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SEPTEMBER 3-6, 2019 | SHERATON HOTEL & MARINA – SAN DIEGO, CA

Knowledge Is Power!

Annual Conference FLOODPLAIN MANAGEMENT ASSOCIATION

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Table of Contents 3

Co-Chair Bios

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Keynote Bios

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FMA 2019 Awards

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2019 Conference Committee

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Hotel Floor Plan

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Program At A Glance

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Detailed Conference Program

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2018-2019 Board Of Directors

Vision The Floodplain Management Association will continue to serve as the premier voice for advancing and promoting flood safety in California, Nevada and Hawaii, as well as environmentally, economically and socially-sustainable use of floodplains.

Mission

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The Association’s Mission is to improve flood safety and maximize floodplain resources through effective dialogue, collaboration, education, legislation and policy.


Conference Co-Chairs Sara Agahi Sara joined the County of San Diego’s Department of Public Works in 2006 and has been managing the Flood Control District since 2014. In addition to her floodplain management role, Sara actively participated on County response and recovery teams for the 2014 swarm of wildfires, the 2017 Lilac Fire, and the 2018 West Fire. In 2017, Sara also participated on the multi-disciplinary County team that responded to the Hepatitis A Outbreak. Sara previously served for 6 years on FMA’s Board of Directors and on the Governor’s Alluvial Fan Task Force (AFTF). Sara received her BS and MS in Civil and Environmental Engineering at the University of Illinois, ChampaignUrbana. She is a licensed Professional Engineer in the states of Illinois and California, a Certified Floodplain Manager, and has over 20 years of public and private sector experience.

Eric Simmons Eric Simmons is with the Mitigation Division of FEMA Region IX in Oakland, CA. His work focuses on the reduction of flood losses to people and the environment due to unwise floodplain development. Flood hazard mapping and other risk analysis work is the primary method of accomplishing this goal. His responsibilities include leading flood map projects and program management for mitigation activities in California, Nevada and the Pacific involving digital map production, needs assessment for new hazard analyses, risk communication, and training on a variety of floodplain management topics. Since joining FEMA in 2005, Eric has also supported disaster recovery operations including the Katrina, Sandy and wildfire disasters. His professional experience also includes water resources engineering, project management and environmental compliance. He graduated with a bachelor and master’s in civil engineering.

Vic Nguyen Vic is the Chief of the Southern Region Office for the California Department of Water Resources and is the liaison with federal, state, and local agencies in Southern California. The Office supports many Department programs throughout the southern region, which covers about 65,000 square miles (40% of the state’s area) and has 23 million people (58% of the state’s population). The programs and services supported by the office include Integrated Regional Water Management grants, Salton Sea restoration, groundwater management, floodplain management, water quality and quantity, environmental compliance, geologic and hydrogeologic investigations, land and water use surveys, climate change, emergency response, and watermaster services. Prior to DWR, Vic was the Principal Engineer for the Colorado River Board of California where he worked on various technical programs within the Colorado River Basin. Vic had also help developed the California Drought Contingency Plan while working at DWR earlier before his return as Chief of the Southern Region Office. Vic is a registered civil engineer with Bachelor and Master of Science degrees in Civil Engineering and is a graduate of U.C. Berkeley.

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Keynote Speaker Bios Col. Aaron Barta Col. Aaron Barta is the 62nd commander of the Los Angeles District. With more than 23 years of active service, he leads 746 military and civilian personnel operating in a 226,000-squaremile area of California, Arizona, Nevada and Utah. He is responsible for a $900 million annual budget for planning, engineering, construction, asset management, regulatory, emergency management and environmental services for three Army and eight Air Force installations, interagency and international customers, and the nation’s civil water resources infrastructure in the Southwest, and a current value of assets worth $70 million. Barta was commissioned as an engineer officer at the U.S. Military Academy June 5, 1995, where he received a Bachelor of Science in environmental engineering. He later received a master’s degree in engineering management from Southern Methodist University, Dallas. He also is a certified project management professional. He began his military service as an assault and obstacle platoon leader with Company B, 44th Engineer Battalion, 2nd Infantry Division, Korea, and later as a sapper platoon leader and executive officer for Company B, 27th Engineer Battalion, 20th Engineer Brigade, at Fort Bragg, North Carolina. Barta later commanded the Military District of Washington Engineer Company at Fort Belvoir, Virginia, where his unit was called upon from Sept. 11 to 21, 2001, to conduct search-and-rescue operations for the victims of the Sept. 11 attack on the Pentagon. The actions of his leaders and Soldiers during the mission earned the company the Army Superior Unit Award. Upon completion of command, he served as aide-de-camp to the commander of the Military District of Washington. He also served as a trainer and operations officer for 1st Battalion, 395th Regiment, at Fort Hood, Texas, and later as program manager in the Project and Contracting Office, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Gulf Region Division, Baghdad, Iraq. Barta was selected by the Asymmetric Warfare Group and served as an operational field adviser, troop commander and squadron operations Officer at Fort Meade, Maryland. At the Asymmetric Warfare Group, he served on multiple deployments to Afghanistan. He also served as the operations officer and executive officer of the 2nd Battalion, 5th Infantry Regiment, 3rd Brigade, 1st Armored Division in Wardak Province, Afghanistan. Additionally, he served as battalion commander for the U.S. Army in Europe’s Headquarters’ Battalion at Wiesbaden, Germany, and as the U.S. European Command’s deputy division chief for engineering and deputy division chief for logistics strategy at Stuttgart, Germany. His awards and badges include the Bronze Star, Defense Meritorious Service Medal, Meritorious Service Medal, Army Commendation Medal, Army Achievement Medal, Iraq Campaign Medal, Afghanistan Campaign Medal, Global War on Terrorism Support Medal, Korean Defense Service Medal, NATO Service Ribbon, Military Outstanding Volunteer Service Medal, Combat Action Badge, Parachutists Badge, Air Assault Badge and Army Staff Badge. He also received the Infantry Order of Saint Maurice. Supervisor Nathan Fletcher Supervisor Nathan Fletcher represents the County of San Diego’s Fourth District. Key priorities for his first term are to improve the County’s behavioral health system, strengthen the child welfare system, tackle climate change and work to improve air quality. Supervisor Fletcher is an environmental champion that’s moving the County to take climate change and its impacts seriously. He is a California Air Resources Board member and is supporting climate resilience planning with his policies to reduce emissions from stationary polluters, create infrastructure to support electric vehicles and support local renewable generation from a community choice energy program.

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Supervisor Fletcher has a proven record as a dedicated public servant and earned a reputation for getting things done and making a difference in people’s lives. He is a member of Governor Gavin Newsom’s Advisory Board on Homelessness and serves on the Regional Task Force for the Homeless. He is Co-Chair of the Child and Family Strengthening Advisory Board, serves on the Executive Board for the San Diego Metropolitan Transit System, The Polinsky Children’s Center, the San Diego Association of Government’s (SANDAG) Transportation Committee and the San Diego Work Force Partnership. He is a combat veteran of the United States Marine Corps and former member of the California Assembly.    


F. Martin Ralph The last few years have seen many advances in understanding the causes of flooding in the U.S. west coast states, and of forecast challenges associated with predicting them. This presentation summarizes key recent developments and describes how they represent a major push supporting flood risk management in the region. This push represents a 21st Century, west-coast version of efforts elsewhere to address other major weather hazards. It supports FMA’s Conference Theme - “Knowledge is Power: Keeping the lights on floodplains, resilience planning, and risk reduction”. Case studies, from the last few years and analysis of nearly 40 years of FEMA flood claims will illustrate the challenges of west-coast flood prediction. One of the physical causes of forecast errors will be described – mesoscale frontal waves and their modulation of AR landfall position and duration. New tools to address these skill gaps are under development, or are already in place. These include an AR forecasting toolkit, a regional weather prediction model - “West-WRF,” and “AR Recon” - a new monitoring method being developed to measure ARs and their precursors offshore using weather reconnaissance aircraft. A scale for ARs, to be launched this winter, is designed to distinguish largely beneficial ARs from those that represent the greatest hazards. Finally, organizational and policy developments supporting research for better AR prediction, and for use of such forecasts in flood and water supply applications, have also emerged in the last few years. Specifically, Forecast-Informed Reservoir Operations (FIRO), California’s “Atmospheric River Research, Mitigation and Climate Forecasting Program,” and creation of CW3E. This new Center, launched in 2014, represents a critical mass of technical capabilities (and serves as a nexus of supporting partnerships) that collaborated with water agencies to launch many of these initiatives and now carries out much of the work, with the help of a network of talented partners across the region, and nation.

Preventative levee failure repairs along Cache Creek

To learn more about GEI’s multi-objective flood management projects, contact:

Jeffrey Twitchell, P.E. 916.631.4555

jtwitchell@geiconsultants.com

Cindy Davis 916.631.4515

cdavis@geiconsultants.com

www.geiconsultants.com Western Offices Bakersfield Pasadena Carlsbad Portland Oakland Sacramento

Hydrology & Hydraulics Geotechnical Engineering

Embankment/Slurry Wall Design & Construction

Seepage, Stability & Seismic Evaluations

Construction Management Grant Funding Assistance

Emergency Action Planning

FEMA Accreditation

NEPA/CEQA Compliance Permitting & 408 Compliance Cultural & Tribal Consultations

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Biology & Restoration


FMA 2019 Awards Coastal Zone Management and Stewardship Award California Coastal Analysis and Mapping Project FEMA Coastal Study Management Team FEMA Region IX

Mentorship Award James Schaaf Schaaf and Wheeler Consulting Civil Engineers

Mentorship Award Coastal Zone Management and Stewardship Award Lindsey Sheehan Formation of San Mateo Flood and Sea Level Rise Resiliency Agency ESA Associates San Mateo Flood and Sea Level Rise Resiliency Agency ESA Associates Karl Mohr Distinguished Service Award for National Activities 25 Years of Service Communications and Outreach Award Cindy Matthews Virtual Reality Project for Flash Flooding NOAA- National Weather Service Erin Neff and Jessi Acuna Public Information Team Floodplain Manager of the Year Clark County Regional Flood Control District Brent Siemer City of Simi Valley Communications and Outreach Award Watershed University 2017 - 2019 Hogg-Owen Award David Pesavento 16 Years of Service to FMA Nikki Blomquist Mark Seits California Department of Water Resources HDR Engineers Integrated Flood Management Award 35 years of protecting Delta Islands and Delta infrastructure Gilbert Cosio MBK Engineers Integrated Flood Management Award 37 years of Protecting Delta Islands and Delta Infrastructure Christopher H. Neudeck Kjeldsen, Sinnock, Neudeck Engineers Award for Excellence 2018 Las Vegas Valley Flood Control Master Plan Update Clark County Regional Flood Control District Atkins Company Andy Lee Award for Extraordinary Public Service for State Activities 25 Years of Distinguished Service Maria Lorenzo-Lee California Department of Water Resources

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Award for Excellence 69 years of engineering service Richard L. Schafer RL Shafer and Associates


2019 Conference Comittee Sara Agahi

Becky Money

Betty Andrews

John Moynier

Liz Avelar

Vic Nguyen

Jamal Batta

Mike Nowlan

Ann Bechtel

Connie Perkins-Gutowsky

Debra Bishop

David Pesavento

Bunny Bishop

Ricardo Pineda

Gregor Blackburn

Thomas Plummer

George Booth

John Powderly

Chris Bowles

Om Prakash

Brian Brown

Jeanne Ruefer

Andrea Clark

Lizzie Schalo

Tapash Das

Mark Seits

Mark Forest

Mary Seits

Vince Geronimo

Eylon Shamir

Mark Gookin

Brent Siemer

Pal Hegedus

Eric Simmons

Erin Huang

Dave Smith

Jeremy Lancaster

Kelly Soule

Ken Leep

Dragi Stefanovic

Cameron Jenkins

Darren Suen

Megan LeRoy

Marty Teal

Maria Lorenzo-Lee

Rick VanBruggen

Abigail Mayrena

Wendy Wang

Hunter Merritt

Alex Yescas

Salomon Miranda

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Hotel Floor Plan

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Program at a Glance Tuesday, September 3, 2019 7:30 am – 5:00 pm Registration – Bay View Foyer 7:30 – 8:30 am Continental Breakfast – Bay View Foyer 8:30 am – 5:30 pm California Department of Water Resources Floodplain Management Review Course - Marina 6

