Issuu on Google+


1.0 Introduction and Methodology 1.1 Introduction 1.2 Methodology 2.0 Overview of Stage 1 Report 3.0 The 5 Year Rejuvenation Strategy 3.1 The Big Business Issue for Harvey Nichols 3.2 The New Brand Vision 3.3 The New Brand Position 3.4 The Harvey Nichols Consumer 3.4.1 Consumer Segmentation 3.4.1.1 Big Spenders 3.4.1.2 Mid Spenders 3.4.1.3 Small Spenders 3.4.1.4 The New Consumer Segment: The Tourist 3.4.2 Harvey Nichols Target Market 3.5 The Current Strategy to the New Strategy 4.0 The Rejuvenation Strategy Year 1 4.1 Introduction and Overview 4.2 Product 4.3 Price 4.4 Place 4.4.1 In-Store Experience 4.4.1.1 Cosmetic Improvements 4.4.1.2 Tackling Navigational Issues 4.4.1.3 In-Store Technology 4.4.1.4 Investment in the Beauty Departments

4

Page 8 8 8 10 12 13 13 14 15 15 16 18 20 22 24 26 29 30 31 32 33 33 33 34 45 48


4.4.2 Improvements to the Website 4.4.2.1 The Mobile Accessible Website 4.4.3 The Creation of an App 4.4.4 An Improved Multichannel Strategy 4.5 Promotion 4.5.1 The Advertising Campaigns 4.5.1.1 Autumn/Winter 2013/14 Campaign 4.5.1.1.1 Concept 4.5.1.2 Spring/Summer 2014 Campaign 4.5.1.2.1 Concept 4.5.1.3 Channels and Target Market 4.5.1.4 Print advertisement 4.5.1.5 Visual Merchandising and In-store Experience 4.5.1.5.1 Autumn Winter 2013/14 4.5.1.5.1.1 Window Displays 4.5.1.5.1.1 In-Store Displays 4.5.1.5.2 Spring/Summer 2014 4.5.1.5.2 .1 Window Displays 4.5.1.5.2 .2 In-store Displays 4.5.1.6 Social Media 4.5.1.7 Harvey Nichols’ Website, mobile website and App 4.5.2 Events 4.5.3 Better Promotion of In-store Services 4.5.4 PR 4.6 Timeline 5.0 The Rejuvenation Strategy Years 2-5 5.1 Introduction and Overview 5.2 Product

5

Page 52 76 77 81 84 84 84 84 86 86 88 88 102 102 102 104 108 108 111 114 121 122 126 127 128 129 130 113


5.3 Price 5.4 Place 5.4.1 Stores 5.4.1.1 Existing Stores 5.4.1.2 Temporary Expansion Strategy 5.4.2 Website, Mobile Website and App 5.4.3 Multichannel Strategy 5.5 Promotion 5.5.1 Advertising Campaigns 5.5.1.1 Channels and Target Markets 5.5.1.2 Print Advertisements 5.5.1.3 Visual Merchandising and In-store Experience 5.5.2 Social Media 5.5.3 Website, mobile website and App 5.5.4 Events 5.5.5 PR 5.6 Planet 5.7 Timeline 6.0 Costs and Finances 6.1 Year 1 6.2 Years 2-5 7.0 Conclusion and Recommendations 8.0 Sources of Information 8.1 References 8.2 List of Images 8.3 Bibliography 9.0 Appendices 9.1 Appendix 1: Research supporting the determining of Harvey Nichols brand position 9.2 Appendix 2: Primary Research Survey into Brand Positioning

6

Page 132 133 133 133 134 136 136 137 137 137 137 137 138 138 138 138 139 141 142 143 147 150 152 153 155 164 172 173 174


9.2.1 Introduction 9.2.2 Sample Analysis 9.2.3 Answer Analysis 9.2.4 Table of Survey Results 9.3 Appendix 3: Observational Research 9.4 Appendix 4: Additional Website Research 9.5 Appendix 5: Research into Apps 9.6 Appendix 6: Macro Trends 9.6.1 A/W 13/14 Macro Trends 9.6.1.1 21st Century Romance 9.6.1.2 Living Design 9.6.2 S/S 14 Macro Trends 9.6.2.1 Neo-Geo 9.6.2.2 Next Nature 9.7 Appendix 7: Visual Merchandising 9.8 Appendix 8: Events for Year 1 9.8.1 Launch of the new Beauty Department (Beauty Extravaganza) 9.8.2 New Website and App Launch 9.8.3 The launch of the Autumn/Winter seasonal campaign 9.8.4 Autumn/Winter 13 fashion show 9.8.5 Check-in competition 9.8.6 Pinterest competition 9.8.7 Spring/Summer Seasonal Campaign Launch 9.8.8 Spring/Summer fashion show 9.8.9 Second Beauty Extravaganza Event 9.9 Appendix 9: Beauty Extravaganza Press Release

7

Page 174 175 178 184 190 191 194 196 196 196 198 200 200 202 204 205 205 207 209 209 209 210 210 210 210 211


1.1 INTRODUCTION This report aims to explain how the Harvey Nichols brand will be rejuvenated and justify this strategy with research from the previous report which answered the question: How can Harvey Nichols best rejuvenate its image within the UK market whilst ensuring that they are giving consumers what they look for in a high end, heritage department store?’ This report will also provide any necessary additional research. The first year will be described in extensive detail and the following four years as an overview. 1.2 METHODOLOGY To implement a strategy for Harvey Nichols it was necessary to carry out some additional research. Further primary observational research has been conducted in the Leeds Harvey Nichols store. This was used to gain a refreshed image of Harvey Nichols in-store environment. A survey was also conducted to establish Harvey Nichols revised brand position. Participants were required to rate a variety of potential Harvey Nichols brand positions, established through secondary research, along with brand positions of competitor stores to establish a consumer preference. They were also asked to identify brand characteristics which they identified with. This was an online and physical survey.

Figure 1: Harvey Nichols Display

9

Secondary research has utilised books, magazines, newspapers, company websites, online reports, blogs and other websites to find information, market and consumer data and trends. Appropriate marketing models such as the Ansoff Matrix, the Benefits Matrix and The Marketing Mix have been used to aid the organisation of this report.


Extensive research was conducted in the previous report into why Harvey Nichols was not performing as well as competitors, potential reasons for this included the lack of a known unique selling point (USP), a lack of an engaging website/ in-store experience, a limited reach in terms of advertising and communication, a lack of stores and the brand not appealing as effectively as possible to tourists and Generation Y consumers. Market and consumer trends were then researched revealing one of the most important overarching trends - the increasingly demanding consumer. This was predicted by Faith Popcorn in 1992, where consumers would have an intolerance for poor products and service as they are choice-saturated and timestarved. They are demanding more from brands in terms of transparency, personalised communication, quality products and outstanding customer service. All of the recommendations made throughout this report aim to satisfy these consumer desires. Recommendations followed informed by key market and consumer insights. After reviewing these recommendations and looking again at dominant trends in the market (identified in the previous report and throughout this report) most of the recommendations will be taken forward to contribute towards the rejuvenation strategy. These recommendations are detailed in section 3.5 as before they are implemented as part of a strategy it is essential to clarify the big business issue for Harvey Nichols, establish their new brand vision, positioning and target market to ensure that the recommendations are appropriate.

11

Figure 2: Harvey Nichols Bag


12


3.1 THE BIG BUSINESS ISSUE FOR HARVEY NICHOLS A further review of information collated during the first report, revealed that the ‘big business issue’ for Harvey Nichols is that their consumers are not aware of their USP and therefore cannot see a differentiation between Harvey Nichols and their competitors. Harvey Nichols USP is that they sell a variety of brands and products which are exclusive to them and therefore cannot be purchased elsewhere. The primary research questionnaire in the previous report revealed that only 2 participants described the brand as ‘exclusive’. When asked ‘What would Harvey Nichols have to do to appeal more effectively to you?’ More advertising was one of the most popular answers with 12 participants stating it. Further comments were made that Harvey Nichols need to ‘put themselves out there more’ as some participants were not aware of the brand’s identity. Therefore a strong communication and marketing strategy emphasising this USP will be integral to the rejuvenation. 3.2 THE NEW BRAND VISION A new brand vision has been developed for Harvey Nichols to address this business issue in the next 5 years. The vision is: ‘For Harvey Nichols to become the leading heritage, luxury department store in the UK, known for its unique range of exclusive products showcased through innovative and exciting multichannel shopping experiences’. Key words ‘exclusive’ and ‘promoted’ relate directly back to the business issue.

Figure 3: Exclusive Lula Pop Up Store at Harvey Nichols

13


3.3 THE NEW BRAND POSITIONING Harvey Nichols currently position themselves as ‘the UK’s premier fashion retailer, renowned both in the UK and internationally for the breadth and depth of its exclusive fashion merchandise’ (Harvey Nichols, 2013: Online) targeted at ABC1s. To identify Harvey Nichols ownable benefit for their new positioning statement the Benefits Matrix was used, see figure 4. Positioning statements of Harvey Nichols and their competitors were compared and it was confirmed that Harvey Nichols ownable benefit of exclusive products was unique to them. A primary research survey was also conducted (appendix 2), where 50 participants were required to rate 6 brand positions including Harrods’, Selfridges’, Liberty’s and three potential Harvey Nichols statements. The most popular second rated position was a potential Harvey Nichols position, proving the popularity of the attributes attached to it. Participants were then asked to select from a list of words, which appealed to them the most. Exclusive, Innovative, Multichannel and Luxury were the four most popular answers, suggesting that these attributes should be incorporated into the most popular potential Harvey Nichols brand position. Therefore their brand position has been adapted from the original, to comply with the research findings: ‘Harvey Nichols sell exclusive luxury fashion, beauty, home and food products to a target market of fashion conscious ABCs through an engaging, innovative, destination, multichannel experience’. The new position still has the existing position at its core but includes a wider market and the addition of the multichannel experience to support the delivery of the USP. See appendix 1 for further research into defining the positioning statement.

Figure 4: The Benefits Matrix

14


3.4 THE HARVEY NICHOLS CONSUMER 3.4.1 CONSUMER SEGMENTATION Harvey Nichols’ consumers were split into three segments in the previous report driven by how much they spend at Harvey Nichols. These segments were then divided by age to target consumers most effectively. Primary research in the form of a questionnaire and additional secondary research drove this segmentation.

15

Figures 5 and 6: Examples of Harvey Nichols Consumers


3.4.1.1 BIG SPENDERS FACTS AND STATISTICS According to Key Note (2013: Online), in 2012 26.1% of the adult population were A or B socioeconomic grade. Key Note (2013: Online) also notes that between March 2011 and March 2012 85.3% of A’s and 86.8% of B’s bought some form of clothing, therefore an average for AB’s is 86.05%. Statistics from Key Note reveal that on average AB households spend £2,152 on clothing per year. Between March 2011 and March 2012 34.8% of female A’s and 43.6% of female B’s purchased cosmetics or fragrances, creating an average of 34.7% of AB female purchasers. 36.2% of A males and 33.5% of B males purchased fragrances in the same time period, providing an average of 34.9% of AB male purchasers. Overall, 34.8% of AB’s purchased cosmetics or fragrances. AB’s buy luxury goods because they ‘want to set themselves apart from the rest’ (Mintel, 2013: Online).

16


Figure 7: Big Spenders

17


3.4.1.2 MID SPENDERS FACTS AND STATISTICS This segment has been adapted from the previous report to include some C2’s as many more affluent C2’s buy luxury items as indulgences according to Mintel. According to Key Note (2013: Online), in 2012 71.2% of the adult population were B or C socioeconomic grade. Key Note (2013: Online) also notes that between March 2011 and March 2012 86.8% of B’s, 84% of C1’s and 79.3% of C2’s bought some form of clothing, therefore an average for B’s, C1’s and C2’s is 83.4%. Statistics from Key Note reveal that on average B and C households spend £1804.40 on clothing per year. Between March 2011 and March 2012 34.6% of B females, 38% of C1 females and 31.4% of C2 females purchased cosmetics or fragrances, leading to an average of 34.7% of B and C female purchasers. During the same time period, 33.5% of B males, 33.5% of C males and 38.7% of C2 males purchased fragrances, an average of 35.2% of B and C males. Overall, 35% of B’s and C1’s purchased cosmetics or fragrances. ‘C1’s are most interested in looking good with designer items’ (Mintel, 2011: Online).

18

Figure 8: MidSpenders


19


3.4.1.3 SMALL SPENDERS FACTS AND STATISTICS According to Key Note (2013: Online), in 2012 73.9% of the population were C1, C2, D and E socioeconomic groups. Key Note (2013: Online) also notes that between March 2011 and March 2012 84% of C1’s, 79.3% of C2’s, 76.7% of D’s and 69.5% of E’s bought some form of clothing, therefore an average for CDE’s is 77.38%. Statistics from Key Note reveal that on average CDE households spend £1144 on clothing per year. Between March 2011 and March 2012 38% of C1 females, 31.4% of C2 females, 33.1% of D females and 57.9% of D females purchased cosmetics or fragrances. This leads to an average of 40.1% of female CDE’s purchasing cosmetics or fragrances. 33.5% of C1 males, 38.7% of C2 males, 31.5% of D males and 26.2% of E males purchased fragrances during the same time period. This leads to an average of 32.5% CDE male purchasers. Overall, 36.3% of CDE’s purchased cosmetics and fragrances. Mintel identified that ‘full-time students… are substantially more likely than average to buy luxury goods for reasons relating to their image and social standing, including wanting to look good and impress others, to set themselves apart from the crowd, to tap into emerging trends and to fit in with their friends’ (Mintel, 2011: Online). In addition to this Mintel states that ‘C2 shoppers (and) those who work part-time… have the greatest tendency to buy luxury items in order to indulge themselves’ (Mintel, 2011: Online).

20

Figure 9: Small Spenders


21


3.4.1.4 THE NEW CONSUMER SEGMENT: THE TOURIST FACTS AND STATISTICS An additional consumer segment of tourists has been created due to the importance of this market to the growth of luxury department stores. In the previous report it was identified that in the next few years ‘the luxury segment looks likely to remain buoyant, driven by broad range stores that appeal to… high spending tourists’ (Mintel, 2012: Online). GMID states ‘as many as one million people visit the UK every year just to shop’ (GMID, 2012: Online) and The Office of National Statistics calculated that 81% of visitors to London spend their time shopping and between ‘two-thirds and three-quarters of holiday visitors shop outside the capital’ (Smithers, 2013: Online). VisitBritain calculated that ‘18 million foreign visitors spent… £4.5bn in Britain’s shops in 2011 – of a total spend of £17.9bn’ (Smithers, 2013: Online), meaning that (on average) a quarter of their total spend was spent in stores. ‘Over half of the shopping splurge was on clothes, with an estimated £2.3bn generated by fashion-conscious foreign tourists. Many visitors also snapped up souvenirs, gifts and household goods, on which they spent £1.6bn’ (Smithers, 2013: Online). ‘A ‘shopping’ tourist spends… an average of £680 per trip’ (Smithers, 2013: Online).

22


Figure10: The Tourist

23


3.4.2 HARVEY NICHOLS TARGET MARKET The target market for Harvey Nichols will elaborate from the current ABC1’s to include C2’s. This is because in 2012 53.8% of adults were socioeconomic grades ABC1 and 75.7% were ABC, therefore by increasing their market to include C2’s, Harvey Nichols will be targeting a significantly larger percentage of the population (21.9% more). The segments ‘Big Spenders’ and ‘Mid spenders’ will be the primary target market. This is due to their high spending power, frequency of purchasing and the high amount of C2’s (part of ‘Mid Spenders’) who desire luxury brands and buy them as indulgences. The secondary target market will be ‘Small Spenders’ and ‘The Tourist’. ‘Small Spenders’ willingness to buy into luxury brands for reasons relating to their image, social standing and for rewards along with their attraction to the features of a store provides a powerful steady, smaller income for the brand. The high spending power of tourists, often coming to the UK specifically to shop, will also contribute strongly to revenue.

24


25

Figure 11: Harvey Nichols Birmingham


3.5 THE CURRENT STRATEGY TO THE NEW STRATEGY Harvey Nichols’ current strategies include broadening their offering to appeal more effectively to tourists, investing in their digital platforms, launching pop up stores and growing their own brand offering. The new strategy will take the current strategies into consideration but focus more on advertising and promoting the brand and their exclusive products, continuing to broaden their offering to appeal to tourists, less affluent and younger consumers, along with creating an unbeatable multichannel experience to set Harvey Nichols apart from competitors. In accordance with the Ansoff Matrix model (figure 12) Harvey Nichols will be employing strategies of Diversification - to attract tourists and less affluent consumers - and Market Penetration to increase awareness of their current products, particularly the exclusive ones, to their target market. This model has been used to clarify the market growth strategy and allowed for definitive objectives to be created. The objectives for the rejuvenation strategy are to: - Create a clear differentiation between Harvey Nichols and their competitors by emphasising their USP of exclusive products - Increase advertising and promotion - Attract tourists, less affluent and younger consumers - Improve the brands multichannel and cross channel strategies - Create sales growth of 9% in the first year and around 7% for the following years.

Figure 12: Ansoff Matrix

26


To achieve these objectives, the recommendations from the stage 1 report have been reviewed and an assessment of the risks has been carried out:

Recommendation An improvement of the instore experience

Risks It will come at a high cost and effort to the brand.

Investment in the beauty sector

It will come at a high cost and effort to the brand.

Taking steps to appeal to a wider market

It may dilute the brands integrity and appeal to current consumers if too many inexpensive brands are brought into the store.

Developing an improved multi-channel and crosschannel strategy

This will be labour and capital intensive as it will require improving existing systems and creating new ones.

Benefits It will draw consumers into the store in a time where many prefer to shop online. Instore experience and destination retailers are also a growing trend (identified in stage 1). Beauty is the fastest growing segment in department stores and it is important for Harvey Nichols to capitalise on it quickly and effectively to ensure that it is the go-to store for consumers. It will attract a wider range of consumers to Harvey Nichols. Due to the economic downturn that the UK is currently experiencing many consumers who previously could, cannot now afford to spend as much money on luxury brands and will therefore turn to luxury diffusion brands. Attracting tourists would also be beneficial due to their high spending power. Consumers increasingly desire to shop via multiple devices at any time and improving this strategy would improve Harvey Nichols appeal, particularly with timestarved consumers.

27

Decision Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes


Developing an expansion/ temporary expansion strategy

Developing a sustainability plan

This will be capital and labour intensive.

There is a desire for more Harvey Nichols stores (identified in stage 1 primary research) and utilising empty retail locations for pop-up stores would be the most cost effective way to do this. It will also increase awareness in areas where there is no Harvey Nichols store and create a buzz and excitement around the brand. It is not directly linked to the It should attract more environmentally new brand positioning and it friendly consumers to the brand. may not have a large impact Despite it not being directly linked to on how the brand is viewed the new brand position it is considered by consumers if it is not at incredibly important to the planet and the forefront of the strategy. consumers. It does not have to be at the forefront of the strategy but should be considered.

Creating a Harvey Nichols’ community

It does not link in with the new positioning statement and therefore may confuse the consumer.

Review of their advertising strategies including using their heritage as a selling point but still remaining modern

This may confuse the consumer as to the brand message of Harvey Nichols as they may not be able to strike a balance between heritage and modernity.

