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Review of the Year

2011


Abandonment. Loneliness. Shipwreck. Danger. Founded in 1856, and entirely funded by voluntary donations, today’s Mission to Seafarers offers emergency assistance, practical support and a friendly welcome to crews visiting 250 ports around the world. Whether caring for victims of piracy or providing a lifeline to those stranded in foreign ports, we are there for the globe’s 1.3 million merchant seafarers of all ranks, nationalities and beliefs.

Patron:

Her Majesty The Queen President:

Her Royal Highness The Princess Royal Secretary General:

The Revd Tom Heffer

The impact seafarers have on our way of life is remarkable. 94% of the country’s imports come by sea and we rely on an international workforce of mariners who brave the elements 365 days a year to ensure our modern world continues to turn. Unfortunately, the 1.3 million men and women who skilfully crew these huge vessels are rarely seen or thought about unless disaster strikes. Constantly on the move, seafarers find themselves arriving in ports which are far from the nearest town. Many more will spend up to a year away from their loved ones and without the support networks we who are land-based take for granted. That is why the work of The Mission to Seafarers is so very important. For over 150 years, it has adapted to the changes in shipping and refined its services to ensure that it is there for the world’s crews when they dock. Through a network of seafarers’ centres and Flying Angel Clubs, the Mission is now the biggest single provider of port-based welfare services in the world. But its charitable work extends far beyond tea and sympathy. In over 250 ports around the world, Mission chaplains and lay staff stand ready to answer every sort of need. From connecting a seafarer with his family thousands of miles away by telephone or internet, to providing post-trauma counselling following a pirate attack, the Mission is there. It is also there for seafarers who simply want to set foot on dry land and reconnect with people after weeks or months at sea. None of this work is possible without our supporters, and as President of The Mission to Seafarers, I would like to thank you for your continuing generosity. As you read this Annual Review, I hope that you will be inspired to renew or make a commitment to this historic organisation. Thanks to your dedicated support, the Mission can continue to provide its unique mix of practical support and human kindness in the places where it is still vitally needed.

HRH The Princess Royal.


Abandonment. Loneliness. Shipwreck. Danger. Founded in 1856, and entirely funded by voluntary donations, today’s Mission to Seafarers offers emergency assistance, practical support and a friendly welcome to crews visiting 250 ports around the world. Whether caring for victims of piracy or providing a lifeline to those stranded in foreign ports, we are there for the globe’s 1.3 million merchant seafarers of all ranks, nationalities and beliefs.

Patron:

Her Majesty The Queen President:

Her Royal Highness The Princess Royal Secretary General:

The Revd Tom Heffer

The impact seafarers have on our way of life is remarkable. 94% of the country’s imports come by sea and we rely on an international workforce of mariners who brave the elements 365 days a year to ensure our modern world continues to turn. Unfortunately, the 1.3 million men and women who skilfully crew these huge vessels are rarely seen or thought about unless disaster strikes. Constantly on the move, seafarers find themselves arriving in ports which are far from the nearest town. Many more will spend up to a year away from their loved ones and without the support networks we who are land-based take for granted. That is why the work of The Mission to Seafarers is so very important. For over 150 years, it has adapted to the changes in shipping and refined its services to ensure that it is there for the world’s crews when they dock. Through a network of seafarers’ centres and Flying Angel Clubs, the Mission is now the biggest single provider of port-based welfare services in the world. But its charitable work extends far beyond tea and sympathy. In over 250 ports around the world, Mission chaplains and lay staff stand ready to answer every sort of need. From connecting a seafarer with his family thousands of miles away by telephone or internet, to providing post-trauma counselling following a pirate attack, the Mission is there. It is also there for seafarers who simply want to set foot on dry land and reconnect with people after weeks or months at sea. None of this work is possible without our supporters, and as President of The Mission to Seafarers, I would like to thank you for your continuing generosity. As you read this Annual Review, I hope that you will be inspired to renew or make a commitment to this historic organisation. Thanks to your dedicated support, the Mission can continue to provide its unique mix of practical support and human kindness in the places where it is still vitally needed.

HRH The Princess Royal.


Why we care Since its earliest days, MtS chaplains have been providing support to the world’s seafarers. From its hostels and reading rooms to modern-day communication centres, counselling services and family liaison, MtS is the world’s largest provider of port-based welfare. The 1.3 million men and women who crew the world’s fleet continue to face many challenges which The Mission seeks to address in a manner consistent with Christian principles and the received practice of the Anglican Communion.

Seafarers have little or no opportunity to contact their family:

Message from the Chairman In 2011, the vital sea lanes of the Indian Ocean were dominated by the attack and capture of seafarers by pirates operating off the coast of Somalia. The UN’s International Maritime Organization launched a global campaign to ‘orchestrate the response’ against the scourge, and many shipowners took the bold but necessary step of embarking armed security personnel to protect their crews and ships. Having championed the seafarer since the 1830s, The Mission to Seafarers played its part in counselling victims of piracy and supporting their families who had been left behind. Away from the headlines, however, seafarers have continued to transport the majority of our food, fuel and raw materials. As the world’s largest provider of port-based welfare services, MtS has supported them with its unique mix of kindness and practical support in over 250 ports around the globe. For some seafarers, this has seen chaplains connecting them by telephone and internet with loved ones whom they haven’t seen for the best part of a year. For others, the Mission has been a much-needed lifeline – providing food, water, clothes and financial assistance in times of distress. This sort of work does not attract daily attention, but it is vital in making a life at sea more bearable for those who chart its course.