Concurrent Sessions and Workshops 9:00 am – 1:30 pm

Registration – Bay View Foyer 7:30 - 8:25 am Continental Breakfast – Exhibit Hall/Harbor Island Ballroom 8:30 - 10:00 am Plenary I - Understanding and predicting atmospheric rivers and west coast flooding: Recent developments in science, observations, forecasting, decision support and policy - Grande Ballroom 8:00 am – 12:30 pm Certified Floodplain Manager’s (CFM) Examination SeaBreeze

10:00 am – 1:00 pm Workshop: County of San Diego Flood Control 101 - Nautilus 4

10:00 - 10:15 am Break - Sponsored By

10:00 am – 1:00pm Workshop: How Mitigation can Reduce Insurance Rates and Improve Resiliency: Elevation Certificates, Lowest Floor Guide, and Flood Insurance Rating Basics - Nautilus 2

10:15 am – 5:30 pm CRS One-on-One Appointments - Spinnaker 2

10:00 - 1:00 pm Workshop: The Engineer as Testifying Expert - Nautilus 3 11:00 am – 1:00 pm Workshop: 2D Hydraulic Modeling Fundamentals 101 Nautilus 1 1:00 - 1:30 pm Lunch On Your Own

10:15– 11:45 am Plenary II - Flood Risk Management: The Differing California Flood Disasters - Grande Ballroom 12:00 – 12:30 pm Plenary II - Special Presentation of the Community Service Project - Exhibit Hall/Harbor Island Ballroom 12:30 - 2:15 pm Awards Luncheon, membership meeting and Keynote Grande Ballroom

Concurrent Sessions and Workshops 1:30 pm – 7:30 pm

Concurrent Sessions 2:30 - 3:50 pm

1:30 pm – 3:30 pm Workshop: Floodplain Management and Construction Requirements and the Effects on NFIP Flood Insurance Nautilus 3

Panels: • Flood-Mar-Strategies for Integrating Flood and Groundwater Management - Nautilus 5 • Beneficial Uses of Floodplains in Impaired Watersheds - Nautilus 1 • Six Months Post Disaster, Now What? Interagency Coordination for Long-Term Disaster Recovery Nautilus 2 • Coastal Issues Committee Colloquium - Bayview Lawn

1:30 – 5:30 pm Workshop: Elevation Certificates and LOMA: The proper way to complete FEMA’s Elevation Certificate, MT-1 and MT-EZ forms, and how these are used in floodplain management. - Nautilus 2 2:00 - 3:30 pm Meet and Greet with State Flood Agencies - Nautilus 4 3:30 -5:00 pm Open House with Federal Agencies - Nautilus 4 5:30 - 7:30 pm Opening Reception and Community Service Project! Exhibit Hall/Harbor Island Ballroom

Wednesday, September 4, 2019 7:30 am - 5:00 pm

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Technical Sessions: • SB 92 Compliance and Dam Hazard Planning Nautilus 3 • Flood Forecasting Methods and Tools - Nautilus 4 • Flood Risk Education and Outreach - Marina 6 • Real Time Flood Forecasting and Public Notification – Marina 3 • Resilience in Multi-Objective Projects - Marina 4

Concurrent Sessions 4:00 - 5:30 pm


Panels: • Dam Safety Discussion Continued - Where Are We Now and Where Do We Go From Here? - Nautilus 5 • Overlooked, Big, and Growing: Urban Flood Risks Nautilus 1 • Flood Control Financing Innovation - A MultiJurisdictional Approach to Finance and Implementation - Nautilus 2 • Sustainable Development - Nautilus 3

From Fire

Technical Sessions: • Climate Change Policy - Nautilus 4 • Groundwater Recharge Using Runoff - Marina 6 • Flood Risk Assessment and Mitigation in Urban Environments - Marina 3 • Challenging Model Updates - Marina 4 5:30 pm - 7:30 pm Reception and Networking – Exhibit Hall/Harbor Island Ballroom

to Flood

Thursday, September 5, 2019 7:30 am - 5:00 pm Registration – Bay View Foyer 7:30 - 8:25 am Continental Breakfast – Exhibit Hall/Harbor Island Ballroom - Sponsored By

Using technology to mitigate natural disasters

7:00 - 8:00 am Emerging Professionals and Mentor/Mentee Session Nautilus 4 8:00 – 8:50 am FMA Meet the Board and ASFPM Chair - Marina 3

Hurricane Maria slammed into Puerto Rico in 2017, dropping more than 35 inches of rain – washing out roads, bridges and homes. At least 35 dams, including the 90-year old Guajataca Dam near the city of Quebradillas, experienced damage and required immediate evacuation. The potential for dam breach was high.

Concurrent Sessions 9:00– 10:30 am Panels: • Challenge Model - Report Session - Nautilus 5 • Encampments in Flood Control Facilities - Nautilus 1 • Mitigation f($)+Adaptation f(i)-Threshold f(t)=Resilience f( ); [if <0 = Suffering f( )] (Equation 1) - Nautilus 2 • The Evolution of Flood Insurance: A Look at Private Flood Insurance and The NFIP’s Risk Rating 2.0 - Nautilus 3

As the Thomas Fire in Santa Barbara County, California raged, it destroyed over 1,000 structures, damaged over 250 more, and caused over $2 billion in damages. Ensuing mudslides compounded the devastation (65 homes damaged, 21 casualties).

Technical Sessions: • Post-Fire Assessment and Recovery - Nautilus 4 • Protecting our Assets, Agricultural and Urban Flooding - Marina 3 • The Balancing Act Part 1: Flood, Mitigation, Ecology, Recreation and Permitting - Marina 6 • Analyzing Modern Levee Issues - Marina 4

From DSS-WISE™ software that enables us to develop two-dimensional dam breach mapping to accelerated two-dimensional modeling methods for emergency mapping of post-fire flood hazards, our teams are using advanced technology to help support and protect our communities.

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10:30 - 11:00 am Break- Exhibit Hall/Harbor Island Ballroom - Sponsored By

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Concurrent Sessions 11:00 am - 12:30 pm Panels: • Challenge Model - Modern Analytical Techniques - Nautilus 5 • Overlapping Silos to Build Regional Water Resilience - Discussing Grants, Technical and Policy Assistance - Nautilus 1 • Fundamentals of Flood Management Law and Liability - Nautilus 2 • Headwaters to Floodplain: Flood Safety Partnership - Nautilus 3 Technical Sessions: • Flood Control Adaptations & Using Technology Nautilus 4 • The Balancing Act Part 2 : Mitigation Credit Strategies - Marina 6 • Intersecting Technical Analysis with Multiple Objectives - Marina 3 • Critical Levee Repair (Public and Private Response) - Marina 4 12:30 - 2:00 PM Networking Lunch - Exhibit Hall/ Harbor Island Ballroom

Concurrent Sessions 2:00 - 3:30 pm Panels: • Research Needs For Improving Sub-Seasonal to Seasonal (S2S) Precipitation Forecasting - Nautilus 5 • Planning For Your Community’s Flood Risk Nautilus 1 • Floodplain Management and Endangered Species - Nautilus 2 Workshop: • CRS 101: Introduction and Basics to the Community Rating System - Marina 3 Technical Sessions: • Central CA - Adaptation to Climate Change Nautilus 3 • Reducing Flood Risk to Urban Areas - Nautilus 4 • Balancing Act Part 3 - Multi-Objective Success Stories - Marina 6 • Hindcasting Hurricane Harvey - Marina 4 3:30 - 4:00 pm Break - Exhibit Hall/Harbor Island Ballroom

Concurrent Sessions 4:00 - 5:30 pm Panels: • Fires to Flood Presentations and Discussion Nautilus 5 • Investing in Our Future - Nautilus 1 • Floodplain Management and Science for the Next Generation: Investing in Our Future Decision Makers - Nautilus 2

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Workshop: • Advanced CRS - Marina 3 Technical Sessions: • Innovative Modeling Tools - Nautilus 3 • Sea Level Rise and Tidal/Riverine Flood Risk Nautilus 4 • Precipitation and Runoff - Marina 6 • Unconventional RA & Decisions under Uncertainty - Marina 4 6:30 - 8:30 pm Thursday Dinner Reception on the Hornblower Cruise Meet at the Dock near SD Adventures. Ship will dock at the hotel at 6:15pm for loading of passengers.

Friday, September 6, 2019 7:30– 8:25 am Continental Breakfast – Bay View Foyer 8:00 am – 9:00 am Modeling and Mapping Committee Meeting - Nautilus 3 8:30 am - 1:00 pm Tijuana River Valley Tour Meet at 8:30 am in the hotel foyer for transport

Concurrent Sessions 9:00 - 11:30 am Silver Jackets Annual Meeting - Marina 6 Workshops: • What is coming in HEC-RAS 5.1? - Marina 3 • LOMR/CLOMR Process Best Practices For a Successful Submittal - Nautilus 5

9:00 am - 10:30 am Technical Sessions: • Lessons Learned on Flood Program Management Nautilus 1 • Pump Station Assessment and Design - Is it Real? Nautilus 2 • Tools for Inundation Mapping - Nautilus 3 • Designing for Climate Uncertainty, Standards and Examples - Marina 4 10:30 – 11:00 am Break

Concurrent Sessions 11:00 am - 12:00 pm Technical Sessions: • Using Hydraulic Analysis in Design - Nautilus 3 • Difficult Stream Restoration Projects - Nautilus 2


California • Arizona • Oregon • Texas • Washington

WATER RESOURCES ENGINEERING

Innovative Solutions for Complex Water Issues SERVICES:

6 Floodplain Studies 6 Hydrology / Hydraulics 6 Numerical Modeling 6 Flood Risk Reduction 6 Sediment Transport 6 Bridge Scour Analysis

CONTACT:

6 Hydraulic Structure Design 6 Flood Forecast & Warning Systems 6 Site Specific PMP Studies 6 Stream Restoration 6 Water Quality & Contaminant Transport Modeling

Martin Teal, P.E., P.H., D.WRE (858) 487-9378 or David Curtis, Ph.D. (916) 932-7402

6 Groundwater 6 Dam Breach Inundation Mapping & Emergency Action Plans 6 Drought Contingency Plans 6 Training and Technical Support

www.westconsultants.com

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We Make a Difference

Prado Dam Outlet Works Design

San Diego Creek Watershed Studies

Stafford Dam E.A.P.