Harvey Nichols can effectively maintain a relationship with consumers, as well as finding out their opinions on the brand. It provides the members with a furthered sense of belonging and being valued by the brand. Harvey Nichols can increase awareness and use the current trend of heritage to benefit this strategy. They can use advertising and promotion to create a clearer brand image.

Yes

Yes

No

Yes

Figure 13: Table of Risks and Benefits of Recommendations This has defined activities to achieve the previously mentioned objectives, these are outlined at the beginning of sections 4 and 5. 28


29


4.1 INTRODUCTION AND OVERVIEW The rejuvenation strategy will be implemented at the start of Autumn/Winter 2013/14 to start the process as soon as possible. This year’s strategy will work towards achieving the overall vision and new positioning of the brand, it is based on trend and consumer research and insight into what Harvey Nichols consumers/potential consumers want from the brand identified in stage 1. To create an impact, many activities will occur simultaneously. It will include; - Diversification of products to further appeal to less affluent consumers, younger consumers and the tourist market - Two season specific advertising campaigns - A website rejuvenation and the creation of a mobile website - The creation of an app - Cosmetic improvements to stores - Improvements to the overall in-store experience including investment in the beauty departments.

30


4.2 PRODUCT Harvey Nichols will continue to diversify to attract a wider audience. Luxury diffusion lines such as Marc By Marc Jacobs and aspirational mass market brands such as Alice + Olivia have been introduced into stores recently. The addition of more brands at similar price points will continue to increase appeal to aspirational CDE’s and Generation Y. Accessories and beauty products are additional ways less affluent consumers can buy into luxury brands, therefore increasing the level of accessories and emphasising the range of beauty products sold in-store and online should attract more Mid and Small Spenders. Harvey Nichols own brand products will be placed in prominent areas to attract tourists to purchase these as souvenirs or other customers to buy them as gifts. Stocking internationally famous brands such as Gucci and Louis Vuitton will also continue to attract tourists who seek these well-known brands. To appeal to their consumers, create differentiation and a clear USP in the consumers mind, Harvey Nichols must continue sourcing and buying products and brands which can be exclusive to Harvey Nichols. These exclusive products will cover a variety of price points to appeal to all consumer segments. The success of this strategy can be measured through comparing sales figures. Figures 14-15: Products Sold in Harvey Nichols

31


4.3 PRICE Harvey Nichols will remain a luxury retailer and therefore the prices of products will not change as they must remain competitive. However, the addition of more aspirational mass market brands and more accessories will reduce the overall average price point of the store. The key performance indicator (KPI) for this strategy will be measuring the potential rise in sales figures.

32

Figure 16: Products of a variety of price points


4.4 PLACE Harvey Nichols stores will undergo cosmetic improvements, navigational issues will be tackled, technology will be incorporated into stores, beauty departments will be renovated, improvements to the website will be implemented and a mobile website and a Harvey Nichols app will be created. Harvey Nichols will also improve their multichannel strategy. 4.4.1 IN-STORE EXPERIENCE 4.4.1.1 COSMETIC IMPROVEMENTS The previous report detailed observational research which revealed that parts of Harvey Nichols’ stores were unclean with rubbish left around the store, repainting necessary, untidy and ceilings were held up with masking tape. Therefore as part of the rejuvenation strategy, these issues will be tackled. This will work towards delivering an engaging in-store environment.

Figure 17: New Hangers

In addition, further observational research (appendix 3) identified that to create a sleeker, neater image, the hangers in-stores must be replaced as they had become worn and tired. The new hangers are shown in figure 17. Observational research was carried out in two stores only, therefore these observations may not be true of all stores, therefore the cosmetic improvements may not be as necessary for some stores.

33


4.4.1.2 TACLKING NAVIGATIONAL ISSUES Observational research from the previous report revealed that the Knightsbridge store was difficult to navigate due to its size. According to Ebster and Garaus, when consumers cannot find their way around a store easily, this has a negative impact. They say; ‘When consumers feel that they are no longer in control of their environment, there is anger and severe dissatisfaction expressed towards the store. This negativity in turn, leads to several unfortunate effects on consumer behaviour: - Consumers spend less time in store - They become more critical in their evaluation of the merchandise - They are less likely to make unplanned purchases - Store loyalty is negatively impacted’ (Ebster and Garaus, p32, 2011). This reinforces the importance of consumers being easily able to navigate a store. Due to this, better signage will be put in place and a navigational store guide will be created. Figures 18 and 19 show examples of the new signage – the arrow signs will be suspended from ceilings.

34


35

Figures 18-19: Harvey Nichols Signage


There is currently a rough store guide on the Harvey Nichols website showing which departments are on which floor, the new Knightsbridge guide will have detailed floor plans similar to the Harrods store guide in figure 20 and will include information on new products, promote in-store services, Harvey Nichols’ exclusive products and event information. It will be available at the entrances to the store. This paper guide will be updated monthly. Examples of the store guide consistent with advertising campaigns detailed in section 4.5.1 are shown in figures 21-28. This guide will benefit all consumers who shop in-store. Success will be measured through the amount of guides picked up on entry to the store and through comments made online or to staff (which will be recorded) regarding the guide. It can then be determined if this guide is useful and should continue to be produced.

Figure 20: Harrods Store Guide

36


37


38


39


40


41


42


43


Figures 21-28: Harvey Nichols Store Guide 44


4.4.1.3 IN-STORE TECHNOLOGY In-store technology will be incorporated into stores to simplify shopping and create a buzz and excitement in store – delivering the multichannel aspect of the vision, putting consumer’s needs first and encouraging consumers into stores. It will also blur boundaries between Harvey Nichols shopping platforms – inspiring cross-channel shopping. This is particularly important as the majority (61/70) of participants from the primary research survey conducted in stage 1, thought that using new technology in-store and for advertising is important for a brand. This also shows that this will appeal to a vast variety of consumers from each segment due to the well-representative nature of the sample. Mobile Visual Search technology (MVS) will be used in stores to view online reviews of products - aiding the shopping experience. MVS is a new and easier alternative to QR Codes which are reported as ‘a dying medium’ (Barocas, 2012: Online). ‘MVS is far more compelling and interactive’ (Barocas, 2012: Online) as consumers are photographing an image as opposed to a non-descript code. To provide this technology Harvey Nichols will link with a company called IQ Engines. Their technology can be built into the Harvey Nichols Smart Phone App and when accessed consumers can photograph images and be linked to a corresponding page. Harvey Nichols will have pre-created a database with the photographable images stored within it and the corresponding web pages. This technology will be used to create intrigue, excitement, brand engagement and help consumers to shop more effectively. Consumers will photograph the products barcode to see customer reviews online. This will be incorporated into stores as ‘92% of global consumers say they trust earned media (wordof-mouth and recommendations) above all other forms of advertising’ (Trend Watching, 2012: Online). Figure 29 on the following page shows this.

45


46

Figure 29: Review Viewing Technology


Technology will also be used instores to again primarily aid the shopping experience. iPads will be placed around the Knightsbridge store and used as an ordering system for when products are out of stock/only available in another store, also providing consumers with the novelty effect of using technology in-store. This service will save customers and staff time, although staff will be on hand to assist. Figure 30 demonstrates this. The iPad ordering and product scanning services will be trialled in the Knightsbridge store for the first year of the plan. The KPI’s will be the amount of photographs received and orders placed.

Figure 30: In-store iPad

47


4.4.1.4 INVESTMENT IN THE BEAUTY DEPARTMENTS In the previous report, beauty was noted as one of the segments consumers were still willing to spend on despite the recession, as they considered luxury beauty products to be an affordable treat. Mintel (2012: Online) also identified the beauty sector as the fastest growing department store category - spending on personal care products and services has risen year on year since 2006 apart from a slight dip in spending in 2009 attributed to the initial shock of the recession. This rise is predicted to continue, showing that this sector will be key in the growth of department stores if the right investment is made. A more engaging and exciting retail space will attract all of Harvey Nichols target consumers to buy their beauty products at Harvey Nichols as in-store experience was also identified as increasingly important to shoppers in Stage 1. Additional research into Harvey Nichols current beauty services has revealed that they do provide a variety of in-store treatments and services, however it still remains that their main ground floor beauty halls needs updating (mainly aesthetically) to compete with competitors, as identified in observational research detailed in the first report and reaffirmed by further observational research detailing the lack of a ‘wow’ factor which the Harvey Nichols Beauty Bazaar store (beauty only store) has. See appendix 3. The addition of the Beauty Bazaar store to their portfolio has set a precedent for how all the beauty departments should look. Figure 31 shows images of the Beauty Bazaar store and figure 35 shows the current beauty halls of some Harvey Nichols stores. Figures 32-34 show images of Harvey Nichols’ competitors beauty halls. These images evidence clear differences and show that Harvey Nichols’ Beauty Bazaar has an unmatched visual experience.

48


Figure 31: Harvey Nichols Beauty Bazaar

49


Figure 32: Selfridges Beauty Hall

Figure 34: John Lewis’ Beauty Hall 50

Figure 33: Liberty’s Beauty Hall

Figure 35: Harvey Nichols’ Beauty Hall


As beauty departments are on the ground floors, they are the first impression of the store consumer’s gage, giving it the ability to drive footfall to other departments. The beauty halls of Harvey Nichols’ stores will undergo revamps to look more like the Beauty Bazaar store. These departments will hold beauty consultancies which can be booked online and in-store. Product benefits will be promoted during this service, as products with added benefits were identified as some of the most popular products among consumers in the previous report. Products exclusive to Harvey Nichols will also be promoted. The success of the beauty department renovation will be determined by measuring any increase in sales and footfall. Beauty events will ensure that Harvey Nichols is the ‘go-to’ store for high end beauty products, providing more of an experience to shopping than their competitors. These events are detailed in appendix 8.

51


4.4.2 IMPROVEMENTS TO THE WEBSITE During the research process of the previous report, participants were asked their opinions on the Harvey Nichols Website. This revealed that 64/70 of participants thought that Harvey Nichols website was average. Harvey Nichols’ website should be considered above average to match their luxurious status. Additional research into websites (appendix 4) and a review of primary research related to the website collated in stage 1 has supported the following changes being made to the Harvey Nichols website. The whole website now has a cleaner, more sophisticated image. Pages are clearer, better structured and less ‘busy’. These aspects are something that consumers in 2013 want, according to WGSN: Consumers want ‘apps, ads and magazines focused on presenting a clean, readable format’ (Marshall-Johnson, 2011: Online), this can also be applied to websites. A comment was made in the survey in stage 1 that the website was ‘bland’, the removal of the colour grey throughout the website and addition of a stronger, more modern, monochrome colour scheme has addressed this. The images on the homepage are also colourful. Social media has been integrated throughout the website on the homepage and on individual product pages – something a surveyed consumer called for. This allows consumers to share the products they like and interact with Harvey Nichols. It also increases awareness of these platforms as this was identified as necessary in the previous report due to their closest competitors having significantly more followers/likes/subscribers e.c.t (see figure 36) and research revealing that Harvey Nichols’ content was similar to their competitor’s content, suggesting the issue lay with lack of promotion.

Store

Facebook Likes Harvey Nichols 81,932 Harrods 323,129 Selfridges 193,230

Twitter Followers 95,217 178,055 113,957

YouTube Subscribers 501 1,003 805

Pinterest Followers 2,468 10,808 4,562

Instagram Followers 19,668 135,792 44,851

Google + Followers 100 1,050 410

Figure 36: Social Media Followers

52


More engaging magazine content has been created and placed throughout the website as opposed to only being accessed through the ‘The HN Edit’ tab previously. This content is now strategically integrated throughout the website and linked in with corresponding products or information e.g. in the men’s coats and jackets section there is a link to an editorial called ‘Those chilly spring days’. When viewing multiple products there were limited options to choose from to refine the category. More options have been added to refine categories on product pages, for example products can now be refined by colour, making it easier and faster for consumers to find what they are looking for. The individual product viewing page has remained largely the same due to positive feedback being received on this area. Major changes are the addition of social media icons where the product can be shared and the linked in content. Another change is the promotion of free click-and-collect. This button has been made the same size and aesthetic as the ‘add to basket’ button as opposed to being smaller and light grey in colour, to emphasise this service and promote the cross-channel benefits of shopping with the brand. A further change is the addition of customer reviews. Once a customer buys something from the website they will be encouraged through email to provide a product review. These reviews are congregated on the product viewing page, allowing consumers to make a more informed choice when purchasing online. The online booking service for a table at a restaurant has been simplified and made neater. This page has also gained an in-store service booking option. This online process is easy, quick and hassle-free, benefitting busy and time-starved consumers who work long hours (identified in stage 1). The ‘Brands’ section has been adapted to include a specific section on exclusive Harvey Nichols products. There is also an ‘Exclusive to HN’ tab added to the navigation bar, where brands and products exclusive to Harvey Nichols can be viewed separately. Both of these features emphasise Harvey Nichols USP of exclusivity. The ‘My Account’ page has also been made cleaner and neater to make it easier for consumers to create an account and access their account. The wishlist page (accessible from My Account) has also been made simpler and items that could be linked to items currently in the wishlist will appear on the page to encourage linked sales. The ‘Stores’ page has been updated with a new layout and called ‘Find a Store’. The success of this website renovation can be measured through unique visitors to each page, figures on the usage of the social media sharing facilities and online booking facilities e.c.t. and sales figures collated by Google Analytics. Figures 37-54 show these changes.


Figure 37: The New Home Page


55 Figure 38: The Old Home Page


56

Figure 39: The New Harvey Nichols Edit Page


Figure 40: The Old Harvey Nichols Edit Page


58 Figure 41: The New Multiple Products Page


Figure 42: The Old Multiple Products Page


60

Figure 43: The New Single Product Page


Figure 44: The Old Single Product Page


62

Figure 45: The New Service Booking Page


Figure 46: The Old Service Booking Page


64

Figure 47: The New Brand Directory Page


Figure 48: The Old Brand Directory Page


66

Figure 49: The New Account Page


Figure 50: The Old Account Page


68

Figure 51: The New Wishlist Page


Figure 52: The Old Wishlist Page


Figure 53: The New Stores Page 70


Figure 54: The Old Stores Page


Harvey Nichols will send out a weekly email newsletter which will include magazine style content, brand information, news and promote exclusive products. All subscribers will receive the same themed newsletter but with content specific to the preferences and tendencies of the consumer segment they belong to. For example, Big Spenders will receive emails which incorporate more high priced items than lower priced items. Figures 55-57 show examples of newsletters where the ‘Big and Bold’ story has been adapted for each segment by incorporating items of varying price points. The Tourist segment has not been included as they are unlikely to be subscribed due not being a regular customer. These tailored newsletters will ensure that consumers feel that Harvey Nichols are talking directly to them and will encourage them to be tempted by purchases suited to them. The success can be measured through the amount of readers who click the links on the emails.

72


73

Figure 55: Big Spenders News Letter


74

Figure 56: Mid Spenders News Letter


75

Figure 57: Small Spenders News Letter


4.4.2.1 THE MOBILE ACCESSIBLE WEBSITE A mobile accessible version of the website will be created to enhance the brands appeal to the multichannel consumer and allow an easy way to purchase goods on a mobile without having to download the app. It will look almost identical to the app (detailed in section 4.4.3) but it will have the menu bar at the top of the page to ensure consistency with other websites and it will not include the ‘camera’ feature. See figure 58. The success of this mobile website can be determined by measuring unique visitors and sales figures collated by Google Analytics.

76

Figure 58: Mobile Website


4.4.3 THE CREATION OF AN APP The creation of a Harvey Nichols app is essential in Harvey Nichols becoming truly multichannel. It is particularly necessary to deliver the MVS technology features previously described. The app will enable consumers to shop easily with Harvey Nichols at any time, in any location – addressing consumer issues of lack of time and desire to shop ‘anytime, anywhere’ (Arthur, 2012: Online). The app will be available on the App Store and the Play Store. Reinforcing the importance of the app and mobile website in a multichannel operation, Hilary Monk, Senior Retail Analyst at Mintel says ‘mobile devices become the key connecting point for cross-channel’ (Mintel, 2012: Online). Research has been undertaken into other e-commerce apps to gage popular features and ensure that Harvey Nichols’ app follows design conventions so as not to confuse consumers with a new layout. See appendix 5. In accordance with consumer tastes (identified in section 4.4.2), the app is clean, neat and simple to use. It is similar in layout to the Harvey Nichols website, however simplified with slightly less options to fit a smaller screen. The homepage has magazine content, events, in-store service information and competition information similar to the website and social media links are also present. Multiple and single product viewing pages from the website are simplified and spaced out to allow for errors when users touch the screen. The stores page, The Harvey Nichols Edit page and the wishlist pages have also all been simplified. The stores page will also allow restaurant and service bookings. The camera feature will be where the MVS technology is incorporated into the app, allowing images and objects around the store to be photographed to reveal content. The success of the new App will be measured by viewing the amount of downloads and by collating data on which pages are most used and the amount of sales generated directly through this platform. See figures 59-65. 77


78


79


80

Figures 59-65: Pages from the Harvey Nichols app


4.4.4 AN IMPROVED MULTICHANNEL STRATEGY The importance of a strong multichannel strategy was identified in the previous report and confirmed as part of the new brand position. A strong multichannel strategy is integral to creating an engaging experience for consumers who expect to be able to shop ‘anytime, anywhere’ (Arthur, 2012: Online) as previously mentioned. An additional benefit to multichannel for Harvey Nichols is that according to research by Marks and Spencer, ‘consumers who mix in-store and online purchasing are generally more satisfied than those who shop in store only’ (Arthur, 2012: Online). Each platform – in-store, online and mobile- will have consistency in terms of design, the content displayed and the messages portrayed. This will ensure professionalism and erase the potential for confusion. All platforms will be integrated to allow for cross-channel shopping. Click-and-collect services will be emphasised through the website and mobile website more than what they currently are. See figures 6567. This is because Mintel says that one in four adults ‘would be willing to shop more online if services like click-and-collect… were available’ (2012: Online). Mintel also noted that many consumers have not registered that most stores already offer click-and-collect. This supports that this lack of awareness needs to be addressed by Harvey Nichols as ‘all the leading players all report higher average spend per cross-channel shopper than mono-channel customer’ (Mintel, 2012: Online), supporting the importance of cross-channel. The success of the promotion of click-and-collect can be assessed by measuring the difference in amount of these orders.

Figures 65-67: Click-and-collect Emphasised through the Website and App 81


A further example of integrating platforms is by displaying promotional material in-store. An example of this is shown in figure 68, where the website and app are promoted in-store. Social Media platforms will also be integrated through the use of promotional advertising campaigns in-store and in-store windows, this will in turn raise awareness of these platforms. See figure 69.

