Page 1

ISSUE 01 SUMMER 2017

GOOdspeed THE TRADEWIND MAGAZINE

INSIDE

SQUAD GOALS

KITEBOARDING KNOWS NO AGE LIMIT

HIDDEN HAVENS

SECRET SPOTS TO ESCAPE IN ST. BARTHS

TRAIL BLAZER

INTERVIEW WITH STOWE'S MOUNTAIN BIKING GURU

SUMMER 2017 | PAGE i


The explorers named the islands after saints...

...Probably because they thought

they were in heaven.

©LAURENT BENOIT

VILLA WV BLB, ST. BARTHS


Planning villa vacations in St. Barths, the Caribbean, and Europe for over 30 years.

VILLA RENTALS | 24/7 CONCIERGE | REAL ESTATE +1 401 849 8012

info@wimco.com


LETTER FROM THE EDITOR

Introducing GOOdspeed I T ’ S S I M P L E : I N F O R M , E N T E R TA I N A N D I N S P I R E to be writing this Editor’s Letter, I must confess this is not the first one I’ve ever written. Though it is the first one that bears my name at the end—an exciting professional goal realized, for sure. Having come up the ranks of magazine publishing in New York City, beginning with a two-year stint as the assistant to the Editor-in-Chief of Vanity Fair, I was well indoctrinated on the importance of a wellwritten, informative and, indeed, opinionated Editor’s Letter. But what I didn’t quite understand until I put together this issue is that as the Editorin-Chief, your mark is left on each story, and sometimes it’s a big blot (sweat stain) and other times it’s just a trace, but it’s always there, indelible like a fingerprint. Thus, the cobbling together of an Editor’s Letter, which always seemed either obsequious or worse, a dull explanation of what’s to come, is, DESPITE THE THRILL FOR ME

in fact, a synopsis of how some of the major stories in the issue came to bear and, ultimately, why the Editor deemed them worthy of inclusion. As a result, it’s crucial to have a guiding sensibility, a direction or even set theme to bring all the stories together. At Goodspeed, our mission is simple: to follow the direction of our host airline, Tradewind Aviation, which promises its clients comfort, safety and convenience. In turn, Goodspeed aims to provide those same clients information, entertainment and inspiration through original print and digital content while they’re in flight. There’s no lofty ambition behind the pages of Goodspeed, but rather a core directive to ensure our readers arrive at their destination with confidence and know-how so they may jump right in and enjoy the very best of the places we land. We are fortunate to have nine distinct destinations from which to create such engaging content, each teeming with interesting people doing interesting things, allowing our job of exposing them to our clients to be a rather enjoyable position. From Nevette Previd’s farm- and sea-inspired food tours on Martha’s Vineyard in “Edible Adventures” (pg. 12) to a band of kitesurfing brothers canvassing the Caribbean in “Squad Goals” (pg. 26) and Stowe’s new mountain biking trails initiatives in “Trail Blazer” (pg. 10), the people of each destination are what truly make the magazine sing. I look forward to sharing with you, in this premiere issue, the stories of our various destinations and the people who make them great. — MEG NOLAN

LETTER FROM THE FOUNDERS

What’s in a name? EZ: In the summer of 2001, Tradewind was just the seed of an idea while I was working as a seaplane flight instructor at the Goodspeed Airport on the shores of the Connecticut River. When the time came to choose a call sign for Tradewind with Air Traffic Control, I naturally thought of the place where I got my start. Goodspeed means just that: good wishes, idyllic times on the water and summer fun. DZ: F  or me, Goodspeed is not just the airline’s call sign, but also a name that is representative of Tradewind’s values as a company. We are a company that puts its customers first, providing comfort and safety and ultimately wishing them well on their journey. After all, don’t we all want to travel with Goodspeed? — ERIC AND DAVID ZIPKIN

DESTINATION LEGEND:

MVL = STOWE, VT

ACK = NANTUCKET

ANU = ANTIGUA

AXA = ANGUILLA

BOS = BOSTON

MVY = MARTHA’S VINEYARD

NEV =NEVIS

SBH = ST. BARTHS

STT

PAGE 2 | THE TRADEWIND MAGAZINE

= ST. THOMAS


ISSUE 01 SUMMER 2017

GOOdspeed THE TRADEWIND MAGAZINE

TabLE of COntents Flight Plan

Control Tower

4

T H E L AT E S T A N D G R E AT E S T IN OUR NINE DISTINCT D E S T I N AT I O N S ........................... 4 The Club Car is back on Nantucket; Anguilla has a spate of new luxury hotels; Perfect picnic wines

The Hangar

18

T R A I L B L A Z E R ........................... 16 A Q&A with Stowe Mountain Biking Club Executive Director Evan Chismark

E D I B L E A D V E N T U R E S . . ............. 18 A profile of Farm.Field.Sea. founder Nevette Previd

28

EXCLUSIVE EXCERPT FROM N A N T U C K E T . . ............................ 22 A fine art monograph from photographer Nathan Coe

S Q U A D G O A L S .. ........................ 28 A Band of Brothers-like kitesurfing saga

W I N G S O V E R N O R M A N D Y ...... 34

In Every Issue C A L E N D A R ................................ 14

V E C T O R ...................................... 38

Not-to-miss events in our destinations

Tradewind’s routes and current happenings

H I D D E N H AV E N S ...................... 20

S U N D O W N E R S ........................... 40

St. Barths’ infamous pools

Tradewind’s pick for where and with what to best toast the sunset

One plane’s journey across the Atlantic to participate in 70th anniversary D-Day memorial ceremonies

SUMMER 2017 | PAGE 3


Club RuLEs THE CLUB CAR’S NEW LOOK

PAGE 4 | THE TRADEWIND MAGAZINE


FLIGHT PLAN

ACK

DON’T MISS the Matador

cocktail made with Casamigos tequila, strawberry, ancho chili liquor and citrus.