Delivering innovative, cost-effective and sustainable solutions integrating water, people and the environment Watershed & Stream Corridor Planning • Flood Risk Management Flood Studies & Modeling • Ecosystem Restoration Climate Change • Community Planning • Geospatial & LiDAR

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Detailed Conference Program Tuesday, September 3, 2019 7:30 am – 5:00 pm

Registration

7:30 – 8:30 am

Continental Breakfast

Bay View Foyer Bay View Foyer

8:30 am – 5:30 pm Marina 6

California Department of Water Resources Floodplain Management Review Course (No CECs For This Course) This full-day workshop reviews floodplain management concepts, practices, and regulations and is intended for those individuals preparing for the Certified Floodplain Manager (CFM) exam. The CFM examination is a patented certification by the Association of State Floodplain Managers (ASFPM) focused primarily on FEMA’s National Flood Insurance Program. Note: If you are not a full conference attendee, and would like to attend this workshop, the one-day FMA Conference fees apply. If you wish to take the CFM examination, you must register separately with ASFPM at http://floods.org at least 3 weeks prior to the examination (fees apply). The CFM examination is scheduled for Wednesday, September 4, at 8:30 a.m. at this Conference. Doors open at 8:00 am. Instructors: Ray Lee, CA Department of Water Resources Salomon Miranda, CA Department of Water Resources Michael Ward, CA Department of Water Resources Robert Lampa, CA Department of Water Resources Daniel Burgett, CA Department of Water Resources

Concurrent Sessions 9:00 am – 1:00 pm

9:00 am – 1:00 pm Nautilus 4

Workshop: County of San Diego Flood Control 101 County of San Diego Flood Control 101 covers the basic criteria for submittals for land development projects that: are either within the mapped floodplain or floodway; impact or propose facilities to be maintained by the Flood Control District; or require complex drainage analyses. Participants will learn details of the County’s drainage standards contained in the County’s Hydrology and Hydraulic Design Manuals; the County’s Flood Damage Prevention Ordinance; The Code of Federal Regulations; and County and FEMA standard methodologies for analyses. Topics covered include hydrologic and hydraulic analyses; reports; regulatory requirements; due diligence; common mistakes and issues, and ways to improve submittals to achieve faster approvals. This workshop is targeted at any level of consultant staff that are involved with H&H analyses or permitting of projects with floodplain or complex drainage issues in the unincorporated County. Instructor: County of San Diego

9:00 am – 1:00 pm Nautilus 1

Workshop: 2D Hydraulic Modeling Fundamentals 101 Over the past two decades, two-dimensional (2D) hydrodynamic modeling has increasingly become the standard approach to derive baseline flood data to inform all aspects of floodplain management. During this time numerous international best practice approaches have evolved to support flood estimation accuracy and reliability using these tools. This workshop will focus on identifying, demonstrating and discussing these approaches.  

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Instructor: Chris Huxley, BMT/TUFLOW Ellis Symons, BMT/TUFLOW

10:00 am – 1:00 pm Nautilus 2

Workshop: How Mitigation can Reduce Insurance Rates and Improve Resiliency: Elevation Certificates, Lowest Floor Guide, and Flood Insurance Rating Basics This workshop will use real-life examples and case studies to demonstrate how information documented on Elevation Certificates affects elevation-based flood insurance rates and provide hands-on experience devising strategies for reducing insurance costs. This will equip participants to assist property owners with identifying and evaluating mitigation options, particularly low-cost or partial mitigation steps that may change the building diagram and/or reduce rates, even when the whole structure cannot be elevated.

Tuesday, September 3, 2019

Three case study datasets will be used as the focus of the discussions. Although the three models have been developed using TUFLOW the principles which this workshop will be focus on are universal and generally applicable to any 2D modeling software. We encourage modelers of all experience level to attend. New modelers will learn techniques to reduce error while also improving model build efficiency. Experienced modelers will reinforce the knowledge they already possess, learn what is happening in this evolving field internationally within Australia and the United Kingdom, and also be given an opportunity to share their personal experiences with the audience in an open and inclusive forum.

Workshop Objectives: • Understand how Elevation Certificates are used to determine insurance rates. • Have experience identifying partial mitigation options for real-life case studies. • Understand the effect that mitigation can have on insurance rates. • Be prepared to discuss these topics during interactions with home- and business owners, especially of pre-FIRM buildings, who may be impacted by insurance reform and the shift to actuarial rates. Instructor: Becca Fricke-Croft

10:00 am - 1:00 pm Nautilus 4

Workshop: The Engineer as Testifying Expert The role of the expert witness is to act as a teacher, providing an educational bridge between the Justice System and the technical world. As the volume of litigation in this country increases, and the issues at hand in court cases become more and more complex, experienced expert witnesses who can convey the technical information to the judge and jury are in higher and higher demand. Municipal, county and state Flood Control Agencies and Public Works Departments are involved in flood related litigation all the time and are their engineers and administrators are frequently called on to testify. This Workshop will cover some of the expert witness “basics,” particularly as they relate to Floodplain Managers and Water Resources Engineers. Included will be a discussion of the role of experts within our judicial system, and the necessary attributes of the testifying expert. The U.S. litigation process will be explained, from retention of the expert, through the discovery process, preparation of reports and declarations, the deposition of the expert, and finally, the resolution of the case through settlement, mediation, arbitration or trial. In the Workshop we will discuss deposition and trial testimony, and some strategies for effectively preparing for, and delivering, testimony in an effective way that is understandable to the layman ( judge and/or jury). The process of delivery of testimony will be discussed in the context of the expert being the teacher, and the jury his class. A number of persuasive strategies for making complex technical concepts more understandable will be presented, and the application of proper ethics throughout the expert witness engagement process will be discussed by way of examples in the field of water resources engineering. Instructor: Richard Van Bruggen, PE, CFM, D.WRE

1:00 - 1:30 pm

Lunch on Your Own

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Concurrent Workshops and Open Forums 1:30 pm – 5:30 pm

Leading with Science® Tetra Tech is pleased to be ranked #1 in Water by Engineering News-Record for 16 years in a row. We are proud to be home to leading technical experts in every sector and to use that expertise throughout the project life cycle. Our commitment to safety is ingrained in our culture and at the forefront of every project.

1:30 pm – 3:30 pm

Workshop: Floodplain Nautilus 3 Management and Construction Requirements and the Effects on NFIP Flood Insurance Participants of this course will learn the basics of floodplain management and the Construction codes that apply when building in a Special Flood Hazard Area. This course will provide an in-depth look into how the Elevation Certificate (FEMA form 086-0-33) is utilized by the Insurance Industry to rate a property’s flood risk for NFIP Flood Insurance. In addition, it will explain how a local municipality can use the form to enforce their Floodplain Management Ordinance and check floodplain compliance. At the end of the course participants will have a better understanding on how the Elevation Certificate should be completed, correctly, correctly, and accurately, which will improve their residents flood insurance premiums and ensure a flood resilient structure is built. Case studies will be used to illustrate what flood loss preventive solutions are available and how to identify possible solutions using the Elevation Certificate that can dramatically lower an owner’s NFIP premium. FEMA’s Technical Bulletin 1 Wet Floodproofing and Technical Bulletin 3 Dry Floodproofing techniques will be reviewed along with International Code Council Construction Code and ASCE 24-14 standards. Instructor: Clay Goodrich, Floodplain Mitigation Specialist

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1:30 – 5:30 pm

Workshop: Elevation Certificates Nautilus 2 and LOMA: The proper way to complete FEMA’s Elevation Certificate, MT-1 and MT-EZ forms, and how these are used in floodplain management. This workshop will go through the Elevation Certificate section by section to help participants verify forms are being completed correctly by both licensed professionals and local community officials. Specific focus will be applied to building diagrams since they are very important in floodplain management at the local level and insurance rating by the NFIP. The workshop will then go through the proper submittal of MT-1s identifying common shortfalls, submittal options, and use of FEMA’s Flood Map Service Center. Workshop Objectives: • Participants will understand how Elevation Certificates are properly completed section by section including building diagram selection. • Participants will know how the Elevation Certificate is used by different individuals including local government officials, surveyors, and MT-1 processors. • Participants will understand the basics of LOMA/MT-1 submittals, and the possible determination types • Participants will learn how to properly submit a LOMA including common shortfalls and where they can find zone A information recognized by FEMA • Participants will become familiar with FEMA’s recently updated Flood Map Service Center and learn ways to use it in the EC, LOMA, and floodplain management process. Instructor: Becca Fricke-Croft

2019 Floodplain Management Association Annual Conference

Flood Management Solutions From Concept to Completion Coastal and Riverine Flood Management Vulnerability Analysis Habitat Restoration Climate Change Permitting + Compliance Betty Andrews, PE bandrews@esassoc.com 707.795.0900

Nick Garrity, PE ngarrity@esassoc.com 310.599.4300

ESA is a 100% employee-owned environmental consulting firm delivering work that matters.

www.esassoc.com

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Tuesday, September 3, 2019

2:00 - 3:30 pm Nautilus 4

Meet and Greet with State Flood Agencies Please join us for a networking opportunity with staff representing multiple state agencies with flood management, emergency management, and mitigation responsibilities. This event will open with program overviews from participating agencies followed by a meet and greet with conference attendees.

3:30 -5:00 pm Nautilus 4

Open House with Federal Agencies Please join Federal agencies’ (FEMA, USACE and others) staff to discuss mapping needs, grant opportunities, and compliance with development regulations during this open forum drop-in discussion. Federal staff will be available to field your questions and direct you to the appropriate resources to address your concerns.

5:30 - 7:30 pm

Opening Reception and Community Service Project! Exhibit Hall/Harbor Island Ballroom

Wednesday, September 4, 2019 7:30 am - 5:00 pm Registration Bay View Foyer

7:30 - 8:25 am

Continental Breakfast Exhibit Hall/ Harbor Island Ballroom

8:30 - 10:00 am

Grande Ballroom

Plenary I - Understanding and predicting atmospheric rivers and west coast flooding: Recent developments in science, observations, forecasting, decision support and policy F. Martin Ralph Center for Western Weather and Water Extremes at UC San Diego’s Scripps Institution of Oceanography

Welcome Remarks: Welcome from the Floodplain Management Association Chair and Executive Director: George Booth, Chair, Floodplain Management Association Mary Seits, Executive Director, Floodplain Management Association Welcoming Remarks: San Diego County Supervisor Nathan Fletcher Introduction of the Conference Co-Chairs: Mary Seits, Executive Director, Floodplain Management Association Introduction and Opening Remarks by Co-chairs: Eric Simmons, Federal Emergency Management Agency Vic Nguyen, California Department of Water Resources Sara Agahi, County of San Diego

8:00 am – 12:30 pm Sea Breaze

Certified Floodplain Manager’s (CFM) Examination If you wish to take the CFM examination, you must register separately with the Association of State Floodplain Managers at http://floods.org at least 3 weeks prior to the examination (fees apply). The Certified Floodplain Manager examination is scheduled for Wednesday, September 4, at 8:30 a.m. at this Conference. Doors open at 8:00 am. Exam Proctors: Garret Tam Sing, CA Department of Water Resources Raul Barba, CA Department of Water Resources

10:00 - 10:15 am Break

Sponsored By

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Grande Ballroom

Plenary II - Flood Risk Management: The Differing California Flood Disasters

Wednesday, September 4, 2019

10:15– 11:45 am

The State of California was selected by ASFPM to host a Flood Risk Management symposium, which was held in April at the Cal OES Headquarters in Rancho Cordova. This event was hosted by the Floodplain Management Association (FMA) and the Association of State Floodplain Managers (ASFPM) Foundation. The location of ASFPM Foundations’ annual symposium is competitive; and this was the first one in California. The intent of the oneday symposium was to delve deeper into key topics found at chapter floodplain management conferences and results in a white paper documenting the findings. Selected experts convened in an open-discussion, think-tank type environment to explore the program and policy implications of “The Differing California Flood Disasters”, including emergency response to levee breaches, flood/alluvial fan/mudflow hazards, and the flood/dam nexus. The objective was to identify solutions to reduce flood damages across California based on collaborative input from subject matter experts and decision members. The symposium had subject matter experts introduce the aforementioned topics before attendees split up into breakout sessions to discuss those topics. The notes from the symposium and the breakout sessions have been put together into a draft white paper that will be used to shape future food management in the State of California. This session will provide an overview of the discussions at the symposium and present the draft findings for policy implementations. Moderator: Jeanne Ruefer, CFM, PMP Program Management Lead RIX, HWC, Inc. Panelists:

Mark Forest, P.E., CFM, HDR Engineering, Inc. and ASFPM Foundation Board Member Jeremy Lancaster, PG, CEG, California Geological Survey Brian Brown, PE, CFM, MBK Engineers Shayan Rehman, PE, CFM, County of Sacramento

12:00 – 12:30 pm

Plenary II - Special Presentation of the Community Service Project Exhibit Hall – Harbor Island Ballroom THANK YOU HDR, Kleinfelder, MBK, Wood Rodgers, Downey Brand, GEI, KSN, Mead & Hunt, Larsen Wurzel and Engeo !!