Figure 68: The Website and App Promoted in Store


Figure 69: Social Media Promoted through Store Windows

83


4.5 PROMOTION Various promotional activities will take place throughout this year to achieve the following communication objectives: - To emphasise Harvey Nichols USP of exclusive products - Promote Harvey Nichols in general and increase brand awareness - Ensure that Harvey Nichols are viewed as an innovative and exciting brand and a destination retailer Many of these activities will be innovative and merge online and offline to enhance the brands multichannel aspect and deliver the brand positioning. Activities will include; two advertising campaigns, visual merchandising and enhancing the in-store experience, events, website, app, social media promotion and sending out press releases. 4.5.1 THE ADVERTISING CAMPAIGNS The main aims of the advertising campaign are to create intrigue and awareness of Harvey Nichols and their exclusive products and emphasise that Harvey Nichols is an innovative brand and exciting place to shop. They aim to satisfy the consumer desire for more advertising from Harvey Nichols (identified in primary research in the previous report – 12 participants called for more advertising). Prior to establishing concepts, season specific macro trends identified by trend forecaster WGSN were researched. Two trends were chosen as a basis for the campaigns as they were most relevant to the brand. These trends are detailed in sections 4.5.1.1.1 and 4.5.1.2.1. Appendix 6 contains research on other macro trends which were discounted. Further to this, additional trends in the market place were researched, evidenced in the previous report. 4.5.1.1 AUTUMN/WINTER 2013/14 CAMPAIGN 4.5.1.1.1 CONCEPT One of the most prominent trends researched in stage 1 was the rise of popularity of vintage photography and social media sites such as Instagram. This has, along with the macro trend ‘Hack-tivate’ inspired the first advertising campaign. ‘Hack-tivate’ terms hacking as a positive concept and is about adapting and changing products to create something better. Existing objects are updated and ‘new ones (are imagined) by disrupting old traditions’ (WGSN, 2011: Online). The campaign will infuse Harvey Nichols traditional heritage with a modern view of the world - inspired by ‘hacking’ and updating traditional ideas. Instagram will be used to take the photos – tapping into the trend of vintage photography but at the same time utilising new technology (a mobile phone) to do this. Images taken using Instagram will juxtapose modern imagery with Harvey Nichols heritage. E.g. re-created images from old advertising campaigns which feature modern imagery such as iPads and this season’s products.


85

Figure 70: Hack-tivate Moodboard


4.5.1.2 SPRING/SUMMER 2014 CAMPAIGN 4.5.1.2.1 CONCEPT The concept for the second advertising campaign is based on WGSN’s Spring/Summer 2014 macro trend – ‘NDA: New Digital Aesthetic’. WGSN states that, ‘the way we look at the world is changing. As we spend more time viewing life through the prism of our iPhones, cameras, tablets and computers, the way these machines “see” and the way we see are becoming intertwined’ (WGSN, 2012: Online). ‘Fashion collections celebrate… ill-suited colour palettes (and) jarring prints’ (WGSN, 2012: Online). WGSN states that there is a blurring of the line between different platforms e.g. laptop, mobile phone and blurring between what is real and what is not. This links in with the idea of multichannel, making this appropriate for Harvey Nichols new positioning. The use of pixilation in the imagery associated with the NDA trend has inspired the imagery for the campaign, linking with the idea of blurring the line between technology and real life.

86


87

Figure 71: NDA Moodboard


4.5.1.3 CHANNELS AND TARGET MARKET Both advertising campaigns will comprise of many aspects on a multichannel level which will link together in a seamless way, targeted at each of Harvey Nichols consumer segments. These aspects include; - Print advertisements - Visual merchandising and in-store experience - Social Media - Harvey Nichols’ Website and App 4.5.1.4 PRINT ADVERTISEMENT The print advertisements will run in four monthly magazines, twice per season. These magazines are Dazed & Confused, GQ, Vogue and Elle, chosen due to their appropriateness for the target market and high volumes of circulation (which will maximise an increase in awareness) identified in figure 72. The advertisement will also be displayed on the London Tube, chosen for similar reasons.

88


Magazine title/ location Dazed & Confused

GQ

Vogue

Elle

The London Tube

Audience Target a youth market and both males and females (Dazed & Confused, 2013: Online). Average age 33, 76% of readers ABC1’s, 83% male, 75% of readers agree it is worth paying extra for quality goods (Conde Nast, 2013: Online). Average age 34, 69% of readers ABC1’s, 89% of readers women, 8/10 readers buy premium fashion brands (Conde Nast, 2013: Online). 65% ABC1 Females, Average age 27 (Hearst, 2013: Online).

Circulation ‘Average monthly circulation of 90,529 globally’ (Maden, 2011: Online).

‘74% of Tube users are ABC1 with enough time for them to absorb the information displayed to them’ (CBS Outdoor, 2013: Online), ‘Research shows that 79% of commuters have been somewhere, bought something or looked something up as a direct result of Tube adverts’ (CBS Outdoor, 2013: Online).

‘A staggering 150,000 people enter the Underground every hour - consisting of workers, tourists, shoppers and residents’ (CBS Outdoor, 2013: Online).

125,825 (Conde Nast, 2013: Online).

205,033 (Conde Nast, 2013: Online).

194,253 (Hearst, 2013: Online).

Advertising rate Estimated (based on similar magazines) Page run of paper £10,000, double page spread £20,000. Page run of paper £13,350 (Conde Nast, 2013: Online).

Page run of paper £25,100, Inside front cover gatefold (4 pages) £133,400, Double page spread £49, 200 (Conde Nast, 2013: Online). Page run of paper £15,750, Double page spread £30,000 (Hearst, 2013: Online). Platinum pack : Bank, Bond St, Covent Garden, Green Park, Holborn, Knightsbridge, Leicester Sq, Oxford Circus, Piccadilly Circus, Tottenham Court Rd (7/10 stations guaranteed in packs)), 48 sheets £63,900 (CBS Outdoor, 2013: Online).

Figure 72: Table of Advertising Locations 89


Figures 73 to 83 show examples of what both print campaigns would look like. Example images from Harvey Nichols’ Instagram page have been used to demonstrate the placement of the images for the Autumn/Winter 2013/14 campaign. Images from a previous campaign have been used to illustrate the Spring/Summer 2014 campaign as they are relatively similar to the desired images. Products featured in the campaigns will be mainly exclusive to Harvey Nichols, emphasising their USP, they will also cover a wide range of price points to attract consumers of a variety of incomes. The locations of Harvey Nichols’ stores have been added to both campaigns to tackle the problem of consumers not knowing that Harvey Nichols had stores outside of London (identified through primary research in the previous report), increasing store awareness. A print campaign has been chosen as Marshall Johnson writing for WGSN states ‘in many cases consumers are tired, confused and over-stimulated by the amount of technology they are seemingly supposed to keep up with’ (MarshallJohnson, 2011: Online). She states that finding a balance with how much technology we incorporate into our lives rather than discounting it all together is what consumers will increasingly be doing. The popularity of the magazines in figure 72 also proves that consumers still have an affinity towards print media, despite being able to read magazines on iPads/online. The credibility of these long-established magazines also supports the use of print media. In order to measure the success of the intrigue caused by these print campaigns, Twitter hashtags have been added to the advertisements. Viewers can then tweet about the adverts and feedback can be easily collated and measured through Twitter. This also creates consumer interaction and merges online and offline. This will however not be appropriate for measuring the feedback from non-twitter users but research into how best to measure the success of a print advertising campaign proved that this would be the only appropriate method.

90


Figure 73: Autumn/ Winter Campaign

91


92

Figure 74: Autumn/ Winter Campaign


93

Figure 75: Autumn/ Winter Campaign


94

Figure 76: Autumn/ Winter Campaign


95

Figure 77: Autumn/ Winter Campaign


96

Figure 78: Spring/Summer Campaign


97

Figure 79: Spring/Summer Campaign


98

Figure 80: Spring/Summer Campaign


99

Figure 81: Spring/Summer Campaign


100

Figure 82: Spring/Summer Campaign


101

Figure 83: Spring/Summer Campaign


4.5.1.5 VISUAL MERCHANDISING AND IN-STORE EXPERIENCE In conjunction with these campaigns there will be appropriate visual merchandising in-store and in store windows, following the concepts of the advertising campaigns, making the space more engaging and exciting. Products used will again cover a range of price points and many will be exclusive to Harvey Nichols. There will be more visual merchandising than there is currently inside the stores (identified as minimal and only present at the top of escalators in observational research in appendix 3). Research was conducted into where best to place displays to create maximum impact. This can be viewed in appendix 7. 4.5.1.5.1 AUTUMN/WINTER 2013/14 4.5.1.5.1.1 WINDOW DISPLAYS For the first advertising campaign, the store windows will be moving and interactive drawing attention and driving consumers inside – particularly tourists, looking for an experience. The windows will contain an iPhone with images from the advertising campaign on screens. Under the images text will say ‘Take a picture of me using the Harvey Nichols app to buy online, find these products in-store or find similar products’. Using their Smart Phone on the Harvey Nichols app consumers can photograph the image and be linked to a web page containing information on where to find the product in the store/similar products and a link to buy the item online. This page will have a specific sub-domain so that Harvey Nichols will know where the sale was generated e.g. when the link is accessed via a phone the link would be www.window.harveynichols.com/product as opposed to www. harveynichols.com/product. These features will utilise MVS technology. Along with being an exciting aspect of the windows, generating word-of-mouth promotion, it will make it easy for customers to buy items from the campaign, pushing sales. Harvey Nichols will be one of the first brands to utilise this technology, adding an additional novelty feature. Windows either side and above will have mannequins and real products in them continuing the campaign theme. Figures 84-85 demonstrate this. Success can be measured through how many photographs the images receive and through how many sales this generates on the mobile device (using the subdomain). Sales of the featured products can also be measured in-store however this method is more inaccurate due to their being no definitive proof the window display drove the sale.

102


Figure 84: Autumn/Winter Window Display

103


Figure 85: Autumn/Winter Window Display

4.5.1.5.1.1 IN-STORE DISPLAYS Displays in store will be directly related to the advertising campaign. Figure 86 shows an example. 104


Figure 86: Autumn/Winter In-Store Displays

105


There will also be tags with images, measuring 20cm x 8cm utilising MVS technology, which consumers can photograph – encouraging customer interaction and creating intrigue along with excitement – improving the shopping experience. This will also hopefully draw in younger consumers (Generation Y) who are excited by the in-store buzz as Mintel states that this is a strong pull for these consumers. When the images on the tags are photographed using the Harvey Nichols app the consumer will be linked to a webpage detailing Harvey Nichols’ history. At the bottom of this page links to their social media websites will be available where more information on Harvey Nichols heritage can be found, in turn promoting the social media outlets. The majority of tags will be unique and will be spread around the store as an incentive for customers to move around the store, potentially being tempted to purchase products en route. After all of the tags have been scanned by one phone and the participant has followed the brand on a social media website they will automatically be entered into a prize draw to win a £500 Harvey Nichols gift card, 5 others will also win £50 gift cards. Figure 87 shows this concept. The success will be measured through the number of competition entries, rise in social media followers and increased footfall.

106


107 Figure 87: Interactive Tags


4.5.1.5.2 SPRING/SUMMER 2014 4.5.1.5.2 .1 WINDOW DISPLAYS This advertising campaign will also have interactive windows. The screens used previously will be used to showcase print advertisements from this campaign. The pixelated aspects of the advertisements will be moving to different spaces to create a dynamic image and reinforce the idea from the macro trend that the lines between technology and ‘real life’ are blurring . The screens in the windows will say: ‘Tweet us @HarveyNichols with the hashtag #HarveyNicholsSS14 telling us what items you’re most excited about buying from the new collections for the chance to see your tweet here.’ Underneath this text, tweets sent in by participants will be shown. Tweets will be censored quickly to ensure no inappropriate/negative comments are shown and ensure participants are not waiting too long to see their tweet. This activity has an element of excitement for participants to get their tweet seen by others and it encourages consumer interaction with the brand, whilst also increasing followers of their Twitter page. See figures 87-88. These ‘stand out’ window displays aim to draw consumers into the store once they are attracted by the buzz created. The success can be measured by the amount of tweets received and increased footfall.

108


Figure 88: Spring/Summer WIndow Display

109


Figure 89: Spring/Summer WIndow Display

110


4.5.1.5.2 .2 IN-STORE DISPLAYS Images from the advertising campaign will be placed around the store with the text ‘Take a picture of me using the Harvey Nichols app’. Once the photograph has been taken, using the MVS technology in the app, the consumer will be linked to a webpage where they will find corresponding content. This content will be in the form of ‘making of’ videos which include interviews with the marketing team behind the concept, the models used in the campaign, the stylists involved in choosing the clothes and the make-up artists involved. The variety of videos should appeal to many consumers, particularly those who aspire to be involved in photo-shoots. Each image will correspond to a different video and once the video is finished the consumer will be encouraged to find the others. Figures 90-91 show this. This will create consumer engagement and interaction. Success will be measured by the amount of photographs taken of the feature and consumer reaction via social media websites.

111


112

Figure 90: Spring/Summer In-Store Display


Figure 91: Video Resulting from Photographing the Display

113


4.5.1.6 SOCIAL MEDIA Figures 92-97 show examples of what Harvey Nichols social media pages will look like during both seasons. Social media websites currently attract a wide age range whereas previously these websites were attracting mainly members of Generation Y. For example, in 2013, 38% of Pinterest users are between 35 and 54 and 40% are between 18 and 34 (Envision Media, 2013: Online). These statistical proportions are also similar with Twitter and Facebook (although Facebook has seen growing numbers of 45-54’s now the largest age group). This shows that the reach of social media is expanding and therefore as is the ability to target a wider variety of consumers through this medium, emphasising the importance of increasing awareness. Additionally, a primary research survey conducted during stage 1 revealed that 65/70 participants said that they thought it was important for brands to use social media to connect with their audience if it was appropriate.

114


Figure 92: Facebook in Autumn/Winter

115


Figure 93: Twitter in Autumn/Winter

116


Figure 94: YouTube in Autumn/Winter

117


Figure 95: Facebook in Spring/Summer

118


Figure 96: Twitter in Spring/Summer

119


Figure 97: YouTube in Spring/Summer

120


4.5.1.7 HARVEY NICHOLS’ WEBSITE, MOBILE WEBSITE AND APP During these seasons the Harvey Nichols website, mobile website and App will display content related to the advertising campaigns. Figures 98 and 99 depict this.

Figures 98-99: App and Website Showing Content Related to the Advertising Campaign


4.5.2 EVENTS Harvey Nichols are currently well known for their in-store events. There will be at least one event every two months for the year and for all stores these events will be: - The launch of the new beauty department (Beauty Extravaganza) - The new website and app launch - The launch of the Autumn/Winter seasonal campaign - Autumn/Winter fashion show - Check-in competition - Pinterest competition - The launch of the Spring/Summer seasonal campaign - Spring/Summer fashion show - Second Beauty Extravaganza There will also be store specific events such as the Q&A with Jonathan Saunders detailed in the Knightsbridge store guide. All events will be promoted through social media, in-store, on the website and on the app. See figures 100-103. The aim of these events is to attract a wide variety of consumers, attracted by the in-store atmosphere and the draw of competitions and offers. Where possible, these events will promote exclusive Harvey Nichols products. The success of these events will be measured through sales on the day, increase in footfall on the day and the level of social media interaction (if appropriate). See appendix 8 for descriptions of these events.

122


123

Figure 100: Events Promoted through Social Media


Figure 101: Events Promoted In-Store Figure 102: Events Promoted through the App

124


125Figure 103: Events Promoted through the Website


4.5.3 BETTER PROMOTION OF IN-STORE SERVICES Currently, in-store services are not promoted strongly in-store or online and booking an appointment online is not possible. There is scope to improve both elements to increase convenience for consumers. In addition to the in-store services being promoted in the store guide, they will also be promoted via the website and app where customers will be able to book appointments. The success of this will be measured through the amount of online bookings received. Services will also be promoted through social media. The arrow signs depicted in section 4.4.1.2 will be used to point customers towards services.

126

Figures 104-105: The Beyond Medispa and Personal Shopping at Harvey Nichols


4.5.4 PR Press releases will used to promote in-store events and will be sent to publications with a high readership of Harvey Nichols target market such as GQ, i-D, Dazed and Confused, Vogue, Glamour, Elle and Esquire along with their online publications and local publications for each event. It will also be sent to online only publications such as Style.com and Refinery 29. The success of this will be measured through the amount of press coverage received. To demonstrate this, a press release has been created for the first Beauty Extravaganza event. It is located in appendix 8.

Figure 106: Magazines aimed at Harvey Nichols Target Market 127


4.6 TIMELINE

128

Figure 107: Year 1 Timeline


5.1 INTRODUCTION AND OVERVIEW These years will be predominantly about maintenance of the strategies put into place for year 1 as well as observing and implementing new and emerging trends to remain at the forefront of innovation. This section of the strategy will include: - Continuing and monitoring product and pricing strategies - Maintaining existing stores including a roll out of iPad ordering and barcode photographing technologies - Employing pop up stores - Continual maintenance of the website, app and mobile website - Maintenance of the multichannel strategy - Promotion of exclusive products - Seasonal campaigns - Creating a sustainability plan

130


5.2 PRODUCT Forecasted statistics on the growth/decline of the UK economy and of the luxury goods market have been used to determine the product and pricing strategies for the following 2-5 years. In terms of the economy, the HM Treasury (2013: Online) have forecast growth of 9.1% between 2012 and 2017, suggesting a slow recovery. The UK luxury sector is set ‘to grow by 57% to £9.4bn by 2015, according to research from luxury trade body Walpole’ (Ledbury Research, 2011: Online). These positive growth figures support the continuation of the product strategy identified in section 4.2. However, if these forecasted figures change and result in a predicted decline in growth, Harvey Nichols may need to consider further diversifying their product ranges to include more upper-mass market products. Measuring and comparing sales figures will be key to determining the success of this strategy.

Figure 108: Harvey Nichols Products 131


5.3 PRICE The growth figures of the UK economy and the luxury market described in section 5.2, support a continuation of the pricing strategy outlined in section 4.3. However, as mentioned in relation to the product strategy, if the forecasted growth figures turn negative a further diversification of products may be necessary further lowering the overall price point of the store.

132

Figure 109: Harvey Nichols Products of Varying Price Points


5.4 PLACE For the next 2-5 years, Harvey Nichols will continue to maintain the strategies put in place from the first year. In addition, they will embark on a temporary expansion strategy. 5.4.1 STORES 5.4.1.1 EXISTING STORES Harvey Nichols will continue to ensure that all stores are kept to a high standard in terms of aesthetics and service. They will also continue releasing the Knightsbridge store guide, as long as it remains popular. Following the iPad ordering service and barcode review accessing technology trials in Knightsbridge, these technologies will be incorporated into all stores (providing they are successful). Harvey Nichols must also be aware of new technologies being developed and work to utilise these in stores ensuring they remain innovative. To complement the click-and-collect service, a seated collection area will be added to the ground floor of each store where customers can wait for their parcels. This will create a more luxurious and personalised feeling to this service, inspired by Liberty’s seated customer service desks identified in observational research in stage 1. See figure 110.

Figure 110: Customer Service and Collection Area

133


5.4.1.2 TEMPORARY EXPANSION STRATEGY Currently, Harvey Nichols set up food based pop up stores during the run up to Christmas in areas such as Liverpool. For the first year of this rejuvenation strategy, the current strategy of pop-up stores was frozen to focus on existing stores. This strategy will now be re-implemented with some changes. During the run up to Christmas pop up stores will be launched. This season has been chosen due to the high proportion of gift buying occurring near Christmas. These stores will be located in major UK cities where there is a high population to maximise the amount of targetable consumers, they are also not near existing stores. The cities are; Cardiff, Glasgow, Bristol and Newcastle. Two of these cities will be chosen for the pop up stores each year. The stores will run from approximately the beginning of October to the end of December (timings will vary slightly according to location), selling Christmas food/beverages, gifts, beauty products, accessories and Christmas decorations. The majority of products will be Harvey Nichols own brand and exclusive products. This addresses the consumer demand for more Harvey Nichols stores identified in the previous report (participants of a survey were asked ‘What would Harvey Nichols have to do to appeal more effectively to you?’ ‘Have a store near me’ received 12 answers and ‘more stores’ received 3). The nature of the temporary store does not dilute the brands exclusive identity by ensuring that the brand is not constantly widely available. The pop up stores’ limited existence also creates excitement and buzz around a brand and will increase awareness and word-of-mouth promotion where there is no permanent store (as identified in stage 1). The stores can be used to promote the Harvey Nichols website, mobile website and app to ensure that once the pop up store ceases trading, consumers will know where they can get Harvey Nichols products from. See figure 111. Success can be measured by the amount of sales generated in each location and any social media response can be monitored. Stores will be reviewed and the best performing locations will be renewed and unsuccessful stores will cease in future.

