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ff WORLD

January

2016


Contents 2

Dream World

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UKFFA Presidential Review

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­Strangford Lough

23

Secretary’s Scribbles

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2015 Poole Week

26

Will Heritage

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Winterising your 15

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UK National Championship

10

FF World Championships 2017

29

Reflections from France 2015

14

Ossie McCutcheon Regatta

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Prizegiving France 2015

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Design and production - Pollittbureau Art Print Ltd www.pollittbureau.co.uk

Editorial

Printed in United Kingdom

January 2016

Front cover image by Rick Tomlinson •

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Editorial Changes­

are afoot. For the international members the magazine is going digital and will be posted on the FFI website. This will be a cheaper and simpler way of communicating.

2015 was a world championship year and hence we have foregrounded that event. Patrick Constant, Michel Pelegrin and Olivier Latin were the three Frenchmen who made it all possible, and we are delighted to include an article in both French and English on Michel’s experience in realising the dream. We are also lucky

enough to have Jeremy Davy’s first-hand account of his and Martin Huett’s valiant attempt to take on the mighty Vials and Turner. UKFFA President Simon Thompson in his review of the year analyses current trends in Flying Fifteen sailing around the British Isles. In this context it is remarkable that Will Heritage, at the age of 14, crewed by his father, won both the Charles Stanley Cowes Classic Week and Cowes Week. Moreover, he is shortlisted for the Yachts & Yachting Young Sailor of the Year. Who says the Flying Fifteen is a boat for old men?

to a close, so it takes off the other side of the globe. Alongside Chris Turner’s advice on winterising your 15, you will find an account of a state championship in Australia. And because the next World Championship will be in Napier, New Zealand in February 2017, a mere fourteen months away, those thinking of going need to start planning soon. Graeme Robinson has written an extensive preview of this event to help us make up our minds. As Shakespeare puts it in The Winter’s Tale, “Thou met’st with things dying; I with things new-born.” Crispin Read Wilson ed.ffworld@gmail.com

As the northern hemisphere season draws

Worlds­France­2015

Courtesy of RDB Photographie

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UKFFA­Presidential­

I am

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writing this following a very enjoyable visit to the AGM of the Parkstone Yacht Club’s Flying Fifteen fleet. This is probably (“definitely!”, I hear in the distance from Parkstone) the largest and most active fleet we have, so I took the time to hear what their members had to say about the challenges the fleet faces over the next few years.

As I wrote in the previous issue of FF World, the role of your President has no job description apart from being a figurehead. I have striven during the season just past to discuss with as many of you as possible your views on the rights and wrongs of many areas of our fleet. I find high levels of interest amongst those that travel to ensure that we can address the issues of getting younger sailors into our fine craft and

also getting more new boats built. However, it will come as no surprise to you to hear that solutions are not simple as well as not being ones to be addressed at an Association level.

Overall situation

The fleet in the UK seems to be suffering from declining participation due to such things as an aging crew base and the increasing issue of commitment of people to devoting a day to sailing, or to crewing a two man (as opposed to one man) boat. A notable exception from reports is Parkstone YC in Poole, where new sailors are coming in from other classes.

Photograph courtesy of Neill Ross

These can be divided into societal ones that are not something we can change, but we can respond to; and more parochial ones to do with the boat we sail, and how it is perceived by those

that do not sail it. This latter area leads us into the discussion of how (if?) we develop the boat in various ways over the next few years whilst protecting the investment and grass roots racing that happens now.

The President in hiking mode •

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Attendance at Association Championship events is down which is the trend in a year when Worlds qualification is not required. The UK background is one of declining participation in dinghy sailing in general, especially at inland venues. People are trading down; from cruisers to day boats, from two man dinghies to single handers, which is a more a reflection of crew availability (and willingness to commit) than one of cost alone. We also face the competition from the new growth mass participation sport (in the UK at least) of cycling. A solo sport that can be undertaken with others if required, without taking up a whole day. This challenge needs to be met at club level with experience shared via the association.

Boat availability

Other issues are a lack of good quality used boats for sale for new entrants to the class to purchase. Current owners are benefiting from the build quality and longevity of our craft from Ovington Boats and so changing them less frequently. What is missing are 4-6-year-old boats on the second hand market that are a competitive route into the class for those looking to make the move across from other fleets. These people do not wish to risk paying for a new boat if they then find that due to location, crew availability or other factors that the boat is not for them. They would be willing to pay something in the mid-teens (£,000) for a well put together boat in order to give it a go. We saw this happen this year after the worlds when 3 boats in this price and age range went up for sale on the UKFFA website. All were sold for or near the asking price within two weeks. My boat was one of these. We were not planning to change but the discussions I was having suggested that we could both sell the boat quickly and get a new one self–fitted out for a sensible investment. We made the mistake with our last boat of not changing it before it aged too much. In the end we had it for

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11 years from new and this was too long. Hopefully this may provide food for thought amongst some of you.

Attracting new sailors to the fleet

Our boat was bought by sailors new to the class who saw all the benefits we ascribe to the boat when they were Race Officers at our Scottish Nationals this year. These were close, competitive racing in a traditionally rigged boat. How else are new entrants going to experience the class? Well, I did suggest at the FFI meeting in August that we need to hold special open meetings where outsiders can come and experience sailing fifteens in a competitive environment, perhaps a combination of coaching on what makes a F15 different from a dinghy (or larger sports boat) to sail and then racing in both long and short form. Greg Wells took away an action to develop such an event and hopefully we will see this in 2016. This cannot happen however without the co-operation of current class members as it will have to be your boats that are used. So please give feedback to me if you are willing to be part of this experiment.

Attracting younger sailors to the fleet

I keep hearing the phrase - ”the F15 is an old man’s boat”. Even if we do not really believe that, we should be careful about expressing the thought as others may come to believe it. We need to start expressing different thoughts about the boat, and about how it is so well designed that it is open to the widest range of sailors of any boat – in terms of age range and in terms of overall crew weight; all of whom can compete effectively for top honours. Affordable boats are available to younger entrants to the class that can be competitive. I note that the second boat in this year’s world championships is 13 years old! All it usually takes is some skill, practice, regular boat maintenance and reasonable sails.

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One generic problem that we all face is that we have lots of youth who sail and then they go to University and then get lost to the sport. The 18-25 age range is an important one to keep in touch with. They usually cannot afford a boat themselves even if they wanted to continue sailing. I also had this problem when in that age range but my solution was to crew an older person who did have a boat; just another member of my sailing club. That took me through my first 7 years sailing International 14s by which time I was hooked! We need to have both a push and a pull programme to grow sailors in this age range – current fifteeners can do their bit by asking younger people to crew them, but it also needs a bit of push to ensure that the attractions of a F15 get more widely known and appreciated. As part of that push, I am pleased to announce that we have had a volunteer for a role that did not previously exist in the fleet, that of Youth Development officer. Patrick Condy from Scotland came forward and said that he loved the class and wanted others in his age range to be able to appreciate it as well. I asked Patrick to present a plan for this which he has done and now have asked him to implement this. If you or your club is approached by Patrick please provide him with help and support and perhaps also be proactive and supply him with information from your fleet. He can be reached at youth.dev@flying15.org.uk. He will focus on generating publicity for the class that emphasises cost effective ways to get sailing from boat ownership to finding a crewing slot.

Future developments to the boat itself

There are two areas currently being discussed in relation to where we take the development of the boat itself; Weight and Sails. Neither should be a surprise to any of you. There are good arguments in favour of action and inaction in both areas, but I wish to develop these further here to help all see both sides of the issues and perhaps enable solutions to be uncovered.