12:30 - 2:15 pm Grande Ballroom

Awards Luncheon and Keynote Sponsor Recognition: George Booth, Chair, FMA Floodplain Management Association Annual Awards Presentations: Ricardo Pineda, Awards Chair Introduction of Keynote Speaker: Sara Agahi, County of San Diego Keynote: Colonel Aaron Barta, 62nd Commander, Los Angeles District, USACE

10:15 am - 5:30 pm Spinnaker 2

CRS One-on-One Appointments Appointments can be scheduled with an ISO/CRS Specialist to discuss specifics about your CRS program, to find out what is needed for your community to improve its current CRS classification, or to have a more detailed discussion on joining CRS and the benefits to your community. These personalized meetings are an opportunity to discuss your community’s land use management program, higher regulatory standards, stormwater management program, flood warning system, watershed management program, or any other components of a balanced floodplain management program. To ensure your first choice of available times, please contact Constance Lake at 307.258.5661 or clake@iso.com. Meetings will be held on Wednesday from 10:15 to 5:30 in Spinnaker 2 of the Conference Center.

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Concurrent Sessions 2:30 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 5:30 pm

2:30 - 3:50 pm

Panel: Flood-Mar-Strategies for Nautilus 5 Integrating Flood and Groundwater Management Moderator: Jim Wieking, California DWR

THERE IS A RIGHT WAY TO DO THINGS. AND THERE IS A NEW WAY TO DO THINGS.

AND SOMETIMES THEYâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;RE EXACTLY THE

SAME THING.

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WWW.WOODRODGERS.COM

Loss of floodplains, aging infrastructure, deferred maintenance, and climate change have intensified the flood risk to people and property. Loss of snowpack storage and a need to bring groundwater basins into a sustainable balance of recharge and pumping will stress the reliability of water supplies. Water management strategies that integrate flood and groundwater management, such as using floodwaters for managed aquifer recharge (i.e., Flood-MAR), can help reduce flood risk and provide other benefits, including sustainability of water supplies. Flood-MAR projects that divert flood flows into irrigation canals and onto large swaths of land, incorporate reservoir reoperation strategies, or expand infrastructure, including floodplains or flood bypasses can increase water supply reliability, reduce flood risk, enhance ecosystems, and achieve other potential benefits. Example FloodMAR strategies that promote flood risk reduction include: 1. Taking water off the channel during highflow events (i.e., skimming peak flows) and purposefully delivering water to irrigation canals or lands (through flooding or irrigation) to promote groundwater infiltration.


Panelists: Harrison Zeff, University of North Carolina Gary Bardini, Sacramento Area Flood Control Agency David Arrate, California DWR

2:30 - 3:50 pm Nautilus 1

Panel: Beneficial Uses of Floodplains in Impaired Watersheds Moderator: Alex Yescas, HDR Engineering, Inc., Vice-Chair, Floodplain Management Association Natural floodplains provide flood risk reduction benefits by slowing runoff and storing flood water. They also provide other benefits of considerable economic, social, and environmental value that are often overlooked when local land-use decisions are made. Floodplains recharge groundwater and convey flows. Floodplains are also important for the supply and quality of water. The floodplain helps maintain water quality through filtration of impurities and processing of organic waste. When inundated with water, floodplains act as natural filters, removing excess sediment and nutrients, which can degrade water quality and increase treatment costs. The list of benefits provided by floodplains could go on to include many other historical, economic, scientific and recreational uses. In this panel, we will discuss a few San Diego watersheds that are impaired by certain constituents of pollution and efforts that are being carried out to improve the watersheds.

Wednesday, September 4, 2019

This methodology requires flexibility and access to significant land area to achieve flood-risk reduction benefits downstream of diversion points. 2. Lowering reservoir storage levels prior to, during, or after the flood season or discrete events, to vacate reservoir storage before anticipated precipitation/snowmelt, which can reduce flood risks below the reservoir. The vacated water is conveyed to specific areas for managed aquifer recharge. 3. Infrastructure, including slowing runoff from properties to encourage groundwater infiltration on public and private lands and reduce runoff from entering already swollen channels. Flood-MAR projects can be utilized on floodplains and expanded flood bypasses to further reduce flood risk and increase groundwater recharge potential, as well as provide ecosystem benefits and potentially reconnect floodplains.

Panelists: Stephanie Gaines, County of San Diego Eric Mosolgo, City of San Diego Rob Hutsel, San Diego River Park Foundation

2:30 - 3:50 pm

Panel: Six Months Post Disaster, Now What? Interagency Coordination for Long-Term Nautilus 2 Disaster Recovery Moderator: Melissa Weymiller, USACE. Disaster recovery can take months or even years, long after the emergency response has completed. However, often there is state and federal involvement to support long-term recovery for communities after a disaster. Over the past few years, the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) focused on development of the National Disaster Recovery Framework (NDRF) and pre-disaster recovery guidance for state and local governments. The California Disaster Recovery Framework (CDRF) builds on the Stateâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s experience and current recovery documents and guidance. This panel will give information about the state and federal frameworks, will provide examples from recent long-term recovery efforts, including Butte County recovery after the Camp Fire, and will describe the role of state and federal agencies in recovery. Panelists: FEMA Representative CalOES Representative USACE Representative

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Wednesday, September 4, 2019

2:30 - 3:50 pm Bayview Lawn

Coastal Issues Committee Colloquium Moderator: Vince Geronimo, Mead & Hunt The FMA Coastal Issues Committee (CIC) meets annually to foster communication and dialogue and strengthen working relationships among the professionals engaged in managing and protecting coastal floodplains and resources. The CIC meeting is an interactive opportunity for participants to collaborate on emerging coastal issues, share coastal information, resources, and educational opportunities, and discuss technical concerns or other critical coastal flood risk and floodplain management issues. Laura Engeman, Center for Climate Change Impacts and Adaptation, UC San Diego, will showcase Scripps Flood Warning System for Imperial Beach, one of the Center’s Resilient Futures projects. The CIC has also invited representatives from local, regional, state and Federal agencies to provide updates on their coastal program or services milestones, provide policy reminders, or share information on upcoming meetings and events. Finally, we’ll name a new CIC chair. Speaker: Laura Engeman, Center for Climate Change Impacts and Adaptation, UC San Diego Scripps Institution of Oceanography

2:30 - 3:50 pm Nautilus 3

Technical Session: SB 92 Compliance and Dam Hazard Planning Session Chair: John Moynier, Michael Baker International • Villa Park Dam Breach Analysis and Inundation Mapping: Presenter(s): Steve Parker, MA, Tetra Tech, Inc. • Importance of Emergency Management integration with the Safe Operation of a Dam: Presenter(s): Heidi Nelkie, Atkins Global, Inc. Co-author(s): Ed Beadenkopf, Dam Safety SME Atkins North America, Preston Wilson, FEMA Office of Dam Safety • Collaborative Technical Assistance in Meeting Senate Bill 92 Requirements: Presenter(s): Sergio Vargas and Shweta Chervu, Ventura County

2:30 - 3:50 pm Nautilus 4

Technical Session: Flood Forecasting Methods and Tools Session Chair: Erin Huang, Jacobs Engineering • Real-Time Inundation Modeling (RTIM) Tool – Developed for Inundation Forecasting in the Central Valley Floodplains: Presenter(s): Laurence Sanati, Chong Vang, and Laurel Moll, California DWR • Ensemble Streamflow Predictions for a Flood Control Operations Decision Support System of Lake Mendocino in Water Year 2019: Presenter(s): Chris Delaney, Sonoma County Water Agency Co-author(s): Michael Konieczki, HDR Engineering, Inc.|David Ford Consulting Engineers, John Mendoza, Sonoma County Water Agency, Robert Hartman, Consultant • Implementation of HEC-RTS for Rapid Flood Forecasting and Online Mapping: Presenter(s): Barnard Mondal, WEST Consultants, Inc. Co-author(s): David Smith, WEST Consultants, Inc.; Rand Allan, Associate Meteorologist, San Diego County Flood Control District

2:30 - 3:50 pm Marina 6

Technical Session: Flood Risk Education and Outreach Session Chair: Megan LeRoy, Mead & Hunt, Inc. • “Make America’s Swamps Great Again”: Background on an Editorial Advocating for the Consideration of Floodplains as Natural Infrastructure in the U.S. Infrastructure Spending Bill: Presenter(s): Kevin Coulton, P.E., CFM, Environmental Science Associates • City of Alameda’s Public Outreach Efforts in Response to 2,000 Residences Added to SFHA: Presenter(s): Andrew Nowacki, City of Alameda • Story Maps for Flood Awareness in Nevada: Presenter(s): Nicole Goehring, Nevada DWR; Melissa Hallas, PE, USACE, Sacramento District

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Marina 3

Technical Session: Real Time Flood Forecasting and Public Notification Session Chair: David Smith, WEST Consultants, Inc. • National Weather Service Flood Forecast and Monitoring Challenges Associated with the Tijuana River Watershed: Presenter(s): Jayme L. Laber, NOAA/National Weather Service, Weather Forecast Office Los Angeles/Oxnard, CA and Joe Dandrea, NOAA/National Weather Service, Weather Forecast Office San Diego, CA • NWS Decision Support Services for Riverside County Emergency Management Department – onsite and coordinated warning and public notification: Presenter(s): Alex Tardy, National Weather Service, San Diego, CA; Bruce Barton, Riverside County Emergency Management Department; Jason Uhley, Riverside Flood Control District • An Innovative Approach to Real Time Flood Forecasting and Mapping for Levee Failure and Overtopping: Presenter(s): Ellis Symons, BMT (TUFLOW), Brisbane, QLD Co-author(s): B Caddis and C Dearnley, BMT (TUFLOW), Brisbane, QLD; S Priya, World Bank Group, New Delhi, India

2:30 - 3:50 pm Marina 4

Technical Session: Resilience in Multi-Objective Projects

Wednesday, September 4, 2019

2:30 - 3:50 pm

Session Chair: Luciana Cunha, WEST Consultants, Inc. • Making Resilience Our Flood Control Endgame—Practical Case Studies From Clark County, Nevada Presenter(s): Clark Barlow, PE, CFM, Atkins North America: Abigail Mayrena, Clark County, Nevada • Reconnection of the Sacramento Deep Water Ship Channel and the Mainstem Sacramento River to Achieve Flood Management and Ecosystem Objectives: Presenter(s): Chakri Malakpet, PE, CFM, and Jeremy Thomas, MLA, Jacobs Engineering, Jesse Patchett, PE, CFM, Wood Rodgers, Inc.; Katie Yancey, City of West Sacramento; Co-author(s): Brad Cavallo, MS, Cramer Fish Sciences • Application of Modern Flood Management Method: Presenter(s): Eng. Mrs. Chen Rozilio, Drainage authority’s supervisor in the Israeli Ministry of Agriculture & Rural Development Coauthor(s): Ing. Mr. Uri Regev, Kishon drainage authority engineer

Concurrent Sessions 4:00 - 5:30 pm

4:00 - 5:30 pm Nautilus 5

Panel: Dam Safety Discussion Continued - Where Are We Now and Where Do We Go From Here? Moderator: Martin Teal, WEST Consultants, Inc. Following a robust discussion at the 2018 FMA Conference in Reno, NV, we are inviting California dam safety speakers back to give us an update on Dam Safety Programs. Updates will include a status report from CA DWR and OES on the Dam Inundation Mapping and Emergency Action Plan submittals and reviews, as well as any new or pending dam safety regulations. Speakers from the City and County of San Diego will give perspective from a local owner and emergency response manager, respectively. Invited speakers include: Panelists:

Jose Lara, Dam Safety Planning Division, CalOES Ariya Balakrishnan, Division of Safety of Dams, California DWR (invited) Laura Curvey, Senior Emergency Services Coordinator, San Diego County OES Bill White, Manager of Security & Emergency Planning, City of San Diego Public Utilities Department

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Wednesday, September 4, 2019