134


Figure 111: Example of a Harvey Nichols Pop Up Store


5.4.2 WEBSITE, MOBILE WEBSITE AND APP Following the rejuvenation of the website, creation of the mobile website and app, there will be continual maintenance throughout these 2-5 years. This will require frequent new content generation for The Harvey Nichols Edit and a continuation of the newsletter strategy outlined in section 4.4.2. 5.4.3 MULTICHANNEL STRATEGY The multichannel strategy outlined in section 4.4.4 will continue for the following 2-5 years. Interlinking messages across platforms and cross-channel selling will be instrumental in ensuring success.

136


5.5 PROMOTION Promotion will follow a similar structure to the first year strategy, including print advertising, visual merchandising, promotion through social media, the website and app, in-store events and sending out press releases. The communication objectives are: - To continue to emphasise Harvey Nichols USP of exclusive products - Promote Harvey Nichols and maintain brand awareness - Continue to ensure that Harvey Nichols are viewed as an innovative and exciting brand and a destination retailer 5.5.1 ADVERTISING CAMPAIGNS Harvey Nichols will continue to launch advertising campaigns seasonally to maintain brand awareness and intrigue. Macro trends from forecasters such as WGSN will continue to be used as the base for concepts and current consumer and market trends will be analysed to ensure that the campaign is suitable. They will continue to emphasise exclusive products. 5.5.1.1 CHANNELS AND TARGET MARKET These advertising campaigns will comprise of the same elements across all multichannel platforms, targeted at all consumer segments. These are; - Print advertisements - Visual merchandising and in-store experience - Social Media - The Website and App 5.5.1.2 PRINT ADVERTISEMENTS The print advertisements will continue to run in GQ, Elle, Dazed & Confused and Vogue, twice during each season and on the London Tube, reaching all of Harvey Nichols consumer segments. Twitter hashtags can again be used to measure success. 5.5.1.3 VISUAL MERCHANDISING AND IN-STORE EXPERIENCE Visual merchandising and in-store experience will continue to utilise new technology in innovative ways, drawing consumers in and ensuring they choose to shop at Harvey Nichols. Continual research into market trends will be essential in delivering this.

Figure 112: Promotional Image for Harvey Nichols


5.5.2 SOCIAL MEDIA Harvey Nichols’ social media pages will continue to reflect the theme of the campaign to ensure continuity throughout all platforms. It will also be used to promote the pop-up stores. Pages will be continually be updated and promoted through other platforms such as the website and in-store to generate more followers to target through these mediums. They will also provide a strong two-way communication system between Harvey Nichols and consumers and engaging content will be posted. 5.5.3 WEBSITE, MOBILE WEBSITE AND APP Similarly to social media, Harvey Nichols website, mobile website and app will continue to showcase content related to the advertising campaign, again ensuring continuity. These platforms will also be used to promote in-store events, services and pop up stores. 5.5.4 EVENTS Harvey Nichols will continue to host events, at least one every two months, many of these events in the first year had a focus on fashion and beauty, these future years will also include food related events to promote the restaurants and food products. As beauty is a growing department store category, these events will still be integral. The aim of these events will again be to attract a wide variety of consumers, some who may not usually shop at Harvey Nichols, attracted by the in-store atmosphere and the draw of competitions and offers. Many will also promote exclusive Harvey Nichols products. The success of these events will be primarily measured through footfall and sales figures. Figure 113: Promotional Image for Harvey Nichols

5.5.5 PR PR will be used to promote all of the in-store events and to gain coverage for the pop up stores. They will be sent to similar publications as mentioned in section 4.5.4 and the press releases for the pop up stores and store specific events will also be sent to local publications. The success of these press releases will be measured through the amount of press coverage received.


5.6 PLANET A 5th P of Planet from the Marketing Mix has been added to the 2-5 year plan due to primary and secondary research showing the importance of sustainable brands to consumers and the planet. A PESTLE analysis in the previous report identified that global warming is a driving factor for creating a sustainable planet and that recycling and sustainable sourcing is important to consumers. In addition, the primary research survey undertaken for this report identified that when asked ‘Are there any other attributes which would make a brand appeal to you more?’, ‘environmentally friendly’ was mentioned twice along with ‘Fairtrade’ mentioned once and ‘locally sourced’ mentioned once. Currently, Harvey Nichols source the products for their restaurants locally and are part of the Sustainable Restaurant Association, they sell recycled and Fairtrade certified products and sell a Harvey Nichols ‘bag for life’. Harvey Nichols must ensure that consumers know what they are doing to become a more sustainable brand. This will be done using a section on their website, describing their sustainable activities. Figure 114 shows this. Posts on social media sites will also be used to emphasise the brands sustainable actions. Throughout this 2-5 year period, Harvey Nichols will continue to maintain the actions previously noted and in addition to these initiatives they will also introduce recycling bins into their stores for use by staff. The success of this strategy can be measured through positive feedback collated through looking at product reviews, social media and comments made to staff regarding these initiatives.

139


Figure 114: Sustainability Section of the Website


5.7 TIMELINE

141

Figure 115: 2-5 Year Timeline


6.1 YEAR 1

Budget: £1,372,758 Cost of Activities: Activity/Strategy Cosmetic store improvements Store guide In-store signage

MVS technology

In-store iPads Barcode scan-able tags

Workings 20 x pots of paint + 144 x ceiling tiles + 100,000 x Hangers + engraving service 10 x A5 pages back and front x 30,000 per month + £10,000 creative 28 floors across all stores x average of 6 signs per store (some will be more, some less) = 168 hanging signs + 28 floors across all stores = 28 A1 wall signs The prices for this technology are provided by IQ Engines – for 100,000 visual scans per month for a year this technology would cost £4,726.16. If this is successful, it is suggested that Harvey Nichols negotiate a deal with IQ engines to allow for more visual scans for around £15,000 per year. £399 per iPad + £394 per stand x 10 locations 2000 tags + creative

143

Total Cost £88,531 £40,000 £1064

Around £15,000

£7930 £5090

Figure 116: Cost of Activities


Investment in the Beauty Departments Improvements to the Website Website Updates Mobile Website App Print Advertising Campaigns

Visual Merchandising

Events PR Agency Tracking Sales Social Media Email Newsletters

Average of £15,000 per store Cost of development Cost for 1 year Cost of creation Cost of creation GQ rate x 4 + Vogue rate x 4 + Elle rate x 4 + Dazed & Confused rate x 4 + London Tube rate x 2 + cost of creation Display screens x 6 stores x 2 windows per store + £10,000 for any additional costs e.g. printing + £10,000 for in-store creative Average of 10 events, per store, per year at an average cost of £5000 = Cost for 1 year Cost for 1 year In house In house

144

£90,000 £25,000 £1000 £10,000 £20,000 £574,600

£69,543

£300,000 £50,000 £50,000 -


Profit and Loss Account for the year: Year

2014

Turnover Turnover Increase Percentage Cost of Sales Gross Profit Gross Profit Percentage Operating Cost Operating Profit

£106,825,000 109% £42,730,000 £64,095,000 60% £41,845,000 £22,250,000

Extra Sales Driven by Initiatives: Extra Sales Additional Turnover Additional Gross Profit Additional Operating Cost Additional Operating Profit

3% £2,940,000 £1,764,000 £1,348,000 £416,000

The profit and loss account has been adapted from an existing past account on Key Note. The growth rate of 9% has been formed based on Harvey Nichols’ current growth rate of 6%, the addition of the initiatives outlined throughout this report and taking into account the rate of growth of department stores and the luxury market.

145

Figure 117: Profit and Loss Account


Growth Forecast:

Figure 118: Growth Forecast

146


6.2 YEARS 2-5 Budget per year: £1022291 Cost of Activities: Activity MVS technology In-Store iPads

PR Agency

Strategy As previously mentioned x 4 £399 per iPad + £394 per stand x 25 locations across 5 stores (not including Beauty Bazaar Store) 2000 tags per store at £90 1 x 3 seat sofa £175 + 4 x 2 seat sofas £135 + £36 per table x 6 stores 2 per year x £20,000 £574,600 x 4 Rough estimate based on stores already owning mannequins and screens for windows (£10,000 per store per year) Yearly price x 4 Cost of bins x 29 floors across 7 stores (Including Beauty Bazaar Store) Cost for 1 year

£50,000

Tracking Sales

Cost for 1 year

£50,000

Social Media

In house

-

Email Newsletters

In house

-

Website Updates

£1000 per year x 4

£4000

Barcode scan-able tags Collection area in stores Pop up stores Advertising campaigns Visual merchandising

Events Addition of recycling bins

147

Total Cost £60,000 £19,825

£450 £4506 £160,000 £2298,400 £240,000

£1200,000 £1982

Figure 119: Cost of Activities


Profit and Loss Account: Year Turnover Turnover Increase Percentage Cost of Sales Gross Profit Gross Profit Percentage Operating Cost Operating Profit

2018 £142,643,000 107% £57,057,000 £85,586,000 60% £51,777,000 £33,809,000

2017 £133,331,000 107% £53,324,000 £79,987,000 60% £48,803,000 £31,184,000

2016 £124,590,000 107% £49,836,000 £74,754,000 60% £45,943,000 £28,811,000

2015 £116,439,000 109% £46,576,000 £69,863,000 60% £43,193,000 £26,670,000

Growth is predicted to even out in the following 2-5 years due to the big initiatives happening in the first two years. However, this may change if other initiatives are introduced.

148

Figure 120: Profit and Loss Account


Growth Forecast:

149

Figure 121: Growth Forecast


The aim of this report was to outline how Harvey Nichols will be rejuvenated based on in-depth research conducted in the first report and further supporting research outlined throughout this report. This has been done through creating a revised brand vision and positioning focused on exclusive products delivered through an engaging multichannel experience, sourcing products to expand their target consumer base, increasing their advertising and using innovative methods, rejuvenating their website and developing a mobile accessible version and app, cosmetically improving stores, improving the overall in-store experience including investing in the beauty department and the addition of new technology, developing a temporary expansion strategy and creating a sustainability plan. Going forward, for Harvey Nichols to maintain this rejuvenated image and new brand position, they must continue to research consumer and market trends to remain one step ahead of their competitors in developing their shopping platforms – ensuring that Harvey Nichols remains a destination retailer. Most importantly, they must ensure that they continue to source and collaborate with designers to gain exclusive product deals.

Figure 122: Harvey Nichols Visual Merchandising

151


4.4.1.4 Investment in the Beauty Departments Mintel, 2012: Online

8.1 REFERENCES 3.3 The New Brand Positioning: Harvey Nichols, 2013: Online

4.4.3 The Creation of an App Arthur, 2012: Online Mintel, 2012: Online

3.4.1.1 Big Spenders: Key Note, 2013: Online Key Note, 2013: Online Mintel, 2013: Online

4.4.4 An Improved Multichannel Strategy Arthur, 2012: Online Arthur, 2012: Online Mintel, 2012: Online Mintel, 2012: Online

3.4.1.2 Mid Spenders: Key Note, 2013: Online Key Note, 2013: Online Mintel, 2011: Online

4.5.1.1.1 Concept WGSN, 2011: Online

3.4.1.3 Small Spenders: Key Note, 2013: Online Key Note, 2013: Online Mintel, 2011: Online Mintel, 2011: Online

4.5.1.2.1 Concept WGSN, 2011: Online WGSN, 2011: Online

3.4.1.4 The New consumer segment: The Tourist: Mintel, 2012: Online GMID, 2012: Online Smithers, 2013: Online Smithers, 2013: Online Smithers, 2013: Online Smithers, 2013: Online 4.4.1.2 Tackling Navigational Issues Ebster and Garaus, p32, 2011 4.4.1.3 In-Store Technology Barocas, 2012: Online Barocas, 2012: Online Trend Watching, 2012: Online

153

4.5.1.4 Print advertisement Dazed & Confused, 2013: Online Maden, 2011: Online Conde Nast, 2013: Online Conde Nast, 2013: Online Conde Nast, 2013: Online Conde Nast, 2013: Online Conde Nast, 2013: Online Conde Nast, 2013: Online Hearst, 2013: Online Hearst, 2013: Online Hearst, 2013: Online CBS Outdoor, 2013: Online CBS Outdoor, 2013: Online CBS Outdoor, 2013: Online CBS Outdoor, 2013: Online Marshall-Johnson, 2011: Online


4.5.1.6 Social Media Envision Media, 2013: Online

WGSN, 2011: Online WGSN, 2011: Online

5.2 Product: HM Treasury, 2013: Online Ledbury Research, 2011: Online

9.7 Appendix 7: Visual Merchandising: Ebster and Garaus, p24, 2011

9.1 Research supporting the determining of Harvey Nichols brand position: Facebook, 2013: Online Harrods, 2013: Online Mintel, 2013: Online Brand Channel, 2013: Online Mintel, 2012: Online Facebook, 2013: Online 9.4 Appendix 4: Additional Website Research: Marshall-Johnson, 2011: Online Craven, p89, 2012 9.6.1.1 21st Century Romance: WGSN, 2011: Online WGSN, 2011: Online 9.6.1.2 Living Design: WGSN, 2011: Online WGSN, 2011: Online WGSN, 2011: Online 9.6.2.1 Neo-Geo: WGSN, 2011: Online WGSN, 2011: Online WGSN, 2011: Online WGSN, 2011: Online 9.6.2.2 Next Nature: WGSN, 2011: Online

154


8.2 LIST OF IMAGES Figure 1: Harvey Nichols Display, http://hmvm.co.uk/, page 9 Figure 2: Harvey Nichols Bag, http://1.bp.blogspot.com/-AfWr2mOFQUw/UIrLgY9uPAI/AAAAAAAAjL8/LnVq-jBg6dc/s1600/ Harvey+Nichols+Kuwait.jpg, page 11 Figure 3: Exclusive Lula Pop Up Store at Harvey Nichols, http://www.fionaleahy.com/fl-journal/lula-magazine-5th-birthday-dinner-and-popup-shop/, page 13 Figure 4: The Benefits Matrix, Own Image, page 14 Figure 5: Example of a Harvey Nichols Consumer, http://uk.glam.com/?9d7bd4, page 15 Figure 6: Example of a Harvey Nichols Consumer, http://farm6.staticflickr.com/5325/7426770382_ebddd2d4e8_z.jpg, page 15 Figure 7: Big Spenders, www.harveynichols.com, http://sharifaknows.blogspot.co.uk/2009/11/street-style_22.html, page 17 Figure 8: Mid Spenders, www.harveynichols.com, http://stylebycarola.blogspot.co.uk/2012/06/swan-lake-couple-street-style-uk.html, page 19 Figure 9: Small Spenders, www.harveynichols.com, http://emeraldcloset.com/category/street-style/page/10/, page 21 Figure 10: The Tourist, www.harveynichols.com, http://trendycrew.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/01/foto13.jpg, page 23 Figure 11: Harvey Nichols Birmingham, http://rosaleengallagher.files.wordpress.com/2010/10/harvey-nicks-birmingham.gif, page 25 Figure 12: Ansoff Matrix, http://www.tutor2u.net/business/strategy/ansoff_matrix.htm, page 26 Figure 13: Table of Risks and Benefits of Recommendations, own image, page 27-28 Figure 14: Product sold in Harvey Nichols, www.harveynichols.com, page 31 Figure 15: Product sold in Harvey Nichols, www.harveynichols.com, page 31 Figure 16: Products of a variety of price points, www.harveynichols.com, page 32 Figure 17: New Hangers, http://1.bp.blogspot.com/-3wNBV66qfd0/TmD3rM1KImI/AAAAAAAABbg/MN27Vi4UZHQ/s1600/luxury-woodenbranded-hangers.jpg, page 33 Figure 18: Harvey Nichols Signage, http://static.home-treats.co.uk/pictures/18841_xxl.jpg, page 34 Figure 19: Harvey Nichols Signage, http://munchkie.files.wordpress.com/2011/04/img_8289.jpg, page 35 Figure 20: Harrods Store Guide, http://www.luxurydaily.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/05/harrods-map.jpg, page 36 Figure 21: Harvey Nichols Store Guide, http://ldnfashion.com/news-features/mulberry-and-harvey-nichols-in-talks-to-line-olympic-walkway/, http://www.harveynichols.com/stores/london, page 37 Figure 22: Harvey Nichols Store Guide, www.harveynichols.com, page 38 Figure 23: Harvey Nichols Store Guide, http://instagram.com/harveynichols, page 38 Figure 24: Harvey Nichols Store Guide, http://www.theleaf.com/images/stories/Twitter_Logo.gif, http://3.bp.blogspot.com/-KNqO9JuXUN8/ Ti2b1LHRquI/AAAAAAAAAIU/L6k8Wlzxj9k/s1600/logo_facebook.png, http://7dias7noches.net/blog/wp-content/uploads/2012/04/ instagram-logo.jpg, http://jonbennallick.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2012/09/Pinterest-Logo-Vector-by-Jon-Bennallick-02.png, page 40 Figure 25: Harvey Nichols Store Guide, www.harveynichols.com, http://cdn.londonandpartners.com/asset/1a880b0ccf8bf66cda41686c70 5b2946.jpg, page 41 155


