or 70x70cm) printed on premium quality cotton art canvas using the latest printing technology, hand-stretched over a 35mm wooden frame.

Photos do not need to have been taken with a professional camera – sometimes your phone camera can be enough. We usually need photos which are at least 2MP (approx 1600X1200 pixels). Please feel free to send in as many photos as you deem necessary, however do not send more than two photos per email.

WIN!

Conditions

Visit www.livingcolours.eu today to order the perfect Mother’s Day gift. Ideas include high quality canvas prints, photobooks, personalised cards, posters and books all featuring your own photos and messages. Also on offer are luxury personalised Holy Communion and Confirmation bookmarks and matching party invitations. Create, preview and order all products quickly and easily online and have them delivered to your door. Get started today.


books

Maltese must reads Hekk Tħabbat il-Qalb Oliver Friggieri, Klabb Kotba Maltin

It-Tfal Jiġu bil-Vapuri, La Jibbnazza Niġi Lura and Dik idDgħajsa f’Nofs il-Port, now published as one volume, can all be read on their own. Each novel is autonomous, but is written in such a manner as to constitute a part of a trilogy. The story is about a family that experiences the birth of a child out of wedlock. Social and religious conflicts give rise to a series of events, the main victim of which is Dun Grejbel, a saintly priest who is grossly misunderstood both by the community and the Church authorities. He pays a very high price for this. Susanna, the young unmarried mother, goes through a great deal of suffering, but her mother, the supreme grandmother and moral leader of the extended family manages to put everything in order.

Farewell Szymborska Earlier this year Polish poet and Nobel laureate Wislawa Szymborska passed away aged 88. She will be remembered for her simple yet playful poems that spoke to the heart. Press reports maintained that she died in her sleep. She had been diagnosed with lung cancer. Polish president Bronislaw Komorowski described Szymborska as the country's “guardian spirit”, and argued that her poems “were brilliant advice, through which the world became more understandable.” Wislawa Szymborska studied Polish Philology and Sociology at the University of Krakow, and published her first poem in March 1945 in the daily Dziennik Polski. Her first collection That's What We Live For (1952) was written under Poland's Communist regime and was an expression of Socialist realism. She later renounced the Stalin-era verse of her first two books, going on to mock Communism in later collections. In an interview she gave The Guardian in 2000 she argued that “everyone needs solitude, especially a person who is used to thinking about what she experiences. Solitude is very important in my work as a mode of inspiration, but isolation is not good in this respect. For the last few years my favourite phrase has been ‘I don’t know’. I've reached the age of selfknowledge, so I don't know anything. People who claim that they know something are responsible for most of the fuss in the world.” She was given the Nobel Prize for Literature in 1996 despite only having published 200 or so poems.

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Uncommon Malta and Gozo

Emma Mattei and John Banthorpe, Miranda Publishers

Uncommon Malta and Gozo is an intimate companion and travelogue that steers you through the urban streets and along the rugged coast with anecdotes, lore, myth, field notes, maps, routes, illustrations and itineraries as your guide. Contributors, new and established, resident and visitor commingle to create a remarkably varied field manual for today’s discerning traveller. Uncommon celebrates the ‘habit of flux’, urging you to lose your way in order to stumble across the roads less travelled in Malta and Gozo.

News from bookland

Coelho breaks Copyright? Bestselling Brazilian novelist Paulo Coelho recently shocked the publishing world by promoting an initiative that defies copyright. He was speaking during the launch of the website Pirate Bay. According to The Guardian, the author of The Alchemist and several other famous titles called on “pirates of the world” to “unite and pirate everything I’ve ever written.” Coelho praised the initiative on his blog and described it as “a new and interesting system to promote the arts”, going on to maintain, “as soon as I learned about it, I decided to participate. Several of my books are there, and…the physical sales of my books are growing since my readers post them in P2P sites.” His readers predictably applauded his association with the Pirate Bay, albeit it not being altogether appreciated by the rest of the publishing world. The books page in VIDA is coordinated by the National Book Council. Check out this page for information from the world of books and reading! www.ktieb.org.mt