As you read our Annual Review, I hope that you will agree that we have been spending your kind donations in the most appropriate way. The Board of Trustees is committed to ensuring that we have the necessary resources to enable our vision to Deliver Maritime Ministry beyond the Next Horizon. It is a vision which requires significant investment and we simply couldn’t do it without your support.

Life at sea can be lonely: Crews are small in size and are often made up of many nationalities, which can leave seafarers feeling isolated from their culture and traditions.

Thank you for your continuing commitment to our work.

Life at sea can be difficult and dangerous: Robert Woods CBE

Whilst at sea, seafarers do not enjoy easy access to communication facilities. In some cases, communication is nonexistent or reserved for certain ranks of crew.

Seafarers endure ice-cold winds, raging waters and, for some, the man-made threats of piracy and armed robbery at sea.

Turnaround times have been reduced: Ships are generally in port for 4-6 hours and when coupled with additional port-based duties, seafarers have little time to relax and contact home.

Ports are often inhospitable environments located far from the nearest town: Short turnaround times mean that there is not the opportunity for decent shore leave or the chance to purchase essential supplies.

Seafarers’ contracts are routinely more than six months and may be as long as 18 months: Long tours of duty exacerbate the feelings of loneliness and isolation many seafarers feel when away from their family and friends.

An attack by pirates or armed robbers adds to the psychological burden of seafaring: In addition to long working hours and the pressures of time and ship management, threats from external rogue elements can add to feelings of vulnerability.

In some countries seafarers are denied access to shore leave: Security is often given as a reason to prevent seafarers from disembarking in port. After weeks on the ocean wave this can have a devastating impact on their wellbeing.

Seafarers may not speak the language of the ports they visit: For strangers in a foreign land help can often get ‘lost in translation’.


Why we care Since its earliest days, MtS chaplains have been providing support to the world’s seafarers. From its hostels and reading rooms to modern-day communication centres, counselling services and family liaison, MtS is the world’s largest provider of port-based welfare. The 1.3 million men and women who crew the world’s fleet continue to face many challenges which The Mission seeks to address in a manner consistent with Christian principles and the received practice of the Anglican Communion.

Seafarers have little or no opportunity to contact their family:

Message from the Chairman In 2011, the vital sea lanes of the Indian Ocean were dominated by the attack and capture of seafarers by pirates operating off the coast of Somalia. The UN’s International Maritime Organization launched a global campaign to ‘orchestrate the response’ against the scourge, and many shipowners took the bold but necessary step of embarking armed security personnel to protect their crews and ships. Having championed the seafarer since the 1830s, The Mission to Seafarers played its part in counselling victims of piracy and supporting their families who had been left behind. Away from the headlines, however, seafarers have continued to transport the majority of our food, fuel and raw materials. As the world’s largest provider of port-based welfare services, MtS has supported them with its unique mix of kindness and practical support in over 250 ports around the globe. For some seafarers, this has seen chaplains connecting them by telephone and internet with loved ones whom they haven’t seen for the best part of a year. For others, the Mission has been a much-needed lifeline – providing food, water, clothes and financial assistance in times of distress. This sort of work does not attract daily attention, but it is vital in making a life at sea more bearable for those who chart its course.

As you read our Annual Review, I hope that you will agree that we have been spending your kind donations in the most appropriate way. The Board of Trustees is committed to ensuring that we have the necessary resources to enable our vision to Deliver Maritime Ministry beyond the Next Horizon. It is a vision which requires significant investment and we simply couldn’t do it without your support.

Life at sea can be lonely: Crews are small in size and are often made up of many nationalities, which can leave seafarers feeling isolated from their culture and traditions.

Thank you for your continuing commitment to our work.

Life at sea can be difficult and dangerous: Robert Woods CBE

Whilst at sea, seafarers do not enjoy easy access to communication facilities. In some cases, communication is nonexistent or reserved for certain ranks of crew.

Seafarers endure ice-cold winds, raging waters and, for some, the man-made threats of piracy and armed robbery at sea.

Turnaround times have been reduced: Ships are generally in port for 4-6 hours and when coupled with additional port-based duties, seafarers have little time to relax and contact home.

Ports are often inhospitable environments located far from the nearest town: Short turnaround times mean that there is not the opportunity for decent shore leave or the chance to purchase essential supplies.

Seafarers’ contracts are routinely more than six months and may be as long as 18 months: Long tours of duty exacerbate the feelings of loneliness and isolation many seafarers feel when away from their family and friends.

An attack by pirates or armed robbers adds to the psychological burden of seafaring: In addition to long working hours and the pressures of time and ship management, threats from external rogue elements can add to feelings of vulnerability.

In some countries seafarers are denied access to shore leave: Security is often given as a reason to prevent seafarers from disembarking in port. After weeks on the ocean wave this can have a devastating impact on their wellbeing.

Seafarers may not speak the language of the ports they visit: For strangers in a foreign land help can often get ‘lost in translation’.