Figure 26: Harvey Nichols Store Guide, www.harveynichols.com, http://media.photobucket.com/user/miras46/media/nature%20scenes/ Vortex-panorama-.jpg.html?filters%5bterm%5d=nature&filters%5bprimary%5d=images, page 42 Figure 27: Harvey Nichols Store Guide, www.harveynichols.com, page 43 Figure 28: Harvey Nichols Store Guide, http://www.theleaf.com/images/stories/Twitter_Logo.gif, http://3.bp.blogspot.com/-KNqO9JuXUN8/ Ti2b1LHRquI/AAAAAAAAAIU/L6k8Wlzxj9k/s1600/logo_facebook.png, http://7dias7noches.net/blog/wp-content/uploads/2012/04/ instagram-logo.jpg, http://jonbennallick.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2012/09/Pinterest-Logo-Vector-by-Jon-Bennallick-02.png, page 44 Figure 29: Review Viewing Technology, www.harveynichols.com, http://www.iceflowstudios.com/v3/wp-content/uploads/2012/09/ iPhone5Front.jpg, http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/f/fe/UPC_A.svg/220px-UPC_A.svg.png, page 46 Figure 30: In-store iPad, http://www.blueinc.co.uk/media/wysiwyg/ipad_1.jpg, http://www.yatzer.com/assets/Article/1602/images/Harvey_ Nichols_Jakarta_Indonesia_yatzer_4.jpg, page 47 Figure 31: Harvey Nichols Beauty Bazaar, http://nick-intl.mtvnimages.com/uri/mgid:file:gsp:scenic:/international/style-intl/generalnews/november/14-11-12/Harvey-Nichols-Liverpool-3-545.jpg?height=363&width=545&matte=1&quality=.9, http://m5.paperblog. com/i/34/349660/beauty-bazaar-harvey-nichols-L-vYuotu.jpeg, http://www.harveynichols.com/hnedit/wp-content/uploads/2012/11/HNBB-387s1.jpg, http://www.andythornton.com/system/portfolio_item_images/1008/original/HN-portf-1.jpg?1355226140, http://images. icnetwork.co.uk/upl/liverpoolecho/nov2012/7/0/596x447/image-15-liverpool-echo-preview-of-new-harvey-nichols-store-pics-jasonroberts-226894391.jpg, page 49 Figure 32: Selfridges Beauty Hall, http://retaildesignblog.net/wp-content/uploads/2012/10/Selfridges-Beauty-Hall-by-HMKM-London-02. jpg, page 50 Figure 33: Liberty’s Beauty Hall, http://4.bp.blogspot.com/-boSCOFJHGvk/Th9Jey2ycWI/AAAAAAAAAH8/ykjjxM7NskU/s1600/BeautyHall.jpg, page 50 Figure 34: John Lewis’ Beauty Hall, http://www.a-littlebird.com/2012/05/03/beauty-john-lewis-new-multi-million-pound-beauty-hall/, page 50 Figure 35: Harvey Nichols Beauty Hall, http://www.disneyrollergirl.net/wp-content/uploads/BeautyMART-Harvey-Nichols-3.jpg, page 50 Figure 36: Social Media Followers, own image, page 52 Figure 37: The New Home Page, www.harveynichols.com, http://www.theleaf.com/images/stories/Twitter_Logo.gif, http://3.bp.blogspot. com/-KNqO9JuXUN8/Ti2b1LHRquI/AAAAAAAAAIU/L6k8Wlzxj9k/s1600/logo_facebook.png, http://7dias7noches.net/blog/wp-content/ uploads/2012/04/instagram-logo.jpg, http://jonbennallick.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2012/09/Pinterest-Logo-Vector-by-Jon-Bennallick-02. png, www.harveynichols.com, http://www.theleaf.com/images/stories/Twitter_Logo.gif, http://3.bp.blogspot.com/-KNqO9JuXUN8/ Ti2b1LHRquI/AAAAAAAAAIU/L6k8Wlzxj9k/s1600/logo_facebook.png, http://7dias7noches.net/blog/wp-content/uploads/2012/04/ instagram-logo.jpg, http://jonbennallick.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2012/09/Pinterest-Logo-Vector-by-Jon-Bennallick-02.png, page 54 Figure 38: The Old Home Page, www.harveynichols.com, page 55 Figure 39: The New Harvey Nichols Edit Page, www.harveynichols.com, http://www.theleaf.com/images/stories/Twitter_Logo.gif, http://3. bp.blogspot.com/-KNqO9JuXUN8/Ti2b1LHRquI/AAAAAAAAAIU/L6k8Wlzxj9k/s1600/logo_facebook.png, http://7dias7noches.net/blog/ wp-content/uploads/2012/04/instagram-logo.jpg, http://jonbennallick.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2012/09/Pinterest-Logo-Vector-by-JonBennallick-02.png, www.harveynichols.com, http://www.theleaf.com/images/stories/Twitter_Logo.gif, http://3.bp.blogspot.com/156


KNqO9JuXUN8/Ti2b1LHRquI/AAAAAAAAAIU/L6k8Wlzxj9k/s1600/logo_facebook.png, http://7dias7noches.net/blog/wp-content/ uploads/2012/04/instagram-logo.jpg, http://jonbennallick.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2012/09/Pinterest-Logo-Vector-by-Jon-Bennallick-02. png, page 56 Figure 40: The Old Harvey Nichols Edit Page, www.harveynichols.com, page 57 Figure 41: The New Multiple Products Page, www.harveynichols.com, http://www.theleaf.com/images/stories/Twitter_Logo.gif, http://3. bp.blogspot.com/-KNqO9JuXUN8/Ti2b1LHRquI/AAAAAAAAAIU/L6k8Wlzxj9k/s1600/logo_facebook.png, http://7dias7noches.net/blog/ wp-content/uploads/2012/04/instagram-logo.jpg, http://jonbennallick.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2012/09/Pinterest-Logo-Vector-by-JonBennallick-02.png, http://moblog.net/media/r/a/r/rareaquaticbadger/cold-spring-harbor-new-york-3.jpg, page 58 Figure 42: The Old Multiple Products Page, www.harveynichols.com, page 59 Figure 43: The New Single Product Page, www.harveynichols.com, http://www.theleaf.com/images/stories/Twitter_Logo.gif, http://3. bp.blogspot.com/-KNqO9JuXUN8/Ti2b1LHRquI/AAAAAAAAAIU/L6k8Wlzxj9k/s1600/logo_facebook.png, http://7dias7noches.net/blog/ wp-content/uploads/2012/04/instagram-logo.jpg, http://jonbennallick.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2012/09/Pinterest-Logo-Vector-by-JonBennallick-02.png, page 60 Figure 44: The Old Single Product Page, www.harveynichols.com, page 61 Figure 45: The New Service Booking Page, www.harveynichols.com, http://www.theleaf.com/images/stories/Twitter_Logo.gif, http://3. bp.blogspot.com/-KNqO9JuXUN8/Ti2b1LHRquI/AAAAAAAAAIU/L6k8Wlzxj9k/s1600/logo_facebook.png, http://7dias7noches.net/blog/ wp-content/uploads/2012/04/instagram-logo.jpg, http://jonbennallick.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2012/09/Pinterest-Logo-Vector-by-JonBennallick-02.png, http://4.bp.blogspot.com/_wK4om1Pu2Bk/TUmf_9G9B5I/AAAAAAAAAkE/5r2tjP8XpQA/s1600/IMG_4870.JPG, http:// www.eatout.co.uk/images/galleries/second-floor-restaurant-at-harvey-nichols-1-1225293739.jpg, http://cdn.whatclinic.com/massagetherapy/uk/london/london-sw-district/brompton-road/beyond-medispalondon/thumbnails/177bc6e5120127ea/dsc00004_compressedoriginal.jpg, page 62 Figure 46: The Old Service Booking Page, www.harveynichols.com, page 63 Figure 47: The New Brand Directory Page, www.harveynichols.com, http://www.theleaf.com/images/stories/Twitter_Logo.gif, http://3. bp.blogspot.com/-KNqO9JuXUN8/Ti2b1LHRquI/AAAAAAAAAIU/L6k8Wlzxj9k/s1600/logo_facebook.png, http://7dias7noches.net/blog/ wp-content/uploads/2012/04/instagram-logo.jpg, http://jonbennallick.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2012/09/Pinterest-Logo-Vector-by-JonBennallick-02.png, page 64 Figure 48: The Old Brand Directory Page, www.harveynichols.com, page 65 Figure 49: The New Account Page, www.harveynichols.com, http://www.theleaf.com/images/stories/Twitter_Logo.gif, http://3.bp.blogspot. com/-KNqO9JuXUN8/Ti2b1LHRquI/AAAAAAAAAIU/L6k8Wlzxj9k/s1600/logo_facebook.png, http://7dias7noches.net/blog/wp-content/ uploads/2012/04/instagram-logo.jpg, http://jonbennallick.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2012/09/Pinterest-Logo-Vector-by-Jon-Bennallick-02. png, http://images.icnetwork.co.uk/upl/liverpoolecho/nov2012/7/0/596x447/image-15-liverpool-echo-preview-of-new-harvey-nicholsstore-pics-jason-roberts-226894391.jpg, http://www.london-attractions.info/images/blogs2011/Shopping%20Party%20at%20Harvey%20 Nichols.jpg, http://cache.marriott.com/propertyimages/l/lbadt/phototour/lbadt_phototour21.jpg?Log=1, page 66 Figure 50: The Old Account Page, www.harveynichols.com, page 67 157


Figure 51: The New Wishlist Page, www.harveynichols.com, http://www.theleaf.com/images/stories/Twitter_Logo.gif, http://3.bp.blogspot. com/-KNqO9JuXUN8/Ti2b1LHRquI/AAAAAAAAAIU/L6k8Wlzxj9k/s1600/logo_facebook.png, http://7dias7noches.net/blog/wp-content/ uploads/2012/04/instagram-logo.jpg, http://jonbennallick.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2012/09/Pinterest-Logo-Vector-by-Jon-Bennallick-02. png, page 68 Figure 52: The Old Wishlist Page, www.harveynichols.com, page 69 Figure 53: The New Stores Page, www.harveynichols.com, http://www.theleaf.com/images/stories/Twitter_Logo.gif, http://3.bp.blogspot. com/-KNqO9JuXUN8/Ti2b1LHRquI/AAAAAAAAAIU/L6k8Wlzxj9k/s1600/logo_facebook.png, http://7dias7noches.net/blog/wp-content/ uploads/2012/04/instagram-logo.jpg, http://jonbennallick.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2012/09/Pinterest-Logo-Vector-by-Jon-Bennallick-02. png, page 70 Figure 54: The Old Stores Page, www.harveynichols.com, page 71 Figure 55: Big Spenders News Letter, www.hotmail.com, http://www.unsigneddesign.com/Vintage%20Wallpaper%20II/vintage_wallpaper2. jpg, http://instagram.com/harveynichols, page 73 Figure 56: Mid Spenders News Letter, www.hotmail.com, http://www.unsigneddesign.com/Vintage%20Wallpaper%20II/vintage_wallpaper2. jpg, http://instagram.com/harveynichols, page 74 Figure 57: Small Spenders News Letter, www.hotmail.com, http://www.unsigneddesign.com/Vintage%20Wallpaper%20II/vintage_ wallpaper2.jpg, http://instagram.com/harveynichols, page 75 Figure 58: Mobile Website, www.harveynichols.com, http://www.iceflowstudios.com/v3/wp-content/uploads/2012/09/iPhone5Front. jpg, http://www.theleaf.com/images/stories/Twitter_Logo.gif, http://3.bp.blogspot.com/-KNqO9JuXUN8/Ti2b1LHRquI/AAAAAAAAAIU/ L6k8Wlzxj9k/s1600/logo_facebook.png, http://7dias7noches.net/blog/wp-content/uploads/2012/04/instagram-logo.jpg, http://jonbennallick. co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2012/09/Pinterest-Logo-Vector-by-Jon-Bennallick-02.png page 76 Figure 59: App Home Page, www.harveynichols.com, http://www.theleaf.com/images/stories/Twitter_Logo.gif, http://3.bp.blogspot. com/-KNqO9JuXUN8/Ti2b1LHRquI/AAAAAAAAAIU/L6k8Wlzxj9k/s1600/logo_facebook.png, http://7dias7noches.net/blog/wp-content/ uploads/2012/04/instagram-logo.jpg, http://jonbennallick.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2012/09/Pinterest-Logo-Vector-by-Jon-Bennallick-02. png, www.harveynichols.com, http://www.theleaf.com/images/stories/Twitter_Logo.gif, http://3.bp.blogspot.com/-KNqO9JuXUN8/ Ti2b1LHRquI/AAAAAAAAAIU/L6k8Wlzxj9k/s1600/logo_facebook.png, http://7dias7noches.net/blog/wp-content/uploads/2012/04/ instagram-logo.jpg, http://jonbennallick.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2012/09/Pinterest-Logo-Vector-by-Jon-Bennallick-02.png, http://www. iceflowstudios.com/v3/wp-content/uploads/2012/09/iPhone5Front.jpg, page 78 Figure 60: App Multiple Product Page, www.harveynichols.com, http://www.theleaf.com/images/stories/Twitter_Logo.gif, http://3.bp.blogspot. com/-KNqO9JuXUN8/Ti2b1LHRquI/AAAAAAAAAIU/L6k8Wlzxj9k/s1600/logo_facebook.png, http://7dias7noches.net/blog/wp-content/ uploads/2012/04/instagram-logo.jpg, http://jonbennallick.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2012/09/Pinterest-Logo-Vector-by-Jon-Bennallick-02. png, http://moblog.net/media/r/a/r/rareaquaticbadger/cold-spring-harbor-new-york-3.jpg, http://www.iceflowstudios.com/v3/wp-content/ uploads/2012/09/iPhone5Front.jpg, page 78 Figure 61: App Single Product Page, www.harveynichols.com, http://www.theleaf.com/images/stories/Twitter_Logo.gif, http://3.bp.blogspot. com/-KNqO9JuXUN8/Ti2b1LHRquI/AAAAAAAAAIU/L6k8Wlzxj9k/s1600/logo_facebook.png, http://7dias7noches.net/blog/wp-content/ uploads/2012/04/instagram-logo.jpg, http://jonbennallick.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2012/09/Pinterest-Logo-Vector-by-Jon-Bennallick-02. png, http://www.iceflowstudios.com/v3/wp-content/uploads/2012/09/iPhone5Front.jpg, page 78


Figure 62: App Stores Page, www.harveynichols.com, http://www.theleaf.com/images/stories/Twitter_Logo.gif, http://3.bp.blogspot. com/-KNqO9JuXUN8/Ti2b1LHRquI/AAAAAAAAAIU/L6k8Wlzxj9k/s1600/logo_facebook.png, http://7dias7noches.net/blog/wp-content/ uploads/2012/04/instagram-logo.jpg, http://jonbennallick.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2012/09/Pinterest-Logo-Vector-by-Jon-Bennallick-02. png, http://www.iceflowstudios.com/v3/wp-content/uploads/2012/09/iPhone5Front.jpg, page 79 Figure 63: App Wishlist Page, www.harveynichols.com, http://www.theleaf.com/images/stories/Twitter_Logo.gif, http://3.bp.blogspot. com/-KNqO9JuXUN8/Ti2b1LHRquI/AAAAAAAAAIU/L6k8Wlzxj9k/s1600/logo_facebook.png, http://7dias7noches.net/blog/wp-content/ uploads/2012/04/instagram-logo.jpg, http://jonbennallick.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2012/09/Pinterest-Logo-Vector-by-Jon-Bennallick-02. png, http://www.iceflowstudios.com/v3/wp-content/uploads/2012/09/iPhone5Front.jpg, page 79 Figure 64: App Camera Page, www.harveynichols.com, http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/f/fe/UPC_A.svg/220pxUPC_A.svg.png, page 79 Figure 65: App Harvey Nichols Edit Page, www.harveynichols.com, http://www.theleaf.com/images/stories/Twitter_Logo.gif, http://3. bp.blogspot.com/-KNqO9JuXUN8/Ti2b1LHRquI/AAAAAAAAAIU/L6k8Wlzxj9k/s1600/logo_facebook.png, http://7dias7noches.net/blog/ wp-content/uploads/2012/04/instagram-logo.jpg, http://jonbennallick.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2012/09/Pinterest-Logo-Vector-by-JonBennallick-02.png, http://www.iceflowstudios.com/v3/wp-content/uploads/2012/09/iPhone5Front.jpg, page 80 Figure 66: Click-and-collect Emphasised on the Website, http://www.theleaf.com/images/stories/Twitter_Logo.gif, http://3.bp.blogspot. com/-KNqO9JuXUN8/Ti2b1LHRquI/AAAAAAAAAIU/L6k8Wlzxj9k/s1600/logo_facebook.png, http://7dias7noches.net/blog/wp-content/ uploads/2012/04/instagram-logo.jpg, http://jonbennallick.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2012/09/Pinterest-Logo-Vector-by-Jon-Bennallick-02. png, www.harveynichols.com, page 81 Figure 67: Click-and-collect Emphasised on the App, http://www.theleaf.com/images/stories/Twitter_Logo.gif, http://3.bp.blogspot. com/-KNqO9JuXUN8/Ti2b1LHRquI/AAAAAAAAAIU/L6k8Wlzxj9k/s1600/logo_facebook.png, http://7dias7noches.net/blog/wp-content/ uploads/2012/04/instagram-logo.jpg, http://jonbennallick.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2012/09/Pinterest-Logo-Vector-by-Jon-Bennallick-02. png, www.harveynichols.com, page 81 Figure 68: The Website and App Promoted in Store, http://www.standoffsystems.com/catalog/files/PortfolioImages/WS-portfolio/WSCeiling_Sign.jpg, http://4.bp.blogspot.com/-2No-A7TTvMk/TmnojctQnvI/AAAAAAAAAA8/wmjAPdX75S0/s1600/roll_up_display_stand_ budget_2.jpg, http://www.disneyrollergirl.net/wp-content/uploads/BeautyMART-Harvey-Nichols-3.jpg, http://www.blueinc.co.uk/media/ wysiwyg/ipad_1.jpg, page 82 Figure 69: Social Media Promoted in Store Windows, http://pinterest.com/pin/6473993186782532/, http://thebestfashionblog.com/wpcontent/uploads/2012/09/Harvey-Nichols-Autumn-Winter-2012-2013-Campaign-8.jpg, page 83 Figure 70: Hack-tivate Moodboard, www.wgsn.com, page 85 Figure 71: NDA Moodboard, www.wgsn.com, page 87 Figure 72: Table of Advertising Locations, page 89 Figure 73: Autumn/Winter Campaign, http://instagram.com/harveynichols, http://designerwallcoverings.com/WallpaperStore/images/ lattistrelliswallslat12011.jpeg, page 91 Figure 74: Autumn/ Winter Campaign, http://instagram.com/harveynichols, http://www.unsigneddesign.com/VintageWallpaper/Vintage%20 Wallpaper/vintagewallpaper4.jpg, page 92 Figure 75: Autumn/ Winter Campaign, http://instagram.com/harveynichols, http://www.fads.co.uk/assets/images/cached/img/1000x750/ f6b8e1e31f48754f5ddff67a02e10e4a/product/piazza-natural-geometric-wallpaper-_1326283350.jpg, page 93