4:00 - 5:30 pm Nautilus 1

Panel: Overlooked, Big, and Growing: Urban Flood Risks Moderator: Betty Andrews, Environmental Science Associates Inc. Areas with dense population, whether major metropolitan areas or smaller communities, typically share some common factors that elevate their flood risk: radical alteration of the natural drainage system, stormwater systems sized for modest rainfall events, flood risks that remain unmapped and unrecognized from a regulatory perspective, and risks that are growing in response to climate change, all combined with the elevated assets and life risk considerations typical of denselypopulated areas. How significant is this challenge, and what measures and strategies might be necessary to address it as climate change continues to drive the variability and intensity of storm events in the future? This panel will assemble experts on the issue from academia, local communities, and the insurance industry for a framing of the problem and a lively discussion about what can be done to respond to it. Panelists: Dave Evans, Milliman Erika Powell, PE, County of San Mateo Lynette Cardoch, Moffat & Nichol

4:00 - 5:30 pm

Panel: Flood Control Financing Innovation - A Multi-Jurisdictional Approach to Finance Nautilus 2 and Implementation Moderator: Seth Wurzel, CGFM, Principal, Larsen Wurzel & Associates, Inc. With the support of multiple bond measures over the last two decades, California continues taking on flood control in the Central Valley and local agencies are leading the way. Flood risk reduction involves coordination with many public agencies at all levels of government, and implementing a program to finance and build a system requires creating a framework to engage all stakeholders to agree on a long-term course of action. This session presents the approach the Cities of Stockton, Lathrop and Manteca and San Joaquin County are currently advancing to provide 200-Year flood protection in the Mossdale Tract Area of the County. These agencies re-formed the San Joaquin Area Flood Control Agency (SJAFCA) in early 2018 to facilitate the financing and implementation of needed flood control improvements with the goal of providing an Urban Level of Flood Protection to the area. The agencies are currently advancing an integrated financial plan consisting of a development impact fee program, a new special benefit assessment district and tax increment financing through, what could be the first multi-jurisdictional Enhanced-Infrastructure Financing District (EIFD) in California. The panel will present and discuss this real time case study currently underway. Panelists:

4:00 - 5:30 pm

Constantine C. Baranoff, Shareholder Kronick Moskovitz Tiedemann & Girard (KMTG) Jamie Gomez, MBA, Managing Principal at Economic & Planning Systems, Inc. (EPS) Fritz Buchman, PE, Deputy Public Works Director, County of San Joaquin Chris Elias, Executive Director, San Joaquin Area Flood Control Agency

Panel: Sustainable Development Moderator: John Powderly, USACE 2019. California is humming, and so is the weather. Gavin Newsom, Governor of California, has made it clear that he intends to oversee construction of more housing as part of his “California for All” agenda, including Executive Order N-06-19, meant to spur the development of affordable housing on excess state land. Meanwhile California’s drought is over (for now), with a snowpack at 161% of normal as of April 1, 2019 - and nervous flood risk managers hope the state doesn’t get a “pineapple express” that melts all of that snow in a week. All while wildfires continue to ravage the state, creating both an immediate danger of fire & smoke damage AND, by altering landscapes & watersheds, a multi-year flood-after-fire risk. We live in interesting times.

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Wednesday, September 4, 2019

And most scientists say it’s only going to get worse. More and more community development professionals - including us flood-risk managers - are using words like “sustainability” and “resiliency.” But what does sustainable mean in the face of constant change? In regions that are largely built out, with more NIMBYs than available development sites, and housing affordability at an all-time low? With hazards projected to become more frequent and more damaging - and the projections themselves becoming more uncertain? Come find out. Panelists:

4:00 - 5:30 pm Nautilus 4

Dr. Todd Bridges, Senior Research Scientist, U.S. Army Engineer Research and Development Center Jeannie Lee, Senior Counsel, State of California Governor’s Office of Planning & Research Anne Rosinski, Earthquake Specialist, FEMA Region IX René Vidales, PE, Watershed Protection Program Coordinator, San Diego County Public Works

Technical Session: Climate Change Policy Session Chair: Dave Curtis, WEST Consultants, Inc. • Building Flood Wisdom with Flood Knowledge: Presenter(s): Michael C. Nowlan, PE, CFM, Wood Rodgers, Inc. • Time For A More Comprehensive Approach For Addressing Uncertainty In Flood Mapping and Resiliency Planning: Presenter(s): Paul Robinson, Hazen and Sawyer • True Collaboration: Essential Dialogues for Shoreline Resiliency: Presenter(s): Hank Ackerman, PE; Rohin Saleh, MS, PE

4:00 - 5:30 pm Marina 6

Technical Session: Groundwater Recharge Using Runoff Session Chair: Ellen M. Cross, Strategic Development, Environmental Science Associates Inc. • From Rain Gauge to Recharge: Designing Groundwater Infrastructure in Urban Los Angeles County: Presenter(s): Steven Bell, PE, QSD, CWE Corp. • Flood Routing and Groundwater Recharge Benefit Calculations: Three Case Studies: Presenter(s): Steven Bell, PE, QSD, CWE Corp.

4:00 - 5:30 pm Marina 3

Technical Session: Flood Risk Assessment and Mitigation in Urban Environments Session Chair: John Moynier, Michael Baker International • Performance Based Incremental Flood Risk Reduction- A Pathway to Practical Project Implementation in Densely Developed Areas with Aged Flood Control Infrastructure: A Case Study of The City of Laguna Beach’s Laguna Canyon Channel Flood Control Improvement/ Repair Project in Downtown Laguna Beach: Presenter(s): Jonis C. Smith PE, CFM, Dudek, Inc. • 1D/2D Modeling for Steep Urban Watersheds: Using Advanced Modeling Approaches to Identify Potential Flood and “Hazard” Mitigation for the City of Grand Terrace: Presenter(s): Tom Ryan, PE and Zach Snyder, PE, Q3 Consulting • Drainage Study for the Manhattan Beach Pump Station using 1D/2D Modeling: Presenter(s): Martin Araiza, PE, Los Angeles County Public Works; Mujahid Chandoo, PE, Michael Baker, International

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Wednesday, September 4, 2019

4:00 - 5:30 pm

Technical Session: Hydraulic Model Updates

Marina 4

Session Chair: Dragi Stefanovic, HDR Engineering, Inc. • Updating and Maintaining the CVFED Hydraulic Models: Presenter(s): Darren Bonfantine, PE, CFM, California DWR Co-Author(s): Yiguo Liang, PHD, PE, CFM • 1D to 2D Model Conversion in Petaluma, CA: Presenter(s): David Smith, PE, CFM, D.WRE, WEST Consultants, Inc. • Urban Floodplain Study on Ross Creek Watershed: Presenter(s): Nahm Lee, PhD, PE, Valley Water

5:30 pm - 7:30 pm

Reception and Networking Exhibit Hall/Harbor Island Ballroom

Thursday, September 5, 2019 7:30 am - 5:00 pm Registration Bay View Foyer

7:30 - 8:25 am

Continental Breakfast Exhibit Hall/ Sponsored By: Harbor Island Ballroom

7:00 - 8:00 am Nautilus 4

Emerging Professionals and Mentor/Mentee Session

The FMA Emerging Professionals Committee meets monthly to provide networking opportunities and mentorship opportunities. This year the Emerging Professionals Committee will be concluding our Pilot Mentorship Program at the FMA Conference and kicking off our new Mentorship Program. If you participated in our Pilot Mentorship Program, please stop by for your certificate. If you are interested in our new Mentorship Program, please join us during this session. Emerging Professionals are those who are new to floodplain management for the first 10 years in floodplain management. Emerging Professionals are always looking for mentors or those who are “young” at heart. All are welcome!

8:00 – 8:50 am Marina 3

FMA Meet the Board and ASFPM Chair Grab your continental breakfast and bring it to the meeting with you. Meet your Board of Directors, Executive Director and hear from the new ASFPM Chair, Ricardo Pineda.

Concurrent Sessions 9:00– 10:30 am

9:00– 10:30 am Nautilus 5

Panel: Challenge Model - Report Session

Hosted by: FMA Modeling and Mapping Committee. FMA Modeling and Mapping Committee will report on the 2019 Challenge Models. Analysis Results will be compared. The range of solutions used to solve the Challenges will be discussed, and insights into how and why the challenges were presented this year in a Virtual Environment will be discussed. New insights and possible solutions to some of the original FEMA 46 issues of 2D modeling will be discussed, based on the issues raised in the Challenge Modeling for 2019 and 2012. A presentation will be given by the attending members of the FMA Modeling and Mapping Committee with the addition of a few invited Technical Partners which will make up the Panel for the Question and Answer portion.

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Nautilus 1

Panel: Encampments in Flood Control Facilities Moderator: Sara Agahi, County of San Diego Panel discussion on encampments in Flood Control facilities including engineered structures, natural channels, and associated open spaces. Panelists will discuss their experiences, challenges, and lessons learned in dealing with encampments in their jurisdictions’ flood control facilities, as well as the public health and safety considerations. Panelists:

9:00– 10:30 am Nautilus 2

Thursday, September 5, 2019

9:00– 10:30 am

Alicia Sutton, Branch Chief of Housing, Homelessness, and Civil Rights in the CA Department of Social Services Kevin Onuma, Deputy Director Operations and Maintenance, Orange County, CA Jon Frye, Flood Control Engineering Manager, Santa Barbara County, CA Abigail Mayrena, Principal Engineer, Clark County, Nevada Susan Bower, Assistant Director Integrative Services, San Diego County, CA Kevin King, General Manager Reclamation District No. 1000, Sacramento, CA

☺); [if <0 = Suffering f(☹)] (Equation 1)

Panel: Mitigation f($)+Adaptation f(i)-Threshold f(t)=Resilience f(

Moderator: Vince Geronimo, PE, CFM; Mead & Hunt, FMA Coastal Issues Committee Chair To be resilient from coastal flood damage, measures are taken to mitigate the potential impact of flooding, the vulnerability of people and property, and the consequences that result from a flood event. Investment and implementation of adaptive design are necessary to maintain coastal resiliency as flood risk profiles change with increasing sea levels and shoreline change. Our panel will explore each of the functions that make up Equation 1 and discuss the resource balancing required to prevent potential suffering faced by coastal communities. Mitigation as a function of current costs f($); Adaptation as a function of investment f(i); Flood Risk Threshold as a function of a changing climate over time f(t); and Resilience as a function of a community’s health, happiness, and wellbeing. Our panel will explore state-wide and regional efforts to implement low-regret adaptive strategies and showcase the Encinitas Cardiff Living Shoreline Project, built to protect wildlife habitat, beaches and infrastructure from the impacts of climate change and sea level rise. Panelists:

9:00– 10:30 am Nautilus 3

Megan Cooper, Regional Manager, State Coastal Conservancy, South Coast Juliette Finzi Hart, PhD, Oceanographer & Director of Outreach, U.S. Geological Survey Erika Powell, PE, Flood Resilience Program Manager, San Mateo County Brian Leslie, Senior Coastal Scientist, GHD

Panel: The Evolution of Flood Insurance: A Look at Private Flood Insurance and The NFIP’s Risk Rating 2.0 While the reform legislation of 2012 and 2014 provided FEMA direction to improve the financial stability of the NFIP, it--along with newer technology--also helped trigger the growth of the private flood insurance market. But advancement in technology has also allowed FEMA to take a new and simpler approach to how federal flood insurance will be rated in the near future. In the quest to be a world-class insurance operation and to close the insurance gap, FEMA’s Federal Insurance Directorate (FID) is focused on improving the service provided to customers - flood insurance policyholders. A significant part of this transformation is Risk Rating 2.0, which will redesign the way FEMA rates a property’s flood risk and prices insurance. This presentation will provide an overview of the new rating approach (Risk Rating 2.0) that will make understanding risk easier for agents and customers by leveraging industry best practices and current technology. In addition to providing the latest updates on Risk Rating 2.0 during this session, FEMA staff will also address audience questions. Panelists: Bruce A. Bender, CFM – Bender Consulting/ASFPM Insurance Committee Co-Chair Tony Hake – Product Service Delivery Division Director, FIMA