The Revd Stephen Miller SENIOR CHAPLAIN, HONG KONG

“I joined the Mission in 1999, first serving as the port chaplain in Rotterdam and then Dubai and the United Arab Emirates. Since May of 2011, I have been port chaplain in Hong Kong, one of the busiest container ports in the world. In 2011, we had over 31,000 seafarers staying at our seamen’s hotel and over 25,000 visiting the two centres which operate around the port.

On the dockside Wherever a crew docks, the port chaplain is a universal friend on whom seafares can always depend.

“A typical day begins with prayers early morning, followed by a small amount of office time working out which ships to visit. The nine container terminals here can handle over 50 ships a day, with many more loading and unloading in the anchorage. I get ready by collecting DVDs of recent sporting fixtures and also pulling together newspapers in different languages so that the seafarers can get a sense of what is going on at home. By 10am, I will be on our launch, going out to the ships in the anchorage. Normally, we try to visit seven ships in a morning, meeting the seafarers and providing them with information, telephone cards and assisting with any problems they might have. In the afternoon, I spend time at the centre, helping the guests staying overnight or talking with crews just about to set sail. I then visit the hospitals where we have seafarers receiving treatment. “The Mission runs two centres in Hong Kong. In the main club house, we have all the usual facilities you would expect in a hotel. St Peter’s Church is also in the building with three chaplains who provide support and guidance to seafarers. We have access to Wi-Fi, table tennis, a swimming pool, gymnasium, laundry facilities and telephones. We also have a ten-pin bowling alley! The second centre houses the chapel of St Paul and features a restaurant, recreational facilities and access to communication facilities. We also have a quiet room set aside for Danish seafarers which is run by the Danish Seamen’s Church. “There are five chaplains and two assistants who help to run the centres. We all come from different traditions and work together for the benefit of seafarers. We also have a staff of 65 involved in the running of the Mariners’ Clubs (as they are known locally). “The best thing about being a port chaplain is the opportunity it gives me to meet so many different people who are passing through to distant lands, but who all have one thing in common: the sea. It is also wonderful when we are able to help. During my time as a chaplain I have dealt with a range of issues including the non-payment of wages, questions about the local area, issues with contracts, family life and sometimes fear for the next part of their voyage. My greatest enjoyment is to share in their stories, listen to their experiences and to be a part of their lives.”

Maggie Whittingham-Lamont SEAFARERS’ CO-ORDINATOR, HALIFAX, NOVA SCOTIA

“I have been the co-ordinator here in Halifax for 21 years. Shipping is big business in Nova Scotia and the port of Halifax receives ships from all over the world with many different types of cargo. These include containers, cars, oil and gypsum. There is also a large fishing fleet here. “The Mission to Seafarers has operated in Halifax for 70 years, but we have been inside the port for 35. The seafarers’ centre is warm and welcoming and we have a team of 20 local people who regularly donate their time to working for the benefit of seafarers. The centre has telephone booths for seafarers to call home, access to Wi-Fi, billiards, a karaoke machine, a bar, foreign exchange and free transportation to and from the ships. We get a great mix of people using the centre, but the main nationalities represented are Filipino, Indian, Eastern European, Sri Lankan, Chinese, Canadian and Malaysian. In total over 7,000 seafarers use the facilities each year. “Seafarers are treated better than they were when I first started, but there is still an important role for the Mission to play in their lives. I think without MtS, many seafarers would miss contact with the outside world. Several captains have told me that since Wi-Fi started to be

introduced on some ships, crew members have become more isolated as they spend more time alone in their cabins, whereas in the past they would be in the crew lounge. In many ports, ship visitors and chaplains are the only way seafarers can get ashore. “I have had many favourite encounters during my time with the Mission, but something which touched me recently was the story of a Filipino seafarer who came out of the telephone booth in tears. This is not an uncommon occurrence, seafarers receive all sorts of devastating news in the confines of those phone booths and so I approached him and asked if he would like to talk. Because he spent so much time at sea, he was totally unaware of a series of mudslides in his native country, and was distraught to discover that his family’s home had disappeared. Fortunately, his family were safe, but everything he had worked for had been lost in an instant. “During his regular calls into Halifax, we would sit and talk. I helped him to transfer money back home to his loved ones and supported him after he discovered that his father had been taken ill. I also drove him to the local charity shops where he was able to purchase barely used clothes for his family. He kept saying how thankful he was to the Mission for this help, but it was his indomitable spirit which impressed me the most.”


The Revd Stephen Miller SENIOR CHAPLAIN, HONG KONG

“I joined the Mission in 1999, first serving as the port chaplain in Rotterdam and then Dubai and the United Arab Emirates. Since May of 2011, I have been port chaplain in Hong Kong, one of the busiest container ports in the world. In 2011, we had over 31,000 seafarers staying at our seamen’s hotel and over 25,000 visiting the two centres which operate around the port.

On the dockside Wherever a crew docks, the port chaplain is a universal friend on whom seafares can always depend.