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Boat weight

The all up boat weight is currently 307Kg. Of this the Hull component is 136Kg. This is not the weight that Uffa Fox designed the boat for however. Following the introduction of exotic manufacturing materials (that is – not wood) the minimum weight of the boat was increased by 11Kg to ensure that wood and GRP boats sailed on an even keel. As Uffa Fox said “weight is only useful in a steam roller). The impact of this change was that sheet loads became higher. Over the passage of time boat builders have improved their art and can now build new boats well under the original minimum weight. Most new boats now come with >20Kg of lead to bring them up to weight. What FFI are going to be proposing is that a start be made in redressing this bulking up of the boat by an initial weight reduction of an amount yet to be agreed. The FFI council meeting at Crozon Morgat heard from the FFI Chief Measurer all the information about the spread of correctors on our fleet over the past years. At that time, it was seen reasonable to go for a 10Kg reduction in boat weight, given that most boats who attend championships would only need to remove correctors and not attend to other ways to remove weight. Subsequent feedback from National Associations is seeing that commitment waver to be replaced by a 5Kg reduction. Some even feel that we should not be seeking to reduce weight at all. Some facts: for all boats registered since 1999 (one 3rd of the current fleet), only 15% of these have less than 5Kg of correctors. It seems that the pace of weight reduction is going to be glacial. You will be asked to vote to advise UKFFA on the aggregate view of the fleet. The ballot is expected to take place in June 2016. Please think before you vote of the wider benefit to the fleet rather than a view based on your current boat. This reduction would not apply until March 2017 anyway. Will you still be sailing? Can you actually take some weight out by replacing some part of your boat? •

The questions about sails These are; •

How many

What Material

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How often

What sail plan

For a fleet like Parkstone where they race up to 3 times per week, a set of sails gets worn out pretty quickly. So having a competitive set for both club racing and open meetings/national championships is a difficult balancing act. The mainsail may last two years but the genoa and spinnaker could reasonably be expected to be worn out in 6 months of racing. So what does this mean for areas like getting new sail makers into the class? If a boat owner can only have one suit of sails per year, then he is not easily going to experiment with sails from other sailmakers or wish to take a risk with novel sail design. Also used sails are going to be well used and probably provide little benefit to the sailor lower down the fleet who would like newer sails with a bit more go in them but is averse to forking out for a new set. One approach to this I have heard mentioned is to have a limit on the number of individual sails purchased in any one year (a number of 5 was mentioned) but no stipulation as to what sails. Others have said why have a limit at all. I now hear the voices crying “cheque book” sailing. I do understand the thought behind that phrase. However, if someone is buying 2-3 suits of sails per year then is it not to be expected that they will wish to offload some of those the following year without too much wear? Does this not offer some benefit to those sailors with smaller budgets? What if it is our sail makers themselves who use this freedom to use extra sails? Ultimately they are in business to make a living and are not going to sit on multiple sets of unused sails for no reason. It would also give them the chance to experiment more – not all experiments are successful.

as yet. If you feel this needs addressing the Association has to vote on this, before it then goes to the FFI Council. So if you wish change in this area then start lobbying your fellow members as a change in this area was voted down at the AGM this year. On the subject of sail material, we enter a contentious area. I have heard from class members saying we should move to new materials as it will make the boat look more modern. I have heard from other fleets who have made the change that we should not do it – the new materials do not make better sails. The Association has no stance on this matter but seeks to be guided by its members. Finally, on the subject of the sail plan, we all perhaps remember the abortive trials of a proposed new sail plan from a few years ago. Discussions are now confined to a possible new higher aspect genoa. This has as its goal reducing the foot length and thus giving better visibility to leeward for helms. This would be achieved by raising the height of the head towards the mast.

In conclusion

I do not apologise for such a lengthy article. I feel it is my job to both listen to and communicate back what I hear to the wider membership; I have done a lot of listening! My term as your President ends after the National Championships in 2016 and Bobby Salmond will become your new President. One present I would like to leave him is a new Vice-President. So please think about giving back to your fleet and volunteering for this role. It is open to any Association member, helm or crew. It helps if you get to the open meetings and like socialising. As President you represent the ordinary member on the committee. I have enjoyed the experience and commend the role to anyone. I wish you good sailing over the winter if that is what you do, or have a great winter beside a warm fire or in the pub. I look forward to seeing you at open meetings around the country in 2016. Simon Thompson President UKFFA

There is no proposal before UKFFA on this subject so no change is on the cards

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job can be a lot of fun and you get to spend a lot of time with and talking to some really committed people who love their sailing and love sailing Flying Fifteens. Many I meet at open meetings, championships and other events: these are great occasions for catching up and getting the latest gossip on who is doing what where and with whom; all in the best possible taste, darlings (sorry, went a bit Kenny there [Everett not Pietersen]). This is great as I get to hear what needs to happen to make the class bolder better and more attractive and these things are all good because the people telling me this stuff are go-ahead competitive people who really want the best for the class.

This is all good and we really need people to come up with ideas to help us attract more sailors into the class and more members into the association. We need to show people what good fun the boats are to sail, that the racing we put on is good, and that the class makes financial sense for them to get into. We, along with the relevant host club, put a lot of effort into the events to try to give the sailors what they want, which I’m sure is not that different from what I suggest above. However, as secretary I also get to meet and talk with other committed and keen people from all walks of life and also from all over the country who rarely if ever travel with their boats. If they attend a championship or open it’s because it is being held at their club. These sailors are no less enthusiastic and would share the same desires as I mention and they too will help us attract more sailors into our boats. We are indeed a broad church and this is a good thing as we cover off lots of different benefits to different groups of people. This, though, can be a problem when it comes to change as I hear

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Keith crewing Justin Waples in hot pursuit of brother Chris at this year’s Nationals differing opinions, very often polarised. One group will want radical decisive bold changes and see this as the only way forward, the other want a steady programme of development and updating that keeps their boats competitive and relevant. The dilemma, then, for us your loyal administrators is how we keep both schools of thought on board [no pun intended] because we need each other. We need the dynamic individuals who will attend championships and open meetings, giving us something to write about and make us look attractive in the sailing media. We also need the committed club sailors who turn out once or twice a week, sail 20 – 30 or more races a year but never travel, and enjoy their leisure time at their club. These are our grass roots, those people who demonstrate on a local level that

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you can have great club racing in a really fun boat that allows a great cross section of the sailing community to compete on a level playing field. So when we are thinking of putting forward changes for consideration, making arguments for or against change, even drafting a suggested rule or ballot paper, let’s not look at it through the narrow prism of our particular view. Let’s not even think about how it will push the class forward or hold it back, let’s think about how we can keep everyone in the boat they chose for whatever reason, or on which side of our broad church they are sitting. I’ve had a great season and I hope you have too, hoping you have a festive Christmas and a good season next year.

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Keith Jamieson

Photograph courtesy of Neill Ross

Secretary’s­Scribbles This


Photograph courtesy of Rick Tomlinson

Will­Heritage­Cleans­up­at­Cowes

Sailing

AT­THE­AGE­OF­14

the Flying 15 with Dad this summer has been fantastic.

We bought a 1996 Ivan Coryn boat that Dad re-painted and re-fitted adding new spars and sails. I am very keen on ropework so, with the help of Dad’s rigger at work, I made a lot of the control lines and sheets for the boat myself. We sail from Cowes Corinthian Yacht Club and as well as us there were a couple of other boats joining the fleet this year. A further new boat will be joining next year (4004 Foof, the double world champion boat, now owned by Andy Storrar. Ed.) so resurgence is continuing within the Flying 15 fleet in Cowes. Before we competed in our first race we had a couple of training sails as I had never sailed a Flying 15 before (and it has been years since Dad sailed one). The Tuesday night series was good for us and as well as being great fun it helped us get up to speed with the other club boats in a series of short evening races in varying wind strengths. Our main goal this year was Cowes week, but at the last minute we decided •

to enter the Charles Stanley Classic Week. This turned out to be the heaviest conditions we had sailed in with plenty of wind and a good Solent chop which took a bit of getting used to. I am so glad we took the spinnaker chute out and fitted cockpit bags instead, especially when we hit a big wave. I was also really happy to have 120kg of Dad crewing for me, but I will have to get him to hike even harder. Dad was happy for me to make most of the tactical decisions. We did discuss the tides and our best route but the starts were all mine. We had a great four days ending up winning the Regatta. With visiting boats from as far away as Scotland and Kent it was a good pointer towards our next event. Cowes Week was a great fun week with eleven boats participating. We had a variety of conditions and some good battles with Rupert Maunder, the man to beat and World Champion in 1992. We managed to get ahead of him in some of the races but just couldn’t hold him behind us. We finished second in all but two races; Rupert did not sail the Saturdays which allowed us to win the week (thank you Rupert!). Winning the last race with the classic Cowes Week