Figure 76: Autumn/ Winter Campaign, http://instagram.com/harveynichols, http://www.fads.co.uk/assets/images/cached/img/1000x750/ f6b8e1e31f48754f5ddff67a02e10e4a/product/arthouse-aquarius-textured-mocha-wallpaper_1319555051.jpg, page 94 Figure 77: Autumn/ Winter Campaign, http://instagram.com/harveynichols, http://www.unsigneddesign.com/Vintage%20Wallpaper%20II/ vintage_wallpaper2.jpg, page 95 Figure 78: Spring/Summer Campaign, http://thebestfashionblog.com/womens-fashion/harvey-nichols-autumn-winter-2012-2013-campaign, page 96 Figure 79: Spring/Summer Campaign, http://thebestfashionblog.com/womens-fashion/harvey-nichols-autumn-winter-2012-2013-campaign, page 97 Figure 80: Spring/Summer Campaign, http://thebestfashionblog.com/womens-fashion/harvey-nichols-autumn-winter-2012-2013-campaign, page 98 Figure 81: Spring/Summer Campaign, http://thebestfashionblog.com/womens-fashion/harvey-nichols-autumn-winter-2012-2013-campaign, page 99 Figure 82: Spring/Summer Campaign, http://thebestfashionblog.com/womens-fashion/harvey-nichols-autumn-winter-2012-2013-campaign, page 100 Figure 83: Spring/Summer Campaign, http://thebestfashionblog.com/womens-fashion/harvey-nichols-autumn-winter-2012-2013-campaign, page 101 Figure 84: Autumn/Winter Window Display, http://instagram.com/harveynichols, http://2.bp.blogspot.com/-mBTMsITYoKc/TjBPi6CWLhI/ AAAAAAAAATg/j2valvjj7KA/s1600/peuf_20110727_17.jpg, http://www.iceflowstudios.com/v3/wp-content/uploads/2012/09/iPhone5Front. jpg, http://www.anothernormal.com/wp-assets/windows/20090114_bergdorf/200901_d3h_06589_bergdorf_w16.jpg, page 103 Figure 85: Autumn/Winter Window Display, http://instagram.com/harveynichols, http://2.bp.blogspot.com/-mBTMsITYoKc/TjBPi6CWLhI/ AAAAAAAAATg/j2valvjj7KA/s1600/peuf_20110727_17.jpg, http://www.iceflowstudios.com/v3/wp-content/uploads/2012/09/iPhone5Front. jpg, http://www.anothernormal.com/wp-assets/windows/2010/20100224_barneys/201002_d7h04698_barneys_w2.jpg, page 104 Figure 86: Autumn/Winter In-Store Displays, http://munchkie.files.wordpress.com/2011/04/img_8289.jpg, http://www.unsigneddesign.com/ Vintage%20Wallpaper%20II/vintage_wallpaper2.jpg, http://designerwallcoverings.com/WallpaperStore/images/lattistrelliswallslat12011. jpeg, http://www.anothernormal.com/wp-assets/windows/2010/20100224_barneys/201002_d7h04698_barneys_w2.jpg, http://www. anothernormal.com/wp-assets/windows/20090114_bergdorf/200901_d3h_06589_bergdorf_w16.jpg, page 105 Figure 87: Interactive Tags, http://www.wbc.co.uk/ktag_zoom-kraft-gift-tag.jpg, http://www.iceflowstudios.com/v3/wp-content/ uploads/2012/09/iPhone5Front.jpg, http://instagram.com/harveynichols, http://www.theleaf.com/images/stories/Twitter_Logo.gif, http://3. bp.blogspot.com/-KNqO9JuXUN8/Ti2b1LHRquI/AAAAAAAAAIU/L6k8Wlzxj9k/s1600/logo_facebook.png, http://7dias7noches.net/blog/ wp-content/uploads/2012/04/instagram-logo.jpg, http://jonbennallick.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2012/09/Pinterest-Logo-Vector-by-JonBennallick-02.png, page 107 Figure 88: Spring/Summer Window Display, http://fazfashiondiary.blogspot.co.uk/2012/08/harvey-nichols-fallwinter-2012-campaign.html, http://2.bp.blogspot.com/-mBTMsITYoKc/TjBPi6CWLhI/AAAAAAAAATg/j2valvjj7KA/s1600/peuf_20110727_17.jpg, page 109 Figure 89: Spring/Summer Window Display, http://fazfashiondiary.blogspot.co.uk/2012/08/harvey-nichols-fallwinter-2012-campaign.html, http://2.bp.blogspot.com/-mBTMsITYoKc/TjBPi6CWLhI/AAAAAAAAATg/j2valvjj7KA/s1600/peuf_20110727_17.jpg, page 110 160


Figure 90: Spring/Summer In-Store Display, http://fazfashiondiary.blogspot.co.uk/2012/08/harvey-nichols-fallwinter-2012-campaign.html, http://munchkie.files.wordpress.com/2011/04/img_8289.jpg, page 112 Figure 91: Video Resulting from Photographing the Display, http://www.iceflowstudios.com/v3/wp-content/uploads/2012/09/iPhone5Front. jpg, www.youtube.com, page 113 Figure 92: Facebook in Autumn/Winter, www.facebook.com, http://instagram.com/harveynichols, http://www.unsigneddesign.com/ Vintage%20Wallpaper%20II/vintage_wallpaper2.jpg, page 115 Figure 93: Twitter in Autumn/Winter, http://www.unsigneddesign.com/VintageWallpaper/Vintage%20Wallpaper/vintagewallpaper4.jpg, http://instagram.com/harveynichols, www.twitter.com, page 116 Figure 94: YouTube in Autumn/Winter, www.youtube.com, http://instagram.com/harveynichols, page 117 Figure 95: Facebook in Spring/Summer, www.facebook.com, http://fazfashiondiary.blogspot.co.uk/2012/08/harvey-nichols-fallwinter-2012campaign.html, page 118 Figure 96: Twitter in Spring/Summer, www.twitter.com, http://fazfashiondiary.blogspot.co.uk/2012/08/harvey-nichols-fallwinter-2012campaign.html, page 119 Figure 97: YouTube in Spring/Summer, www.youtube.com, http://fazfashiondiary.blogspot.co.uk/2012/08/harvey-nichols-fallwinter-2012campaign.html, page 120 Figure 98: App Showing Content Related to the Advertising Campaign, www.harveynichols.com, http://www.theleaf.com/images/stories/ Twitter_Logo.gif, http://3.bp.blogspot.com/-KNqO9JuXUN8/Ti2b1LHRquI/AAAAAAAAAIU/L6k8Wlzxj9k/s1600/logo_facebook.png, http://7dias7noches.net/blog/wp-content/uploads/2012/04/instagram-logo.jpg, http://jonbennallick.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2012/09/ Pinterest-Logo-Vector-by-Jon-Bennallick-02.png, http://www.iceflowstudios.com/v3/wp-content/uploads/2012/09/iPhone5Front.jpg, page 121 Figure 99: Website Showing Content Related to the Advertising Campaign, www.harveynichols.com, http://www.theleaf.com/images/ stories/Twitter_Logo.gif, http://3.bp.blogspot.com/-KNqO9JuXUN8/Ti2b1LHRquI/AAAAAAAAAIU/L6k8Wlzxj9k/s1600/logo_facebook.png, http://7dias7noches.net/blog/wp-content/uploads/2012/04/instagram-logo.jpg, http://jonbennallick.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2012/09/ Pinterest-Logo-Vector-by-Jon-Bennallick-02.png, www.harveynichols.com, http://www.theleaf.com/images/stories/Twitter_Logo.gif, http://3.bp.blogspot.com/-KNqO9JuXUN8/Ti2b1LHRquI/AAAAAAAAAIU/L6k8Wlzxj9k/s1600/logo_facebook.png, http://7dias7noches.net/ blog/wp-content/uploads/2012/04/instagram-logo.jpg, http://jonbennallick.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2012/09/Pinterest-Logo-Vector-byJon-Bennallick-02.png, page 121 Figure 100: Events Promoted through Social Media, www.facebook.com, www.twitter.com, http://fazfashiondiary.blogspot.co.uk/2012/08/ harvey-nichols-fallwinter-2012-campaign.html, http://www.harveynichols.com/hnedit/wp-content/uploads/2012/11/HN-BB-387s1.jpg, page 123 Figure 101: Events Promoted In-Store, www.harveynichols.com, http://4.bp.blogspot.com/-2No-A7TTvMk/TmnojctQnvI/AAAAAAAAAA8/ wmjAPdX75S0/s1600/roll_up_display_stand_budget_2.jpg, http://www.disneyrollergirl.net/wp-content/uploads/BeautyMART-HarveyNichols-3.jpg, page 124 Figure 102: Events Promoted through the App, www.harveynichols.com, http://www.theleaf.com/images/stories/Twitter_Logo.gif, http://3. bp.blogspot.com/-KNqO9JuXUN8/Ti2b1LHRquI/AAAAAAAAAIU/L6k8Wlzxj9k/s1600/logo_facebook.png, http://7dias7noches.net/blog/ wp-content/uploads/2012/04/instagram-logo.jpg, http://jonbennallick.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2012/09/Pinterest-Logo-Vector-by-JonBennallick-02.png, http://www.iceflowstudios.com/v3/wp-content/uploads/2012/09/iPhone5Front.jpg, page 124


Figure 103: Events Promoted through the Website, www.harveynichols.com, http://www.theleaf.com/images/stories/Twitter_Logo.gif, http://3.bp.blogspot.com/-KNqO9JuXUN8/Ti2b1LHRquI/AAAAAAAAAIU/L6k8Wlzxj9k/s1600/logo_facebook.png, http://7dias7noches. net/blog/wp-content/uploads/2012/04/instagram-logo.jpg, http://jonbennallick.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2012/09/Pinterest-Logo-Vectorby-Jon-Bennallick-02.png, www.harveynichols.com, http://www.theleaf.com/images/stories/Twitter_Logo.gif, http://3.bp.blogspot. com/-KNqO9JuXUN8/Ti2b1LHRquI/AAAAAAAAAIU/L6k8Wlzxj9k/s1600/logo_facebook.png, http://7dias7noches.net/blog/wp-content/ uploads/2012/04/instagram-logo.jpg, http://jonbennallick.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2012/09/Pinterest-Logo-Vector-by-Jon-Bennallick-02. png, page 125 Figure 104: The Beyond Medispa at Harvey Nichols, http://cdn.whatclinic.com/massage-therapy/uk/london/london-sw-district/bromptonroad/beyond-medispalondon/thumbnails/177bc6e5120127ea/dsc00004_compressed-original.jpg, page 126 Figure 105: Personal Shopping at Harvey Nichols, http://www.harveynichols.com/media/PersonalShopping_EDIN.jpg, page 126 Figure 106: Magazines aimed at Harvey Nichols Target Market, http://www.celebitchy.com/wp-content/uploads/2010/12/gq-cover-med-res. jpg, http://3.bp.blogspot.com/-zE3U-aYpUxA/T1krQJYVOdI/AAAAAAAAR-Q/a7SH9dK_fc0/s1600/Elle+UK+April+Cover+%232.jpg, http:// www.gotceleb.com/wp-content/uploads/celebrities/saoirse-ronan/dazed-confused-magazine-april-2013/Saoirse-Ronan---Dazed-andConfused-magazine--01.jpg, http://images.fashionmodeldirectory.com/images/magazines/covers/36/600/vogue-uk-2007-november-00. jpg, page 127 Figure 107: Year 1 Timeline, own image, page 128 Figure 108: Harvey Nichols Products, www.harveynichols.com, page 131 Figure 109: Harvey Nichols Products of Varying Price Points, www.harveynichols.com, page 132 Figure 110: Customer Service and Collection Area, http://www.viewpictures.co.uk/ImageThumbs/VER-VS-0005/3/VER-VS-0005_VERTU_ STORE_LANDSCAPE_VIEW_OF_SEATING_AREA_AND_DISPLAY_CABINETS.jpg, page 133 Figure 111: Example of a Harvey Nichols Pop Up Store, http://denimaniac.files.wordpress.com/2009/08/ymc_shop_front.jpg, http://www. publicdomainpictures.net/pictures/20000/velka/purple-christmas-baubles-11289755293oz0.jpg, http://www.anothernormal.com/wp-assets/ windows/2010/20100224_barneys/201002_d7h04698_barneys_w2.jpg, http://www.anothernormal.com/wp-assets/windows/20090114_ bergdorf/200901_d3h_06589_bergdorf_w16.jpg, page 135 Figure 112: Promotional Image for Harvey Nichols, http://fazfashiondiary.blogspot.co.uk/2012/08/harvey-nichols-fallwinter-2012-campaign. html, page 137 Figure 113: Promotional Image for Harvey Nichols, http://instagram.com/harveynichols, http://www.unsigneddesign.com/Vintage%20 Wallpaper%20II/vintage_wallpaper2.jpg, page 138 Figure 114: Sustainability Section on the Website, www.harveynichols.com, http://www.theleaf.com/images/stories/Twitter_Logo.gif, http://3.bp.blogspot.com/-KNqO9JuXUN8/Ti2b1LHRquI/AAAAAAAAAIU/L6k8Wlzxj9k/s1600/logo_facebook.png, http://7dias7noches. net/blog/wp-content/uploads/2012/04/instagram-logo.jpg, http://jonbennallick.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2012/09/Pinterest-Logo-Vectorby-Jon-Bennallick-02.png, www.harveynichols.com, http://www.theleaf.com/images/stories/Twitter_Logo.gif, http://3.bp.blogspot. com/-KNqO9JuXUN8/Ti2b1LHRquI/AAAAAAAAAIU/L6k8Wlzxj9k/s1600/logo_facebook.png, http://7dias7noches.net/blog/wp-content/ uploads/2012/04/instagram-logo.jpg, http://jonbennallick.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2012/09/Pinterest-Logo-Vector-by-Jon-Bennallick-02. png, http://mynews.mumbleabout.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/05/Recycle_Logo_big.jpg, http://uhome.in/wp-content/uploads/2012/07/ brown-paper-bag-texture.jpg, page 140 162


Figure 115: 2-5 Year Timeline, own image, page 141 Figure 116: Cost of Activities, own image, page 143 and 144 Figure 117: Profit and Loss Account, own image, page 145 Figure 118: Growth Forecast, own image, page 146 Figure 119: Cost of Activities, own image, page 147 Figure 120: Profit and Loss Account, own image, page 148 Figure 121: Growth Forecast, own image, page 149 Figure 122: Harvey Nichols Visual Merchandising, http://ftape.com/media/?p=10730, page 151

163


8.3 BIBLIOGRAPHY Books: Ebster, C and M, Garaus, 2011. Store design and visual merchandising: creating a store space that encourages buying. Business Expert Press: United States of America. Floor, K, 2006. Branding a store: how to build successful retail brands in a changing marketplace. Kogan Page Limited: United Kingdom. Gupta, S and G Randhawa, 2008. Retail Management. Atlantic: New Delhi. Perrey, J and D Spillecke, 2011. Retail marketing and branding: A definitive guide to maximising ROI. John Wiley and Sons: United Kingdom. Newspaper/Magazine Articles: Craven, J, November 2012. Vogues’ Top 100 Online Stores. British Vogue. Page 89-100 Wynarczyk, N, April 2013. The Queens of Pop-up. Marie Claire, Page 174-180. Online Articles: Barocas, J, 2012. Why MVS is the new QR. Available at: http://www.imediaconnection.com/content/31189.asp, accessed 1st March 2013. Barocas, J, 2012. Why QR codes won’t last. Available at: http://mashable.com/2012/02/15/qr-codes-rip/, accessed 1st March 2013. BBC News, 2013. Chinese tourists sub ‘Big Stupid Clock’. Available at: http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-london-21298641, accessed 11th March 2013. Beauty Stat, 2013. 2013, 2014 beauty industry market trends and statistics – cosmetic executive women trend spotting event. Available at:http://www.beautystat.com/site/skincare/2013-2014-beauty-industry-market-trends-and-statistics-cosmetic-executive-womentrendspotting-event/, accessed 5th March 2013. Bolick, S, 2012. Sustainability now a strategy, not just a report. Available at: http://www.forbes.com/sites/sap/2012/03/19/sustainability-nowa-strategy-not-just-a-report/, accessed 26th March 2013. Envision Media, 2013. Facebook vs Twitter vs Pinterest – 2013 statistics. Available at: http://www.envisionmedia360.com/infographics/ facebook-vs-twitter-vs-pinterest-2013-statistics-infographic-719, accessed 21st March 2013. Google, 2013. Google Analytics. Available at: http://www.google.co.uk/analytics/, accessed 21st March 2013.


Greenstein, T, 2013. The billion dollar travel trend you’ve never heard of. Available at: http://www.forbes.com/sites/traceygreenstein/2012/04/18/ the-billion-dollar-travel-trend-youve-never-heard-of/, accessed 11th March 2013. Hume, T, 2011. Shopping tourists fuel record retail sales. Available at: http://www.independent.co.uk/news/uk/home-news/shopping-touristsfuel-record-retail-sales-6281794.html, accessed 11th March 2013. Hutchings, E, 2013. Dior takes over the entire Harrods store. Available at: http://www.psfk.com/2013/03/dior-harrods-takeover.html?utm_ source=Sailthru&utm_medium=email&utm_term=daily&utm_campaign=Daily%202013-03-20, accessed 4th April 2013. Jones, T, 2013. Harvey Nichols ‘lesbian kiss’ campaign cleared by advertising watchdog. Available at: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/femail/ article-2289581/Harvey-Nichols-lesbian-kiss-advert-cleared-Advertising-Standards-Authority.html, accessed 7th March 2013. Lee, L, 2012. Manchester city stars shop ‘till they drop at Carrington training ground as upmarket Harvey Nichols set up Christmas stores. Available at: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/sport/football/article-2241041/Manchester-City-stars-shop-Carrington-Harvey-Nichols-setChristmas-store.html, accessed 26th March 2013. Ledbury Research, 2011. UK luxury market to grow by 57% by 2015. Available at: https://www.ledburyresearch.com/news/archive/ukluxury-market-to-grow-by-57-by-2015, accessed 1st December 2012. Lovett, G, 2012. Harvey Nichols adds classic labels to boost its brand mix. Available at: http://www.retail-week.com/sectors/departmentstores/harvey-nichols-adds-classic-labels-to-boost-its-brand-mix/5037368.article, accessed 1st March 2013. MacDonald, G, 2009. Harvey Nichols to widen appeal with young-fashion offer. Available at: http://www.retail-week.com/sectors/departmentstores/harvey-nichols-to-widen-appeal-with-young-fashion-offer/5002408.article, accessed 1st March 2013. Maden, S, 2011. Dazed & Confused celebrates 20 years with biggest issue to date. Available at: http://www.mediaweek.co.uk/news/1092156/ Dazed---Confused-celebrates-20-years-biggest-issue-date/, accessed 22nd February 2013. Marshall-Johnson, R, 2011. Future Consumer Forecast 2013. Available at: http://www.wgsn.com/content/report/Think_Tank/2011/June/ consumer_forecast20130.html, accessed 12th November 2012. Moulds, J, 2013. Budget 2013: UK economic growth slashed by half. Available at: http://www.guardian.co.uk/uk/2013/mar/20/budget-2013economic-growth-forecast, accessed 22nd March 2013. Munro, J, 2012. How Vintage Aesthetics in Branding Entice Consumers. Available at: http://www.trendreports.com/article/vintage-aestheticsin-branding, accessed 21st March 2013. 165


Patel, D, 2013. Luxury retailers leading the way with in-store technology. Available at: http://www.guardian.co.uk/media-network/medianetwork-blog/2013/jan/15/luxury-retailers-in-store-tech#, accessed 1st March 2013. Pop Up Space Blog, 2012. Harvey Nichols pop up shop. Available at: http://www.popupspaceblog.com/2012/10/harvey-nichols-pop-upshop/, accessed 26th March 2013. PSFK Labs, 2013. Rachel Shechtman: Why retail is like publishing. Available at: http://www.psfk.com/2013/03/rachel-shechtman-on-howretail-is-like-publishing-conference-2013.html?utm_source=Sailthru&utm_medium=email&utm_term=daily&utm_campaign=Daily%20 2013-03-19, accessed 4th April 2013. Retail Week, 2012. Harvey Nichols expands digital team. Available at: http://www.retail-week.com/sectors/department-stores/harveynichols-expands-digital-team/5037595.article, accessed 1st March 2013. Roggio, A, 2009. Ecommerce know-how: Four ways to measure and print advertising effectiveness. Available at: http://www. practicalecommerce.com/articles/1076-Ecommerce-Know-How-Four-Ways-to-Measure-Print-Advertising-Effectiveness, accessed 21st March 2013. Shields, A, 2009. Harvey Nichols targets tourist spend with campaign. Available at: http://www.retail-week.com/in-business/marketing/ harvey-nichols-targets-tourist-spend-with-ad-campaign/2013797.article, accessed 11th March 2013. Small Biz Makeover, 2012. QR codes vs. Mobile Visual Search. Available at: http://sbmwebsitedesign.com/qr-codes-vs-mobile-visualsearch/, accessed 1st March 2013. Smithers, R, 2013. Tourists splurge ÂŁ4.5bn in UK shops. Available at: http://www.guardian.co.uk/business/2013/feb/27/tourists-spend-ukshops-retail, accessed 11th March 2013. Torison Mobile, 2012. QR codes vs. Mobile Visual Search. Available at: http://torsionmobile.com/2012/03/21/qr-codes-vs-mobile-visualsearch/, accessed 1st March 2013. Visual.ly, 2013. Storytelling one frame at a time. Available at: http://visual.ly/storytelling-one-frame-time, accessed 15th April 2013. Walker, 2013. Kate Spade Japan releases a new item each week to encourage shopping. Available at: http://www.psfk.com/2013/03/katespade-saturday-japan.html?utm_source=Sailthru&utm_medium=email&utm_term=daily&utm_campaign=Daily%202013-03-20, accessed 4th April 2013. 166


