Issuu on Google+

Local Agency M

R

E

ar

L

k

etin

g

B o o k l e t

1

PUBLIC A

T

I

O

N

S

06 LONG 97 L

E IF

TAL CHLORINE EN F M

E RE

ELE

ISO I400I

IS O

Local Publicity Programme

ECF

This product is printed with the environment in mind. Please visit www.kwdoggett.com.au and look for these logos to find out more.


F I R S T

N A T I O N A L

NATIONAL OFFICE D ist R ib u tion P R I N C I P A L ( S )

L ist

89 Hoddle Street Richmond VIC 3121 Phone : 1800 032 332 Fax : 1800 832 332 marketing@firstnational.com.au

S A L E S

P R O P E R T Y M A N A G E M E N T

O T H E R

www.fngateway.com.au


PUBLIC R

E

L

A

T

I

O

N

S

Local publicity programme

C

O

N

T

E

N

T

S

Introduction

1

Newsworthiness

2

Media release request

4

Media release distribution

4

Media release example

5

Photographs

6

Working with the media

7

If the media gets it wrong

9

National PR programme and resources

11

Adverse media

13

Other public re lations

15

2


1 I N T R O D U C T I O N

Broadly speaking, public relations (PR) encompasses a multitude of marketing tactics, tools and activities. For the purposes of First National Real Estate’s public relations strategy, it is about creating a strong identity for its members and the network, in the media, which is read, watched and listened to by our clients. KEY PR CHANNELS ONLINE/SOCIAL

ELECTRONIC

PRINT

Facebook

Television (free and paid to air)

Newspapers

Twitter

Radio

Magazines (consumer and trade/specialty) Newsletters

Web/internet For First National, there are two significant areas of opportunity:

• First National Real Estate: General stories in the media about trends, developments, fundraising initiatives and issues in the real estate sector as well as the First National network which are of interest to, and relevant for, the homeowner, vendor and buyer. These are public relations activities that National Office plans and implements. • First National Real Estate Members: Stories in your local media about your individual business such as a new staff appointment, a business anniversary, support for a local charitable or community programme, and sales trends and/ or results in your area. These are activities that all First National members can initiate and benefit from directly. REMEMBER: Public relations is complementary to advertising and marketing functions. While both are about promoting a message, product or service, there are some key differences:

PUBLIC RELATIONS

ADVERTISING

Limited control of message, content and appearance/timing.

Full control of the message/content and appearance/timing.

Unpaid, so increased objectivity.

Paid for, so seen as subjective.

Allows for more messages to be conveyed.

Allows limited messages to be conveyed.

Informative and educational.

Key purpose is ‘awareness’.


2 N E W S W O R T H I N E S S

For any PR activity to be successful, in the light of it not being paid for, it needs to be credible, timely and newsworthy. But what makes news newsworthy? When an editor needs to decide to run a particular story, s/he will ask how well the story meets each of the following five criteria: Timing: News is only ‘news’ when it is current. If it happened a week ago, or yesterday it is no longer news. It may still have the potential as a media story, but only if it has impact for something which is about to happen. The sooner we know about your possible story idea, the better. Significance: For a story to be significant it needs to affect people – the more people impacted by your story, the greater significance it will have and therefore the more newsworthy. Proximity: Proximity is not just about geographical distance. It relates to how ‘close’ a story is to the intended audience. It could be close in terms of cultural significance, personal significance, etc. For example, something that happens overseas, may affect Australia’s economy and/or property market, making it ‘close’ to us. Prominence: The more prominent the people affected, the more significant the story becomes. Someone selling their home may not garner much media attention – but a celebrity or prominent figure putting their home on the market will be of significance. Human Interest: Human interest stories are the exception to many of the rules above, as they often don’t date as quickly as other stories, need not affect a large number of people and may not matter where in the world the story took place. Human interest stories appeal to people’s emotions: sadness, humour, amusement, etc. Pet stories are always welcome by the media for this very reason. Often, for a story to be newsworthy, it needs only meet two of these criteria.