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finish, running down the green with the spinnaker up to the line at the Royal Yacht Squadron was a real highlight for me. It was fantastic to win such a famous week and I also won the Young Skipper trophy for under 25 helms, which was a great bonus. I’m looking forward to next year already. Having done nearly all my sailing in Optimists, Laser 4.7 and Radials since I was eight years old, I was surprised how good the Flying 15 was to sail, even with a keel. The first windy spinnaker reach we had was fantastic. It was at that point I was sold on the 15. As well as racing the boat I enjoy setting up the rig and sails, although I still have a lot to learn and have found Steve Goacher’s tuning guide really helpful. I am really looking forward to next year; as well as sailing in Cowes it would be great to do a couple of open meetings and with the Nationals at Hayling Island that is not too far away. Dad is always telling me how he started sailing Flying Fifteens with his Dad in 1971 on the river Medway and now I am sailing one with him. It has sort of come full circle and I am really looking forward to sailing the Fifteen for many years to come.

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UK­National­Championship NEILL­ROSS­REPORTS

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competed in the UKGlobal Flying Fifteen UK Nationals hosted by the Royal Northern & Clyde Yacht Club from 12th to 15th July on the Clyde.

Straight away, competition was hot with current World Champions, Graham Vials and Chris Turner, leading the way in the first race. They were not to have it all their own way though, and at the end of the first day, although they topped the leaderboard, they shared the same points tally as Richard Lovering and Matt Alvarado. Steve Goacher and Tim Harper were also in the mix with a bullet in the third race.

Photography by Neill Ross

for Lovering/Alvarado, just one point ahead of Goacher/Harper. Third and fourth places were also separated by just one point with Apthorp/Green just sneaking it to take third overall. In the Classic Fleet the father son duo of Alasdair Ireland and Alasdair Ireland Jr secured top spot with the aid of a very creditable ninth overall in the penultimate race.

Unfortunately, day two was a disappointment; with no wind whatsoever, no racing was possible. We were also due a visit from HRH the Princess Royal but technical problems with aircraft meant that too was off the menu. So to Tuesday, and with an extra race squeezed in to make up for the previous day, three races were held in excellent conditions. Charles Apthorp and Alan Green led the way in the first race but two seconds were sufficient for Lovering and Alvarado to retain top spot, Vials and Turner having headed home to fulfil other commitments. David McKee and Andy Weatherspoon had also obviously found form and a string of solid results were topped off with a first in the last race of the day. Only one race had been scheduled for the last day to make for an early start home for those with a long distance to travel. The decision was made, however, to make the most of the superb conditions and run two races to complete the full series. It was to prove Goacher/Harper's day with two bullets but a second in the first race was enough to secure top spot

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Lovering/Alvarado •

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Nationals­2015

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Reflections­from­France­2015

On

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Jeremy Davy and Martin Huett finished second overall in their fourteen year old boat, 3760

Before we could go sailing, we had to put the boat and equipment through scrutineering. In my view this remains an essential part of any Worlds and the Fifteens are fortunate to have an extremely well-organised international measurement team that focus on the key performance areas to ensure that the measurement process is robust whilst being relatively painless! Most importantly, all boats were weighed, which is the absolute bare minimum measurement requirement at a major championship for any serious racing

Courtesy of RDB Photographie

arrival at Crozon-Morgat, any concerns about the late change in venue for the 2015 Worlds soon subsided as it became clear that the Centre Nautique Crozon-Morgat was in a great location and was professionally managed by a team who knew how to run successful sailing events. Martin and I were unable to take part in the PreWorlds due to other commitments and, therefore, we arrived in France knowing that we would be playing catch-up with the majority of competitors who did compete in the preliminary event. Fortunately, the talk in the boat park after

the final race of the Pre-Worlds reinforced our perception of the venue: it would provide a fair test and was not a particularly technical race track.

class. I have to salute the FF measurement team for doing such an excellent job – we should not forget that we rely heavily on the work of volunteers who undertake often thankless tasks for the love of our great class. When racing finally got underway on day two after a “false start” from a lack of wind, Race 1 (arguably, the trickiest race of the whole event) provided light and patchy winds which tested everyone’s patience to the limit. Graham Vials and Chris Turner did what Graham and Chris often do and sailed a flawless race to win comfortably. In fact, the winning margin was so comfortable that Graham even had time to relieve himself whilst sailing the final reach to the finish!

Crowded start line

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Photograph courtesy of Simon Thompson

groove and two race wins all but sealed their third World Championship victory. As their nearest rivals, we were keen to keep the pressure up but, if a fifth place in the first race of the day felt like we had failed in that objective, the black flag in the next race all but handed the title to Graham and Chris. After an uncharacteristically slow start to the regatta, Richard Lovering and Matt Alvarado were finally showing the form that had secured the UK National Title in the previous month and scored two second places.

A family affair: Martin Huett and Jeremy Davy

We (in second place) consoled ourselves that our bladders had stood up better to the rigours of a long opening race and a plentiful supply of hydration drinks! Alan Bax and Mark Darling held off the chasing group to secure third and proceeded to spend the rest of the week at the sharp end of the fleet. Race 2 proved to be our regatta high point (although we didn’t know it at the time) after managing to hold off Graham and Chris for a race win. After a disappointing first race, Greg Wells and Richard Rigg found themselves back in familiar territory, finishing third.

Day 3 was an impromptu Lay Day, this time due to too much wind. The undoubted highlight of the day was an al fresco lunch in one of the many restaurants in Crozon-Morgat, watching Apthorp senior and Apthorp junior (surely a future FF champion in the making?) put their FF through its paces in seriously windy conditions in the harbour! If you’ve missed the YouTube clip I can recommend it although, to properly recreate the moment, you’ll need a full glass of red wine in one hand! The following day dawned with strong

winds and Race 3 was certainly a memorable affair with gusts of 30+ knots. Just keeping the spinnaker pole in the retainer on the boom was a challenge as boats bounced around on the large waves before the start, something Steve Goacher (and crew Tim Harper) found when they managed to snap their spinnaker pole in half during a pre-start tack, proving that even the best can fall victim to the sort of mishaps that usually only affect us mere mortals. If anyone was under the misapprehension that Graham and Chris’ phenomenal speed derives from their un-Ffifteen-like reduced all-up crew weight, the first beat of Race 3 demonstrated that technique trumps “grunt” every time! They flew upwind and rounded first having had, by their standards, a mediocre start. From that point, they sailed unchallenged to their second win. Andy McKee and Rich Jones demonstrated that they intended to provide a robust challenge by scoring the first of three consecutive third places. Day 5 provided perfect sailing conditions with winds of 12-15 knots. By this stage, Graham and Chris were firmly in the

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The final day brought winds of 10-12 knots and a tricky chop. Graham and Chris had built up a big enough lead to enjoy the comfort of knowing that, regardless of the results of their nearest contenders, a top six result would secure the title. They finished sixth and headed for home, safe in the knowledge that a historic third title in a row had been achieved. The day, however, belonged to Charles Apthorp and Alan Green who scored a first and a second. Ex-Fireball World Champion, Crispin Read-Wilson and crew, Steve Brown, proved that form is temporary but class is permanent by rounding the week off with a dominant performance in the final race to take line honours. Throughout our week in Crozon-Morgat, there was a genuine buzz around the town and no more so than on the evening of the prize giving held in the main square in the centre of the town. Locals gathered with Ffifteeners to watch proceedings and applaud the newly-crowned champions and other prize winners. If ever anyone could be described as a stalwart of the FF Class, it’s Greg Wells. It was, therefore, fitting that a fantastic event should end with Greg being asked to step down from the podium (having finished the event in third place) to receive the Uffa Fox Medal for his outstanding service to the class. In summary, the Crozon-Morgat Worlds was an unconditional success with a good turnout of nearly 80 boats, the full spectrum of sailing conditions and very worthy winners. Roll on New Zealand 2017!