This summer Nantucket witnessed the rebirth of one of its landmark restaurants on Main Street, The Club Car. Aptly named due to its 19th-century railway car exterior (it’s an original car from the former Siasconset Railway), the hallmark eatery reopened its doors this May, revealing a thoroughly renovated, contemporary look, complete with modern luxury finishes (lacquer, brass and antique mirrors) and deep-seated blue banquettes. Designed by Nantucket native Tharon Anderson and executed by Dwyer Maloney of Main Street Construction, the aesthetic is what they call “vintage coastal,” a melding between the antique bar-car area and the vibrant, whitewashed dining space. Bridging the two areas is the beloved piano, preserved from the restaurant’s previous incarnation and now sitting proudly up front, offering both customers at the bar and those in the dining room a chance to join in the revelry. Equally indulging the melodious crowd is a special late-night menu and various large-bottle formats of wine. Serving dinner nightly and lunch Wednesday through Sunday, the 82-seat restaurant features Californian cuisine with a Mediterranean twist with multiple share-plate options alongside a tempting menu of sweet and spicy libations. The trio of partners behind The Club Car, Chef Mayumi Hattori, Ty Costa and Sommelier Tammy McDonough, are no strangers to the island, having worked together prior at neighboring Straight Wharf, and it is this shared passion for the island, its dining scene and, most of all, its people that has them eager to welcome you to the Club.

AXA

Hotel Heyday Anguilla set a record last year by welcoming 79,239

tourists over the year, an 8.2% increase over the previous year, and it’s clear that the big luxury brand hotels took notice. First to come was the Four Seasons, which took over the Viceroy property late last year to the tune of a $10 million rebranding and expansion of the spa and gym. The second is Belmond, which, just this spring announced its purchase of the beloved GrecoMoorish-style property, Cap Juluca, located on the southwestern coast at Maundays Bay. According to CEO Roeland Vos, “This one-of-a-kind resort presents a compelling opportunity to build on our past experience of acquiring hotels that can be restored to iconic status through investment in the physical product and enhancement of all operational, sales, revenue management and service functions.” Belmond Cap Juluca will undergo a thorough renovation after the festive holidays, including an additional 25 new beachfront rooms and enhancements across the board from the spa to the public areas. The spend is approximated at $36 million and set to be completed by the end of 2018. We can’t wait to see what’s to come.

SUMMER 2017 | PAGE 5


FLIGHT PLAN

ACK

BoHo Bolthole G L O B A L LY S O U R C E D FA S H I O N S O N T H E W H A R F

1

2

*

CHECK OUT her embroidered cover-ups from Las Noches Ibiza by Eric & Jack.

Back for her second year on Nantucket, boutique owner Joey Wölffer caters to those eschewing the conventional preppy style for more Bohemian flair.

3

Her wharfside bolthole, located at 20 Old South Wharf, features limited designs in jewelry, clothing and accessories sourced by Joey from around the world. Standout pieces include Boho chic dresses by French designer V de Vinster, notice-me clip-on earrings from French designer Dominique Denaive, and Joey’s own line of handbags made from suede and calf leather. A Long Island native and partner in her family’s winery, Joey’s talent lies in selecting stylish yet effortless looks that are undeniably chic.



1 PAGE 6 | THE TRADEWIND MAGAZINE

The wharfside boutique that feels like a treasure chest.



2

Statement clip-on earrings from French designer Dominique Denaive



3

A suede Boho bag from the Joey Wölffer Collection.


CONVERSATIONS

-

MUSIC

what matters most WORDS PICTURES

DATA

STORIES

FACTS EMOTIONS

The Nantucket Project is about what matters in our noisy, messy world. We bring fresh ideas to curious audiences in live talks, short original films, and unforgettable experiences.

nantucketproject.com


PAGE 8 | THE TRADEWIND MAGAZINE


FLIGHT PLAN

ANU

Ion in Zion I S L A N D B AT H I N G AT C A R L I S L E B AY

Known for its lush landscape, it’s no surprise Antigua is a hotbed for transporting wellness experiences. Yet, what if the transporting didn’t just happen mentally but also physically? That’s what Carlisle Bay, an 82-room resort on Antigua’s southern coast, is banking on with its new Island Bathing experience. Billed as a meditative experience, guests are first physically conveyed via private boat to an uninhabited island and then mentally transported with expert-guided meditation and breath work surrounded by the calming sounds of the waves,

wind and palm trees. Better yet, it’s actually proven to work: According to studies by Columbia University, pounding surf creates negative ions in the air, which can help enhance mood, stimulate senses, improve oxygen absorption and even boost resistance to disease. STARTS AT

$725 for up to two people; reservations@carlisle-bay.com.

MVY

GOAT YOGA I T ’ S T H E L AT E S T F I T N E S S T R E N D T O SWEEP THE YOGA WORLD.