eating & drinking

Ed

In good order

eats

Ristorante L’Ordine, 47, Main Street, St Julian’s T: 2138 2923

Overall Rating: Food: 3/5 Service: 3/5 Ambience: 3/5 Value: 4/5

All good things come to an end at some point. It has been a pleasure writing for VIDA and occupying this spot month after month. Unfortunately it has become harder and harder to find the time to eat out, take photos and write about it, so this will most likely be the last edition of Ed Eats on VIDA. I’ve enjoyed the trip and hope that you have enjoyed reading this feature as much as I’ve enjoyed writing it. Eating out is something of a social event and I often pick different victims to join me on my forays into the wildly unpredictable landscape that our Islands’ eateries form. Unfortunately for her, one of my most frequent victims is my ever-suffering better half. There is a place reserved for her in gastronomic heaven, one where she gets to choose where she wants to eat, where she wants to sit, and what wine to drink with her food. Until then, however, she’ll put up with my weird ways. I’ve been writing about my dining experiences for almost five years now and it has been practically that long since she suggested that we pay a visit to Ristorante L’Ordine in St Julians, a restaurant that she mentioned with a fond nostalgia while lapsing into a description of meals she enjoyed there as a child (which in her case, is not too long ago). That was enough to put me off for five years. Happy childhood memories are often marred by re-visiting them in our adulthood – try re-reading the Narnia series and you’ll know exactly what I mean. What was delightful narrative to little Ed today comes across as an insufferably patronising lecture interspersed with descriptions of what would have been a fantasy world to a Victorian preacher. Would I risk dashing the memories of innumerable childhood meals by revisiting L’Ordine? Eventually I caved in, aided and abetted by the staff at Peperoncino round the corner telling me that they were packed solid. Into L’Ordine we walked and, while bustling with activity, they had a table available for us. The table was quite tiny and this would become a problem soon. Seated, we were given menus by a man who was in a hurry but who made every effort to be polite in his own rushed sort of way. This would turn out to be part of the charm of the place. So, if this were a football match, we’d be at a 1-1 draw quite early into the game. The menus really tell us all about the restaurant. Antipasti, pasta dishes, pizza and a reasonable spread of fish and meat main courses keep the Italian theme going and offer quite a

familiar range of dishes that will suit most tastes. The pricing is reasonable, too, probably explaining the number of happy families that occupied many of the tables around us. I was quite hungry by the time I made it out of my cave so my body was screaming loudly for a carbohydrate load. The choice was between pizza and pasta for me and I was tempted by the Pizza Piccante, which offered hot peppers, onions and spicy pepperoni with the added kick of anchovy. The nostalgia had kicked in across the table and, dreamy-eyed, the better half ordered a fillet steak. She swore that it was perfect the last time she’d ordered it and I wondered whether the strain of cows it came from back then would still be roaming the planet. We ordered a bottle of Meridiana’s Melqart which was priced at an attractive €20, but they had run out of stock. Our waiter, hurried as he evidently was, took the time to offer a swap for a bottle of Marsovin’s Cheval Franc. This was priced at an even more attractive €15 and I was happy to accept. Cheval Franc, with its peppery, spicy aroma coming from the blend of estategrown Cabernet Franc and Syrah, would be a treat with the spicy pizza and fillet steak. Our food was served in no time at all. The fillet, served rare as requested and with a mushroom sauce, also as specified, was a generous portion. The cut was a good one and the meat was full of flavour, with that pleasingly tender texture that one orders a fillet for. The sauce was laden with a flavour that screamed Bisto to me and I would have done all I could to avoid it, but the nostalgia had kicked in fully across the table and it was devoured in its entirety. Meanwhile, on my side of the table, I was having logistical issues. The tiny table was adjacent to a metal rail that separates two areas of the restaurant, the pizza was huge, and there was no room for my elbow to perform the motion needed to cut the pizza. I turned sideways, eating at a slight angle to the table and coming uncomfortably close to the guy seated at the table next to ours. The pizza was reasonably good, with a crisp base and generous toppings. It wasn’t as spicy as I’d have liked it to be but then my expectations in this department are well above average. We were out of there in less than an hour – just what I needed to satisfy the hunger and leave plenty of time to enjoy a night out, and paid just under €50 for the meal. The food, the service and the price are not at the top of the charts but everything was in good order.

ed.eats.on@gmail.com | follow @edeats on Twitter Ed eats. That’s all he does. He accepts no invitations and turns up unannounced to keep this column free from bias. Readers of the column hardly ever agree with him and yet Ed eats on.