Walsh, K, 2011. Designer Outlets lure the fashion tourists. Available at: http://www.thesundaytimes.co.uk/sto/public/roadtorecovery/ article661635.ece, accessed 11th March 2013. Wee, H, 2013. How mobile technology is revolutionising in-store shopping. Available at: http://www.cnbc.com/id/100377473/How_Mobile_ Technology_Is_Revolutionizing_InStore_Shopping, accessed 1st March 2013. WGSN Newsteam, 2012. Harvey Nichols year end profits rise. Available at: http://www.wgsn.com.ezproxy.ntu.ac.uk/content/report/ News/2012/Sept_Stories/Sept_19/News_Story_Sept_1918.html, accessed 11th April 2013. Websites: Another Magazine, 2013. Home. Available at: http://www.anothermag.com/, accessed 11th March 2013. ASOS, 2013. Fashion Finder. Available at: http://fashionfinder.asos.com/?WT.ac=ASOS_grpnav_UK, accessed 11th March 2013. BigDug, 2013. Recycling Bins. Available at: http://www.bigdug.co.uk/home-storage-c402/kitchen-utility-cellar-c609/recycling-binspp1856?utm_source=google&utm_medium=cpc&utm_term=recycling-bins&utm_campaign=product%2Blisting%2Bads&__ja=kw:%20 Recycling%20Bins%20%7Ccgn:Google_Merchant_Centre_Product_Ads%7Ctsid:42969&gclid=CJD2rvyOqbYCFcLHtAodi2MAEA, accessed 1st April 2013. CBS Outdoor, 2013. London Underground. Available at: http://www.cbsoutdoor.co.uk/Our-Media/London-Underground/, accessed 11th March 2013. CBS Outdoor, 2013. London Underground Rate Card. Available at: http://www.cbsoutdoor.co.uk/Global/UK/documents/2013_Rate_Cards/ London%20Underground,%20DLR%20London%20Tramlink%20Rate%20Card%202013.pdf, accessed 11th March. CDC, 2013. 44cm Flat Wooden Walnut Tops Hanger with Notches & Gold Hook. Available at: http://www.hangersuk.co.uk/shop-index#!/~/ product/category=2597032&id=12162294, accessed 4th April 2013. Cruise, 2013. Home. Available at: http://www.cruisefashion.co.uk/, accessed 11th March 2013. Dabs, 2013. NEC Displays V651 65 Inch full HD public LCD display. Available at: http://www.dabs.com/products/nec-displays-v651-65-inchfull-hd-public-lcd-display-7XYQ.html?utm_source=google&utm_medium=ppc%20product%20search&utm_content=Q200&origin=pla, accessed 4th April 2013. Dazed & Confused, 2013. About. http://www.dazeddigital.com/info/article/824/1/dazed-confused, accessed 22nd February 2013. 167


Ebay, 2013. Overlapping polystyrene ceiling tiles. Available at: http://compare.ebay.co.uk/like/300875224227?var=lv&ltyp=AllFixedPriceIte mTypes&var=sbar&adtype=pla&crdt=0, accessed 4th April 2013. Elle, 2013. Elle Media Kit. Available at: http://www.ellemediakit.com/r5/showkiosk.asp?listing_id=4165173, accessed 22nd February 2013. Elle, 2013. Home. Available at: http://www.elle.com/, accessed 22nd February 2013. Fairtrade, 2013. Home. Available at: http://www.fairtrade.org.uk/, accessed 26th March 2013. Franteractive, 2013. Ansoff Matrix. Available at: http://www.franteractive.net/Matrix-Ansoff.html, accessed 1st March 2013. Google, 2013. Levv FUCOCCH coffee table in clear glass with chrome legs. Available at: https://www.google.co.uk/shopping/product/6713 065219967217835?q=glass%20coffee%20table&hl=en&bav=on.2,or.r_cp.r_qf.&bvm=bv.44442042,d.ZGU&biw=1517&bih=714&sa=X&ei =Y1JZUeDZI-WX1AW77IHYCA&ved=0CGEQ8wIwATgK, accessed 1st April 2013. Google Play, 2013. Old Navy Snap Appy. Available at: https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.oldnavy.snapappy&hl=en, accessed 1st March 2013. GQ, 2013. Home. Available at: http://www.gq-magazine.co.uk/, accessed 22nd February 2013. Harrods, 2013. Brand Identity Guidelines. Available at: http://harrodscreative.com/downloads/Harrods%20Brand%20Guidelines.pdf, accessed 6th March 2013. Harvey Nichols, 2013. In-store services. Available at: http://www.harveynichols.com/london-instore, accessed 25th February 2013. Harvey Nichols, 2013. London. Available at: http://www.harveynichols.com/london, accessed 25th February 2013. Hearst, 2013. Elle Magazine. Available at: http://www.hearst.co.uk/magazines/Elle/5-about.htm, accessed 22nd February 2013. Ikea, 2013. KARLSTAD. Available at: http://www.ikea.com/gb/en/catalog/products/70118685/, accessed 1st April 2013. Ikea, 2013. KARLSTAD. Available at: http://www.ikea.com/gb/en/catalog/products/10118711/, accessed 1st April 2013. Instagram, 2013. Harvey Nichols. Available at: http://instagram.com/harveynichols, accessed 25th February 2013. IQ Engines, 2013. How it works. Available at: https://www.iqengines.com/howitworks/, accessed 1st March 2013.


IQ Engines, 2013. VisionIQ Pricing Plans. Available at: https://www.iqengines.com/pricing/#, accessed 1st March 2013. Laser Make, 2013. Home. Available at: http://www.lasermake.co.uk/, accessed 4th April 2013. Liverpool One, 2012. Harvey Nichols Food Market Pop up shop. Available at: http://www.liverpool-one.com/website/Modules/StoreDirectory/ StoreListing/StoreDetails.aspx?RetailUnitId=a36cc1d4-5382-4bae-9e15-086e3db711f2m, accessed 26th March 2013. Luxury Branding, 2012. Selfridges. Available at: http://www.luxury-branding.com/experience/luxury-fashion-and-luxury-retail-branding/ selfridges/, accessed 6th March 2013. Marks and Spencer, 2013. Plan A. Available at: http://plana.marksandspencer.com/, accessed 26th March 2013. Net-a-Porter, 2013. Home. Available at: http://www.net-a-porter.com/magazine/185/contents, accessed 11th March 2013. PC World, 2013. Apple iPad with retina display – 16gb Wi-Fi white. Available at: http://www.pcworld.co.uk/gbuk/apple-ipad-with-retinadisplay-16-gb-wifi-white-17316282-pdt.html, accessed 1st April 2013. PicklinQ, 2013. Home. Available at: http://www.pixlinq.com/home, accessed 1st March 2013. POD Exhibitions, 2013. Electurm iPad Podium. Available at: http://www.pod-exhibition-systems.co.uk/product.aspx?p=electrum+ipad+pod ium&pi=5673&sc=ipad+stands&sci=800&c=multimedi&ci=0, accessed 1st April 2013. Selfridges, 2013. No Noise. Available at: http://nonoise.selfridges.com/, accessed 1st March 2013. Topshop, 2013. Organza insert shift dress. Available at: http://www.topshop.com/webapp/wcs/stores/servlet/ProductDisplay?beginIndex= 1&viewAllFlag=&catalogId=33057&storeId=12556&productId=8881055&langId=-1&sort_field=Relevance&categoryId=208523&parent_ca tegoryId=203984&pageSize=2000, accessed 11th March 2013. UK Cities, 2013. Largest Cities in the UK. Available at: http://www.ukcities.co.uk/populations/, accessed 26th March 2013. Vogue, 2013. Home. Available at: http://www.vogue.co.uk/, accessed 22nd February 2013. Wilkinson, 2013. Wilko every day value silk emulsion white paint 2.5 litre. Available at: http://www.wilko.com/wall+ceiling-paint/wilkoeveryday-value-silk-emulsion-paint-white-25ltr/invt/0104350, accessed 4th April 2013. 169


Reports: CBS Outdoor, 2013. Pack Portfolio: London Underground. Available at: http://www.cbsoutdoor.co.uk/Global/UK/documents/packs/CBS%20 Outdoor%2048%20Sheet%20Packs.pdf, accessed 11th March 2013. Conde Nast, 2013. GQ Media Pack. Available at: http://digital-assets.condenast.co.uk.s3.amazonaws.com/static/condenast/gq-mediapack-30042012.pdf, accessed 22nd February 2013. Conde Nast, 2013. Vogue Media Pack. Available at: http://digital-assets.condenast.co.uk.s3.amazonaws.com/static/condenast/voguemedia-pack-integrated-november-2012.pdf, accessed 22nd February 2013. Deloitte, 2013. The changing face of retail. Available at: http://www.deloitte.com/assets/Dcom-UnitedKingdom/Local%20Assets/Documents/ Industries/Consumer%20Business/uk-cb-store-of-the-future-report.pdf, accessed 4th April 2013. GMID, 2012. Consumer Lifestyles in the United Kingdom. Available at: https://www.portal.euromonitor.com/Portal/Pages/Search/ SearchResultsList.aspx, accessed 11th November 2012. HM Treasury, 2013. Forecasts for the UK economy. Available at: http://www.hm-treasury.gov.uk/d/201302forecomp.pdf, accessed 22nd March 2013. Key Note, 2013. ABC1 Consumer Market Report 2013. Available at: https://www.keynote.co.uk/market-intelligence/view/product/10643/ abc1-consumer?medium=html, accessed 11th March 2013. Key Note, 2013. C2DE Consumer Market Report 2013. Available at: https://www.keynote.co.uk/market-intelligence/view/product/10658/ c2de-consumer?medium=html, accessed 11th March 2013. Key Note, 2013. Harvey Nichols and Company limited. Available at: https://www.keynote.co.uk/business-intelligence/company-information/ view?regdNo=01774537&searchId=4077747&perPage=50&position=2&page=1&tabName=overview, accessed 11th April 2013. Mintel, 2013. Beauty retailing – UK – January 2013. Available at: http://academic.mintel.com/display/590054/?highlight=true, accessed 5th March 2013. Mintel, 2011. Consumer attitudes towards luxury brands – UK – November 2011. Available at: http://academic.mintel.com/display/600576/ ?highlight=true#hit1, accessed 11th March 2013. Mintel, 2012. Department store retailing – UK – March 2012. Available at: http://academic.mintel.com/display/590054/?highlight=true, accessed 5th March 2013. 170


WGSN Creative Direction team, 2011. AW 13/14 Macro trends. Available at: http://www.wgsn.com/content/report/Creative_Direction/ Autumn_Winter_2013_14/macro_trends/AW13_14_Macro_Trends.html, accessed 7th November 2012. WGSN Creative Direction team, 2012. S/S 2014 Macro Trends. Available at: http://www.wgsn.com/content/report/Creative_Direction/ Spring_summer_2014/s_s_14_neo_geo.html, accessed 20th February 2013. Videos: PlixinQ, 2011. La Redoute app powered by PlixinQ. Available at: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qUZCFtc42Q4&lr=1&uid=VLZGyMos1 jD2U3BB6ZySiA, accessed 1st March 2013. WGSN Official, 2012. Retail strategy webinar – designing the customer experience. Available at: http://www.youtube.com/ watch?v=Qc2gcDi1bXM, accessed 15th March 2013.

171


9.1 APPENDIX 1: RESEARCH SUPPORTING THE DETERMINING OF HARVEY NICHOLS’ BRAND POSITION In order to establish this positioning, it was essential to compare the positions of Harvey Nichols closest competitors. Harvey Nichols three main competitors positioning statements are: Harrods: Harrods are the ‘world’s most famous luxury department store’ (Facebook, 2013: Online), offering ‘constant innovation, service and quality to people all over the world’ (Harrods, 2013: Online) - predominantly ‘luxury consumers and ABC1s but the flagship Harrods store is a major tourist destination its own right, providing an appeal across the demographic spectrum’ (Mintel, 2013: Online). Selfridges: ‘Selfridges ‘are metropolitan, energetic… daring (and) irreverent’ (Brand Channel, 2013: Online). They focus on selling fashion to the upper mass market, with increasing provision for luxury customers. Selfridges’ stores are a tourist destination in their own right, more so in London than elsewhere’ (Mintel, 2012: Online). Liberty: Liberty is ‘the leading destination store in London… where the latest fashions sit alongside design classics… synonymous with luxury and great design’ (Facebook, 2013: Online). Reviewing these positions revealed that none of them mentioned exclusivity (Harvey Nichols USP) and therefore provided a clear space in the market for Harvey Nichols to occupy. This primary research was carried out with 50 consumers across all of Harvey Nichols consumer segments to determine exactly what they desire from Harvey Nichols. Participants were asked to rate 6 brand positions including Harrods’, Selfridges’, Liberty’s and three potential Harvey Nichols statements. The Harvey Nichols statements were created based upon secondary research in stage 1 which indicated the importance of trends such as multichannel, in-store experience, time-pressured consumers and the impact of the recession. The most popular second rated position was a potential Harvey Nichols position which proves the popularity of the attributes attached to it. One participant said that it was ‘more customer focused’ than the other potential Harvey Nichols statements and another said ‘I love the idea of including the shopping EXPERIENCE in the mission statement’. Participants were then asked to select from a list of words the ones which appealed to them the most. The words; Exclusive, Innovative, Multichannel and Luxury were the four most popular answers, suggesting that these attributes should be incorporated into the most popular potential Harvey Nichols brand position. 173


9.2 APPENDIX 2: PRIMARY RESEARCH SURVEY INTO BRAND POSITIONING 9.2.1 INTRODUCTION Prior to the full survey being conducted a pilot of the survey in paper form was tested with a sample of 10 participants. This yielded the desired responses and proved successful. Following the pilot, the survey was distributed in the form of an online survey and a physical survey. It was distributed via social media websites Facebook and Twitter, through email for contacts to then pass on and physically to contacts. This enabled a wide variety of 50 participants to be surveyed. Each participant of the online survey received the following message before starting the survey: ‘Please fill out this survey to aid me in my final year project at university on rejuvenating the Harvey Nichols brand, all answers are anonymous. By taking part you are agreeing that your answers can be used in my university project. Thank you for your time, it is greatly appreciated. Hannah Smith.’ Each participant of the paper survey received this message: ‘Dear participant, Please fill out this survey to aid me in my final year project at university on rejuvenating the Harvey Nichols brand. Answers will be anonymous as consent forms will be instantly mixed up in order to ensure anonymity. By taking part you are agreeing that your answers can be used in my university project. Thank you for your time, it is greatly appreciated. Hannah Smith. Please write today’s date, your name and your provide signature below.’ (Consent form signatures can be found in the ‘Additional Documents’ file).

174


9.2.2 SAMPLE ANALYSIS Convenience sampling was utilised due to the short space of time available to collect and analyse data. The sample has been analysed by socioeconomic groups, age, gender and geographical location. Figure 123 reveals that a wide range of socioeconomic statuses have been surveyed, all of these socioeconomic groups correspond to one or more of Harvey Nichols’ consumer segments. There are more E’s than any other group due to the distribution of the surveys on social media websites which yielded a high response from students. As many of these E’s are students, they may have wealthy families who support them financially, therefore their classification as E may not be entirely representative of their financial situation.

A=10% B=12% C1=18% C2=22% D=4% E=34% Figure 123: Socioeconomic Grouping of Participants

175


16-25=28% 26-35=24% 36-45=16% 46-55=20% 56-65=12% Figure 124: Age of Participants

A wide age range of participants have been surveyed as Harvey Nichols appeals to a wide variety of age groups. Each age group has a similar amount of respondents, providing a representative sample. As Harvey Nichols appeals to both males and females, a relatively equal balance of genders of participants was aimed for.

Male=46% Female=54% Figure 125: Gender of Participants


In order to ensure that the views expressed by participants was not location biased, a range of participants who lived/have previously lived in different areas of Britain have been surveyed. There is a bias towards participants who live/have lived in the East Midlands due to the location of the survey being conducted there. If more time was available, a wider crosssection of locations could have been surveyed. Overall, the sample taken for this survey is representative of Harvey Nichols primary and secondary target markets. Answers will be analysed generally as Harvey Nichols is aiming to appeal to a cross-section of different consumers.

East Midlands=74% Greater London=6% North East=4% North West=4% South East=8% South West=2% West Midlands=12% Yorkshire & The Humber=6% Scotland=4% Wales =2% Figure 126: Locations Lived in by Participants

177


9.2.3 ANSWER ANALYSIS 1. Please rate these brand positions in order of what would appeal to you the most. Rate from most appealing (1) to least (6): a. We are the world’s most famous luxury department store selling luxury goods and offering constant innovation, service and quality to people all over the world. b. We are the leading destination store in London where the latest fashions sit alongside design classics, synonymous with luxury and great design. c. We are innovative, fashion forward and about providing an engaging multichannel experience for our customers when buying our exclusive luxury fashion merchandise. d. We sell exclusive luxury fashion, beauty, home and food products to the fashion conscious through an engaging, innovative multichannel shopping experience. e. We are metropolitan, energetic, daring and irreverent department store who sell luxury and mass market products. f. We sell exclusive luxury fashion, beauty, home and food products through an engaging, innovative multichannel experience. AND 2. Please state why you have chosen this order:

178


Analysis: Question 1 contains 6 brand positions, three are those of competitor stores and three are slight variations on the proposed new Harvey Nichols brand position. A corresponds to Harrods’ brand position, B corresponds to Liberty’s brand position, E corresponds to Selfridges’ brand position and C, D and F are potential Harvey Nichols’ brand positions. Participants were then asked why they had chosen this particular order. The first rated answer, the second rated answer and the third rated answer have been put into a graph to see which have been rated the most popular brand positions. In addition to this, the least popular answers have been put into a graph to see which brand positions were the least attractive to consumers. This question has been designed to establish what consumers find most attractive from a brand position and determine which potential Harvey Nichols position was the most popular among consumers. Figure127: Most Popular Brand Positions

179

The most popular first rated answer is A (Harrods’ brand position). This shows that the majority of consumers found Harrods’ positioning to be the most appealing with one stating ‘If A is the world’s best it must be good’ and another saying ‘No. 1 appeals to me because it would be the ultimate shopping experience’. However, opinion still appeared to be divided regarding this positioning as some participants thought that Harrods’ brand position ‘tries too hard’, another said ‘don’t like that A think they are the best’ and a further participant said ‘Can’t have a brand blowing they’re own trumpet too much can you?’ This shows that this positioning may not be the most appropriate as it seemed to have a negative reaction from some consumers.