Not only is it a real live thing; it’s also wildly popular now in Martha’s Vineyard. First recognized nationally in January—CNN covered classes out in Oregon—Goat Yoga is the rather simple concept of practicing yoga alongside baby or dwarf goats, combining the benefits of an asana yoga practice with those of animal therapy. And this summer it can be found on Martha’s Vineyard at Native Earth Teaching Farm in Chilmark. Taught by yogi veteran Josey Kirkland, who teaches a Vinyasa Flow style, the hour-long classes ($25) will be held roughly twice a month and feature

a variety of Nigerian Dwarf goats and Pygmy goats. According to Josey, the Nigerian Dwarf goats, of which she owns two, are “really incredible, silly and loving animals” while the new litter of Pygmy goats ensures an adorable and playful practice. TO REGISTER FOR CLASS,

email joseykirkland@gmail.com.

SUMMER 2017 | PAGE 9


FLIGHT PLAN

L-O-L-A LOLA WHERE YOU DRINK CHAMPAGNE

ACK BOS

ACK | CT

DON’T MISS their Green

Light Roll made with spicy toro, shiso and green apple topped with kiwi, ponzu and fresh lime zest.

Nantucket’s infamous LOLA 41 and Station 21 proprietor, Marco Coelho, has expanded his empire to the metropolitan streets of Boston with his early-summer opening of LOLA 42. Located down by the seaport, at 22 Liberty Drive, this LOLA outpost features a similar menu with favorites like the Tuna Avocado Poke Salad and the beloved Lola and Tuna Burgers, while the seafront views keep the siren call of Nantucket still audible. Open seven days a week with lunch, afternoon and dinner menus, LOLA 42 promises to keep those needing a Nantucket fix on the mainland happily satiated.

PAGE 10 | THE TRADEWIND MAGAZINE

Something Special A NANTUCKET FAVORITE COMES TO GREENWICH, CONN. Beloved on Nantucket since 1970, Something Natural is a fresh, homemade sandwich shop and bakery with devotees as loyal as they come—evidenced by the ubiquitous lotus-like flower sticker you spy on cars both on- and off-island. Noted for its tucked-away residential location (and that congested driveway come August) as much as its chewy, freshly baked chocolate chip cookies and warm Portuguese Bread and Herb Rolls, the popular sandwich spot is as familiar to Nantucketers as the ferry’s horn. As a result, it was met with mixed emotions when their recent expansion into Greenwich, Connecticut, was first announced: natives cried commercialism while others worried bigger would dampen the specialness. Open since early July, in another tucked-away location behind Saks Fifth Avenue just off Greenwich Avenue, it’s virtually impossible to find fault with not only a small business’ success, but also with more daily homemade bread, cookies and brownies, not to mention Something Natural’s signature sandwiches (Sheila’s Favorite, Avocado, Cheddar & Chutney) in the world. The Greenwich location will also be serving new-to-the-menu salads such as the Cisco Caesar, 50 Cliff Cobb, Brant Point Bowl and Surfside Salad. They also offer gluten free bread and muffins for breakfast. And for those fortunate enough to visit both the Connecticut and the Nantucket outposts more than once a year, count yourself naturally lucky, indeed.


SUMMER 2017 | PAGE 11


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PAGE 12 | THE TRADEWIND MAGAZINE


FLIGHT PLAN

PicNic Wisely

ACK | MVY | SBH

Nothing quite defines an indulgent beach picnic like the right bottle of wine. Ever the intimidating subject, we’ve taken the hesitation out of your selection by rounding up a list of top picnic wines chosen by the top spots on island to grab them.

S T. B A R T H É L É M Y Les Galeries du Commerce, St. Jean

• D  omaine de L’Ile de Porquerolles Rosé from Cotes de Provence, France. Crisp and fresh, the acidity on the palate will keep the hot sun at bay. $30 • W  illiam Fevre Chablis from Burgundy, France. Green, flinty and mineral notes make this Chardonnay ideal with shellfish. $25

Epernay

NANTUCKET 1 North Beach Street

• L  ily Rosé from Côtes de Provence, France. Soft, delicate rosé perfect for summer sipping at the beach or on your deck. $19 • V  ale Do Capucho, ‘Fossil,’ White blend from Lisboa, Portugal. A crisp

blend of Arinto, Godello and Fernao Pires grapes, fossilized seashells and Roman artifacts, the wine is organically grown and delicious. $23

Vintage MV Wine & Spirits

photo by Tim Ehrenberg, BRAND NEW - NANTUCKET

Maya’s To Go

M A R T H A’ S V I N E YA R D 29 Winter Street

• 2  016 Domaine du Salvard Cheverny Rosé from the Loire Valley, France. A blend of Pinot Noir and Gamay, this light red is refreshing for when the sun sets. $15 • 2  015 Broc Cellars Love Red from the North Coast of California. This wine is a blend of Carignan, Valdiguie and Syrah. We like to put a little chill on the bottle before we head out for a picnic to keep it bright and fresh. $24

When Only Bubbles Will Do NV Louis Pommery Sparkling Wine from California. Brand-new from Pommery, this sparkler done in the Methode Champenoise is light and fresh. $24