May 2012 | Issue 29 | vida.com.mt

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advertorial

The economic climate

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lthough one cannot say that the encompassing gloom experienced by the global economy last year, mainly as a result of the sovereign debt crisis, is over, we are witnessing optimistic signs of a modest recovery, and 2012 has seen a far better start than many anticipated.

In the final quarter of 2011, euro area Gross Domestic Product (GDP) dropped by 0.3% and a contraction also seems to be on the cards for the first three months of this year, thereby taking the euro zone into a technical recession (two consecutive quarters of negative GDP growth). Negative growth was spread all over the euro area countries, not just the peripheral ones going through the debt crisis. The latter are obviously being hit the worst as they implement austerity measures, which tend to stifle growth. However, the ECB’s three-year Long-term Refinancing Operations (LTROs) have significantly reduced the uncertainty emanating from the sovereign debt crisis, and going forward, GDP is expected to turn into positive territory again, although only moderately. Owing to its latest actions, the ECB has managed to impress the markets, and investors are starting to believe that it will do what it takes to prevent an implosion of the common currency, which many global investors had wrongly predicted late last year.

While the LTROs and the second Greek bailout are helping to deliver financial market stabilisation, one cannot conclude that the debt crisis is over, given that it is structural in nature. A higher degree of fiscal and political union is required – one monetary policy and seventeen different fiscal policies have created a euro zone in which an economic dwarf such as Greece has the capacity to contaminate large economies such as Spain, Italy and even France. At the same time, most economic indicators in the world’s largest economy have been surprising in the last few months and continue to show the recovery gaining momentum. Real GDP in the US grew by 3% annualised rate during the fourth quarter of last year, and 2012 has got off to a solid start, although growth for the first quarter is expected to be lower. The two big concerns of the US economy – residential construction and the labour market – have provided encouraging news. Residential construction is starting to pick up, albeit from a very depressed level, as low prices and interest rates are attracting new buyers. After staying stubbornly high at around 9%, the unemployment rate has started to come down as the labour market shows signs of improvement. In consequence, market analysts perceive very little risk of the US economy stagnating or even sliding back to recession, although the presidential election

will introduce some uncertainty on the policy front. Today, one cannot ignore China, which has become the world’s second largest economy. The importance of Chinese economic growth for world economy is undisputed, especially for those economies relying on the export of commodities. Consequently, the fact that China is envisaging slower growth this year can result in a weaker performance on economies that depend on Chinese imports of their raw materials. Such a reduction in GDP growth, from 9.2% last year to a forecasted 7.5% this year, is a deliberate policy choice by the Chinese government in its effort to control the booming property market and inflationary pressures. As discussed, economists are feeling more upbeat about the recovery. However, caution will no doubt prevail, and uncertainty will keep investors on their toes. The euro zone peripheral countries still seem a long way off from experiencing robust growth, especially as the austerity policies make economic expansion challenging. Furthermore, the rising price of oil, which has now settled at around $125 a barrel, can also threaten to derail fragile recoveries. A rising oil price is a risk to consumption and growth as it reduces disposable income and purchasing power for consumers and causes margin squeeze for corporates.

Issued by Bank of Valletta 58 Zachary Street Valletta VLT1130 – Malta.

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advertorial

Insurance protection for electronic items T

hink carefully for a moment. How much do you think your cordless phone, DVD player, surround system, mp3 player, laptop, video camera, photographic equipment, car stereo and any other gadget you may own are worth altogether? No doubt a big sum! Sometimes, we simply don’t think about how much these things are worth, and how expensive they would be to replace if they were stolen, lost, or damaged. When insuring personal electronic items under a home policy, there are two main options available: • Contents – under this section, you are likely to be covered for major losses as a result of fire, theft, flooding, malicious damage and other events or ‘perils’ listed on your policy. • All Risks – cover under this section protects you against loss or theft of, or accidental damage to, your personal valuables (including electronic items). This cover extends to damage caused accidentally. Therefore, whereas electronic items would be covered under Contents if damaged or destroyed by fire, flood or any other peril listed in the policy, under All Risks these items will also be covered if accidentally damaged (say by spilling something over them). All Risks is normally optional (meaning it is up to you whether you want it included with your standard Contents cover). It is subject to additional premium, and exclusions apply. Check the insurance's exclusions list for this particular cover to make sure you understand what is included

and what's not. In addition, if your items are covered under the All Risks section, you may extend cover for portable electronics when used outside your home (such as video cameras). This extension of cover is not automatic and available on request, and additional premium is usually applied.

can be increased (especially if owner-fitted equipment is higher than the policy limit) to make sure you are adequately covered. Equipment that is not fitted to the vehicle (such as hand-held GPS units and mobile phones) would not usually be covered under a motor policy.