“A typical day begins with prayers early morning, followed by a small amount of office time working out which ships to visit. The nine container terminals here can handle over 50 ships a day, with many more loading and unloading in the anchorage. I get ready by collecting DVDs of recent sporting fixtures and also pulling together newspapers in different languages so that the seafarers can get a sense of what is going on at home. By 10am, I will be on our launch, going out to the ships in the anchorage. Normally, we try to visit seven ships in a morning, meeting the seafarers and providing them with information, telephone cards and assisting with any problems they might have. In the afternoon, I spend time at the centre, helping the guests staying overnight or talking with crews just about to set sail. I then visit the hospitals where we have seafarers receiving treatment. “The Mission runs two centres in Hong Kong. In the main club house, we have all the usual facilities you would expect in a hotel. St Peter’s Church is also in the building with three chaplains who provide support and guidance to seafarers. We have access to Wi-Fi, table tennis, a swimming pool, gymnasium, laundry facilities and telephones. We also have a ten-pin bowling alley! The second centre houses the chapel of St Paul and features a restaurant, recreational facilities and access to communication facilities. We also have a quiet room set aside for Danish seafarers which is run by the Danish Seamen’s Church. “There are five chaplains and two assistants who help to run the centres. We all come from different traditions and work together for the benefit of seafarers. We also have a staff of 65 involved in the running of the Mariners’ Clubs (as they are known locally). “The best thing about being a port chaplain is the opportunity it gives me to meet so many different people who are passing through to distant lands, but who all have one thing in common: the sea. It is also wonderful when we are able to help. During my time as a chaplain I have dealt with a range of issues including the non-payment of wages, questions about the local area, issues with contracts, family life and sometimes fear for the next part of their voyage. My greatest enjoyment is to share in their stories, listen to their experiences and to be a part of their lives.”

Maggie Whittingham-Lamont SEAFARERS’ CO-ORDINATOR, HALIFAX, NOVA SCOTIA

“I have been the co-ordinator here in Halifax for 21 years. Shipping is big business in Nova Scotia and the port of Halifax receives ships from all over the world with many different types of cargo. These include containers, cars, oil and gypsum. There is also a large fishing fleet here. “The Mission to Seafarers has operated in Halifax for 70 years, but we have been inside the port for 35. The seafarers’ centre is warm and welcoming and we have a team of 20 local people who regularly donate their time to working for the benefit of seafarers. The centre has telephone booths for seafarers to call home, access to Wi-Fi, billiards, a karaoke machine, a bar, foreign exchange and free transportation to and from the ships. We get a great mix of people using the centre, but the main nationalities represented are Filipino, Indian, Eastern European, Sri Lankan, Chinese, Canadian and Malaysian. In total over 7,000 seafarers use the facilities each year. “Seafarers are treated better than they were when I first started, but there is still an important role for the Mission to play in their lives. I think without MtS, many seafarers would miss contact with the outside world. Several captains have told me that since Wi-Fi started to be

introduced on some ships, crew members have become more isolated as they spend more time alone in their cabins, whereas in the past they would be in the crew lounge. In many ports, ship visitors and chaplains are the only way seafarers can get ashore. “I have had many favourite encounters during my time with the Mission, but something which touched me recently was the story of a Filipino seafarer who came out of the telephone booth in tears. This is not an uncommon occurrence, seafarers receive all sorts of devastating news in the confines of those phone booths and so I approached him and asked if he would like to talk. Because he spent so much time at sea, he was totally unaware of a series of mudslides in his native country, and was distraught to discover that his family’s home had disappeared. Fortunately, his family were safe, but everything he had worked for had been lost in an instant. “During his regular calls into Halifax, we would sit and talk. I helped him to transfer money back home to his loved ones and supported him after he discovered that his father had been taken ill. I also drove him to the local charity shops where he was able to purchase barely used clothes for his family. He kept saying how thankful he was to the Mission for this help, but it was his indomitable spirit which impressed me the most.”


Giving seafarers a voice

We believe in speaking out for seafarers. From highlighting issues which affect our work through the local media, to raising concerns with government and the United Nations International Maritime Organization (IMO), MtS is a leading voice on the welfare issues affecting today’s merchant mariner.

Best Management Practices for Protection against Somalia Based Piracy

In 2011, piracy was top of the shipping agenda. MtS campaigned vigorously for better levels of protection for seafarers transiting the high risk areas and spoke out through the media and at the London Conference on Somalia, organised by the British Government. Following interviews with crews visiting our centre in Mombasa, MtS became the first maritime ministry to call for trained, authorised armed guards to be placed on merchant vessels. We also joined the pan-industry endorsement of Best Management Practices (version 4), (which gives detailed guidance on anti-piracy measures), and actively promoted its use by distributing it through our seafarers’ centres and clubs. As a recognised provider of welfare services, the international community regularly seeks our advice and guidance on how best to support seafarers working on their ships. In 2011 we continued to contribute to the training of Liberian Flag State Inspectors. We held meetings with various governments on the International Ship and Port Facility Security Code and the Maritime Labour Convention, 2006. We gave presentations to representatives from the Government of the Bahamas on the importance of allowing seafarers to access welfare facilities, and we also submitted papers for discussion at the IMO on post-piracy care and the importance of a properly implemented ship safety management code.

Our work with seafarers on the front line informs the training and advice we give to our first responders to help them deal with the myriad of problems seafarers face. In 2011, MtS held a consultative forum in England which saw representatives from around the world gather for a week-long conference where training and best practice were shared. We also rolled out an international training programme to help chaplains working on the front line spot the signs of post-traumatic stress disorder and tools for counselling seafarers suffering from addiction to alcohol.