SUMMER 2017 | PAGE 13


CALENDAR

AUGUST 5–14

12–20

20

SBH

ACK

ACK

Summer Sessions

Race Week

Opera House Cup

7–8

16

21

ANU

MVY Illumination Night, Oak Bluffs

MVY Dirty Dozen Brass Band, Old Whaling Church, Edgartown

Carnival Judging of the Bands and Winners

12 ACK

Boston Pops Concert, Jetties Beach

18 MVY

Oak Bluffs Fireworks

19

MVY

MVY Aretha Franklin, The Tabernacle, Oak Bluffs

Chilmark Road Race

PAGE 14 | THE TRADEWIND MAGAZINE

25–27 MVL Wine & Food Classic


SEPTEMBER 9

9/10–10/14

14–17

16

9/29–10/1

NEV Nevis Marathon

MVY Striped Bass and Bluefish Derby

ACK

MVY

The Nantucket Project

Illumination Night, Oak Bluffs

MVL Stowe Oktoberfest

OCTOBER 6–8

7

MVL Foliage Arts Festival

ACK

Cranberry Festival


Trail Blazer

E VA N C H I S M A R K O F S T O W E T R A I L S PA R T N E R S H I P

As the relatively new Executive Director of Stowe’s Mountain Bike Club, soon to be known as the Stowe Trails Partnership under his reign, representing over 35 miles of mountain bike trails throughout the Stowe area, Evan Chismark has set himself up for an ambitious start. Through his work with the Town of Stowe, the Stowe Land Trust, private property owners and several other nonprofits, the partnership has created a unique network that takes advantage of the elevation changes and terrain distinct to Stowe. A dedicated rider for the past 16 years, Evan has PAGE 16 | THE TRADEWIND MAGAZINE

pushed the club to take on more of an ambassador role of the area’s trails, working with local partners and property owners to showcase the immense terrain. We sat down with the area’s bona fide trail blazer to get a feel for the mountain biking culture and how visitors can grab a piece of the action.


C O N T R O L T O W E R | E VA N C H I S M A R K

How did you get started mountain biking? I started mountain biking in grade school in the early ’90s, but I really fell in love with mountain biking during the summer of 2001 while living in northern California when I purchased my first full-suspension bike. That was a game changer—right tool for the job, if you will. Suddenly I was riding further, faster, and having way more fun than I ever had. As a crusty old snowboarder, I’ve found a lot of parallels between mountain bike culture and early snowboard culture—there’s an analogous DIY ethos that persists in mountain biking that I’ve always been drawn to. But ultimately, it’s just wicked fun!

What is special about mountain biking in Stowe? Stowe’s trails are an alchemical mix of technical, smooth, hand-built, machine-sculpted and everything in between. There’s a great balance of beginner terrain and highly advanced terrain—one-hour lunch loops to all-day epics. Additionally, most of Stowe’s trails are purposebuilt mountain bike trails—meaning they were designed and built by mountain bikers with mountain biking in mind, as opposed to hiking trails or foot paths that have been co-opted by bikers.

What is it that people need to know to start mountain biking, especially if they’re intimidated? It’s all relative—just like you wouldn’t point it down Liftline your first day on skis at Stowe, you also wouldn’t want your first ride to be on a technical root-strewn off-camber trail. Start out on terrain appropriate to your ability and fitness level. There are even several coaching services available in Stowe, so grab a lesson and start out on the right foot. Enlist a friend who rides to show you some of Stowe’s easier trails, or check out the lower trails up at Trapp Family Lodge. Also crucial: Get on a bike that fits you and is tuned properly— riding your spouse or partner’s 20-year-old college commuter bike is a bad idea! Take incremental steps toward progression and don’t take

it too seriously. New riders tend to associate mountain biking with one of two things: spandex/all-day suffer-fest rides, or people tossing themselves off of cliffs and doing backflips. Those are, no doubt, interesting ends of the mountain bike spectrum, but for most of us that’s not mountain biking.

What’s the best time you’ve ever had on your mountain bike and why? My favorite rides generally fall into one of three categories: the kind where we set out on a big ride, bite off more than we can chew, and sputter back to the trail head at the end of the day running on fumes; the kind that happens totally organically, when you run into a buddy randomly and just shred for a few hours; or the bike destination vacation that’s all about exploration and riding new trails. I’ve found though that the ride itself is usually just a backdrop to the experience that’s shared among a group of friends. I’ll admit that the first time I rode at Whistler Mountain Bike Park was a borderline spiritual experience.

At what age do you think kids can start to mountain bike? Based on the crop of young rippers in this town, pretty young apparently! This year we started Stowe Bike Night, which is a weekly gathering of families and kids of all ages to ride bikes and just share a sense of community. Each week we see more and more kids, and both the age range and skill level are astonishing.

What’s the secret to being a good mountain biker? Despite the many hours I’ve spent dissecting the technicalities and finer points, I’m still trying to answer that question myself—that’s part of what makes mountain biking great. Like golf or skiing/ snowboarding, mountain biking is instantly fun but can also take a lifetime to master. But if I had to take a stab I’d say that the two secret ingredients are: don’t take yourself too seriously, and just have fun.