When travelling abroad, electronic items can usually be covered under the baggage section of your travel policy. Items under this section are usually defined in the policy and include items such as coats, watches and jewellery apart from electronic items. If you intend to take electronic items with you on your travels, make sure the limit on your policy is sufficient. There may be a limit for each electronic item and a maximum limit per claim for valuables, so it pays to take the time to check the value of the items you will be carrying. Remember, you must keep these items in your hand luggage and not in an unaccompanied suitcase whilst travelling.

What about businesses? Surely, with the advances in technology, no business can do without electronic equipment. Indeed, some businesses might even stop functioning should any of this equipment be out of order! Although cover might be available under a standard Fire & Special Perils policy, insurers have developed a specialised type of cover often referred to as an Electronic Equipment Insurance (EEI), which would include: • Accidental damage including breakdown and losses due to lightning and electrical power fluctuations or surges; • Loss of Data stored on computers; and • Portable equipment whilst off premises (where the use of such equipment is in Malta or abroad).

If the limits under the travel policy are inadequate however, most insurers may offer to extend the All Risks cover (home insurance) to cover you whilst abroad. This cover would however need to be purchased for a 12-month period and not for the duration of the trip only. In terms of the audio equipment in your vehicle, Third Party Fire & Theft and Comprehensive motor policies usually cover fitted (both factory- and owner- fitted) audio or audiovisual equipment for a specific limit. It is therefore important to check if the limit

Items that may be included under this type of cover include computers, printers, servers, photocopiers, laptops, point of sale systems, PABX systems and any other business equipment that is used in business. A similar policy is the Business All Risks, which however might not cover loss of data and expenses incurred as a result of accidental damage.

Officials from the Malta Financial Services Authority are regularly on radio and TV programmes discussing financial services from a consumer viewpoint. Fortnightly Programmes (May) – Magazine Weekly Programmes – Malta llejla on Net TV on 101 on Radio 101 on Tuesdays at 09:05 (8th & 22th); Mondays at 18:10; Sellili on TVM on Tuesdays at Familja Waħda on Radju Malta on Wednesdays 12:30; Kalamita on ONE on Thursdays at 13:00; and at 10:30 (2nd, 16thst and 30); and Darek, Flusek, Niskata on Favourite TV on Fridays at 13:30. Negozju on RTK on Fridays at 17:00 (11th and 25th). For more information contact MFSA on consumerinfo@mfsa.com.mt or freephone 8007 4924, or visit www.mymoneybox.mfsa.com.mt.

April 2012 | Issue 28 | vida.com.mt

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advertorial

Protecting your property with a security system

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our home may well be the most valuable property you own and keeping it safe is critically important. Our homes truly are our castles. Unfortunately, today’s homes don’t normally have drawbridges, moats, ramparts, or thick walls of stone to defend them. But you can make your home safe from unwanted intruders with modern security devices. Today’s home security systems are effective and affordable. Home intruder alarms protect your property and belongings and keep your family safe as well. Modern intruder alarm systems are in great demand, as they’ve proven to be a very good way to protect your home and belongings. The intruder alarm system is a sophisticated electronic device containing sensors and a low-voltage power system connected to the main control panel. When the system’s signals are interrupted, screaming alarms get your attention and frighten burglars away. The most common sensors indicate when doors or windows are opened or broken. The latest system designs are hard-wired to be more affordable, but retrofit wireless systems are inexpensive and easier to install. The most important characteristics of an effective intruder alarm system are its accuracy in identifying the correct alarm outputs to assure quick and correct responses, as well as the unit’s accuracy in communicating with the security service provider. When a system fails on either of these functions, it fails the homeowner. Homeowners need to be diligent in testing their alarm systems and securing the needed repairs. Having a home security intruder alarm system has other benefits too. You may qualify for a significant discount on your homeowner’s insurance when you have a system installed for example. The insurer may require a third-party certification verifying inspection and effective operation of the system.