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Thursday, September 5, 2019

9:00– 10:30 am Nautilus 4

Technical Session: Post-Fire Assessment and Recovery Session Chair: Martin J. Teal, WEST Consultants, Inc. • Woolsey Fire – Los Angeles County Public Works’ Post-Fire Response to Debris Flow Potential - A Team Effort: Presenter(s): Patricia M. Wood, PE, Los Angeles County Public Works CoAuthor(s): Kenneth A. Zimmer, PE, Los Angeles County Public Works • Predicting Post-Wildfire Peak Streamflow for Small Watersheds in Southern California: Presenter(s): Brent Wilder, San Diego State University Co-Author(s): Alicia M. Kinoshita, San Diego State University • Holy Fire Mudflow Risk Assessment, Riverside County, California: Presenter(s): Mike Kellogg, PG, CFM, GISP, JE Fuller/Hydrology & Geomorphology, Inc. Co-author(s): Nate Vaughan, PE, JE Fuller/Hydrology & Geomorphology, Inc.; Mike Wong, PE, Riverside County Flood Control and Water Conservation District; Amy McNeill, PE, Riverside County Flood Control and Water Conservation District

9:00– 10:30 am Marina 3

Technical Session: Protecting our Assets - Agricultural and Urban Flooding Session Chair: Chakri Malakpet, Jacobs Engineering, Inc. • Sedimentation, Vegetation and Land Use Dynamics of the Brahmaputra-Jamuna Floodplain, Bangladesh: Presenter(s): Dr. Md. Nurul Islam, Department of Geography and Environment, Jahangirnagar University Co-Author(s): Colin R. Thorne and Nick Mount, School of Geography, University of Nottingham • Protecting Agriculture Structures in a SFHA: Presenter(s): Clay Goodrich, Flood Mitigation Specialist • In the Spotlight: Reducing Statewide Floodplain Risks Through Stringent Technical Standards and Advanced Floodplain Ordinances: Presenter(s): Kevin Houck, PE, CFM, Colorado Water Conservation Board; Tom Browning, PE, MBA, D.WRE, Atkins Global

9:00– 10:30 am Marina 6

Technical Session: The Balancing Act Part 1: Flood, Mitigation, Ecology, Recreation and Permitting Session Chair: Melissa Weymiller, USACE • Tracking CVFPP and Conservation Strategy Outcomes: Presenter(s): Lori ClamurroChew, California DWR; Eric Ginney, Environmental Science Associates Inc.; Katie Riley, Environmental Incentives • A 75-Year Project at the Corte Madera Creek Watershed: Presenter(s): Raymond P.L. Wong, PhD, PE, CFM, GHD; Hugh Davis, PE, GE, Marin County Flood Control and Water Conservation District Co-Author(s): Tonya Redfield, Marin County Flood Control and Water Conservation District

9:00– 10:30 am Marina 4

Technical Session: Analyzing Modern Levee Issues Session Chair: Joseph Thomas, Kjeldsen, Sinnock & Neudeck, Inc. • FEMA Region IX – Natural Valley Analysis of Multiple Levee Systems Using FLO-2D in Stanislaus County, CA: Presenter(s): Pani Ramalingam, PhD, PE Co-Author(s): Seth Ahrens, PE, STARR II; Eric Simmons, PE and Xing Liu, FEMA Region IX • Southport EIP Zoned Levee Design: Presenter(s): Robert Lokteff, PE, GE, Blackburn Consulting • GIS-Based Tool to Prioritize FEMA Levee Mapping Updates: Presenter(s): Kim M. Dunn, PE, D.WRE, CFM Senior Technical Client Manager

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• Levee Accreditation 65.10 Requirements Do’s and Don’ts for Applicants and Reviewers. Presenter(s): Paul Glenn, PE, PG, CDM Smith


Break

Harbor Island Exhibit Hall Sponsored By

Concurrent Sessions 11:00 am - 12:30 pm

11:00 am - 12:30 pm Nautilus 5

Panel: Challenge Model - Modern Analytical Techniques Hosted by: FMA Modeling and Mapping Committee. Short presentations on the computational capabilities of remote computing, virtual computing and cloud computing will be made by panelists. The panelists will relate how these modern capabilities can currently be used by our industry and what may be on the horizon, as our industry moves towards big data computing. A discussion of what needs to change to make this possible. Panel will consist of Datacate Technical personnel (the data center that hosted the 2019 Challenge Models), several industry software vendors, and a limited number of modelers from the 2019 Challenge. JPL

11:00 - 12:30 PM Nautilus 1

Thursday, September 5, 2019

10:30 - 11:00 am

Panel: Overlapping Silos to Build Regional Water Resilience - Discussing Grants, Technical and Policy Assistance Moderator: Maria Lorenzo-Lee, P.E., CFM, California DWR & Larry McKinney, Santa Ana Watershed Project Authority With renewed direction, there is growing support to integrate flood risk reduction and water supply/ water quality planning efforts at the regional level, and to leverage state and federal funding more effectively to fund implementation projects that reap multiple benefits. Many flood managers know about FEMAâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Hazard Mitigation Grant program and to list projects in a Local Hazard Mitigation Plan to be eligible. However, did you know that your flood and stormwater projects could be eligible for other state grants if you coordinate through your regional Integrated Regional Water Management (IRWM) group and get your projects reflected in their IRWM Plan? Learn about other grants, such as the Prop 1 IRWM & Coastal grants, any Prop 68 flood-related grants and USACE funding programs that are currently available; and two entities that flood managers can use to help overlap silos and build regional water resilience. Panelists: Victoria LaMar-Haas, California Governorâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Office of Emergency Services Robert Crane, California DWR Mark Stadler (or Lance Exkhart), local Regional Water Management Program Rachael Orellana, United States Army Corps of Engineers

11:00 am - 12:30 pm Nautilus 2

Panel: Fundamentals of Flood Management Law and Liability Moderator: Andrea Clark, Downey Brand LLP As floodplain managers engage in resilience planning and reduction of risks associated with floodplains, risk of liability plays an important role, particularly in light of our changing climate and resulting changes in hydrological patterns. This panel will offer some basics on flood management law (federal, state and local) and offer perspectives from local and state representatives regarding the role of liability concerns in flood project development and implementation. Panelists: Scott Shapiro, Downey Brand LLP Jit Dua, California Central Valley Flood Protection Board Gary Bardini, Sacramento Area Flood Control Agency

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Thursday, September 5, 2019

11:00 - 12:30 pm Nautilus 3

Panel: Headwaters to Floodplain: Flood Safety Partnership Moderator: Michael Mierzwa, California DWR Attend this session to hear from Federal, State, and local agency experts about current realities and new opportunities associated with looking at flood management and flood safety preparedness from the entire watershed – or “headwaters to floodplains” – perspective. Provide input about what type of technical assistance and funding assistance is needed to expand or strengthen your programs. Panelists:

11:00 - 12:30 pm Nautilus 4

Jose Lara, Chief; Hazard Mitigation and Dam Safety Planning Division, CalOES Gregor Blackburn, PhD, Chief; Floodplain Management, DHS-FEMA, Region IX John Cain, Conservation Director, River Partners Local Agency Representative TBD

Technical Session: Flood Control Adaptations & Using Technology Session Chair: Abigail Mayrena, Clark County Flood Control • Overcoming Hydraulic Challenges: Case Study of Three Infrastructure Retrofit Projects in Southern California: Presenter(s): Kayla Kilgo, PhD, CWE Corp. Co-Author(s): Andrea Mosqueda and Ben Willardson, PhD, PE, D.WRE, QSD/P, CWE Corp. • Providing SMARTer Solutions to Water Resources Problems: Presenter(s): Margaret Engesser and Dylan Van Dyne, USACE, Sacramento District • Realizing the Multi-Purpose Benefits of Unmanned Aircraft System Surveys in Levee Repairs: Presenter(s): Kent Zenobia, PE, California DWR Co-Author(s): Taylor Myers, EIT, California DWR; Nagesh Malyala, PE, and Rob Nixon, PE, GE, AECOM

11:00 - 12:30 pm Marina 6

Technical Session: The Balancing Act Part 2 : Mitigation Credit Strategies Session Chair: Bunny L. Bishop, CFM, Nevada Division of Water Resource, Department of Conservation and Natural Resources • The Next Chapter of Advance Mitigation: Mitigation Credit Agreements: Presenter(s): Katie Riley Environmental Incentives, Dan Kaiser, Environmental Defense Fund • Maximizing the Benefits of Multi-Objective Projects by Securing Advance Mitigation Credits: Presenter(s): Vance Howard, GEI Consultants, Inc. • Floodplain Rehabilitation for Design Multiple Benefits: Maximizing Ecological Function and Mitigation Credits: Presenter(s): Sam Diaz, cbec eco engineering Co-Author(s): Chris Bowles and John Stofleth, cbec eco engineering; Vance Howard, GEI Consultants, Inc.; Kenric Jameson, RD900; Paul Dirksen, WSAFCA

11:00 - 12:30 pm Marina 3

Technical Session: Intersecting Technical Analysis with Multiple Objectives Session Chair: Debra Bishop, H.T. Harvey & Associates • Coyote Valley Creek and Floodplain Restoration Alternatives: Hydrologic and Hydraulic Analysis of Ecological Uplift and Flood Reduction Potential: Presenter(s): Annika Sullivan, PE, Environmental Science Associates Inc. Co-Author(s): James Gregory, PE, Environmental Science Associates Inc. • Coastal Wetland Ecosystem Restoration: The Intersection of Technical Analyses and Multiple Objectives: Presenter(s): Elizabeth Schalo, Environmental Science Associates (ESA); Nicholas Garrity, PE, Environmental Science Associates (ESA)

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• When Good Intentions Lead to Unintended Consequences- Environmental Benefits vs Societal Impacts: Presenter(s): David A. Jaffe, PhD, PE, D.WRE, Michael Baker International; John Moynier, Michael Baker International;


Marina 4

Technical Session: Critical Levee Repair (Public and Private Response) Session Chair: Megan LeRoy, Mead & Hunt • Public – Private Response to “Critical” Levee Repair Sites in Central Valley, California: Presenter(s): David Wheeldon, PE, California DWR Co-Author(s): Nagesh Malyala, PE, Richard Millet, PE, GE, Rob Nixon, PE, GE, and Loren A. Murray, PE, AECOM • Design and Construction Lessons Learned on Bank Protection Projects: Presenter(s): Thomas W. Smith, PE, GE, RiverSmith Engineering, Inc. • Clarksburg Small Community Flood Risk Reduction Feasibility Study; Presenter(s) Jafar Faghih, HDR Engineering, Inc.; Emily Pappalardo, MBK Engineers, Inc.

12:30 - 2:00 pm

Networking Lunch Exhibit Hall/Harbor Island Ballroom

Thursday, September 5, 2019

11:00 - 12:30 pm

Concurrent Sessions 2:00 - 3:30 pm

2:00 - 3:30 pm Nautilus 5

Panel: Research Needs For Improving Sub-Seasonal to Seasonal (S2S) Precipitation Forecasting Moderator: Jeanine Jones, California DWR Reauthorization of the Weather Research Act in 2019 bolstered the charge to NOAA to take actions to improve sub-seasonal to seasonal (S2S) precipitation forecasts, forecasts with lead times of weeks to months. Improved S2S forecasting would support a variety of water resources management decisions, from forecast-informed reservoir operations to planning for water transfers and groundwater recharge. DWR has already been investing in research intended to lay the groundwork for making progress for California on this scientifically challenging subject. There is no silver bullet for improving forecasts – research investments and progress are required in observations, modeling, data assimilation in models, and access to high-performance computing capacity. This panel will describe some of the activities contributing to forecasting improvements. Panelists:

2:00 - 3:30 pm Nautilus 1

Jeanine Jones, California DWR Mike Anderson, California DWR Mike DeFlorio, Scripps Institute of Oceanography, UC San Diego Bruce Cornuelle, Scripps Institute of Oceanography, UC San Diego

Panel: Planning For Your Community’s Flood Risk Moderator: Alison Kearns, Risk Analysis Branch Chief, FEMA Region IX Knowing your community’s flood risk and taking action to reduce that risk are two very different things. How do you bridge the gap between having hazard information, then using it make your community more resilient? The answer is planning. Whether it’s your hazard mitigation plan, floodplain management plan, or comprehensive plan, these documents provide a mechanism to systematically address hazards in your community and develop implementable projects. In the session, hear advice and lessons learned from planners, risk analysts, and engineers on how to plan effectively for your flood risk. Panelists:

Xing Liu, Senior Community Planner, FEMA Region IX Ethan Mobley and Brian Greer, Dynamic Planning and Science Rick Iger, Principal Engineer, Provost & Pritchard Consulting Group Asia King, Risk Analyst, FEMA Region IX

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Imagine it. Delivered. AECOM is proud to sponsor the 2019 Annual Conference of the Floodplain Management Association.