If you could design the perfect day of mountain biking on Stowe’s trails, how would it begin and end, meals included? It would definitely be a long day in the saddle. I’d start with an early latte at PK Coffee, hit up Commodities Natural Market to fill my pack with snacks, then set off from town, just a few close buddies traveling light so we can cover as much ground as possible. We’d pedal out to Sterling Forest, take a break at one of the stellar view points out there, then rally over to the new trails on the other side of the forest. We’d stop in midride for a snack and beer at the von Trapp Brewing Bierhall (there’s literally a mountain bike trail that connects from the trail network right to the brewery!). Then we’d finish with some hot laps in Cady Hill Forest, after which we’d jump on the Rec Path to consume our body weight in pizza, sushi and craft brew. There would, of course, be the requisite jump in the river along the way too.

SUMMER 2017 | PAGE 17


Edible Adventures W I T H FA R M . F I E L D . S E A . O F M A R T H A’ S V I N E YA R D

For the past three years, Farm.Field.Sea. has been leading island culinary adventures and creating bespoke events for those eager to enjoy the richness of Martha’s Vineyard’s plentiful farm and sea life firsthand. STARTED BY NEVETTE PREVID, A LOVER OF

Farm.Field.Sea. taps into Martha’s Vineyard’s 42 working farms and over 20 oyster farms, harnessing what she calls “a foodie’s paradise.” The company hosts both group tours and private bespoke events. Their two-year-old Summer Series Local Food Tours feature roughly 10 farms at any one time and give guests an intimate view into how the farmers harvest and tend to their crops, livestock and marine life, followed by a convivial shared meal. EXPERIENTIAL TRAVEL,

A popular adventure is the Oyster Farm Tour with Cottage City Oysters, which includes a behindthe-scenes visit by boat to the nursery beds followed by a tasting and shucking demonstration by Cottage City purveyors Dan and Greg Martino. New experiences this year are a Flower Workshop with Morning Glory Farms and Plein Air Painting Farm.Field.Sea. Founder with Local Artists on Island Farms, catering Nevette Previd to guests who “don’t want to get their hands dirty” but will still enjoy unique access to farms typically only frequented by locals. According to Previd, “Our recipe for a magical event is one part adventure, one part hands-on fun and one part a feast at a unique island location.” FOR MORE INFORMATION

check out www.farmfieldsea.com

PAGE 18 | THE TRADEWIND MAGAZINE


C O N T R O L T O W E R | FA R M . F I E L D . S E A .

SUMMER 2017 | PAGE 19


PAGE 20 | THE TRADEWIND MAGAZINE


HIDDEN HAVENS THE POOLS, ST. BARTHS

Given that everything in St. Barths is twice as nice, it should be no surprise that there’s not one but two natural swimming pools tucked into the rocky outcroppings of the island. Both are exquisite examples of where nature has once again outdone herself. Natural Pool of Grand Fond

Natural Pool of Petite Cul de Sac

To reach this pool you must follow the marked trail head just off the right of Grand Fond’s pebble beach. The goat path climbs up the hill and along the coastline, requiring single-file walking. After roughly 20 minutes, you’ll spot the pool. Make your way down carefully as it is lined with sea urchins and rather steep. Regulars come well equipped, wearing sneakers and bathing suits, hats and ample sunscreen (there’s very little shade) plus armed with a towel and water.

This path is less marked but slightly easier on the feet as it hugs the shoreline for the first 10 to 15 minutes. Begin at the small parking area at the end of the road on the right in Petite Cul de Sac. Take your first right and walk along the beach until it ends, then head up and over the hill, waving to the goats as you pass by. Be careful as you begin to descend on the rocky, windward side of the hill, maintaining around 20 feet between you and the water. Head straight and you will run right into the natural pool.

ABOVE Bathers enjoying the

pool near Petite Cul de Sac.

Map data ©2017 Google, Imagery ©2017 CNES / Airbus, DigitalGlobe SUMMER 2017 | PAGE 21


FINE ART NANTUCKET PAGE 22 | THE TRADEWIND MAGAZINE


T H E H A N G A R | N AT H A N C O E

Photographer Nathan Coe portrays an evocative avant-garde aesthetic in his new, limited edition fine art book, Nantucket.

“The book showcases 10 years of my shooting on Nantucket.” —NATHAN COE SUMMER 2017 | PAGE 23


“I had to kill a lot of my darlings, as my mother-inlaw kept telling me during the editing process.”

Q&A 1.

 WHAT IS IT ABOUT NANTUCKET THAT SUSTAINS YOUR CREATIVITY?

Nantucket has an otherworldly nature to it, especially in the off seasons. The light and slithers of land against an enormous sky are so beautiful. Nowhere else has the skies we have here.

2.

IF HOME WERE NOT NANTUCKET, WHERE WOULD IT BE?

Probably a deserted island with a golf course and mountains to climb. I haven’t found it yet.

3.

 YOU ALSO OWN NANTUCKET’S ONLY ORGANIC TAKEAWAY SPOT, NATIV MADE. WHAT DO YOU WANT PEOPLE TO KNOW ABOUT IT?

The quality is second to none, and it’s all about the ethics and standards behind the food and ingredients. Plus, you can get anything depending on how you rolled out of bed: a cold pressed juice and healthy snack or a delicious pastry and cold brewed coffee.

4.

 WHO IS A FELLOW LOCAL ARTIST YOU ADMIRE? I admire Illya Kagan’s paintings. He really captures the color and character of the light and the Nantucket skies.

5.

NEXT PROJECT ON DECK THAT HAS YOU EXCITED?