1. Best Management Practices (version 4) 2. Consultative Forum 2011 InterManager

WORLD SHIPPING COUNCIL PARTNERS IN TRADE

3. MtS with Seafarers in Mombasa


Giving seafarers a voice

We believe in speaking out for seafarers. From highlighting issues which affect our work through the local media, to raising concerns with government and the United Nations International Maritime Organization (IMO), MtS is a leading voice on the welfare issues affecting today’s merchant mariner.

Best Management Practices for Protection against Somalia Based Piracy

In 2011, piracy was top of the shipping agenda. MtS campaigned vigorously for better levels of protection for seafarers transiting the high risk areas and spoke out through the media and at the London Conference on Somalia, organised by the British Government. Following interviews with crews visiting our centre in Mombasa, MtS became the first maritime ministry to call for trained, authorised armed guards to be placed on merchant vessels. We also joined the pan-industry endorsement of Best Management Practices (version 4), (which gives detailed guidance on anti-piracy measures), and actively promoted its use by distributing it through our seafarers’ centres and clubs. As a recognised provider of welfare services, the international community regularly seeks our advice and guidance on how best to support seafarers working on their ships. In 2011 we continued to contribute to the training of Liberian Flag State Inspectors. We held meetings with various governments on the International Ship and Port Facility Security Code and the Maritime Labour Convention, 2006. We gave presentations to representatives from the Government of the Bahamas on the importance of allowing seafarers to access welfare facilities, and we also submitted papers for discussion at the IMO on post-piracy care and the importance of a properly implemented ship safety management code.

Our work with seafarers on the front line informs the training and advice we give to our first responders to help them deal with the myriad of problems seafarers face. In 2011, MtS held a consultative forum in England which saw representatives from around the world gather for a week-long conference where training and best practice were shared. We also rolled out an international training programme to help chaplains working on the front line spot the signs of post-traumatic stress disorder and tools for counselling seafarers suffering from addiction to alcohol.

1. Best Management Practices (version 4) 2. Consultative Forum 2011 InterManager

WORLD SHIPPING COUNCIL PARTNERS IN TRADE

3. MtS with Seafarers in Mombasa


Our network

Centre, MtS ‘Flying Angel Club’ Centre, MtS with partners MtS Ship visiting and counselling


Our network

Centre, MtS ‘Flying Angel Club’ Centre, MtS with partners MtS Ship visiting and counselling


Beyond the next horizon The Mission to Seafarers is committed to Delivering Maritime Ministry Beyond the Next Horizon. Our five-year strategy, which we launched in 2010, focuses on MtS adapting to the changing patterns of the shipping industry so that our services are in the locations where they are most needed.

At the end of 2011, we took stock of the achievements we had made since the strategy was launched: To offer practical help and spiritual support at the point of greatest need

To increase sources of funding to achieve a balanced budget

We have successfully remodelled our ministries in South Shields, Port Talbot, Portbury and our ports on the Humber (Hull, Immingham and Goole). We have developed new models of operation, working in close partnerships with other organisations linked to seafarers’ welfare, so that these ports now offer an ecumenical ship-visiting programme.

At the end of December 2011 a director of development was appointed to provide strategic leadership to both the fundraising and communication functions.

In Maputo, Mozambique, we have restored a chaplaincy that had been suspended because of many years of civil war.

We redeveloped our website at www.missiontoseafarers. org which gives supporters and seafarers a better understanding of who we are, how they can support us and where help can be accessed.

To provide advocacy services and campaign for changes which improve seafarers’ lives

A new-look Flying Angel News has given our regular donors more information about how we spend their money. The publication has a print run of nearly 30,000 per issue and is sent to every person who donates to The Mission to Seafarers.

We have rolled out an international training programme for chaplains to act as first responders to seafarers who have been held hostage or attacked by pirates.

To optimise the use of resources

We continued to support our chaplains and volunteers in the field with education and training courses, which included managing aggression and dealing with drugs and alcohol, so that they are equipped to deal with seafarers suffering these problems.

Four posts have been created to lead our corporate partnership initiative, community fundraising activity, statutory funding and trust work and the direct mail and legacy programme.

“Dysfunctional families, relationship breakdown, illness and death are problems which can affect all of us at one time or another. But couple these with the hazardous conditions a life at sea brings and it adds another dimension to the anxiety of such circumstances.” Canon Ken Peters, director of justice and welfare.


Beyond the next horizon The Mission to Seafarers is committed to Delivering Maritime Ministry Beyond the Next Horizon. Our five-year strategy, which we launched in 2010, focuses on MtS adapting to the changing patterns of the shipping industry so that our services are in the locations where they are most needed.

At the end of 2011, we took stock of the achievements we had made since the strategy was launched: To offer practical help and spiritual support at the point of greatest need

To increase sources of funding to achieve a balanced budget

We have successfully remodelled our ministries in South Shields, Port Talbot, Portbury and our ports on the Humber (Hull, Immingham and Goole). We have developed new models of operation, working in close partnerships with other organisations linked to seafarers’ welfare, so that these ports now offer an ecumenical ship-visiting programme.

At the end of December 2011 a director of development was appointed to provide strategic leadership to both the fundraising and communication functions.

In Maputo, Mozambique, we have restored a chaplaincy that had been suspended because of many years of civil war.

We redeveloped our website at www.missiontoseafarers. org which gives supporters and seafarers a better understanding of who we are, how they can support us and where help can be accessed.