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Be sure that the inspector’s report covers features beyond the promises and advertising of the security service company. You’ll want to know that the inspector agrees that your system is efficient, reliable, and of high quality. When you know your home security burglar alarm system meets these three conditions, you can feel more secure that your family, your home, and your property are well-protected.


advertorial

Protect your children online by Rodney Testa

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n open Internet is unsafe for children, and parenting in this digital age is difficult. The Internet is among the most pervasive inventions of all time. As our businesses and families become increasingly intertwined with it, the more essential it becomes for us to take a proactive role to protect our loved ones from internet pornography and other dangers. Although nothing can take the place of well-informed parents who take an active part in their children's online activities, Internet Parental Control software adds a strong, additional layer of defense, giving parents an added measure of control and peace of mind. The sites can be blocked entirely or they can monitor the sites for inappropriate activity. Some send email alerts in real time in the event of potentially dangerous interactions. Some prevent the display of inappropriate video content.

Which sites can be blocked with Parental Control software? Any web-site can be blocked. The parental control can restrict access to a particular website or a webpage as well as to all known sites that contain information related to certain subjects (e.g sites providing information about drugs, weapons, online games and so on). An administrator can specify a website he wants to block using its URL or key words found in the address. Pre-Defined Lists from solution supplier are used to block web-resources by subject. Can my children disable the parental control without my permission? The Parental Control software can be disabled only by the system administrator after entering a password.

info@technoworldpc.com

April 2012 | Issue 28 | vida.com.mt

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advertorial

Discover how to lose weight the fun way Feeling fit and fabulous Are you unhappy with being overweight? Do you dream of wearing clothes that fit? Why do we continue to put off looking great and feeling healthier? Shedding extra kilos can be made more achievable with the help of a caring slimming consultant and the group therapy of a weekly slimming class. Being weighed on the same scales, at the same time on the same day of the week will always produce great results. The desire to impress your fellow slimmers, your slimming consultant and above all yourself with your weight loss will help you achieve your goal. Slimming clubs offer incentive awards such as slimmer of the week, and very often the ultimate slimmer of the year. Along with the advice and guidance of a slimming consultant and a determined attitude from the supportive members of the slimming class, these awards encourage and motivate the club’s members to be more successful. Why are you still hesitating? Join a slimming club now!

Want to feel better, have more energy, and perhaps even live longer? Look no further than exercise. Strength training has long been a missing component in women’s fitness, but it’s crucial to a healthy body. Muscle burns more calories than fat, and it looks a lot better too! Dieting without strength training leads to muscle loss, which makes it harder to lose weight. Strength training is also good for building strong bones. Sustained cardio activity – keeping your heart in its target training zone for at least 30 minutes – is great for burning calories and building lung capacity and aerobic fitness. Health benefits of regular exercise and physical activity are hard to ignore. What’s more, the benefits of exercise are yours for the taking, regardless of your age or physical ability. Physical activity stimulates various brain chemicals that can leave you feeling happier and more relaxed, and can even help prevent or manage a wide range of health problems and concerns. Regular exercise makes you feel better about your appearance and yourself in general, boosts your confidence and improves self-esteem. As a general goal, aim for at least 30 minutes of physical activity every day – you’ll be amazed at the results.

Slim Easy Slimming Clubs Held at

in Mosta & St Pauls Bay

Morning & evening classes available

T: 2157 9093 / 2141 1749 | M: 9940 2620

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2141 1749 St Pauls Bay - 2152 0783 Mosta -