3 N E W S W O R T H I N E S S

Here’s a simple five point checklist to determine if your story is newsworthy: • Is there a ‘wow’ factor for the general community? • Is this new? A world first? An Australian first? A Queensland first? A local first? • Is this related to a current issue in the news? • Does this impact people/the community in a significant way? • Will this appeal to a mass audience? If you answered yes to one or more of these questions, fill in the Media Release Request form (which can be downloaded from www.fngateway.com.au) and follow the instructions. Below are some examples of possible news stories: A new office location. Moving to a larger office can be an interesting news item for your local paper, particularly if you can provide a professional photograph of the move and new premises. Staff appointments. A press release about a new staff member including their experience and why they have joined your office will usually be welcomed by a local newspaper. A celebrity vendor or buyer. Media is always interested in news about celebrities and personalities – just be sure you have permission from your client to reveal details. Auction and sales results. If your newspaper runs regular property sales results, make sure you are contributing to this by phoning through or emailing your weekly sales. Unusual homes or properties. A prestige home, an inexpensive block of land with significant potential, or an historic property - these can all make interesting stories. Sponsorships. If your office is sponsoring a local sports team or a community initiative, make sure you send a media release to your local paper explaining what you are doing, why you are doing it, and its importance to your community. Business initiatives. If you are undertaking specialised training, or if your business is offering a new service or product, provide details to head office (via the Media Release Request form which can be downloaded from www.fngateway.com.au). Highlight what is interesting or different, and how it benefits your business and customers. Local infrastructure changes and developments. Changes to property taxes, local zoning or infrastructure affect many people in the property market. You can provide information and insight about developments that may impact the property owner, because media welcomes material that will help to educate and inform their readers. Alert National Office, via the Media Release Request form.


4 M E D I A

R E L E A S E

R E Q U E S T

Preparing a media release requires specific skills and experience. While the network relies on members on the ground to assist identify local angles and tailor releases with local information, we have experts who will prepare the actual media release for you.

TIP

When you identify a need for a media release, complete a “Media Release Request” form which can be downloaded from www.fngateway.com.au.

Usually, media release requests will be responded to within 48 hours. Where this is not possible, National Office will advise the requesting member as soon as possible.

M E D I A

R E L E A S E

D I S T R I B U T I O N

Distribution of media releases is conducted by the local member. Independently of member request, the network provides complementary proforma media releases approximately bi-monthly, or as needs dictate. There are just three steps involved in distributing a proforma media release, once it has been tailored with your local office information: • Tailor the release with the specific local information requested: often the trading region, office name, principal name and contact details. • Email/fax the release to your local media contact/s. • Follow up to ensure they receive the release, and if possible, ask if they are interested in using it or require anything further (in some instances, they may wish to set up a photograph to be taken). The contact details for your local paper are kept on www.fngateway.com.au - just search for the National Media Database and download your state’s file. If by any chance, your location or local paper has changed, or you need to add a publication, please let National Office know so they can find and update the contact details for you. Use the contact details to telephone the local media (newspaper, radio and/or TV station) and ask how they like to receive media releases - either via fax or email, and obtain the relevant details. At the same time, ascertain deadlines and which are the best days for the media to receive releases - often, local newspapers have weekly deadlines and they don’t like being encumbered with releases on that day. Remember: There is no guarantee your release will be used. Other factors may come into play such as editor’s personal preferences, competing news on the day, lack of space, etc. However, distributing media releases on a regular basis to your media keeps the lines of communication open, and often the media may hold the information until a suitable time or space means they can use it.


5 M E D I A

R E L E A S E

E X A M P L E

te Media Release - da

FE ted in investing in ON PROPERTY LI SE A LE EW N e for those interes A tim al ide e th is ELECT FOR w er this week, no