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aecom.com


Nautilus 2

Panel: Floodplain Management and Endangered Species Moderator: Gregor Blackburn, FEMA On May 25, 2018, a Record of Decision was signed announcing FEMA’s intent to implement the Preferred Alternative from the NFIP Final Nationwide Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement. This Preferred Alternative includes proposed program modifications to demonstrate compliance with the Endangered Species Act. FEMA is currently developing the necessary policies and processes for demonstration of NFIP compliance with the ESA. What is the ESA and what are its requirements? How does ESA compliance relate to the NFIP? Join us for a discussion on the ESA and how it overlaps with the NFIP. Panelists: Gregor Blackburn, Floodplain Management & Insurance Branch Chief, FEMA Region IX Julia Gillespie, Environmental Protection Specialist, FEMA Region IX Andrea Clark, Downey Brand LLP Daven Patel, PE, CFM, STARR II

2:00 - 3:30 pm Marina 3

Workshop: CRS 101: Introduction and Basics to the Community Rating System

Thursday, September 5, 2019

2:00 - 3:30 pm

Instructor: Constance Lake, CFM, ISO/CRS Specialist This workshop will cover the requirements to join the Community Rating System (CRS) Program, an overview of the prerequisites and documentation requirements for most of the CRS activities most commonly receiving credit when a community joins the program, and the CRS points that a community can work towards to achieve a CRS Rating. The focus of this workshop will be an overview of the 2017 CRS Coordinator’s Manual. The CRS provides annual flood insurance premium discounts in those communities that implement floodplain management activities above and beyond the minimum requirements of the National Flood Insurance Program (NFIP). The CRS has been proven to help motivate elected officials and residents to support flood protection programs. To date 95 of California’s 526 NFIP communities have joined the CRS. California CRS communities are saving their residential and business property owners more than $14.8 million each year.

2:00 - 3:30 pm Nautilus 3

Technical Session: Central CA - Adaptation to Climate Change Session Chair: David C. Curtis, PhD, F.EWRI, WEST Consultants, Inc. • Changing Flood Risks in the California Central Valley under Climate Change: Presenter(s): Tapash Das, PhD, Jacobs Engineering Co-author(s): Armin Munévar, PE, Jacobs Engineering; Mahesh Gautam, California DWR, and Samson Haile-Selassie, California DWR • Development and Comparison of Ensemble-Informed Climate Scenarios for Planning under Climate Change Uncertainties: Presenter(s): Alejandro Perez, California DWR Co-author(s): Mahesh Gautam, California DWR

2:00 - 3:30 pm Nautilus 4

Technical Session: Reducing Flood Risk to Urban Areas Session Chair: Ken Leep, Harris & Associates • Protecting Hadera City from Flooding: Presenter(s): Eng. Mrs. Chen Rozilio, Drainage authority’s supervisor in the Israeli Ministry of Agriculture & Rural Development • Lamont, The Town that FEMA Forgot or NFIP – ‘Help, I’ve Fallen, and I don’t know what UP is’: Presenter(s): Clark Farr, PE, retired • Working Together to Reduce Flood Risk: Tribal Partnership Opportunities through U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Programs: Presenter(s): Patricia Fontanet and Melissa Weymiller, USACE

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Thursday, September 5, 2019

2:00 - 3:30 pm Marina 6

Technical Session: Balancing Act Part 3 - Multi-Objective Success Stories Session Chair: Debra Bishop, H.T. Harvey and Associates • Upper Llagas Creek Flood Protection Project – How Flood Protection, Geomorphological Science, Habitat Enhancement, and Long-term Maintenance are Integrated to Create a Successful Project: Presenter(s): Timothy Harrison, Woodard & Curran • Multi-Agency Cooperation and Funding to Implement a Multi-Benefit Stream Flow Enhancement and Floodplain Restoration Project in the Russian River Watershed: Presenter(s): Anthony Falzone, FlowWest; Chris Ott, Dry Creek Rancheria • Integrated Multi-Purpose Stormwater Basins - Integrated, Multi-Objective Floodplain Management – Collaboration, Design, Permitting and/or Construction: Presenter(s): Ron Rovansek, Ph.D., P.E., LEED AP

2:00 - 3:30 pm Marina 4

Technical Session: Hindcasting Hurricane Harvey Session Chair: Jamal Batta, City of Chula Vista • Hurricane Harvey and Subsequent Flood Resiliency Mitigation: Presenter(s): Ira Artz, Tetra Tech, Inc. • Efficient and Reliable Compound Flood Modeling: Hindcasting Damages and Impacts of Hurricane Harvey: Presenter(s): Kees Nederhoff, Deltares USA • Lessons learned from Local and State Watershed Programs; Presenter(s): Alex Yescas, HDR Engineering, Inc.

3:30 - 4 :00 pm Exhibit Hall

Break

Concurrent Sessions 4:00 - 5:30 pm

4:00 - 5:30 pm Nautilus 5

Panel: Fires to Flood Presentations and Discussion Moderator: Alex Tardy, National Weather Service Following one of the driest years on record for southern California during 2017-18, several major wildfires erupted during the summer of 2018. There were 2 particular wildfires that burned thousands of acres of dry old fuel across steep terrain named the Cranston and Holy fires. While most properties and structures were miraculously saved during the ragging wildfires, the steep slopes were left with severe burns deep into the soil leaving behind only ash and silt. Once the fires were under control, the focus in mid-August 2018 turned to assessing the burn scar severity and understanding the potential for debris flows. The Holy fire scar was a particular concern due to the proximity of hundreds of homes and several schools downstream of numerous major drainages from the Santa Ana mountains. The Cranston fire spared the town of Idyllwild due to fire-fighting efforts, but left the bare slopes susceptible to debris flows that could wash out state highways 74 and 243 as well as campgrounds at Lake Hemet. Plans for immediate mitigation efforts were developed by jointagencies and numerous meetings were held to develop a strategy for public outreach and emergency notification including mapping of affected areas and potential evacuation zones. A panel of experts from county, state and federal agencies will present and discuss the emergency management efforts, challenges and successes from post-wildfire assessment, debris flow prediction and mitigation, as well as public educational outreach and announcements. Panelists:

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Alex Tardy, NWS Bruce Barton and Jason Uhley, Riverside Co. Emily Fudge, USFS Brian Swanson, CGS


Nautilus 1

Panel: Investing in our Future Moderator: Alison Kearns, Risk Analysis Branch Chief, FEMA Region IX

Thursday, September 5, 2019

4:00 - 5:30 pm

This session will explore the goals and recommendations presented in the newly released, National Mitigation Investment Strategy, which provides a national approach to investing in mitigation and risk management across the United States. The strategy will: Provide stakeholders with a foundational understanding of how mitigation investments protect what their communities value. Foster a better understanding of risks in order to support investment decisions, align risk reduction goals with programs and incentives, and simplify access to investment funds. Assure that national stakeholders are participating in mitigation activities, especially decisions to enhance building codes and infrastructure standards and the use of financial products that link to mitigation. The National Mitigation Investment Strategy is intended to be a whole community strategy whose success cannot be achieved without the combined efforts of state, local, tribal, territorial, nongovernmental, academic, and private sector stakeholders. This session will discuss the plan for implementing the strategy and how stakeholders at every level can be involved.

Panelists: Jamie Leigh Price, Mitigation Investment Lead, FEMA HQ

4:00 - 5:30 pm Nautilus 2

Panel: Floodplain Management and Science for the Next Generation: Investing in Our Future Decision Makers Moderator: Carlos Rendo, Outreach Coordinator, Nevada DWR Water resource professionals try, almost daily, to address outreach and education needs and promote awareness of floodplain management issues. However, we may just be throwing good money after bad in shortsighted, scattered fashion, when we could be strategically maximizing a return on our investment, by reaching the decision makers of the future: our K-12 students. The investment adage of â&#x20AC;&#x153;buy low, sell highâ&#x20AC;? applies to our efforts in flood risk and water education, as well: we should be reaching these young people where they live today, by teaching them about the real flood problems they are inheriting, so they can be informed and empowered to act in their own communities. This panel will focus on ways that communicators are addressing the knowledge gap of students, and teachers, by raising awareness of flood risk and heightening the understanding of the natural processes of floodplains. Participants will leave this session with a better understanding of the ways K-12 teachers in California are accomplishing the goals of Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS), and adopting a framework for applying real-world concepts and phenomena-based education to the K-12 curriculum. Panel participants will walk away with ideas for constructive relationship-building across the gap between floodplain professionals and teaching professionals. Panelists: Crystal Howe, San Diego County Office of Education, CREEC Coordinator Anne Stephens, California State University Chico, Environmental Science Department Hunter Merritt, USACE Sacramento District Silver Jackets Deputy

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Thursday, September 5, 2019

4:00 - 5:30 pm Marina 3

Workshop: Advanced CRS Instructor: Constance Lake, CFM, ISO/CRS Specialist This workshop will cover in greater detail specific activities that most advanced class CRS communities apply for. This will include some elements within the 2017 CRS Coordinator’s Manual from Activities 330, 370, 430, 450, and the 600 series. Other Activities and elements can be considered if time allows and participates are willing. Attendees are encouraged to ask technical questions pertaining to specific CRS Activities, as well as share their experiences and ideas on implementing CRS Activities and suggest how the CRS Program might be improved to encourage greater participation in California, Hawaii, and Nevada.

4:00 - 5:30 pm Nautilus 3

Technical Session: Innovative Modeling Tools Session Chair: Tapash Das, Jacobs Engineering • Synthesizing Changes in Streamflow Resulting from Global Climate Model Projections across California: Presenter(s): Michael Founds, cbec eco engineering Co-author(s): Luke Tillmann, Chris Campbell, Sam Diaz, Chris Hammersmark, cbec eco engineering • Assessing the Vulnerability of Transportation Infrastructure to Climate Stressors in San Diego, California: Presenter(s): Jake Thickman and Conor Ofsthun, Moffatt & Nichol • Exploring Water Resource Systems Vulnerabilities and Adaptations to Climate Change in California: Presenter(s): Romain Maendly, California DWR Co-author(s): David Arrate and Wyatt Arnold, California DWR; John Kucharski, USACE, Hydrologic Engineering Center, Institute of Water Resources; Jennifer Olszewski, USACE

4:00 - 5:30 pm Nautilus 4

Technical Session: Sea Level Rise and Tidal/Riverine Flood Risk Session Chair: Renato Espinoza Torres, PE CFM, HDR Engineering, Inc. • The City of Millbrae’s Sea Level Rise Adaptation Assessment- A Regional Approach: Presenter(s): Khee Lim, City of Millbrae; Millicent Cowley-Crawford, West Yost Associates • Navigating the CoSMoS: Application of CoSMoS to Local Communities: Presenter(s): Lindsey Sheehan, PE, Nick Garrity, PE, Environmental Science Associates Inc. • Sea Level Rise and the Challenge of the Coastal-Riverine Interface: Presenter(s): Rohin Saleh, MS, PE, County of Alameda

4:00 - 5:30 pm Marina 6

Technical Session: Precipitation and Runoff Session Chair: Shayan Rehman, County of Sacramento • Why does that 100-year storm keep popping up?: Presenter(s): Joe Dandrea, NOAA/National Weather Service • Extreme Precipitation in the Columbia River Basin: Presenter(s): Luciana Cunha, PhD, PH, WEST Consultants, Inc. Co-Author(s): Brian Skahill, Angela Duren, PE, PH, John England Jr., PhD, PE, PH, D.WRE, USACE; Chris D. Bahner, P.E. D.WRE, WEST Consultants, Inc. • Are Standard Hydrologic Methods Applicable for A’ā and Pāhoe’hoe?: Presenter(s): Martin J. Teal, WEST Consultants, Inc.