To provide advocacy services and campaign for changes which improve seafarers’ lives

A new-look Flying Angel News has given our regular donors more information about how we spend their money. The publication has a print run of nearly 30,000 per issue and is sent to every person who donates to The Mission to Seafarers.

We have rolled out an international training programme for chaplains to act as first responders to seafarers who have been held hostage or attacked by pirates.

To optimise the use of resources

We continued to support our chaplains and volunteers in the field with education and training courses, which included managing aggression and dealing with drugs and alcohol, so that they are equipped to deal with seafarers suffering these problems.

Four posts have been created to lead our corporate partnership initiative, community fundraising activity, statutory funding and trust work and the direct mail and legacy programme.

“Dysfunctional families, relationship breakdown, illness and death are problems which can affect all of us at one time or another. But couple these with the hazardous conditions a life at sea brings and it adds another dimension to the anxiety of such circumstances.” Canon Ken Peters, director of justice and welfare.


Our magnificent Supporters Lambeth Palace

Flag days

Local volunteers took to the streets in the South of England to raise funds for MtS. In Swanage, Fareham, Farnham and Leatherhead teams of people stood in the high street and outside supermarkets to raise our profile and to collect spare change. In Woking, Ian Fraser and his team raised over £900. Ian is a retired member of the Royal Navy and he and his former colleagues don their blazers and berets whilst they collect – a surefire way of attracting attention!

As we’ve already highlighted, 2011 was the year when the international community and the shipping industry began to take piracy seriously. To raise awareness of the plight of crews held hostage and to showcase the counselling and support our chaplains give, MtS hosted a reception at Lambeth Palace, the Archbishop of Canterbury’s London home. The event was sponsored by the Liberian Ship Registry and featured many dignitaries, including out President, HRH The Princess Royal. The head of the our International Maritime Organization, shipowners and politicians joined high level supporters to remember all those held hostage and to learn more about the post-trauma counselling and emergency response chaplains in the High Risk Area are giving daily to crews transiting pirate waters.

Carol concert

Annual Service

On World Maritime Day, the home church of MtS, St Michael Paternoster Royal, was full as people gathered to celebrate another year of caring for seafarers around the world. The service featured a sermon by the Secretary General who informed the congregation of the exciting plans MtS had for expanding new services and redefining old ones.

Rounding off a successful year of fundraising, our annual Festival of Nine Lessons and Carols was a star-studded affair. Supported by our President and her husband Vice Admiral Sir Timothy Laurence, stars of the stage and small screen gathered to read the Christmas story to over 200 people. Popular television presenter Pam Rhodes from Songs of Praise and veteran Newsnight anchor Peter Snow provided suitable readings, whilst the St Michael’s Singers performed a series of seasonal choral arrangements. Following the service, the princess and her husband joined supporters at the Worshipful Company of Skinners for a reception of mulled wine and mince pies.


Our magnificent Supporters Lambeth Palace

Flag days

Local volunteers took to the streets in the South of England to raise funds for MtS. In Swanage, Fareham, Farnham and Leatherhead teams of people stood in the high street and outside supermarkets to raise our profile and to collect spare change. In Woking, Ian Fraser and his team raised over £900. Ian is a retired member of the Royal Navy and he and his former colleagues don their blazers and berets whilst they collect – a surefire way of attracting attention!

As we’ve already highlighted, 2011 was the year when the international community and the shipping industry began to take piracy seriously. To raise awareness of the plight of crews held hostage and to showcase the counselling and support our chaplains give, MtS hosted a reception at Lambeth Palace, the Archbishop of Canterbury’s London home. The event was sponsored by the Liberian Ship Registry and featured many dignitaries, including out President, HRH The Princess Royal. The head of the our International Maritime Organization, shipowners and politicians joined high level supporters to remember all those held hostage and to learn more about the post-trauma counselling and emergency response chaplains in the High Risk Area are giving daily to crews transiting pirate waters.

Carol concert

Annual Service

On World Maritime Day, the home church of MtS, St Michael Paternoster Royal, was full as people gathered to celebrate another year of caring for seafarers around the world. The service featured a sermon by the Secretary General who informed the congregation of the exciting plans MtS had for expanding new services and redefining old ones.

Rounding off a successful year of fundraising, our annual Festival of Nine Lessons and Carols was a star-studded affair. Supported by our President and her husband Vice Admiral Sir Timothy Laurence, stars of the stage and small screen gathered to read the Christmas story to over 200 people. Popular television presenter Pam Rhodes from Songs of Praise and veteran Newsnight anchor Peter Snow provided suitable readings, whilst the St Michael’s Singers performed a series of seasonal choral arrangements. Following the service, the princess and her husband joined supporters at the Worshipful Company of Skinners for a reception of mulled wine and mince pies.