me. ction lat al Estate Office na wins the Federal Ele l, First National Re ipa inc Regardless of who Pr e, m na l cording to Principa investors to build the bandwagon, ac arket for would-be m ct rfe pe a g tin property to get on ea g conditions are cr led with good buyin up co lds yie al nt re “Strong l name said. ople’s minds are h property,” Principa ancial year, when pe fin w ne a of rt their wealth throug sta e property and at th ages to investing in nt va ad y an m e ar in particular. “There the tax advantages on g zin ali pit is relatively low risk.” ca at ould look capital gains and it d an e om inc g on tax, investors sh tin ra nt vehicle for gene ladder, such ent is also an excelle operty investment tm pr es e th inv an on p as ste rty st “Prope ople to take the fir d strategic in their a lot of ways for pe e ar e er th id le more creative an sa litt e a ing be of r Principal nam te mat lleagues - it’s just a friends or work co , ily fam th wi g yin as bu g mbers are beginnin e buyers whose nu m ho st fir by d thinking. te vaca arket space being ain claiming the m ag ce on e ar rs sto “Inve ion levels and competit ipal name said. returns to normal ity tiv ac r to es to level out,” Princ inv re ket conditions befo to capitalize on mar e tim e th is w no “So, tment properties.” again. me, or other inves ho n ow eir begins to heat up th in going supply ing equity they have ht and there is an on rs could consider us tig ne ed ow e ain m m re ho g ve tin ha tes “Exis gthened, vacancy ra using affordability. al yields have stren nt re s, th on m 12 erest rates erode ho t int ing as re inc Over the las as lly neither party ing demand, especia rtainly for as long as of strong and grow ce e d fac an e e, th in tim e ge m ta so shor ed to continue for al market is expect nt re e th in incipal name said. nd tre l “This genera mand equation,” Pr de s rsu ve ly pp su age the tment dollar.” g to effectively man ender for the inves nt co g plans to do anythin on str a ain property will rem political outcome, “Regardless of the - copy ends telephone. ional Real Estate tate Office name on Es al Re l na io Issued by: First Nat at N st name, Principal, Fir n contact Principal io at m or inf er rth fu For


6 P H O T O G R A P H S

Photographs add an important dimension to media stories. Like a media release, they need to be of a high standard (quality and resolution) and relevant. Media usually prefer to use photographs they take themselves, however, if they have limited time and/or resources, they will sometimes use ones that have been supplied. Identifying a ‘photo opportunity’ is half the battle. Some opportunities may include: • Properties for sale, a ‘house of the week’, or a property that sold above expectations, are each provide valuable content for sales and listings releases and information. • Office awards photos of you and your sales team with an award, certificate or trophy. • An office move - photos of you and your staff at your new office, with First National Real Estate signage. • A photograph of you with a local sports team or sports identity you have agreed to sponsor. • A photograph of a cheque handover to a local charity or community for funds your office has raised. • A photograph of an event you have organised to raise funds for charity such as a sausage sizzle. • Winner/s of a competition First National has sponsored or run. Remember: A photograph should add value to a media release or story. In effect, it should be able to sell the story on its own, with simply a brief caption. If you have identified an opportunity for a photograph, alert the media. It may be as simple as including a line in your covering email when you send a media release, or just dropping them a line (via telephone, fax or email) advising the opportunity is there and what it is about. It may be as simple as saying: A photograph of John Smith First National and its sales award is available if required/ upon request or The First National John Smith team is available for a photograph.


7 W O R K I N G

W I T H

T H E

M E D I A

As well as regularly preparing and sending press releases to your local media, it is important and appropriate to directly contact your local editor and/or journalist on an occasional basis. Below are some ideas for fostering a good working relationship with your local media: • Introduce yourself to any unknown media. Let the editor/journalist know you are always available to talk with them on any local property matters. Send, or drop off your business card. • Chat to your local media contacts about the type of material they are interested in receiving - any topics or angles of note. It is useful to know whether they like receiving a consumer information release, or just property listings and sales. • At least once a year invite your local journalists and the editor to lunch (your shout!). The purpose is not to give a sales pitch, but to discuss general property and related issues in your area. This helps set you up as an expert in your field and increases the propensity for media to approach you when they are looking for comments on property. • Make sure they have your mobile number and that you always answer and return their calls promptly. • Send copies of the network’s bi-annual Property Outlook to them with a note saying you would be happy to quote on local property conditions. • Ensure you send a Christmas/New Year/Festive Seasons greetings, as you would to any business contact.