I’m planning an art series of photographs using a fashion vibe with a little tongue in cheek toward the island’s stereotypes and unique idiosyncrasies.

PAGE 24 | THE TRADEWIND MAGAZINE


AT LEFT Nantucket, available

from late July at nathancoe.com, $2,500.

FINE ART NANTUCKET

“It’s a heavily curated and disciplined project, focusing on my individual style and perception of the island.”

SUMMER 2017 | PAGE 25


PAGE 26 | THE TRADEWIND MAGAZINE


Reaching New Heights in Real Estate Service THE TEAM AT LITTLE RIVER REALTY

Gayle Oberg Owner/Broker, Zoe’ Bedell, Pam Plummer, Mike Hickey, Bud Keene (not shown)

SALES & RENTALS STOWE, VERMONT info@LRRVermont.com

LRRVermont.com

802.253.1553

FOR EXTRAORDINARY EVENTS AND VIP SERVICES

www.epicpresentations.com contact@epicpresentations.com Photo by Francois Vochelle

SUMMER 2017 | PAGE 27


SQUAD GOALS

Fueled by a shared passion—which, for most of them, was found later in life—an intrepid crew of fifty-somethings have banded together in common pursuit of the best kiteboarding conditions they can find, wherever they may be.

PAGE 28 | THE TRADEWIND MAGAZINE


THE HANGAR | SQUAD GOALS

Decade-old pals and Greenwich, Connecticut residents Robert Greenhill, Brian Olson, Max Justicz and Scott Stuart have multiple things in common—similar-aged children, athletic dispositions, competitive spirit—but the one thing that has truly cemented their friendship is a similar affinity for the adrenaline-fueled sport of kiteboarding. Heralded as one of the most dangerous activities one can do—a kiter literally tethers himself to a large kite with nothing but a plastic board to ground him to the water—kiteboarding is anything but a leisurely pursuit. And like anything that flirts with mortal injury, those drawn to it are typically consummate thrill-seekers. Just ask this modern Band of Brothers, who recently sat down with Goodspeed to share advice, their expertise and even some tall tales from their global kiting adventures, which have taken them from Mozambique to Fiji to the Caribbean and back again, as they steadfastly search for the best possible breeze. From multi-family boat vacations to ensure they can adjust to changing wind conditions, to having their own personal meteorologist on call, to last-minute hops down to the islands, the appetite is fierce and, better yet, inclusive. As Greenhill says, “It’s more fun to share it with others and spread the sport around. Plus, newbies bring new energy and sparkle and get you excited all over again.” And what began as a men’s group has grown into an all-inclusive family sport, with kids and spouses now suiting up as well. As Stuart aptly put it, “Learning with your family is super special. What other sport can you all learn at the same time?” Stuart’s son Nate is equally as entrenched as his father, and is spending this summer coaching kiteboarding on Nantucket.

The group’s annual trips—sometimes multiple times a year—are discussed during their quarterly “kite nights” at one another’s homes, where calendars are coordinated and kitesurfing videos are screened. The devotion toward the sport is fierce. When asked what it was that first brought each of them to the world of kiting, the answers are quite similar. As Greenhill put it, “It’s the natural continuation of the curve for adrenaline-fueled

“The kite will pull you. It’s a monster. It’s like water skiing but still being attached to a moving boat.”

SUMMER 2017 | PAGE 29


THE HANGAR | SQUAD GOALS

“The current generation of kiteboarders feels like a relatively intimate group of sporting pioneers—perhaps like surfing in the 1940s and 1950s before neoprene and Hollywood raised public awareness.”

sports. Eventually it looked too fun not to try.” And of course, there’s the competitive element. “There’s a lot of egging on in kiteboarding,” says Olson. So, once Stuart saw Olson and Greenhill kiting, he had what he called an actual “physical craving” to try it. All three are former windsurfers, and as they put it, “Kiting is like Windsurfing 8.0 or Windsurfing 3D.” There’s a bumper sticker from top kiteboarding school Real Sports that Olson loves that says, “Windsurfing has been canceled.” There’s no question that kiteboarding is viewed as an athletic evolution by these guys, though they’re also quick to point out the sport’s physical benefits, particularly for someone in their 50s and 60s, due to its low impact on the joints. As Stuart puts it, “If I go skiing for a week, I’m beat up. After a week of kiting I feel great. It’s like being in plank for a week.” Like any athletic grouping, a shared level of skill is appreciated, and thus to make this travel team one must have what they call “your upwind license,” which means you must be able to keep upwind on your own. If you can’t, you likely still need instruction, and if you still need instruction then the kiting spots are limited. And thus, the secret to eventual kiting success is first and foremost to get good instruction. Greenhill next advises, “Commit three days or nine hours of water time, because after nine hours something beautiful will definitely happen and you’ll be hooked for life.” He also warns, “The worst thing you can do is quit after five hours. You have to push through that initial frustration because the first time you ride 15 feet, it’s the most expensive yet exhilarating thing in your life.” They also recommend utilizing the network of kiters or, as Olson puts it, “borrowing other people’s intelligence and doing proper research and development on the instruction and safety elements of the sport. It may seem boring when you start, but with context you quickly understand why, and then it can be safe and enjoyable.” They are quick to point out that having offshore breezes with boat support is the safest way to start. And then, when you are learning and need to “maximize your reps” of