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Greg Wells receiving Jeremy Davy and Martin Huett, winners race 2

Prizegiving­France­2015 Photograph courtesy of Simon Thompson

Charles Apthorp and Alan Green (l), winners race 6

Graham Vials (r) and Chris Turne

Crispin Read Wilson and Steve Brown, winners race 7

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g the Uffa Fox medal from Geoff Bayliss

Philippa Packer, first woman, crewed by Dean Macaullay (r)

Fabien and Alexia Constant, first French team

er, winners races 1, 3, 4, 5 and triple world champions

John Clarke and Michael Scholes, winners of the Classic Division

d Thomas Camus, winners Silver Division •

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Rêve­de Mondial

C’est

Triple World Champions stretch their lead

Photography courtesy of RDB Photographie

un rêve qui a démarré en douceur, sans qu’on s’en rende vraiment compte. Notre bienaimé président Patrick Constant me lançant : « et puisque tu as l’air si motivé pour que le prochain Mondial de la classe ait lieu en France, je suppose que tu es prêt à t’en occuper avec moi ? » Après, sont venues les discussions avec Hyères – c’est le club qu’avaient pressenti nos amis britanniques – qui a donné son accord pour faire ensuite volte-face, la sélection des autres candidatures prometteuses, Crozon-Morgat et Douarnenez, Patrick partant visiter les deux clubs et son retour enthousiaste : « A Crozon-Morgat j’ai rencontré des gens

Dream­ World It

was a dream that started imperceptibly, without anyone really noticing. Our beloved president Patrick Constant’s opening gambit was, "And since you seem so determined that the next World Championship should take place in France, I suppose you're prepared to organise it with me?” Then came the discussions with Hyères - the club favoured by our British friends - who agreed to do it, but subsequently executed a volte-face. This was followed by the short-listing of other potential venues, Crozon-Morgat and Douarnenez. Patrick went off to visit the two clubs and he came back enthused: "At Crozon-

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hyper-motivés, le directeur du club est un type comme ça (geste à l’appui), l’endroit est superbe, le plan d’eau magnifique, et tous y compris M. le Maire m’ont assuré : « tout ce qu’il faut faire pour que votre championnat soit réussi, nous le ferons ! » Et voilà, c’était parti. Ou presque. Le nom de Crozon-Morgat n’ayant pas encore acquis toute la notoriété internationale que méritent le club, le village et le plan d’eau, notre commodore Greg Wells a tout de même eu besoin de venir vérifier lui-même, sans doute pour mieux emporter l’adhésion de la fédération internationale, un tantinet conservatrice. Mais Greg a été impressionné par la qualité du directeur exécutif du club, Olivier Latin, et par la totale et étonnante absence de courant dans la baie, qui en fait un plan d’eau idéal pour des régates de haut niveau.

Morgat I met hyper-motivated people; the director of the club is a guy like that (gesture of crossed fingers), the place is superb, the sailing waters are magnificent, and everybody including the Mayor assured me: ‘Everything that can be done to make your Championship successful, we will do!’ " And, hey presto, we were up and running. Or almost. The name of Crozon-Morgat having not yet gained the full international recognition that the club, the village and the water deserves, our then President of FFI, Greg Wells, came and checked out the venue himself, in order to secure the support of the (understandably) cautious international federation. Greg was impressed by the calibre of the club's executive director, Olivier Latin, and by the total and astonishing absence of current in the bay, making it an ideal water for high-level regattas.

Normalement, c’est là que les em…bêtements commencent et que la réalité remplace l’utopie : on se rend compte de la somme de ce qu’il y a à préparer, de la difficulté de communiquer avec tous ces gens impliqués, discuter, évaluer, comprendre, se faire comprendre, négocier, obtenir des décisions… On se dit qu’il va falloir faire et refaire des checklists, des « conference calls », des chaînes de discussion email, avec toujours l’angoisse de négliger quelque chose d’important… Mais petit à petit l’énergie et la disponibilité incroyables d’Olivier créent un optimisme contagieux, et avec Patrick et Greg à la manœuvre, les obstacles s’aplanissent et tout devient facile.

Normally, this is when the problems start and when reality replaces the dream: where you realise the enormity of what needs to be prepared, the difficulty of communicating with all the people involved, to discuss, evaluate, understand and be understood, negotiate, extract decisions; the need to make and re-make checklists, the conference calls, the chains of email discussions, always with the anxiety of forgetting something vital. But, little by little, Olivier’s energy and amazing receptivity created an infectious optimism and with Patrick and Greg in combination, obstacles were eradicated and everything became plain sailing.

Notre première réunion de travail sur place à Morgat avec Olivier bien sûr, Yvon Macé le président et Philippe Quéré le secrétaire du CNCM avait donné le ton. Le temps d’arrièresaison était superbe, et la route par Plougastel et Le Faou nous avait offert des vues époustouflantes de la rade de Brest et de ses rivières, dont l’Aulne et son improbable cimetière de navires de guerre qu’on découvre à un tournant. En arrivant, la plage de Morgat à marée basse, le petit port, le club-house, la chaleur de l’accueil, l’enthousiasme de l’état-major du club, tout nous a donné à Patrick et à moi la certitude immédiate

Our first meeting on site in Morgat with Olivier, Yvon Macé, the president, and Philippe Quéré, the secretary of CNCM, set the tone. The late season weather was beautiful and the road via Plougastel and Le Faou gave us breathtaking views of Brest harbour and its estuaries, including the Aulne and its improbable graveyard of warships which you discover at a bend. On arrival, the Morgat beach at low tide, the little harbour, the clubhouse, the warmth of the welcome, the enthusiasm of the staff of the club, all combined to give Patrick and me the immediate certainty that the event could only be a magnificent success.

Vials and Turner (22) off the start line •

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Apthorp father and son que l’évènement ne pouvait être qu’un magnifique succès. En lever de rideau du Mondial, nous avions les trois jours de notre National. Un bon échauffement, avec 50 bateaux sur la ligne, des rappels généraux et des « black flags », et pour beaucoup la (re-) découverte de ce que veut dire naviguer au sein d’une flotte monotype dense. Les francophones en profitent pour se familiariser avec quelques expressions typiques : « starboard ! », « water ! », « luff ! » et autres « protest ! ». Mais de retour à terre, c’est une démonstration d’entraide et de camaraderie pour sortir les bateaux de l’eau et leur faire remonter la cale, certes en pente douce mais tout de même… Des bras bienveillants sont par bonheur offerts par les jeunes et moins jeunes bénévoles du club – qu’ils soient ici chaleureusement remerciés. Ainsi que les infatigables volontaires qui s’activent à préparer des crêpes et servir des (demi) pintes de cidre et des (vraies) pintes de bière locale à une joyeuse armée d’assoiffés qui refont la régate autour du bar de plage version finistérienne.

As a curtain-raiser for the Worlds, we had three days of our National Championship. A good warm-up, with fifty boats on the line, general recalls and "black flags", and for many the discovery, or re-discovery, of what it means to navigate in a densely packed one-design fleet. The French took the opportunity to become familiar with some typical phrases: "Starboard!", "Water!", "Luff!" and sometimes "Protest!". On our return to shore there was teamwork and camaraderie to haul the boats out of the water and back up the slipway – not a steep incline, but still a long slope, especially at low water. Helping hands were happily offered by young and not so young club volunteers they are here gratefully acknowledged, as are the tireless volunteers who worked to prepare pancakes and serve (half) pints of cider and (full) pints of local beer to a cheerful army of the thirsty who continued the regatta around this Finistérienne version of the beach-bar. On the Nationals results sheet, the Brits monopolized the top of the table; the first "foreigner" at ninth was an Australian. Overall winners, double world champions Graham Vials and Chris Turner, and first French, Alexia and Fabien Constant, newly married and whose speed under spinnaker was up there with the best.