Our Finances

Our Thanks The Mission to Seafarers is grateful to all the parishes, committees and individuals who have supported our work in the past year. In particular, we would like to thank the following trusts and companies for their generous support:

2011 incoming resources % 36 5 6 2 21 12 13 5

Legacies

1969

% 23 2 1 73 2

Cost of generating funds Fundraising trading Investment management costs Charitable activities Governance costs

1274 127 38 4096 113 5648

Royal Institution of Naval Architects

Associated British Ports

Saga Shipping Company Ltd

Bibby Line Group Ltd

Salamander Charitable Trust

Community

252

British Association of Cargo Surveyors

Seafarers UK

Trusts

329

Carnival UK

Sealion Shipping Ltd

Corporate

119

David Brooke Charity

Seatrade Communications Ltd

DP World

Sky

Euromast

Society of Maritime Industries

GC Gibson Charitable Trust

Sovcomflot (UK) Ltd

GC Gibson Trust

Swan Hellenic

Global Marine Services Ltd

The 29th May 1961 Trust

Graig Shipping PLC

The Douglas Investment Trust

Hadley Shipping Company Ltd

The Fulmer Charitable Trust

Ince & Co

The GF Eyre Charitable Trust

International Marine Transportation Ltd

The J Swire Charitable Trust

The ITF Seafarers’ Trust

The London Diocesan Fund

ITOPF Ltd

The Maersk Company Ltd

Joseph Strong Fraser Trust

The Medway Mission to Seamen Trust

Ken Colyer Trust

The Propeller Club of The United States

Langlet Shipping Limited

The Sunrise (Sidmouth) Trust

Liberian International Ship and Corporate Registry

The Swire Charitable Trust

Linden Charitable Trust

The Worshipful Company of Curriers

Little Britain Trust

The Worshipful Company of Innholders

London Container Terminal

The Worshipful Company of Tallow Chandlers

Merchant Navy Welfare Board

The Worshipful Company of Fishmongers

Miss E A Pemberton-Barnes Will Trust

The Worshipful Company of World Traders

Nautilus International

The Worshipful Company of Gold and Silver Wyre Drawers

Niarchos (London) Ltd

Thomas Miller P&I Ltd

Peninsula Petroleum

Tindall Riley (Britannia) Limited

Peter Storrs Trust

Westminster Dredging Co Ltd

Appeals & donations

1150

Invest

649

Charity activity

728

Other

267 5463

2011 incoming expended

A Bilbrough & Co Ltd

Robert Orpwood Blott Settlement


Our Finances

Our Thanks The Mission to Seafarers is grateful to all the parishes, committees and individuals who have supported our work in the past year. In particular, we would like to thank the following trusts and companies for their generous support:

2011 incoming resources % 36 5 6 2 21 12 13 5

Legacies

1969

% 23 2 1 73 2

Cost of generating funds Fundraising trading Investment management costs Charitable activities Governance costs

1274 127 38 4096 113 5648

Royal Institution of Naval Architects

Associated British Ports

Saga Shipping Company Ltd

Bibby Line Group Ltd

Salamander Charitable Trust

Community

252

British Association of Cargo Surveyors

Seafarers UK

Trusts

329

Carnival UK

Sealion Shipping Ltd

Corporate

119

David Brooke Charity

Seatrade Communications Ltd

DP World

Sky

Euromast

Society of Maritime Industries

GC Gibson Charitable Trust

Sovcomflot (UK) Ltd

GC Gibson Trust

Swan Hellenic

Global Marine Services Ltd

The 29th May 1961 Trust

Graig Shipping PLC

The Douglas Investment Trust

Hadley Shipping Company Ltd

The Fulmer Charitable Trust

Ince & Co

The GF Eyre Charitable Trust

International Marine Transportation Ltd

The J Swire Charitable Trust

The ITF Seafarers’ Trust

The London Diocesan Fund

ITOPF Ltd

The Maersk Company Ltd

Joseph Strong Fraser Trust

The Medway Mission to Seamen Trust

Ken Colyer Trust

The Propeller Club of The United States

Langlet Shipping Limited

The Sunrise (Sidmouth) Trust

Liberian International Ship and Corporate Registry

The Swire Charitable Trust

Linden Charitable Trust

The Worshipful Company of Curriers

Little Britain Trust

The Worshipful Company of Innholders

London Container Terminal

The Worshipful Company of Tallow Chandlers

Merchant Navy Welfare Board

The Worshipful Company of Fishmongers

Miss E A Pemberton-Barnes Will Trust

The Worshipful Company of World Traders

Nautilus International

The Worshipful Company of Gold and Silver Wyre Drawers

Niarchos (London) Ltd

Thomas Miller P&I Ltd

Peninsula Petroleum

Tindall Riley (Britannia) Limited

Peter Storrs Trust

Westminster Dredging Co Ltd

Appeals & donations

1150

Invest

649

Charity activity

728

Other

267 5463

2011 incoming expended

A Bilbrough & Co Ltd

Robert Orpwood Blott Settlement


MtS in numbers ...

comfort

security transportation hospitality

communication

internet

mission

welfare

outreach

counselling telephone

advocacy

family liaison

support

friendliness family

spiritual

Belonging

trauma care

help

welcome

assistance post

ship-visiting

The Board of Trustees The work of MtS is overseen and directed by the Board of Trustees which is the ultimate governing body of the charity. Trustees may serve on the Board for two periods of four years, apart from those aged 70 or over, who are re-elected annually. The Chairman and Vice-Chairman are elected for a four-year term.