PAGE 30 | THE TRADEWIND MAGAZINE

going downwind and back, they stress that hiring dinghy support is crucial and well worth the money. Given their high level of experience, we asked what could possibly keep the adrenaline flowing currently. The reply was unanimous: “Tricks.” “Level 1 is riding. Level 2 is keeping upwind, and Level 3 and up is jumping. You can always progress in the sport with tricks,” explained Stuart. No doubt that also explains why the sport is not only prime for thrill-seekers and competitive types, but also why it has such a tight grip on its participants. “Scott can do a back roll and front roll, a dark slide, and a back-roll hand-drag—pound for pound the coolest one there is,” quips Greenhill. When asked how it feels to do such major tricks, Stuart demurred, “It’s scary to get high and then have the kite just react and then deal with a massive deceleration.” The newest evolution to the sport is the hydrofoil board, where a fin-like centerboard on the bottom allows the board to float above the water at certain speeds and, according to Olson, “is the Zen or the yoga of kiteboarding.” “All you hear is the foil whizzing through the water. Plus, it’s great in light wind, expanding your opportunity set,” adds Greenhill—business jargon evidencing their business-like approach to getting on the water with the optimal wind as often as possible. Another thing that makes foiling appealing to the guys is the quietness that allows them to chat more easily, particularly using their newfound toy, BbTALKIN, a waterproof headset two-way radio that gives the egging on full exposure. But what really has upped the ante on the egging (and technology) is Woo. “Woo is what gamified the whole sport,” says Greenhill. “Woo could also be the undoing of the group.” Woo is an accelerometer, a small gadget attached to the board that prints out stats to your phone such as highest jump and highest speed. You can create your own subgroups and then connect to social media, allowing users to post their session. And, most of all, for a competitive subset like these guys, it “pushes you to the margin.” For the


BEER STORIES

MOON KITING

On a group trip down to Necker Island a few years back, Brian Olson asked the host, Richard Branson himself, if he’d ever kited under a full moon. The second he acknowledged he hadn’t, he was rousing everyone to join him to anoint such an action. He didn’t even bother to change into a suit and went in fully clothed. Armed with individual EPIRBs and glow sticks affixed to their boards, the guys all headed out for a moonlit circumnavigation they’ll never forget.

“Kiting is a free Neti pot. You have to be comfortable with water in your nose.”

IN STITCHES

Everyone has had his fair share of uncomfortable landings or what feels like gallons of water up their noses. As Olson says, “Kitesurfing is like a free Neti pot,” but it was Bobby Greenhill who can claim the most stitches out of the group. He was down in Cape Hatteras, where Real Sports is located, when he crash landed in some shallow water; when he went to retrieve his board, he sliced his leg open, right to the bone, on some chicken wire from an old lobster trap. And since it was out in the field, per se, he got only seven marine stitches, whereas a hospital would have likely put in 30-plus.

SUMMER 2017 | PAGE 31


THE HANGAR | SQUAD GOALS

“The worst thing you can do is quit after five hours. You have to push through that initial frustration because the first time you ride 15 feet, it’s the most expensive yet exhilarating thing in your life.”

record, the group’s current highest jump stat belongs to Brian Olson at 38 feet, but all of them have recorded some impressive speed with 8 or 9G landings. When asked why they think the devotion to the sport is so universally strong, Justicz answered, “It’s a relatively small and undiscovered sport. The current generation of kiteboarders feels like a relatively intimate group of sporting pioneers—perhaps like surfing in the 1940s and 1950s before neoprene and Hollywood raised public awareness.” Furthermore, it’s about the shared experience. Olson calls it a “10 out of 10 for camaraderie,” saying, “For every day of kiting, you get a solid three hours of good conversation.” It’s clear the shared sense of exhaustion and accomplishment is a unifying element for not just physical fitness and competitive exhilaration but, most important, a longstanding friendship.

PAGE 32 | THE TRADEWIND MAGAZINE

CHEAT SHEET G L O S S A RY

WHERE TO GO

When the kiter is attached to a wakeboard-like board, known as a twin-tip.

— Shore Club, Turks & Caicos

When the kiter is using a surfboard to then surf and play in waves.

— Outer Banks, North Carolina

KITEBOARDING:

KITESURFING:

DOWNWINDERS:

When kiters can enjoy an effortless breeze going downwind and work on some tricks. It’s equivalent to off-piste powder skiing, as you can just jump and float.

— Anegada in British Virgin Islands — Union Island in the Grenadines — Nantucket in September and October — Lewis Gut in Bridgeport, CT — Cape Town, South Africa — Fortaleza in Northern Brazil — Nitro City in Panama — Dorado Beach in Puerto Rico

WHERE TO LEARN

W H E R E T O AV O I D

— Real Sports in Cape Hatteras, North Carolina

Classic crowded spots like Cabarete in the Dominican Republic.

— 40Knots in Nonesuch Bay, Antigua — 7è CIEL in St. Barths — Next Level Watersports, Nantucket — Skyhigh Kiteboarding, Martha’s Vineyard

IDEAL CONDITIONS

Warm water, high visibility, 20 to 30 knots of onshore breeze with protected flat water like Coatue beach in Nantucket Harbor or waves in the Outer Banks, NC.


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WINGS OVER NORMANDY One plane's journey across the Atlantic to participate in 70th anniversary D-Day memorial ceremonies.

PAGE 34 | THE TRADEWIND MAGAZINE

©Lee Howard Photography Co. U.K.