Sur la feuille de résultats du National, les britanniques trustent le haut du tableau, le premier « étranger » est 9ème, c’est un Australien. Vainqueurs au général, les (pour l’instant) doubles champions du Monde Graham Vials et Chris Turner, et premiers français, Alexia et Fabien Constant, tout jeunes mariés et dont la vitesse sous spi est au niveau de celle des meilleurs. Un break d’une journée pour accueillir les derniers arrivants, nos amis belges en particulier, et leur permettre de passer les opérations de jauge, et le Mondial peut démarrer. 72 bateaux au départ maintenant, la ligne semble à la fois immense et densément peuplée, pas facile de se faire sa place… Heureusement, chaque manche semble offrir autant de raisons de jouer la droite que la gauche ou que de préférer tricoter au centre, si bien que la flotte se répartit assez naturellement. Le tarif habituel est malgré tout de 2 rappels généraux par manche.

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Patrick Constant and Michel Pélegrin A break of one day followed to accommodate the latest arrivals, especially our Belgian friends, and allow them to pass the measurement checks, and the World Championship could start. 72 boats at the start now, the line seemed both huge and densely populated, not easy to create a slot. Fortunately, each race seemed to offer so many reasons to play the right or the left or to work the middle of the course that the fleet

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Quand on arrive à faire un départ correct, on peut observer d’assez près les « top guns » qui sont déjà aux avant-postes (mais comment font-ils pour se lancer mieux que tout le monde ?), et puis après quelques virements, c’est fini, pfuit, envolés… A l’approche de la bouée de près sur la layline tribord, la flotte est encore bien dense, attention à ne pas se laisser progressivement dériver sous la layline… Tactiquement, mon équipier Erwan Gouriou et moi apprenons beaucoup, un peu dans la douleur. Sous spi, sur les bananes (des « saucisses » pour les anglophones), il peut y avoir des options. On voit deux trains se former, à droite ceux qui sont partis à la bouée en « bare away », à gauche ceux qui ont empannés très tôt, au milieu quelques malins qui suivent les oscillations et multiplient les empannages. La bouée de vent arrière arrive vite, ou plutôt les bouées, pas facile de choisir entre la droite (« j’ai l’impression qu’il y a moins de monde, on aura du vent frais pour le près ») et la gauche (« on s’infiltre sous le vent, si on s’engage suffisamment tôt, on réclame de l’eau et on gagne 5 places »), zut, on aurait dû choisir l’autre côté finalement, tant pis, allez, c’est reparti, on se remotive, on reste concentrés, il y a de quoi se refaire…

divided fairly naturally. The usual tally was still two general recalls per race.

When we get off to a good start, we can observe from close quarters the "top guns" who are already in the front rank (but how do they manage to start better than everyone else?), then after a few tacks it's over, whoosh, they’ve gone. As we approach the windward mark on the starboard layline, the fleet is still pretty dense, careful, don’t gradually sag below the layline ... Tactically, my crew Erwan Gouriou and I learn a lot, often painfully. Under spinnaker, on the bananas (the English call them "sausages") there are options. We see two lines form: on the right those who bore away at the mark on starboard; on the left those who gybed off straight away, and down the middle some smart sailors who have gybed on the shifts. The leeward mark arrives quickly, or rather two marks, not easy to choose between the right ("It seems to me that the right is less crowded, there will be clearer wind for the beat") and the left ("we can creep down to leeward, if we start early enough, then we can call water and gain five places"), damn, we should have chosen the other side, too bad, let’s go, we start again, we remotivate, we stay focused, there is Un rêve en effet, avec des images, des sensations, des still something to be gained… souvenirs. Je revois Bernard Demartial obtenant d’un anglais A dream indeed with images, feelings, memories. I remember anonyme équipé de voiles P&B qu’il le tuyaute sur ses Bernard Demartial getting tips on tuning from an anonymous réglages, sans se douter qu’il s’agit d’Alan Bax « himself ».

Reaching action •

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Graham Vials partageant avec son enthousiasme communicatif ses réglages pour équipage léger dans la brise (merci Graham !). Gilles Chevalier se faisant pénaliser pour rocking en se demandant encore pourquoi. Bertrand Semaille se fendant gentiment tous les soirs d’un résumé de la journée. Yves Defrance au dîner de clôture accompagnant chants et danses au bandonéon en tapant la mesure avec ardeur. Greg en fin de mandat, nettement ému en recevant sa médaille Uffa Fox. Tous ces échanges multilingues, parfois un peu gauches, toujours amicaux, souvent chaleureux. C’est bien ça le rêve, en fait, se retrouver toutes nationalités, tous âges et tous niveaux mélangés, échanger et participer de tout son cœur à un évènement qui appartient à tous, ceux qui l’ont préparé et ceux qui l’ont vécu. Un rêve qui prend corps petit à petit et dont on s’aperçoit à la fin qu’il a tenu ses promesses. A bientôt à Dinard, Hayling Island, Medemblik, Napier et ailleurs. J’adore ce bateau, vive le Flying Fifteen

Englishman with a suit of P & B sails unaware that this was Alan Bax himself. Graham Vials enthusiastically sharing his sail settings for lightweight crews in a breeze (Graham, thank you!). Gilles Chevalier being penalized for rocking while still wondering why. Bertrand Semaille kindly churning out every night a summary of the day. Yves Defrance at the closing dinner accompanying songs and dances on his bandonéon, beating time with ardour. Greg at the end of presidency, clearly moved by receiving his Uffa Fox medal. All the multilingual exchanges, sometimes a little clumsy, always friendly, often heartfelt. It’s a great dream, in fact, for all nationalities and all levels and ages to meet and mix, exchange knowledge and participate wholeheartedly in an event that belongs to all, both those who organised and those who lived it. It was a dream which took shape little by little and which can be seen . Roll on Dinard, Hayling Island, Medemblik, Napier and beyond. I love this boat, long live the Flying Fifteen!

Michel Pélegrin d’Almeïda FRA 3932 « jamais deux » (ex GBR 3932 à Chris Swallow)

Michel Pélegrin d’Almeïda FRA 3932 "jamais deux" (ex Chris Swallow’s GBR 3932)

Greg Wells plots his next move

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Pat McAuley in Vixen, British champion in 1960, sailing off Portaferry

STRANGFORD­LOUGH

S ­

BY­MARCUS­CRICHTON

TRANGFORD

Lough in County Down, on the eastern side of Northern Ireland, is the largest seawater inlet in Britain. With its coves, mudflats, pladdies and at least seventy islands, it’s an internationally renowned area for wildlife. It is also a boating paradise and a great place to sail a Flying Fifteen. The lough got its name from the Vikings, who came from across the Irish Sea to pillage and plunder. They called it ‘Stronge Fjorde’ in reference to the fearsome tides which swept their longships through its narrow entrance which is still known today as The Narrows. An even earlier visitor was St Patrick •

who had to navigate its treacherous waters on his mission to bring Christianity to the pagan Irish and whose statue gazes benignly down on the main body lough from a nearby hilltop. Patrick built his first church in Ireland a few miles inland at a place called Saul — the Irish word for barn — and lies buried in Downpatrick, the historic county town of Down, which was once an important trading port thanks to its proximity to the lough. Sheltered by the Ards Peninsula to the east and the magnificent Mourne Mountains to the south, Strangford Lough is a cradle of Christianity. It’s also a very special place for Flying Fifteen sailors and with a respectful nod to those from Dublin Bay and Belfast Lough, who might claim otherwise, it can be argued that Strangford Lough is

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the spiritual home of Flying Fifteen sailing in Ireland. The founding fathers were two brothers, Max and Peter Browne. After their interest was sparked by a magazine article about a 20-foot performance keelboat, they obtained a set of plans from Uffa Fox and set about building a boat in a borrowed shed near their home at Mahee Island at the northern end of the lough. Wood was hard to find in the austerity years following World War 2 but in 1952 Strangford Lough’s first Flying Fifteen, Witch of Nendrum (No 84), was launched. They sailed at Strangford Lough Yacht Club at nearby Whiterock and the boat proved such a hit that other members quickly decided that a Flying Fifteen was the must have boat.