The Do’s and Don’ts of dealing with the media Never:

ALWAYS

Ask when they are going to use your material - that is at the

Avoid contact around their deadlines - media don’t have a

editor’s discretion.

lot of time when they are ‘on deadline’.

Trade off any advertising spend you have with them -

Be courteous and pleasant - it doesn’t hurt to ask how they

editorial is based on its own merit and journalists need to

are going and make nice conversation.

maintain their credibility and integrity. Think you can ‘talk off the record’ - they can quote you on anything you say.

Be clear and concise about the purpose of your conversation. Understand they have a job to do, just like you.


8 W O R K I N G

W I T H

T H E

M E D I A

Remember: Journalists are very busy, and just like you, have good days and bad days. Don’t take things they say or do personally. Your objective is to establish yourself as a useful and reliable contact by providing them with accurate, timely and interesting information they can use. Occasionally, a journalist may call you directly. This could be because they are planning to use a media release you have sent them, and want additional comment. It could be because they are looking for an expert comment on an issue such as a zoning decision by local councillor a new property tax. Or they could simply be ‘fishing’ for a story. When a journalist calls your office: • Return the call as quickly as possible. If you miss a deadline, you may miss an opportunity for exposure for your business. • Avoid commenting on an issue or topic you are not fully across. Ask the journalist if he or she can provide more information, or if you can have some time to research the matter before you provide a comment. • If you are not sure about something, or don’t know the answer to a question, say so. • Don’t comment on gossip or rumour. • Don’t get caught in a public stoush with your competitors. If you have a different opinion say so, but never comment on their practices or business.


9 I F

T H E

M E D I A

G E T S

I T

W R O N G

Very occasionally, a newspaper may make a mistake in reporting information you have provided. This is unlikely if you provide well-written and wellresearched press releases, but it can happen with information provided over the phone. It may simply be that your name is spelt incorrectly or it may be more serious. If you provided the correct information in the first place, and if there is an error in the story that appears in the newspaper, you are entitled to ask for a correction to be printed. Remember that the error needs to be serious to warrant this - it is certainly not appropriate to ask that the spelling of your name be clarified, but it is fair to ask that the sale price of a property be recorded properly. This should not be confused with disagreeing with an article your paper may print. If you disagree with an article, or with how a local issue is being presented, your only recourse is to write a letter to the editor, which should be polite, brief and accurately present your thoughts or opinion. Never tell a journalist they ‘got it wrong’. Maybe they did, or maybe that’s just your opinion. It is far more constructive to focus on maintaining a longterm professional relationship with your local media.


10

PR is supported at a national level through a number of initiatives and through the provision of resources for you to use on a regular basis. National and State Press Releases Every month at least one proforma media release is issued to members around the country by First National. These are mainly ’soft’ releases comprising consumer information and articles, and they are well received by many media. They are provided to members in a format that allows you to easily insert the relevant local information. Note: These releases do not replace ones you can generate dealing with issues and announcements of interest to your specific town, suburb or region. Local news and happenings will always be of interest to your local media. Additionally, if there is an important issue affecting the industry nationally, or on a state basis, National Office issues media releases providing comment and insight. These can also be tailored with local member office and principal information and often constitute ‘hard news’. Examples of this include First National Real Estate responses to increases in interest rates, legislative changes and to initiatives impacting the property market handed down in state budgets. All press releases issued by National Marketing are posted on firstnational.com.au on the day of distribution, emailed directly to all email recipients, and are filed in chronological order under the Media Resources menu on Gateway. It is recommended that you review these releases thoroughly. Once issued to your local newspaper by your office, it is important they are followed up with a telephone call to increase media’s propensity to use the materials.