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Marina 4

Technical Session: Unconventional RA & Decisions under Uncertainty Session Chair: Pro Mitra, MBK Engineers • State-Of-Practice Risk Analysis Procedures Inform Floodplain Management Decisions Under Uncertainty: Presenter(s): Nathan Pingel, HDR Engineering, Inc., Donna Lee, CFM , HDR Engineering, Inc. • Monte Carlo Flood Modelling to Reduce Uncertainty in Flood Risk Management, Planning and Disaster Management – The Brisbane River Case Study: Presenter(s): Chris Huxley, BMT (TUFLOW)

6:30 - 8:30 pm

Thursday Dinner Reception on the Hornblower Cruise At the Dock near SD Adventures Ship will dock at the hotel at 6:15pm for loading of passengers.

Thursday, September 5, 2019

4:00 - 5:30 pm

Friday, September 6, 2019 7:30– 8:25 am

Continental Breakfast

8:00 am – 9:00 am

Modeling and Mapping Committee Meeting

Bay View Foyer Nautilus 3

The FMA Modeling and Mapping Committee (MMC) meets annually to discuss modeling and mapping issues and strengthen working relationships among the professionals who do modeling and mapping of floodplains. This year the MMC will discuss how the challenge models went, modeling and mapping floodplain management issues, and set goals for the upcoming year. All are welcome.

8:30 am - 1:00 pm

Tijuana River Valley Tour Meet at 8:30 am in the hotel foyer for transport The Tijuana River Valley (Valley) has a decades-long history of flooding and water quality issues. Although significant improvements in the area of wastewater treatment have in recent years improved water quality on both sides of the border, stormwater flows continue to bring substantial amounts of sediment and trash and other contaminants into the Valley from sources in both the United States (U.S.) and Mexico. The sediment and trash pollutants cause water quality impairments, threaten life and property from flooding, degrade valuable riparian and estuarine habitats, and impact recreational opportunities for residents and visitors. Efforts to protect and restore Valley resources are not new; sediment management, land preservation and habitat restoration have been conducted in the Tijuana River watershed for many years. Local, state, and federal management agencies, along with many non-governmental organizations and other stakeholders have invested significant effort and funding in project planning and implementation both in the U.S. and in Mexico to improve conditions. Recent activities have included pollution prevention and source control for sediment and trash, water quality improvements, flood control, improved recreational opportunities, and public education and outreach. These projects demonstrate the dedication and wealth of experience that the various operating agencies and stakeholders have invested in the Valley and watershed.

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Friday, September 6, 2019

The future brings many challenges for the Valley. The bi-national nature of the watershed is one major obstacle. It is well known that source control and pollution prevention activities can be the most cost-effective solutions to reduce sediment and trash loading. With the majority of the watershed situated in Mexico, planning and implementing source control and other projects across the international border present an added challenge to an already complex problem. Other challenges include: • Identifying long-term funding for operation and maintenance of sediment and trash management facilities, • Coordinating agencies in project review and approval, and • Scheduling projects to meet short-term sediment and trash control needs with long-term restoration goals while maximizing funding opportunities. Please join us for this opportunity to visit this complex watershed (U.S. side only) and hear directly from many of the stakeholders on the unique challenges. We will start the tour at the upstream end of the Valley where U.S. Customs and Border Protection will escort us for portions of the tour along the border (Tijuana River Flood Control Project). Moving downstream, State and County Parks will highlight ongoing sediment and trash capture projects along several of the main tributaries. We will culminate with lunch and a special presentation at the picturesque Border Field state park. This should be a very fascinating and informative tour, especially with the recently renewed focus on cross-border issues.

Concurrent Sessions 9:00 - 11:30 am

9:00 - 11:30 am Marina 6

Silver Jackets Annual Meeting Have you wondered how you could get multiple agencies working together to support your community? If so, come to the Silver Jackets Annual Meeting to learn more about all the great things the California and Nevada Silver Jackets Teams are working on. We will discuss this year’s accomplishments. We look forward to hearing what is important to you, and what you would like to see the California team accomplish next year. Leads: Rachael Orellana and Hunter Merritt, USACE Chris Williams, Wendy Wang, and Nikki Blomquist, CA DWR

9:00 - 11:30 am Marina 3

Workshop: What is coming in HEC-RAS 5.1? This Workshop will provide an overview of the many new features that are being added to HEC-RAS 5.1. Some of the new features that will be discussed in the workshop are: 1. Spatial precipitation 2. Spatial Infiltration 3. Wind Forces 4. Pump stations inside 2D Flow Areas 5. Bridge Hydraulics inside 2D Flow Areas 6. Physically Based Dam and Levee Breaching 7. 3D Visualization tool 8. New Features within HEC-RAS Mapper 9. 2D Sediment Transport

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Instructors: Mark Forest, PE, CFM – Practice Leader, Floodplain Management and Surface Water Modeling, HDR Engineering, Inc. Marty Teal, PE, PH, D.WRE- Senior Vice President, WEST Consultants, Inc.


Workshop: LOMR/CLOMR Process Best Practices For a Successful Submittal Nautilus 5 This workshop will be educating and helping requesters, community officials (floodplain managers), engineers, and other state reviewers involved in MT-2 Letters of Map Revision (LOMR), and Conditional Letters of Map Revisions (CLOMR) submittals. STARR II currently reviews MT-2 submittals in FEMA Regions 2, 5, 7, 9, and 10; and this workshop will provide an overview of the MT-2 process and FEMA regulations and focus on best practices that can be followed to ensure a successful submittal.

All Things Stormwater

Friday, September 6, 2019

9:00 -11:30 am

Instructors: Alex Haptemariam

Concurrent Sessions 9:00 - 10:30 am

9:00 am - 10:30 am

Technical Session: Lessons Learned on Flood Program Management Nautilus 1 Session Chair: Ken Leep, Harris & Associates • Funding for Urban Flooding Challenges: Lessons Learned from Recent Storm Drainage Ballot Measures: Presenter(s): Jerry Bradshaw, SCI Consulting • SCORE!: A local agency’s approach towards Community Rating System implementation: Presenter(s): Carl Walker, Harris & Associates • Communicating Model Results: Improving Reading, Analysis, and Engagement: Presenter(s): John Pritchard, Environmental Science Associates Inc.

Stormwater Design • Hydrology & Hydraulics 9:00 am - 10:30 am

Technical Session: Pump Station Assessment and Design - Is it Real? Nautilus 2 Session Chair: Paul Robinson, Hazen and Sawyer • Presentation 1: Pump Station Condition and Assessment: Presenter(s): Dan Matthies, Wood Rodgers, Inc.

Flood Hazard Mitigation • Watershed Planning

Q3 Consulting Q3consulting.net

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Friday, September 6, 2019

• Pump Station Design versus Operational Realities: Presenter(s): Rohin Saleh, Alameda County • Presentation 2: Pump Station Risk-Based Analysis: Presenter(s): Dan Matthies, Wood Rodgers, Inc.

9:00 am - 10:30 am Nautilus 3

Technical Session: Tools for Inundation Mapping Session Chair: Brent Siemer, City of Simi Valley • Using ArcGIS, LiDAR, and HEC-RAS 2D to Update Inundation Maps for Stevens Creek Dam: Presenter(s): John Xizao Yang, Santa Clara Valley Water District • Incorporating GIS Field Apps into O&M and Public Outreach: Presenter(s): Andy Chamberlain, Zone 7 Water Agency

9:00 am - 10:30 am Marina 4

Technical Session: Designing for Climate Uncertainty, Standards and Examples Session Chair: Vince Geronimo, Mead & Hunt • Update of the Sacramento County Intensity-Duration-Frequency Curves: Presenter(s): Luciana Cunha, WEST Consultants, Inc. • Expanding Our Knowledge of Climate Uncertainty – An Experimental Design at the American River Basin: Presenter(s): Wayne Li, Wood Rodgers, Inc. • Introduction to Watershed Management and Flood Regulation in Israel: Presenter(s): Liad Bar-Zvi, Ministry of Agriculture and Rural Development, Israel

10:30 – 11:00 am

Break

Concurrent Sessions 11:00 am - 12:00 pm

11:00 am - 12:00 pm Marina 3

Technical Session: Using Hydraulic Analysis in Design Session Chair: Raymond Wong, GHD • Flood Planning/Design Transition in the Johnson Lane Area of Douglas County: Using a Planning-Level FLO-2D Model to Inform Road Improvement Design: Presenter(s): Mary Horvath, NCE • Hydraulic Design and Complex Pier Scour Evaluation for the Shoemaker Bridge over the Los Angeles River: Presenter(s): Dragi Stefanovic, HDR Engineering, Inc.

11:00 am - 12:00 pm Nautilus 2

Technical Session: Difficult Stream Restoration Projects Session Chair: Shayan Rehman, County of Sacramento • Feasibility and Design of a Multi-Objective Stream Restoration in a Highly Constrained Urban Environment – Escondido Creek in Escondido, CA: Presenter(s): Luke Tillmann, cbec eco engineering • The Yuba River Canyon Restoration Project: Restoring Form and Function: Presenter(s): Eric Ginney, Environmental Science Associates Inc.

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Save The Date! 2020 Floodplain Management Association

Annual conference SEPTEMBER 8-11, 2020 | THE HYATT REGENCY SACRAMENTO – SACRAMENTO, CA

3rd Annual (SWEPSYM)

Southwest Extreme Precipitation Symposium APRIL 2, 2020 | THE SCRIPPS INSTITUTE OF OCEANOGRAPHY – UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, SAN DIEGO

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Board of Directors 2018-2019 George Booth - Chair Sacramento County

David Pesavento - Advisor California DWR

Alex Yescas - Vice Chair HDR Engineering, Inc.

Salomon Miranda - Advisor California DWR

Connie Perkins-Gutowsky -Central Valley Flood Protection Board

Alan Haynes - Advisor NOAA

Mike Nowlan - Treasurer Wood Rodgers, Inc.

Eric Simmons - Advisor FEMA Region IX

Abigail Mayrena - Director Clark County RFCD

Carol Tyau-Beam - Advisor Hawaii DLNR

Brent Siemer - Director City of Simi Valley, DPW

Bunny Bishop - Advisor Nevada DWR

John Moynier - Director Michael Baker International

Jeanne Ruefer - Advisor HWC INC

Vince Geronimo - Director Mead and Hunt

Jose Lara – Advisor California Governor’s Office of Emergency Services (CalOES)

Brian Brown - Director MBK Engineers Darren Suen - Central Valley Flood Protection Board John Powderly - Director Mark Seits - Past Chair HDR Engineering, Inc.

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Jeremy Lancaster - Advisor California Geological Survey (CGS) Mary Seits - Executive Director Floodplain Management Association


Thank You To Our Sponsors GOLD SPONSORS

PLATINUM SPONSOR

SILVER SPONSOR

BREAK SPONSOR

BREAKFAST SPONSOR

BADGE & LANYARD SPONSOR

EXHIBITORS

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Profile for Floodplain Management Association

FMA Annual Conference 2019 | Onsite Guide  

FMA Annual Conference 2019 | Onsite Guide  

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