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By 1956 there were over thirty Flying Fifteens at the club. That same year SLYC hosted the Championship of the British Isles and the Browne brothers, Max at the helm and Peter crewing, stormed to victory in a 40-plus fleet which included the Duke of Edinburgh in the celebrated Coweslip. The Duke’s crew was one Uffa Fox. Two years later Peter was a champion again when he crewed Willie Carson to victory on the Tay in Scotland. It was the start of a golden era. Over the next twenty-five years Strangford Lough churned out British champions like goods on a conveyor belt. In 1960 SLYC were celebrating again when Pat McAuley and his crew, Tom Finnegan, won the championship on the Clyde in Vixen (No 210). Two years later, when the championship returned to the lough, the victors were the husband-and-wife team of Terence and Bridget Kennedy in Icarus (No 440). They would go to win it again in 1966. In 1970 another husband-and-wife team from Whiterock, Peter and Anne McAuley, triumphed in Cork in Cuchulain

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(No 1095), which was the first glass-fibre boat to win championship. The following year, Tom and Dianne Andrews, whose father was the aforementioned Willie Carson, went to Cowes and won again for SLYC in Chinook (1283). Meanwhile, other clubs in Strangford Lough had discovered the Flying Fifteen bug. At Kircubbin the driving force was Henry Gilmore, a major figure in the construction industry, who was also a keen sailor. Using his own materials and workshop facilities, he build a number of Flying Fifteens for Kircubbin members, including his son Edward, who was British champion in 1972 in Interceptor (1100). The success kept coming. Tom and Dianne Andrews won again in 1974 in Chinook and in 1978 Kircubbin pair Jim Rodgers and Paul Kerr finished top of the pack in Vega (568). The following year Edward Gilmore was champion for a second time in a new Interceptor (2481) and he went on to complete his hat-trick in Interceptor III (2879) in Lowestoft in 1983.

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Importantly, club racing in the lough kept pace with all the championship silverware. Strangford Lough YC and Kircubbin SC were the pre-eminent clubs, but there were new kids on the block in the form of Portaferry SC and Strangford SC. Then, as now, these two clubs on either side of the lough sensibly pulled their resources and sailed together as one fleet. At the Strangford club, based in beautiful Castleward Bay, where the trees can affect the outcome of a race just as much as the tide, Oliver Curran, Tommy Connor and Gerry Reilly were the early pioneers and worked hard to develop the class, while in Portaferry Seamus Byers and the O’Neill brothers, Terry and Barney, were among the early leading lights. With Flying Fifteens also at the Killyleagh and Quoile clubs, it was the No 1 class in the lough and it wasn’t uncommon to see 40-strong fleets at regattas. The class continued to attract and nurture some top class sailors, such as John Miller, Norman Watson, Raymond Gilmore, John McCann, Brian McKee,

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Darren Martin, Roger Chamberlain and Andrew McCleery. Sadly, numbers have diminished in recent years. There are now just a handful of Fifteens in Whiterock and none in Kircubbin. Happily, Strangford and Portaferry remain strong and there is still a small fleet in Killyleagh. There is new blood in the fleet and the 2015 season ended with a series of well

attended one-day events comprising short windward-leeward races, which could well be the blueprint for the future. Most of the old guard are still around, though watching from the sidelines. At regattas where there may be fifteen or more different classes, people like Peter Browne still ask who won the Flying Fifteen race.

The competition, camaraderie and friendship of the early years remain, as do the challenges. There are rocks and submerged wrecks to avoid, there are races to be won and the tidal rip, known to some as the ‘Washing Machine,’ that brought St Patrick and the Vikings to our shores, continues to bewilder and beguile.

Flying 15s in Castleward Bay, home of Strangford Sailing Club •

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Parkstone

Parkstone teams and several potential visitors.

Yacht Club bucked the trend of truncating sailing events by deciding to revert to a full week of sailing for 2015’s Poole Week. Twenty Flying Fifteen teams entered for Poole Week this year, including seven visiting boats, despite the event clashing with the World Champs in France to which we lost four

Parkstone’s mission in organising the week was to provide each class the racing that they wanted and, having canvassed both locals and visitors, the Flying Fifteens were provided a programme of variety. Our requirements were for two races each day and a mix of Olympic courses in the harbour and bay and good quality “harbour tour” type

courses – ensuring that we always had proper beats, runs and reaches. The 2015 race team certainly delivered that in spades. Day One:

• Champagne sailing – a steady F4 and two Olympic courses in the top triangle of Poole Harbour. • The top three of the day were Graham and Ben Scroggie, Patrick Keats and Richard Whitworth and Bob Alexander and Huw Willetts.

Photograph courtesy of David Harding of Sailing Scenes

• Free sailor suppers, free beer and prize giving – a draw for all competitors for £400 pounds worth of Zhik vouchers – attendance and humour is high! Day 2:

• A little windier and the perfect excuse for a harbour blast race followed by an Olympic triangle. • Top three positions unchanged.

Overall winners Bob Alexander and Huw Willetts

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• The fleet heads off for Loch Fyne after another free beer and another well attended daily prize giving! A great evening enjoyed by the local folk and our guests. 2 0 1 6

Photograph courtesy of David Harding of Sailing Scenes

2015­-The­year­Poole­Week­ CAME­BACK!­­PATRICK­KEATS­REPORTS


Day 3: • Was programmed to be a start from RMYC with a tour taking us in to Poole Bay – however the f5/6 with poor visibility due to rain meant a harbour tour course was arranged. • Several 15’s decided not to enjoy the monsoon conditions but those that did were treated to one of the most perfect Flying 15 reaches past the beautiful Brownsea Island – not that anyone would have been able to enjoy the view as this was a white knuckle ride of delight! • The top 3 boats were consistent but Bob and Huw were beginning to show a form of taking the top bullets… • More free beer, more Zhik vouchers, then the fleet moved on to a fabulous Paella night hosted by Sara Briscoe and Graham Latham. Day 4

• Still a good breeze, still excellent racing! Harbour tour first, followed by an Olympic Course. • Bob and Huw 2 bullets. Graham/Ben and Patrick/Richard still trading blows for 2nd and 3rd. • The pattern of free beer, hilarious prizegiving and draw for vouchers from Zhik, West Quay chandlery and other sponsors now well established… Day 5

• Sailing nirvana! Sunny and windy and two Olympic courses in the bay.

Photograph courtesy of David Harding of Sailing Scenes

• Bob and Huw recorded two seconds with Patrick /Richard and Graham/Ben

There were some knockdown gusts taking respective bullets in the two to third to take second overall. races. • Two points separated the top three • By now you can guess what came boats and the competition throughout next…free hog roast accompanying the the fleet was just as cut-throat! Well free beer, prize giving (heckling getting done to Rob Jarrett for winning the hard worse and led by some of the rowdier fought crews’ race trophy! elements of the 15 fleet), voucher drawer and the party night…great band and Looking Forward: dancing and more beer.

Poole Week 2016

Day 6

• My head hurts and early start to allow the visitors to get away. Why does it always rain when I have a hangover? • All to play for in the top three boats – only three points separating them. One series race today and a crew’s race. • Patrick and Richard took this one but Bob and Huw in coming second very deservedly took the plaudits for the week and Graham/Ben managed to pull a huge comeback in the race from last

Our focus is to provide top quality racing that is tailored to the needs of each class and the fleet representatives are already working on the full racing programme for 2016. The entry fee is less than £100 and if you enter by the 8th April it is less than £60! The NoR and much more information is available on the dedicated Poole Week website www.pooleweek.org. We look forward to welcoming you for another week of first class and varied racing!