advertorial

The glamour of the Cote D’Azur lifestyle Springtime in Nice, summer in St Tropez and autumn in Cannes sounds like a chic millionaire’s lifestyle, oozing with style and jeu de vivre. This is why the German house of jewellery Bruno Mayer with their lifestyle brand Viventy Jewels has chosen the glamour of the Cote D’Azur lifestyle as the theme for it’s 2012 collection. Viventy’s inspiration is sought from the French Riviera due to the uniqueness and glamorous feel of the region. No other coast has more glamour than the French Riviera, with its exclusive beach clubs, beautiful buildings and lifestyle extravaganza. The same can be said for the Viventy designs, which have a relaxed style and elegant feel – you can’t but feel inspired by the glamour of each single piece. It is no wonder that Viventy has fast hit the top five most popular jewellery brands in the UK and is already amongst the most popular jewellery brands in Central Europe. Viventy’s fabulous collection in solid silver comes with a superb high-end finish. German craftsmanship ensures a sharp and precise piece of jewellery with a contemporary design and stunning finish. To give the collections that luxurious, exclusive platinum look, every piece in the collection is Rhodium-plated. What’s more, all this is at affordable prices. The design of this new collection highlights large high-class pieces with a clear design. Viventy also emphasizes new surface structures: 'soft ice' as a new finish that gives the jewellery an exceptional look.

Lifelong decay-free teeth for your kids Impossible as it may sound, this really is an attainable goal. Across the next couple of dental health articles in the upcoming issues of VIDA we shall be helping you ensure that your children’s smiles remain perfect.

• Get your children accustomed to visiting the dentist regularly from an early age. Firstly, your children will view visiting the dentist in a positive way and not only when they are in pain and secondly you, as a parent, will learn how to educate them about dental health. • Consider specific treatment like fissure sealants to keep your child’s teeth caries free. Fissure sealants can be applied to children’s teeth by dentists, which literally fill in the cracks so that acid or sugar cannot cause caries to form. Fissure sealants are made up of a plastic material that sticks to cracks in molars and pre-molars (back teeth) to stop food getting stuck and causing decay. This can be done once permanent teeth erupt or surface, although sometimes, even baby teeth can be treated. If your child is on a dental payment plan, dentists will often include fissure sealants for children in the package. • Help your children to brush their teeth twice a day until they are at least five years old – and no sweets in bed after brushing! • Consider joining a dental payment plan. The good thing about a dental plan is that you get treatment when you need it, not just when you can afford it.

Experience the Glamour of Viventy and the Cote D’Azur Collections at any of the 202 Jewellery outlets in Sliema, Fgura & Valletta, or go to www.202jewellery.com for more info.

With Denplan, you get treatment when you need it not just when you can afford it! Find a Denplan dentist today t: 21 322 600 e: denplan@atlas.com.mt w: atlas.com.mt/denplan Atlas Healthcare Insurance Agency Limited is authorised by the MFSA to act as agents for AXA PPP healthcare limited who provide the insurance cover. Denplan Limited provides the support and expertise to administer Denplan Care.

April 2012 | Issue 28 | vida.com.mt

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10% OFF

€44.99

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Groovy Costume

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Tel: 183, Constitution street, Mosta Wholesale & Retail www: melsaccessories.com Facebook: Bemania Mosta

April 2012 | Issue 28 | vida.com.mt

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Property Attard – Choice of 3 Penthouses in a quiet area, 3 bedrooms, open plan, bathroom, ensuite, views, starting from €193,000 – Call 7943 3883 Birkirkara – Elevated ground floor Maisonette in a quite area, consisting of kitchen/living/dining combined, 2 bedrooms, bathroom, boxroom, good sized back yard, use of roof, being sold furnished – €99,000 – Call 7725 3502 Qawra – Penthouse, fully furnished with great sea views, 3 bedrooms, main bathroom, ensuite, kitchen/ living combined, large front terrace, back terrace, one car garage, airspace – €265,000 – Tel 7943 3883 Sliema - Bargain Apartment comprising open plan kitchen/living/dining, 2 double bedrooms, bathroom, balcony with views, part ownership of roof, Freehold – €106,500 – Tel 7725 3502 St Julian’s – Apartment, first floor, semi-finished, having open plan kitchen/living/dining, 3 bedrooms, bathroom, ensuite – €126,000 – Tel 7725 3502

For Sale HONDA SLR650 – Year 1999, regularly serviced, new Dunlop rear tyre & new chain €3725 Call 9940 3599 VW Golf Mk IV – 1.9 TDi 115 bhp 2003 model fully loaded in very good condition. Please call/SMS 9985 4122. Nissan Datsun – White in good condition. Always garaged. VRT passed. €700. Call 9982 3498.