©Lee Howard Photography Co. U.K.

Placid Lassie over the English countryside, on her way to the 70th D-Day Commemorations in Normandy, France—here in formation with a C-45.


THE HANGAR | PLACID LASSIE

In the pre-dawn hours of June 6, 1944, thousands of brave Allied soldiers embarked on D-Day, the final invasion of Hitler’s Fortress Europe. Fourteen of those troopers of the 101st Airborne Division rode the Douglas C-47 christened by her crew as Placid Lassie. Lassie, along with many of those troopers, survived the war and entered civilian life. The C-47 cargo plane was converted to a DC-3 airliner and plied the skies of North America for more than 50 years. Finally abandoned in a field in rural Georgia, Lassie was discovered by a group of enthusiasts and recognized for what she is: a proud war veteran deserving of respect and preservation. After a four-year restoration costing several hundred thousand dollars and countless man-hours, Lassie was one of two C-47s that braved the North Atlantic to honor and commemorate the sacrifices of 1944. In the morning hours of June 6, 2014, Placid Lassie flew again over the beaches of Normandy! Today, Lassie flies regularly with the same dedicated group of volunteers who pulled her out of the field seven years ago. She visits air shows throughout North America, bringing her story of heroism and resilience to younger generations. In 2019, America will mark the 75th anniversary of the D-Day Invasion— and again, Lassie will cross the pond, this time as the leader of the 75th Squadron, a group of a dozen or more DC-3/C-47 aircraft that will participate in the Normandy Commemorations.

Tradewind Aviation is proud to be a major supporter of Placid Lassie and the 75th Squadron. FOR MORE INFORMATION

75thsquadron.org.

and to participate, visit placidlassie.org and

SMALL IMAGES, LEFT TO RIGHT: Crossing the Channel; Departing Southampton; Jumpers away;

Formation of history SUMMER 2017 | PAGE 35


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TRADEWIND AVIATION COMFORT | CONVENIENCE | SAFETY

Tradewind Aviation was founded in 2001 on the premise that every flight deserves the highest-quality aircraft, crew and service. Headquartered at the Waterbury-Oxford Airport (OXC) in Connecticut with operational bases at Westchester County Airport (HPN) in White Plains, New York, and San Juan International Airport (SJU) in Puerto Rico, Tradewind operates 21 aircraft for on-demand private charter and scheduled “Shuttle” service throughout the U.S. and Caribbean.

Stowe

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Northeast Routes

Caribbean Routes

of a private charter for the cost of a single seat. In the Northeast U.S., scheduled Shuttle flights are operated from the New York area to Boston (BOS), Stowe (MVL), Nantucket (ACK) and Martha’s Vineyard (MVY) and depart from private Annapolis charter FBO terminals. In the Caribbean, Shuttle flights are operated between San Juan (SJU), St. Barths (SBH), Anguilla (AXA), Nevis (NEV), Antigua (ANU) and St. Thomas (STT). Private charter flights are offered throughout the U.S. and Caribbean in our fleet of world-class Pilatus PC-12 and Citation CJ3 jets. The safety of our customers and our employees is our number one priority. Tradewind is a United States-certificated scheduled air carrier under Part 135 of the Federal Aviation Regulations. Operating continuously and without incident since 2001, Tradewind Aviation exceeds the FAA, ICAO and industry standards for aircraft equipment, pilot training and maintenance. SHUTTLE FLIGHTS OFFER THE COMFORT AND CONVENIENCE

Tradewind is a preferred air supplier of the Virtuoso network. PAGE 38 | THE TRADEWIND MAGAZINE

Tradewind Aviation has been awarded an ARGUS Gold rating, which is held by less than 20% of all US-certificated charter operators.

As a scheduled air carrier, Tradewind is subject to a higher operational Dominica standard and increased scrutiny by FAA, DOT and foreign regulatory agencies as compared to the majority of on-demand charter operators.

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1.800.376.7922 | +1.203.267.3305 charter@flytradewind.com www.flytradewind.com


We would very much welcome the opportunity to provide our superior level of service for your next journey. Our flight department is available 24/7 and happy to assist you. Contact us today!

SUMMER 2017 | PAGE 39


SuNdowners

Tradewind’s latest pick for where and with what to best toast the sunset Nothing quite tops off a good day like a delicious cocktail in hand, seated in a prime venue for admiring the sky as the sun bids its colorful adieu. Fortunately, Tradewind flies to some of the most spectacular spots in the world for enjoying such a relaxing ritual. Below is one of our favorite spots with the tasty cocktail of choice. The recipe is included for you to re-create the ritual at home.

Cheers!

SEX IN THE BATH

BONITO | ST. BARTHS RECIPE 1.35 oz. (4 cl) vodka 0.67 oz. (2 cl) saké 0.33 oz. (1 cl) lime juice 1.35 oz. (4 cl) purée litchi 1.35 oz. (4 cl) coconut cream DIRECTIONS Pour all ingredients into a shaker with ice. Shake vigorously for best froth—and serve creatively!

PAGE 40 | THE TRADEWIND MAGAZINE


THE MORNING COMMUTE.

GOODSPEED The Tradewind Magazine | Issue 01 | August 2017  

A new luxury inflight magazine from Tradewind Aviation, highlighting the latest and greatest from their distinct destinations.

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