Patrick Keats and Richard Whitworth •

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Parkstone is committed to Poole Week and will be doing the same for us in 2016. The dates will be Sunday 21st August to Friday 26th so no clash with the Europeans! The Parkstone Flying 15s will ensure you a very warm welcome and will arrange another vibrant social programme. Why not bring your friends from other classes too? There is a handicap fleet with class results where the fleet exceeds six entrants or, if they can get twelve boats or more together they will very likely have their own class start. We have verbal confirmation from our lead sponsor so the generous prize and beer fund is looking secure!

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Winterising­your­15

BY­CHRIS­TURNER

avoid this by drying out the tanks…If you are really keen you can place a dehumidifier in the cockpit… I leave all the covers off to ensure that no moisture can be trapped against the gel surface, I even remove the rudder from its bag and place that in the cockpit, it is often forgotten but is the most common part to pick up blisters from being stowed wet.

The

Ovington Inlands always signifies the end of the Sailing Season for me, at least here in the Northern hemisphere…Sadly, this year we were forced to cancel the event due to our first named storm Abigail. With the event over it is now time to put the boat away, luckily for me that is the new owner’s job this year as Foof is now in new hands…Here are a few tips for looking after your boat. If like me you are lucky enough to be able to get your boat inside there is not a huge amount to do. Once washed down and dried, I leave off all the covers and hatches to let the boat ‘breathe’. I oil the bailers and leave them in the down position…I tend to use a little olive oil and just brush it around the seal. I go around all the blocks and cleats, check they are clean and give them a little squirt of lubricant, not really sure what is really best, Mclube is good when you are up and running but not sure how good it is when ‘winterizing’ I use GT85 which I find very good. I take all the sails out of the boat and store them elsewhere allowing the maximum airflow through your tanks… Over time the boats can take on weight through the laminate so you can help

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The reason you do not want moisture against any surface is that it can cause blistering (osmosis) and once you get it, it is very hard to get rid of…There are some old wives tales of using sugar or salt and sprinkling it over affected areas to absorb the moisture and apparently the blisters reduce although I have had no experience of this… If you have to leave your boat outside then it is important to let as much air get across the boat as possible…Avoid where possible cover contact with the decks…In the past, I have made props to hold the cover up, there are plenty of discarded mast tubes kicking around most sailing clubs so you should be able to find a stump to drop in the mast gate and use a longer length propped from there to the transom. Hatch covers are again removed and if you can take everything out from the cockpit and store inside it would be best...If not, I make sure the sails are off the cockpit floor by using the draw strings on the sail bags to hang them off the jib plinths with the other end up under the foredeck. Leave the bailers down and oil as for storing inside. I would always take the undercover off for winter storage both inside and out, it is offering very little in protection and you are better to have air flowing over your boat than a damp cover against the hull skin… Where possible avoid PVC or any nonbreathable material in your covers and always ship in containers with NO

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covers on, all for the same reasons as above and in a sealed box the symptoms are accelerated. Same procedures apply for airflow through the hatches.

If you cannot get your mast inside it is best you strip the mast as much as possible. I usually run ‘mouse lines’ down the tube to remove the halyards more damage is done leaving them out all winter than in use…A padded mast bag is useful to help protect the alloy. If you are reading this in the Southern Hemisphere you don’t need to worry quite as much as you tend not to be as wet as us up here but the same rules apply, try to avoid leaving anything damp against any surfaces of the hull. As for me, no trip South for this winter so it’s getting the warm kit on and getting out on the bike and for sailing next season back to the boat with one less digit.

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Flying­Fifteen­World­Championships TO­RETURN­TO­NAPIER,­NEW­ZEALAND­IN­2017 WHERE

• Napier Sailing Club is ideally located in the popular Ahuriri suburb, 2km from Napier City and about the same distance from the Port of Napier. • Immediately adjacent is the Bluewater Hotel, across the road from which are luxury apartments, many of which are available for short-term rental and a selection of restaurants. • A short distance along West Quay are several bars and licensed premises. • Within easy distance, in Ahuriri and Westshore, there are many motels, hotels and other accommodation options, including houses and cottages for rent, and the Westshore Motor Camp, which has cabins and sites for caravans, motorhomes and tents. • The Napier Sailing Club is about 3km from Napier Airport and is only a short distance from the main highway routes that link the region to Taupo, Auckland and Gisborne to the north, and to Palmerston North and Wellington to the south.

A Little Bit Of Background Geography And History NAPIER & HAWKE’S BAY

WHEN • The 21st Flying Fifteen World Championships will be held at the Napier Sailing Club in February-March 2017.

• Napier is a small provincial city of some 55,000 population on the East Coast of the North Island of New Zealand. It is on the same latitude as Mallorca. • It is a rural service centre with a major Port facility

• Preliminary schedule: from Monday 20 February, through to Friday 3 March 2017:

• Hawke’s Bay province is noted for fine wines, horticulture and orchards and traditional sheep and cattle pastoral farming

o 20 – 21 February: Registration and measuring

• Tourism attracts many international tourists and some 50 cruise ships visit the Port of Napier every year.

o 22 – 24 February NZ National Championship o 25 February: lay day (additional registration and measuring) o Sunday 26 February – Friday 3 March: World Championship o Friday 3 March: prizegiving and closing dinner. GETTING THERE

• Overseas visitors can fly to New Zealand with most international carriers. • It is then a domestic flight of about an hour from Auckland to Napier, or slightly more than half an hour from Wellington. • By road, the journey from Auckland to Napier is approximately 425km - about 6 hours travel time. Wellington to Napier is a distance of about 325km and driving time is about 4½ hours • It is probable that boats will be shipped by container directly to the Port of Napier, from where the containers will be delivered onto the Napier Sailing Club site, where they can remain for the duration of the World Championships.

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1931 EARTHQUAKE AND THE RISE OF ART DECO

• A magnitude 7.8 earthquake struck the region on 3 February 1931, destroying most of the buildings in central Napier and the nearby town of Hastings. 256 people lost their lives. • The earthquake affected everyone in the Hawke’s Bay province, but some good came out of it, as the land around Napier was upthrust by as much as 3 metres by the massive forces that were generated in the huge earthquake. • Despite the Depression, Napier rose from the ashes with style. Many of the new buildings in the Central Business District were designed by the nation’s premier architects and constructed by the finest artisans who migrated to the area in search of work. • Most of the buildings are in the Art Deco style that had recently evolved in California and, thanks to the combined efforts of the Art Deco Trust and the Napier City Council, many of these buildings have been preserved and now are a major attraction. F LY I N G

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NAPIER SAILING CLUB • The Napier Sailing Club was founded in 1891 and the World Championships will be held during the Club’s 125th Anniversary season. • The 1931 earthquake completely destroyed the Napier Sailing Club. Not only was the clubhouse demolished and the jetty severely damaged, but the 4,000 hectares (10,000 acres) of tidal waters on which the Club raced was uplifted by the earthquake and the seabed rose so high that the whole area became dry land, the middle part of which is now the site of the Napier Airport. • It was only in 1939, after Napier had been rebuilt and the Great Depression had ended, that the Napier Sailing Club was re-established, on a new site at the inshore end of the historic Port Ahuriri. Some boat sheds were constructed on reclaimed land and club racing then took place in the open waters of Hawke Bay. In 1952, a small clubhouse was built, and over

events were Gerald Martin’s woolshed party on his farm and the prize giving dinner that was interrupted when a fire broke out against one of the walls of the War Memorial Hall. • The Napier Sailing Club now has better facilities than it had 25 years ago, Gerald Martin will be at the 21st World Championships as the Principal Race Officer, and the War Memorial Hall is scheduled to re-open in February 2017 after major renovations and extensions, when it will be ready to host the prize giving dinner if required (hopefully without disruption this time).

ART DECO WEEKEND

• February is the busiest month for tourism and related activities in Napier. the following years new boatsheds, pile moorings and other facilities were developed to cater for the growing yacht racing, cruising and recreational fishing activities.

• Commemoration of the 1931 earthquake occurs on its anniversary, on 3 February each year, but it is in the days leading up to and during the third weekend in February that the re-birth of Napier is celebrated.