Both D and C were potential Harvey Nichols brand positions and were the most popular second rated position (D) and most popular third rated (C). This shows that both of these positions appeal to the Harvey Nichols consumer and that as D is the most popular out of the two, this is likely to be the chosen brand position. One participant said ‘D’s more customer focused than C&F’. As C and F are the other potential Harvey Nichols statements, this comment suggests that D will be the most popular statement among consumers. Another said ‘A&D state what kind of company they are, engaging me immediately and the words flow and appeal to me more’ again supporting that the attributes within this position are popular with Harvey Nichols’ consumers. A participant who rated D as their second preference said ‘I love the idea of including the shopping EXPERIENCE in the mission statement’, which supports the market trend of creating an experience for shoppers and further supports the relevance of this brand position to consumers. Another statement from a participant who rated D first states ‘I like exclusivity, luxury and multichannel’ – all words which are used in the statement. However, one participant who rated C and D low said that the ‘lower ones seem lost in jargon’ and another with a similar rating said ‘4-6 do not engage me and I am unsure of the word multichannel’. This shows the importance of clarity in delivering the brands message. Although the word multichannel will be present in the positioning statement it will not be used in marketing messages so as not to confuse some consumers.

180


E (Selfridges’ positioning statement) was rated the least appealing by 20/50 consumers. One stated ‘No 6’s message least favourite because of the mass market products’, this suggests that for some consumers the addition of mass market products to a luxury brand has a negative impact on their opinion of the brand. Harvey Nichols need to ensure that they do not dilute their brand identity when broadening their offering, they must ensure that the products which they stock are no less than upper-mass market. Another consumer who rated it as last said ‘Eye catching wording appeals to me personally’, suggesting that the wording was not eye catching enough. ‘Exclusivity and luxury are more closely aligned to what I like than daring and irreverent’ was another reason for rating E as last which suggests that for this consumer the attributes of E were not to their preference. A further participant who ranked E as second to last said ‘the last few try too hard’. Figure128: Least Popular Brand Positions

181

E was closely followed by F as the second most ranked as least appealing position. This was another option for Harvey Nichols positioning statement which has been revealed as being significantly less popular than the other two and will therefore be discounted as an option. F was described as ‘boring’ by one participant who also said that ‘4-6 do not engage me’ (referring to C, F and D). This suggests that the simplicity of the statement was what made it least appealing.


3. Please tick these characteristics of a brand which appeal most to you: - Fashion Forward - Innovative - Exclusive - Engaging - Multichannel - Cross-channel - Luxury Analysis: This question was used to gage which of these words are most appealing to consumers and determine which should be incorporated into the brand position. This question was a multi-choice question as these are specific features which primary research from the previous report and secondary research has proven to be important to brands currently and in the near future. Many are also appropriate to the Harvey Nichols brand currently and to current trends within the department store and luxury stores. The words; Exclusive, Innovative, Multichannel and Luxury were the four most popular answers, suggesting that these attributes are things which consumers look for in a brand. These will all therefore be incorporated into the brand position statement. Engaging and Fashion Forward were also popular answers which may also be incorporated. Most of these words were incorporated into the brand position which was the second rated most popular answer, validating this as the choice for the positioning statement. Cross-channel received the lowest amount of selections, significantly less than any other attribute. It could be suggested that this may not be something that is currently important to consumers as it is not a particularly well known concept and is an emerging trend in retail. 182

Figure129: Brand Attributes


4. Are there any other attributes which would make a brand appeal to you more? Analysis: This question yielded a vast amount of unique answers and was designed as an open-ended question in order to gain perspective on additional characteristics (not included in the previous question) which would make a brand such as Harvey Nichols appeal to consumers within their target market. This graph revealed that the most popular attributes were Quality, Value for Money, Environmentally Friendly, the Design/Style, Customer Service, Unique, and Design Classics. Environmentally Friendly was mentioned twice along with Fairtrade mentioned once and Locally Sourced mentioned once. These characteristics are all related to sustainability and reinforce the need for sustainability to be incorporated into the rejuvenated Harvey Nichols brand. Quality, Customer Service, Design/Style, Design Classics and Uniqueness are all features which can be incorporated into Harvey Nichols’ communication strategy – some visually and some in writing.

Figure130: Brand Attributes

Value for Money is a subjective term which depends on a person’s individual views and finances and therefore is not something which Harvey Nichols can promise in a brand position. 183


9.2.4 TABLE OF SURVEY RESULTS

184


185


186


187


188


Figure131: Table of Survey Results

189


9.3 APPENDIX 3: OBSERVATIONAL RESEARCH Further to the observational research in the first report, an additional store visit has occurred to gain a clearer and refreshed image of Harvey Nichols stores. Harvey Nichols: Date visited: 1st March 2013 Store location: Leeds Observations: - Man opening door for customers at the entrance, added to the overall store experience positively - Store appeared clean and tidy - Hangers looked old and tired, would benefit from looking new and cleaner - Visual merchandising displays were present at the top of the escalator when reaching the floor but it was otherwise absent making some areas look sparse and bland - The dark tiled floor of the beauty hall was a nice change to many competitor’s which are bright white. The department looked neat but lacking a ‘wow’ factor that the beauty bazaar store has. Due to only having access to two stores for observational research (Knightsbridge store research is detailed in the previous report), the conclusions from this research may be generalised and the scope of issues identified may not be as problematic for all stores.

Figure132: Harvey Nichols Leeds

190


9.4 APPENDIX 4: ADDITONAL WEBSITE RESEARCH Additional research into websites has been conducted to support the changes being made to the current Harvey Nichols website. Below are comments consumers made regarding the website through a primary research survey conducted in stage 1: Positive: - ‘Easy to use’ - ‘Simple design but all elements easily accessible - ‘Clean, well-organised, good for viewing products’ Neutral: - ‘Looks okay’ - ‘Could be a bit more inspiring’ - ‘nothing spectacular to make people talk about it’ - ‘Classic website which is similar to many others’ Negative/aspects which could be improved: - Looked outdated to me’ - ‘A mobile accessible website would be good’ - ‘It’s a bit ‘blah’’ - ‘Quite old fashioned and would benefit from links to their social media pages’ - ‘Could do a lot more to engage with consumers’ - ‘Bland, too dark, not exciting’ - ‘No sense of brand’

191


As previously mentioned and mentioned in Stage 1, consumers are increasingly time-starved and want a seamless, easy way to shop. Marshall-Johnson, writing for WGSN says that in 2013, consumers will want ‘apps, ads and magazines focused on presenting a clean, readable format’ (Marshall-Johnson, 2011: Online). This can be also be transferred into website design. Further secondary research has been done into websites and the images in figure 113 show the best aspects of some of the most innovative and engaging websites around at the moment. - Net-a-Porter have strong magazine-style content to engage their consumers whilst shopping online. Net-a-Porter was identified in the November 2012 of British Vogue as number one in ‘Vogue’s Top 100 Online Stores’ saying ‘It is impossibly easy to lose a few hours perusing the entire store, not to mention its online magazine. Its customer-focused service bends over backwards for big and small spenders alike. Great for jewellery, too, which they colour-coordinate with outfits’ (Craven, p89, 2012). - ASOS have a strong consumer interaction with their feature which enables shoppers to create their own outfits to share with other shoppers. Along with a Marketplace where members can sell their own brand/unwanted clothing. - Cruise have a very simplistic landing page which reflects their high-end brand image well. - Magazine AnOther fill the computer screen width with moving content which adds an extra dimension of interest as that is not often seen on websites. - & Other Stories have magazine content mixed in with their product pages which allows consumers to view this content whilst shopping, without navigating from the current web page. & Other Stories also show their products on a model which is another useful feature to gage size when buying products online. - Finally, Topshop have product reviews and a star rating system enabling consumers to get a better picture of the product before purchasing.

192


193

Figure133: Websites


9.5 APPENDIX 5: RESEARCH INTO APPS Research has been undertaken into other e-commerce apps to gage popular features and ensure that Harvey Nichols app follow design conventions so as not to confuse consumers with a completely new layout. Figure 134 shows some of the apps which were researched: - The Harrods and Net-a-Porter apps were viewed as they are two of Harvey Nichols main competitors online. The Harrods app does not have a e-commerce feature which the Harvey Nichols app will giving it a strong advantage. It does however have a lot of additional content which the Harvey Nichols app must match. The Net-a-Porter also has a lot of additional magazine style content and an engaging interface. - The ASOS app was also viewed as it has a clean, simple layout, similar to how the Harvey Nichols app will look. - The Topshop app has been used for inspiration for the layout of product pages as it is simple and neat.

194


195

Figure134: Apps


9.6 APPENDIX 6: MACRO TRENDS 9.6.1 A/W 13/14 MACRO TRENDS 9.6.1.1 21ST CENTURY ROMANCE WGSN says ‘romance as a design concept in the 21st Century places the importance on awe-inspiring and breath-taking beauty above all else’ (WGSN, 2011: Online). This trend is about captivating objects which create instant emotional reactions. ‘It’s foundations are science, nature, craftsmanship and the bringing together of seemingly contradictory design elements’ (WGSN, 2011: Online). Metamodernism is a term described by WGSN as something which had evolved from modernism and post modernism which will be defined in the next decade. Beauty and magic is instilled in non-traditional areas such as new media art and modern artisans are using technology to add dimension to traditional crafts. ‘Romantic Nature’ is a sub-theme which brings emotion, imagination and spontaneity to modern minimalism. Plants inspire new geometry for traditional print which is used to enhance stripes and checks. Fantasy and nature are fused.

196


197

Figure135: 21st Century Romance Moodboard


9.6.1.2 LIVING DESIGN Living design is about objects coming to life, merging the animal, human and the technological. It is about communicating ideas though feel, look and interaction. Hypertechnical becomes hyper-cute. The pace of innovation slows and technology is made more personal and ‘friendly’ to make gadgets like familiar companions. ‘Design responds by inventing new ways to make and talk about making; traditional disciplines are fused as products and designers learn to communicate and collaborate’ (WGSN, 2011: Online). Many products are inspired by emotion and ‘adopting shapes and textures from the animal kingdom is a simple introduction to cross-fertilisation as a direction for styling hand-held products like phones, tablets and music devices grow soft furry pelts as they become tactile technological pets’ (WGSN, 2011: Online). ‘As technology moves closer to creating artificial life, algorithms emerge as a new tool for creating organic art, music and fashion based on numbers’ (WGSN, 2011: Online). New solutions are created to old problems to help us move forward.

198


199

Figure136: Living Design Moodboard


9.6.2 S/S 14 MACRO TRENDS 9.6.2.1 NEO-GEO ‘Scientists have declared a new geological age: the Anthropocene. It is a new man-made era that recognises the extent of the effects mankind has had upon the earth’ (WGSN, 2012: Online). ‘Designers, cultural theorists and philosophers are suggesting revolutionary ways in which we can re-imagine civilisation in this new era. Urban planning, politics, and even education are in their sights’ (WGSN, 2012: Online). They are taking things back to their origins. In this trend we are moving away from over-consumption to find a more positive way to develop products. Projects are being created which ‘encourage us to imagine changes in the way we design our neighbourhoods, cities, countries, even continents, and the rethinking of political and economic systems’ (WGSN, 2012: Online). Resourcefulness in design is highlighted in this trend and waste is used to make products. There is also a focus on raw materials and a future without technology is imagined where ‘real time’ is prioritised. ‘Artists are reimagining brands, using Post-industrial materials and embedding them with state of the art functionality’ (WGSN, 2012: Online).

200


201

Figure137: Neo-Geo Moodboard


9.6.2.2 NEXT NATURE WGSN describes nature as alluring, sexy, spiritual, entertaining and ironic in this trend and plant life takes on human characteristics. They say that plants are not always pure and innocent and can be ‘sexy’. ‘Traditional ideas on nature, ecology and sustainability are given an overhaul. Nature tells us it is part of technology, design and youth culture’ (WGSN, 2012: Online). ‘Future objects become indistinguishable from nature’ (WGSN, 2012: Online) and ‘we will think about things ecologically, rather than mechanically’ (WGSN, 2012: Online).

202


203

Figure138: Next Nature Moodboard


9.7 APPENDIX 7: VISUAL MERCHANDISING Authors Ebster and Garaus state that ‘many shoppers will walk counter clockwise through the store’ (Ebster and Garaus, p9, 2011), suggesting that placing elements of visual merchandising on the right side of entrances would be beneficial. Additionally, ‘products placed at the shoppers eye level tend to sell significantly better than products at other heights on the shelf because products at eye level receive more attention that products placed either above or below’ (Ebster and Garaus, p24, 2011). This therefore should also relate to visual merchandising, suggesting that displays placed at eye level will attract attention and the products used in the display are likely to sell well.

204


9.8 APPENDIX 8: EVENTS FOR YEAR 1 9.8.1 LAUNCH OF THE NEW BEAUTY DEPARTMENT (BEAUTY EXTRAVAGANZA) Harvey Nichols will host an event to launch the new beauty departments at each store called the ‘Beauty Extravaganza’. Complementary beauty treatments will be provided on the day along with a 10% discount on all beauty products for the day to encourage sales and 2 hourly competitions to win exclusive Harvey Nichols beauty goody bags. The competition will involve shoppers tweeting Harvey Nichols with the hashtag #HarveyNicholsBeautyExtravaganza stating their favourite beauty product. Winners will be chosen at random in 2 hourly intervals. This will help to promote their Twitter page to shoppers on the day and consumers at home who see the tweets as it will hopefully trend. Complementary drinks will also be on offer. From 10am on Saturday the 24th of August 2013. See figure 139 for some of the in-store promotional material for this event.

205


206 Figure139: Promotional Material for the Beauty Extravaganza


9.8.2 NEW WEBSITE AND APP LAUNCH This event will celebrate the launch of the improved Harvey Nichols website and the new app. iPads will be placed around the store for consumers to browse the new website and for any purchases made on the new website during the event, a 10% discount will be applied. Click-and-collect will be available for the following day and free next day delivery especially for the event. The free delivery will be included as shopping diary results from the previous report showed that 3 of the participants mentioned free delivery being a bonus and 1 said that it was poor for large companies not to offer this service. This will therefore encourage orders. QR codes will be placed around the store for consumers to scan and be linked to the app store where they can download the Harvey Nichols app. QR codes are being used as an alternative to MVS as MVS technology is only available to use once the app is downloaded. See figure 140. Any purchases made via the app on this day will receive the same offers as purchases made via the website. From 10am on Saturday the 31st of August 2013.

207


208 Promotional Material for the Website and App Launch Figure140:


9.8.3 THE LAUNCH OF THE AUTUMN/WINTER SEASONAL CAMPAIGN Following the launch of the new beauty department and the improved website and new app launch, the Autumn/Winter campaign displays will go up in stores and translate through to all other platforms. An event will be held in store where consumers are encouraged to try out the MVS technology in the windows and on the tags in-store. The competition regarding photographing all of the tags will have a unique prizes for this day five £100 gift cards will be on offer for winners to encourage a high level of participation on the first day. They must also tweet with the hashtag #HarveyNicholsAW13 to be in with the chance of winning. Complementary drinks will be on offer throughout the day. From 10am Saturday 7th September 2013. 9.8.4 AUTUMN/WINTER 2013 FASHION SHOW Harvey Nichols currently have two fashion shows per year to show the new seasons collections. They have a drinks reception followed by the show and 15% off on the night. This event will continue. Monday September 16th 2013 from 7.30pm. 9.8.5 CHECK-IN COMPETITION Throughout the space of a week, Harvey Nichols will run a competition which links their stores and Facebook. Shoppers will be encouraged to ‘check-in’ using Facebook when they come to a Harvey Nichols store. This event will raise awareness of the brand and their Facebook page as friends of those who check-in will see the post. When users check-in they will be entered into a prize draw to win a £500 gift voucher and a year of 10% off everything exclusively for them at Harvey Nichols. This event will run from December the 9th – 15th.

209


9.8.6 PINTEREST COMPETITION: During the month of January 2014 Harvey Nichols will run a competition on Pinterest where users will be challenged to create a board with images they think best describe Harvey Nichols. Two winners will be chosen to help create and design the new campaign for Autumn/Winter 2014. The nature of competition will attract creative types and will inspire consumer engagement with the brand as they will feel that Harvey Nichols is giving them an opportunity and that they value their consumer’s ideas. In turn it will give the brand fresh and new ideas for a campaign from a consumer perspective. This will occur throughout January. 9.8.7 SPRING/SUMMER SEASONAL CAMPAIGN LAUNCH The spring/summer seasonal campaign will launch with an in-store event. Consumers get their first opportunity to tweet their messages to the windows and use the MVS technology in-store to get behind the scenes access to the making of the campaign. For this day only the tweets sent to be displayed on the window will be put into prize draw to win one of 5 £100 Harvey Nichols gift cards. Participants must however also like the brand on Facebook and follow them on Twitter to be entered. The gift card incentive further encourages consumer interaction and word of mouth promotion about the event. From 10am on Saturday the 9th of February 2014. 9.8.8 SPRING/SUMMER FASHION SHOW This event will follow the same structure as the Autumn/Winter show but take place on Tuesday 4th of March 2014. 9.8.9 SECOND BEAUTY EXTRAVAGANZA EVENT Harvey Nichols will do a second Beauty Extravaganza which will be similar to the first. Exclusive Beauty goody bags will be available for every customer who makes a purchase on the day, free drinks and another Twitter competition. 2 hourly prizes will be given for the best tweets saying why they love Harvey Nichols beauty department attached with the hashtag #HarveyNicholsBeautyExtravaganza. From 10am on Saturday the 5th of July 2014.

210


9.9 APPENDIX 9: BEAUTY EXTRAVAGANZA PRESS RELEASE Press Release Harvey Nichols Group Ltd 109-125 Knightsbridge London SW1X 7RJ Embargoed for: Saturday 17th August 2013.

Harvey Nichols Beauty Extravaganza. • • •

Celebrate the opening of Harvey Nichols newly refurbished beauty departments. Stores across the country will be participating in the event on Saturday 24th of August 2013. Competitions, complementary beauty treatments and 10% discount will be on offer.

Join Harvey Nichols as they celebrate the grand re-opening of their new and improved beauty departments with spectacular in-store events across the country. Following the Launch of Harvey Nichols’ Beauty Bazaar Store in Liverpool, the brand has embarked upon a thorough renovation of all of the beauty departments across their UK stores. Shoppers attending the events can expect an exciting, fun filled day and evening where they can receive complementary beauty treatments and drinks. Competitions will be running throughout the day where participants can get their hands on exclusive Harvey Nichols goody bags. Harvey Nichols fans can get a head start on entering the first competition of the day by tweeting the morning of the event with the hashtag #HarveyNicholsBeautyExtravaganza telling them your favourite beauty product to be in with a chance of winning the first bag. 10% off all beauty products will also be available throughout the day. CEO Joseph Wan says; ‘We are so excited to launch our new beauty departments and we hope you enjoy this extravaganza which our teams have been working hard to put together!’ Come down to your local Harvey Nichols store on Saturday 24th of August to join in the fun at the ground floor beauty hall. This is one not to be missed!

211


Ends Notes to editors: • Participating stores are Knightsbridge, Leeds, Manchester, Edinburgh, Birmingham and Bristol. • See our website www.HarveyNichols.com for more information. For more information please contact: Hannah Smith: H.Smith@harveynichols.co.uk, +44 20 7391 0969 Josephine Green: J.Green@harveynichols.co.uk, +44 20 7391 0957

212


213


Harvey nichols brand rejuvenation strategy