The Board requires a quorum of five trustees and meets four times a year. It is the governing council of the organisation which authorises the Terms of Reference for five committees which also meet throughout the year. These are: Governance and Nominations

|

Audit and Risk

|

Investment

258

the number of ports in which we work

1856 the year MtS was founded

71

the number of countries MtS works in

174,000 Copies of The Sea issued

112,000 Copies of Flying Angel News sent out

348,000 the number of seafarers visiting our centres

Remuneration

|

Fundraising

The Board maintains and reviews a skills audit of trustees to ensure the skills set of members reflect the requirements of The Mission to Seafarers. A recruitment process is in place where potential trustees are interviewed by unconnected representatives of the Governance and Nominations Committee before a recommendation is made. Upon appointment, all trustees are given an induction to familiarise themselves not only with the work of the organisation, but also their responsibilities as a trustee. Some may undergo more specific training in the form of short courses.

Who’s Who

955

the number of Sea Sunday packs issued

|

Robert Woods CBE

John Hughes FNI

Robert Woods has been a trustee of MtS since 1998 and was appointed Chairman in 2007. He spent his working life in the shipping industry and retains a keen interest in maritime affairs. He is Chairman of P&O Ferries, Southampton Container Terminal and Tilbury Container Services and is a special advisor to DP World’s parent company, P&F World FZE. He is also a non-executive director on the boards of John Swire & Sons and Cathay Pacific Airways. Robert is an Honorary Captain in the Royal Naval Reserve.

John Hughes spent a large part of his working life at sea, commanding a variety of vessels including cargo/ tramp tankers and very large crude carriers. He is a Master Mariner, a Fellow of the Nautical Institute and a Younger Brother of Trinity House. John has been a supporter of MtS for many years and joined as a trustee in 2005. He was elected Vice Chairman in 2007.

Chairman

Vice Chairman

Malcolm S H BeII CA AAT Vice Admiral Sir Tom Blackburn KCVO CB The Revd Canon Christopher Burke (From January 2011) David Cockcroft (From January 2012) The Rt Revd Richard M C Frith Howell Harris-Hughes CBE (From January 2011 until July 2011) Christopher Horrocks CBE Captain John W Hughes FNI Frances Lloyd (From April 2011) Stephen Lyon (From January 2011) Paul Moloney (From April 2011 until October 2011) David Moorhouse CBE (From January 2011) Clive Mowatt (Until February 2012) Neale Rodrigues (From January 2011) Simon P Sherrard Robert B Woods CBE


MtS in numbers ...

comfort

security transportation hospitality

communication

internet

mission

welfare

outreach

counselling telephone

advocacy

family liaison

support

friendliness family

spiritual

Belonging

trauma care

help

welcome

assistance post

ship-visiting

The Board of Trustees The work of MtS is overseen and directed by the Board of Trustees which is the ultimate governing body of the charity. Trustees may serve on the Board for two periods of four years, apart from those aged 70 or over, who are re-elected annually. The Chairman and Vice-Chairman are elected for a four-year term.

The Board requires a quorum of five trustees and meets four times a year. It is the governing council of the organisation which authorises the Terms of Reference for five committees which also meet throughout the year. These are: Governance and Nominations

|

Audit and Risk

|

Investment

258

the number of ports in which we work

1856 the year MtS was founded

71

the number of countries MtS works in

174,000 Copies of The Sea issued

112,000 Copies of Flying Angel News sent out

348,000 the number of seafarers visiting our centres

Remuneration

|

Fundraising

The Board maintains and reviews a skills audit of trustees to ensure the skills set of members reflect the requirements of The Mission to Seafarers. A recruitment process is in place where potential trustees are interviewed by unconnected representatives of the Governance and Nominations Committee before a recommendation is made. Upon appointment, all trustees are given an induction to familiarise themselves not only with the work of the organisation, but also their responsibilities as a trustee. Some may undergo more specific training in the form of short courses.

Who’s Who

955

the number of Sea Sunday packs issued

|

Robert Woods CBE

John Hughes FNI

Robert Woods has been a trustee of MtS since 1998 and was appointed Chairman in 2007. He spent his working life in the shipping industry and retains a keen interest in maritime affairs. He is Chairman of P&O Ferries, Southampton Container Terminal and Tilbury Container Services and is a special advisor to DP World’s parent company, P&F World FZE. He is also a non-executive director on the boards of John Swire & Sons and Cathay Pacific Airways. Robert is an Honorary Captain in the Royal Naval Reserve.

John Hughes spent a large part of his working life at sea, commanding a variety of vessels including cargo/ tramp tankers and very large crude carriers. He is a Master Mariner, a Fellow of the Nautical Institute and a Younger Brother of Trinity House. John has been a supporter of MtS for many years and joined as a trustee in 2005. He was elected Vice Chairman in 2007.

Chairman

Vice Chairman

Malcolm S H BeII CA AAT Vice Admiral Sir Tom Blackburn KCVO CB The Revd Canon Christopher Burke (From January 2011) David Cockcroft (From January 2012) The Rt Revd Richard M C Frith Howell Harris-Hughes CBE (From January 2011 until July 2011) Christopher Horrocks CBE Captain John W Hughes FNI Frances Lloyd (From April 2011) Stephen Lyon (From January 2011) Paul Moloney (From April 2011 until October 2011) David Moorhouse CBE (From January 2011) Clive Mowatt (Until February 2012) Neale Rodrigues (From January 2011) Simon P Sherrard Robert B Woods CBE


www.missiontoseafarers.org


Mission to Seafarers Annual Review 2011