• In more recent times a new clubhouse was built and subsequently enlarged to meet demand, marina berths and boat launching ramps and pontoons have been developed, and further land has been reclaimed to create a hardstand work area and travel lift facility. • The Napier Sailing Club grounds extend over more than 3.5 hectares (8.5 acres), providing ample space for boats and vehicle parking. With over 1,000 members, the Club is the third-largest yacht club in New Zealand • The Napier Sailing Club hosted the 3rd World Championship back in 1982. Club member Barry Finlayson competed as the defending World Champion, having won the title with crew Ian Norrie two years earlier, at Hayling Island. • Competitors FROM 1982 still have treasured memories of the huge swells and glassy waters that occurred one day, providing unforgettable experiences and some of the most dramatic photographs of Flying Fifteens. Other memorable

• Art Deco Weekend runs from Thursday 16 to Sunday 19 February 2017. This incorporates a great many events, including classic car displays, 1930s themed dances, parades and balls. The vast majority of local people and visitors dress up for the occasion to greater or lesser extents. Some go the “whole hog” with stylish costumes, while others simply don a boater and cravat (for the gentlemen) or slip on a fascinator or large hat and a boa (for the ladies). • It is thoroughly recommended that anyone planning to attend the 2017 World Championships should look to arrive in Napier a few days early, to indulge in the Art Deco Weekend festivities.

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• Within the local area, there are quality golf courses to suit every level of handicap and size of pocket, from the public courses at Awatoto and Mangateretere, to the championships courses at Bridge Pa (near Hastings) and Waiohiki (near Napier), to the world-renowned Cape Kidnappers golf course, which is only a short drive from Napier. For the more adventurous, visits to country golf courses can be organised and there are always opportunities for people to visit farms and other points of interest, all of which can be catered to suit the individual interests. KAPA HAKA FESTIVAL • Coinciding with the first week of the 2017 Championships, Napier and Hastings will host the National Te Matatini Kapa Haka Festival, which will attract as many as 10,000 participants and supporters, who will take part in and attend a wide range of Maori cultural events, covering music, dance, traditional practices and foods and many other activities as well.

The Napier Sailing Club invites all Flying Fifteen Class sailors to come to New Zealand in February 2017, to bring family and friends, to take part in an event that the Club will do everything within its capabilities to make into a memorable occasion.

• While most of the attendees at the Kapa Haka will be hosted by family and friends, this will further increase the demand for accommodation over this period, but will also provide opportunities to attend events and functions, which will have a distinctly Maori flavour. SOCIAL PROGRAMME

• In addition to the Art Deco and Kapa Haka Festival events, it is proposed that functions and outings will be made available to suit everyone’s wishes. Hawke’s Bay is famous for its wines, with the locally produced Chardonnays and Merlots having received many international awards. Within the NapierHastings area, there are a significant number of vineyards with quality restaurants and (needless to say) many opportunities to sample and enjoy the locally grown and produced wines. Local foods are abundant, whether it is beef and lamb from the pasture, fruit and produce from the land, or seafood from Hawke Bay.

Contacts for Further Information: Further information may be obtained by contacting the following: Graeme Robinson Chairman, Organising Committee 2017 Flying Fifteen World Championships Email - gwrobinson@xtra.co.nz

• For competitors, supporters and family, there are many opportunities and options for filling the days (including the lay days), such as visits to the Gannet Colony at Cape Kidnappers riding on a tractor-hauled trailer along the beach or by luxury overland bus to the east, to the bird sanctuary at Ocean Beach to the southeast, or to take in the natural beauty of Shines Falls and the “inland island” or nearby Lake Tutira to the north. Taupo is less than two hours away to the west.

Links: For further information on the Napier Sailing Club, events and accommodation in Napier, and related links, the following are some suggested websites: Napier Sailing Club http://www.napiersailingclub.org.nz/ Napier i-Site, Visitor Information http://www.napiernz.com/ Napier City Council http://www.napier.govt.nz/ Napier Art Deco Trust http://www.artdeconapier.com/ New Zealand Weather Forecast http://www.metservice.com/national/home Hawke Bay Marine Forecast http://www.metservice.com/marine-surf/recreationalmarine/hawke-bay Flying Fifteen New Zealand http://flying15.org.nz/

I N T E R N A T I O N A L

Shelly Te Uki Napier Sailing Club Manager Email - manager@napiersailingclub.org.nz

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Ossie­McCutcheon­Flying­Fifteen­

The

REGATTA­AND­TRAINING­WEEKEND

Run by Flying Fifteen International – Victoria and GLYC November 2015 Ossie McCutcheon Regatta was held at the Gippsland Lakes Yacht Club for 2015. We were fortunate to have Gavin Dagley as the coach for the weekend and the beautiful Gippsland Lakes as the venue to sail on. The weather was very mild but the winds were light to moderate throughout the weekend. On Saturday after registration the information and coaching session was held in the Clubhouse. Gavin had brought a series of videos that focused on starting techniques and the 15 common starting errors which were very informative and provoked a great deal of discussion. The wind was slow to fill in but the fleet was on the water in the afternoon to work on starting skills. Gavin instructed the boats to practice individual starts. It was soon evident that without the cues from a fleet it was more difficult to time a start correctly and it illustrated the importance of practicing individual starts in order to develop better control of the factors leading up to a well-timed fleet start. Following a series of starts the fleet was soon into short windward/leeward races. The afternoon sea breeze had developed so the pressure of close short course racing brought out many strengths and weakness that were captured on video and later analysed and discussed at the club. Sunday was race day and was to start at 9:30am but by the time the boats had drifted around the committee boat for an hour it was decided to stop for an early lunch. Fortunately, the afternoon sea breeze slowly began to fill in. With the full consensus of all competitors the last race start time limit was moved from 2pm to 3pm and enabled all 5 races to be completed. The first three races were sailed in light conditions with the wind building to a moderate breeze for the last two races of the day. Each race was closely contested. Dale Collings and Warren Slater in “Aussie Falcon” started with a win in race 1 followed closely by Jim Callahan and Rod Gardiner in “Impulse” and Brian Carol and Kelvin Brown in “Supertoy Plays On”. Peter Milne and Phillip Dubbin in “Lapse

of Reality” (current Victorian Champions) found a burst of speed in the medium conditions to win heats 2 & 3. With the breeze building Dale and Warren came back a win in race 4 setting the scene for a final Medal Race showdown. Going into the last race, which if completed would allow 1 drop, Dale and Warren were on 5 points (after 1 drop) closely followed by Peter and Phillip on 6 points (with 1 drop) equal with Jim and Rod. At the first rounding of the Last race had Peter in the lead closely followed by Jim then Dale. Dale quickly set himself up on the inside for a Port Gate rounding with the building breeze on the right for the next upwind. Jim followed Dale to the right but Peter took the Starboard Gate and went out left giving the lead away. Peter and Phillip would subsequently have spinnaker gear problems and had to withdraw from the last race. Trevor Williams and Ian Rainey followed up their second in race 4 with another second in the last race with Jim being held out at the final finish by Michael Clark and Keith HaySmith (the steady improvers for this regatta) to sneak into 3rd in the final race. Full results can be found at http://www.sailres.com/view.php?s=417. After the boats were off the water, Gavin showed the videos of the races and discussed sail trim, boat handling and other points of interests. At presentation Dale and Warren took home the winning trophy and Peter Milne and Philip Dubbin took the Handicap trophy. The Gippsland Lakes Yacht Club did an excellent job of race management under the direction of James Frecherville and his team. Though the fleet was only made up of six registered boats the learning experience and the individual attention by Gavin was invaluable. It is unfortunate that more Flying Fifteen members did not avail themselves of the excellent training opportunity and hospitality so plan on being there next year. Thank you to everyone who helped with the planning and organization. Written by Jim Callahan, edited by Dale Collings

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FF World January 2016  

The magazine of the Flying 15 Association; the original Sports Boat. Raced in countries around the world.

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