Services Models wanted – Male and female models between the ages of 18 and 25 wanted for advertising and fashion magazine shoots. Send recent photos (close up and full body shot) to fashion@vida.com.mt. Car Transport from UK – Manchester & Reading Call 9949 5373 / 7946 8152 for a free quotation.

To book your advert you can: · Send the details and photos you wish to include in the advert, together with a cheque payable to ‘Focused Knowledge Ltd’, by post to: CLASSIFIEDS, Vida Magazine, Pitkali Road, Attard, ATD 2214.

Now also open in Birzebbugia T: 21421976 T: 2122 6020-3

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· Send the advert details and photos by email followed by a cheque sent by post to the same postal address above. classifieds@vida.com.mt · Visit our offices at Pitkali Road, Attard, and ask for our Sales Team to book your advert and pay in cash or by cheque.

All bookings and payments must reach our offices by no later than May 111h 2012. Bookings that reach our offices after this date will be published in the following issue.

BOOK NOW

2339 2236


competitions

All competition replies should reach our offices by Friday May 11th. Send them to Competitions, VIDA Magazine, Pitkali Road, Attard, ATD 2214, or by email on win@vida.com.mt. By sending in an entry to any of VIDA magazine’s competitions, you are giving Focused Knowledge Ltd and carefully selected partners permission to store and use your contact details.

WIN! WIN €50

voucher

Mention a type of lighting which can be found at LUX - it. Hint: visit our website for answer

Name one of our foundations.

WIN €50

WIN MORE Missha, Embassy Complex Level 1, Santa Lucija Street, Valletta. T: 2729 0001 Join us on facebook

www.facebook.com/VidaMag

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WIN!

Three winners will each win a 15-minute treatment for 2 worth €18

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LUX-IT Lighting, 105, Luqa Road, Paola (Opposite Carters Supermarket). W: www.lux-it.com T: 2166 5544 Name: Address: Contact Number:

Name: Address: Contact Number:

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LOSE 8 KILOS IN ONE MONTH T: 2787 9665/2163 6625 Find us on Facebook (Essence hair, nails and beauty centre) Triq il-Baħrija, Marsascala

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May 2012 | Issue 29 | vida.com.mt

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Only for Kids

Show your love

Last month we also asked you to send a picture of your Easter eggs. Here are some of your entries:

Where would we be without our parents? Especially as children, our parents are responsible for every facet of our lives, and sometimes we fail to realise just how much they do for us on a daily basis. We’ve all heard the lecture about them putting a roof over our heads, clothes on our backs and food on the table when we do something wrong, but do we really appreciate these facts? Aside from these larger, more obvious undertakings, the little things our parents do, out of sheer love for us, often go unnoticed when we’re young. Don’t be too busy playing a video game or thinking about the boy you fancy to notice your favourite dessert in the fridge, your football kit freshly laundered and neatly folded in your gym bag or that new pair of shoes you didn’t really need but they bought you anyway because you liked them.

R a isa

With Mother’s Day falling this month, it’s the perfect opportunity to show your gratitude, not just for your mum, but for both parents. A small token of your appreciation can go a really long way, and you don’t need to spend money to make your point. Make them a card, with a personal note thanking them for all they do for you, and it will mean the world to them. If writing or crafts aren’t your thing, do something you wouldn’t normally do, like washing the dishes or clearing up your room without being asked to – chances are they’ll prefer that to a box of chocolates or a bouquet of flowers anyway!

WIN! Win a hamper made up of Nesquik products! Find 10 things related to appreciating your parents in the grid and send us the solution by post. The correct answers will enter a draw to win the Nesquik Hamper.

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Another chance to win!

Parents Mother Father Love Respect Family Appreciation Child Thanks Mother’s Day

Send us a picture of yourself with your great parents and be in with another chance of winning the hamper made up of Nesquik products!

Maya Rachel Borg

Maya Rachel Borg, 9 is the winner of last month’s competition. She wins a hamper made up of Nesquik products.

Send your entries, together with your name, surname, age and contact details (address, telephone number, email address), to: Kids Competition, VIDA Magazine, Pitkali Road, Attard, ATD 2214 by no later than Friday May11t h.

64

vida.com.mt | Issue 29 | May 2012

K a yle ig h D em a nuele



Vida Magazine May 2012 - Issue 29