1 11 N A T I O N A L

P R

P R O G R A M M E

A N D

R E S O U R C E S

Property Outlook

20 10

Twice a year - around the end of the financial year (Mid Year) and at the end of the calendar, media are eager to receive information with predictions for how the market is anticipated to trend in the

Property Outlook

coming six to 12 month period, as well as a brief review of what has transpired over the past six to 12 months. In the past, media have taken much of this information from key industry bodies such as Residex,

firstnational.com.au

Australian Property Monitors, Real Estate Institutes (national and state chapters) and BIS Shrapnel. Often this information is at a national or state level, with little information at the grass roots level. First National’s National Office takes it upon itself to fill some of the gaps by distributing information from real estate agents who are at the coalface. National, state and a local media release accompany each edition of Property Outlook and, in combination, this twice yearly initiative receives an excellent response from media. But compiling this information, especially at local level, is something we can only do with the assistance of network members. Prior to each Property Outlook being prepared, a survey is distributed to members which forms the basis for these releases and Outlooks. While increasing numbers of members are completing com.au firstnational.

this survey and realising the exposure they gain for their agencies through the distribution of the Outlook and releases, it is important to achieve as high a response rate as possible. Members are encouraged that when they receive this Survey, they take the 15 minutes or so to complete

the survey, as fully as they are able, and return it by the due dates. Apart from being an excellent tool for generating media relationships and exposure, the Outlook becomes a good source of information for clients and potential clients considering property decisions throughout the year. The Property Outlook and media releases are provided in electronic magazine format for members to easily upload to websites and forward to any interested media. They are provided in PDF format, on request, for ease of printing and professionally printed hard copy versions may be ordered through the network’s alliance partners - propertybrochures.com.au or Printforce. Contact the National Communications Manager or the National Marketing to request a PDF version. If you have contributed to the survey, your office will receive an individually tailored copy with a page specific to your area. This will serve to highlight your agency’s expertise and knowledge the real estate market when read by visitors to your office or website. All members are encouraged to email a link to the electronic magazine version of Property Outlook to their entire customer database.


122

Press Clippings National Marketing collects clippings of press releases and articles that mention First National Real Estate. A selection of these is posted regularly on Gateway and you can review them to develop ideas for your own press releases. How can you benefit from First National Real Estate’s public relations programme? • Adapt and issue to your media the proforma releases emailed directly to your office – also available on Gateway. • When a release is issued, follow up with your local media within a few days. Media are looking for local spokespeople and angles and this will help get the release noticed. • Forward ideas for state-specific press release topics - market issues and opportunities in Queensland, for example, or improving sales in regional areas in New South Wales - to the National Communications Manager. Ideas will be followed up and acted on if a news opportunity exists.


13 A D V E R S E

M E D I A

Media can, and sometimes do, promote a negative stereotype of the real estate industry, portraying stories from unfairly treated tenants and auctions gone wrong to under and over-quoting, along with a variety of other topics. What’s important is that First National staff have a basic understanding of how to conduct themselves in any situation with the media, and where possible, turn free media attention into positive publicity (see Being Opportunistic with Media below). When faced with the situation where media are being difficult, or adverse, consider the following: Common Misconceptions People often believe that: • A story will look worse if you are unavailable for comment on camera • Media is interested in presenting both sides of the story • Relevant facts to the case will be screened While that may sometimes occur, it is not always the case. Unless you are experienced in dealing with the media, it is always risky to expose yourself to their more experienced, and sometimes not fair, methods.

What to do If you are faced with adverse media attention: • Stay calm and immediately seek the network’s advice before making any comment in person, or over the phone. • As soon as you are aware of developing media interest, or possible threats by consumers of approaching media, contact the National Communications Manager or CEO’s office on 1800 032 332 for advice. This may include: • Alerting the network • Step-by-step public relations advice • Assistance in the preparation of a media statement which cannot be manipulated or edited, has been properly considered and has the input of the network’s and/or legal advice.


14

Ambushed? Should you be suddenly and unexpectedly faced with media, remember – it is your right to set the agenda. You might choose to advise your current appointment schedule means you are not available to conduct an interview at the specific time, but that your office will happily provide a written statement. Then, consider the above actions under What To Do. How should staff deal with media in your absence? • Greet the journalist and crew warmly. • Ask if they have an appointment to see the Principal. • Advise that the Principal is not currently available but offer to contact him/her to advise the media is waiting. • Offer tea, coffee or refreshments while the crew waits. • Once contact with the Principal has been made, advise the crew that commitments will prevent an interview today but that a media statement will be issued as soon as possible. • Obtain journalist’s contact details and ask for a list of their questions. Being Opportunistic with Media Whenever you have the opportunity of dealing with the media it represents an opportunity for generating positive media, and ultimately lead to a mutually beneficial relationship. The following are some topics for consideration to discuss with media, if appropriate: • Local market conditions • The array of press releases available from First National which you would be happy to provide comment on


15 O T H E R

P U B L I C

R E L A T I O N S

As PR is about communication between an organisation and its public, there are many other communication activities you can undertake to reinforce your brand and encourage understanding of, and interest in, your products and services. Newsletter A newsletter can be an effective communication tool, allowing you to update clients, the media and business providers about the property market, and reconfirm our leadership in this role. However, a successful newsletter needs to be: • Timely, accurate and regular • Appropriately resourced and supported • Relevant, informative and interesting • Distributed to a good database Newsletter content tips: • Listings and sales report for the past month or quarter, with an analysis of what this means for the local market. • Any business achievements and awards. • A comment - your perspective - on any issue impacting the market, such as a rate rise increase, a local zoning regulation, or changes to property tax legislation. • Explanation, or overview, of any new trends, market developments, etc. • Responses to infrastructure and projects in the region, specifically as they relate to, or impact on, the property market. • Edited copies of recent First National Real Estate media releases and articles. • Tips for homeowners and buyers. The design and production should be kept simple, and as it is likely that many contacts would prefer to receive the newsletter via email, the document size must be manageable. Always use correct logos to identify your office as a part of the First National Real Estate network. Provided your newsletter contains quality information, the use of photographs should be minimal. Focus instead on communicating that you are your area’s local real estate expert.


16

Sponsorships Sponsorships can be a meaningful way of gaining exposure for your company’s name and brand in your local community. There are several things to consider when assessing a sponsorship opportunity: • Synergies: The most successful sponsorships are those in which there is a strong and obvious partnership, or synergy, between the sponsoring organisation and the recipient. • Relevance: To your business goals and objectives, mission statement and values. • Commitment: Do you have the financial and human resources to appropriately commit and support the sponsorship? • Measurement: Set measurable objectives that are realistic and achievable e.g. percentage increase in leads generated, customer enquiries, etc; increased awareness and recognition of brand, products and/or services. • Leverage: How the sponsorship can be leveraged in terms of exposure, marketing materials and collateral, employee incentives, employee and client involvement, etc. • Ownership versus co-sponsor: What naming rights, signage, etc are available. Sponsorships can range from commercial endorsements of a local sports team through to support for a community programme such as Neighbourhood Watch or fire safety. Fundraising activity and the First National Foundation Actively supporting the First National Foundation can be an important way of involving and motivating staff, raising the profile of your business in the local community, and positioning your business as a ‘good corporate citizen’. You should not expect to receive publicity as a ‘reward’ for charitable activity. However, if your office holds an event such as a charity auction or golf day to raise funds for the Foundation, it is acceptable to invite your local media to attend and/ or issue a media release about the activity, including specific details of monies raised.


17 N O T E S

________________________________________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________________________________


18 N O T E S

________________________________________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________________________________


19 N O T E S

________________________________________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________________________________


F I R S T

N A T I O N A L

NATIONAL OFFICE D ist R ib u tion P R I N C I P A L ( S )

L ist

89 Hoddle Street Richmond VIC 3121 Phone : 1800 032 332 Fax : 1800 832 332 marketing@firstnational.com.au

S A L E S

P R O P E R T Y M A N A G E M E N T

O T H E R

www.fngateway.com.au


Local Agency M

R

E

ar

L

k

etin

g

B o o k l e t

1

PUBLIC A

T

I

O

N

S

06 LONG 97 L

E IF

TAL CHLORINE EN F M

E RE

ELE

ISO I400I

IS O

Local Publicity Programme

ECF

This product is printed with the environment in mind. Please visit www.kwdoggett.com.au and look for these logos to find out more.


Public Relations - Local Agency Manual