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$2.95 • OCTOBER 10, 2019 71ST YEAR • NO. 19

Reno Air Races

PERIODICALS - TIME-SENSITIVE DATED MATERIALS

The first HARRAH Every Student Flies 3 ways to buy used LSA Tackling spatial disorientation


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General Aviation News —  800.426.8538

October 10, 2019


October 10, 2019

www.GeneralAviationNews.com — facebook.com/ganews

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The TOC EDITORIAL Janice Wood, Editor Janice@GeneralAviationNews.com

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CONTRIBUTING WRITERS Jamie Beckett • Theron Burton William E. Dubois • Joni M. Fisher Dan Johnson • Frederick Johnsen Jeffrey Madison • Paul McBride Amelia T. Reiheld • Tom Snow Ben Visser • Bill Walker ADVERTISING & SUBSCRIPTIONS Ben Sclair, Publisher Ben@GeneralAviationNews.com PRODUCTION & WEB DEVELOPMENT Russell Kasselman Russell@GeneralAviationNews.com GENERAL CONTACT Phone: 800-426-8538 || 253-471-9888 Fax: 253-471-9888 Internet: www.generalaviationnews.com Social: twitter.com/genavnews facebook.com/ganews General Aviation News accepts unsolicited editorial manuscripts and photos but is not responsible for return unless submissions are accompanied by a stamped, selfaddressed envelope. READER INFORMATION General Aviation News makes its subscription list available to other companies for their products and services. To be excluded from such offers, send a copy of your mailing label to General Aviation News, Attn: Mail Preference Service, PO Box 39099, Lakewood WA 98496. General Aviation News – a publication of Flyer Media, Inc. – endeavors to accept only reliable advertisements, but shall not be responsible for advertisements nor are the views expressed in those advertisements necessarily those of General Aviation News. The right to decline or discontinue any ad without explanation is reserved. General Aviation News (ISSN 1536 8513) is published semimonthly by Flyer Media, Inc., 5409 100th St. SW #39099, Lakewood, WA 98496-0099. Periodicals Postage Paid at Lakewood, Washington, and additional mailing offices. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to General Aviation News, 5409 100th St. SW #39099, Lakewood, WA 98496-0099. Publications mail agreement number 40648085. Return undeliverable Canadian addresses to P.O. Box 1051, Fort Erie, ON L2A 6C7. Courier delivery: 5409 100th St SW #39099, Lakewood, WA 98496.

General Aviation News • 71st Year, No. 19 • October 10, 2019 • © 2019 Flyer Media, Inc. • All Rights Reserved.

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CC# Exp. MasterCard or VISA only Mail form to 5409 100th St. SW #39099, Lakewood, WA 98496-0099 Please allow 4-6 weeks for delivery of first issue. Canada - add $10 additional postage per year. The subscription rate is $85 per year for countries outside of Canada and Mexico. All payments in U.S. dollars.

Photo by James W. Roberts

This 1938 Ryan SCW made the annual pilgrimage to Blakesburg, Iowa, for the Antique Airplane Association’s annual fly-in.

News

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6....... Every Student Flies 6....... Build and Fly program for RC aircraft takes off 8....... Only 44% of GA aircraft equipped with ADS-B 9....... Flirtey introduces new delivery drone 12..... Iowa aviation school finds a new home 13..... Flight Safety Detectives podcast debuts 14..... Tackling spatial disorientation 16..... Drone prices hit by tariffs 20..... The first HARRAH

Columnists 10..... TOUCH & GO NBAA opens a gate in the fence 11..... POLITICS FOR PILOTS Connection + conversation = conversion 17..... ASK PAUL: Will this engine work in a Velocity? 18..... OF WINGS & THINGS Commandos go civilian 26..... SPLOG 3 ways to buy a used LSA

On Final 27..... Accident Reports 30..... New Products 36..... Aviation Classifieds

Photo by Gerald Balzer collection

This brightly painted C-46 was one of many that was used in civilian freight hauling.

COVER SHOT Dennis Sanders in Race 8 “Dreadnought” was the winner in the Gold Final at the 2019 Reno Air Races at 403.274 mph, the fourth championship for the airplane that is affectionately referred to as “The Buick.” Cover Photo by Bradley Orr.

NOTICE: The next issue will be mailed Oct. 24, 2019.


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General Aviation News —  800.426.8538

October 10, 2019

Leading Image

Photo by Eric Dumigan

Eric Dumigan submitted this photo and note: “Geoff Armstrong and Trevor Rafferty flying Upright Aviation Academy’s Extra 300 over Toronto.”

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October 10, 2019

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Briefing Cirrus Aircraft has unveiled the TRAC Series, a line of aircraft developed specifically for flight training (pictured). CirrusAircraft.com

flown by their owners through a collaboration with Air Fleet Capital. NBTBank.com Applications are now open for the Flying Musicians Association Solo Scholarship program, which takes high school musicians from zero hours to solo. Nominations must be made by music teachers by Jan. 31, 2020. FlyingMusicians.org

Piper Aircraft’s first group of apprentices have begun their two-year program. The nine apprentices shadow skilled aircraft assembly workers and learn all aspects of fabrication and assembly of aircraft during the two-year initiative, as well as attend technical classes and receive hands-on training. Piper.com Texas Aircraft Manufacturing’s Colt Light Sport Aircraft has received FAA approval under ASTM standards as a Special-LSA. TexasAircraft.com Aviation Safety Resources, which manufactures emergency recovery systems for aircraft, has opened a new facility in Nicholasville, Kentucky. AviationSafetyResources.com Blue Line Aviation, a flight school near Raleigh, N.C., has broken ground

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on a new training facility at Johnston Regional Airport (KJNX). The $13 million project is expected to be finished in late 2020, when Blue Line will officially move its headquarters from Raleigh-Durham International Airport (KRDU), where it has been since its founding in 2012. BlueLineAviationLLC.com

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Aircraft Spruce officially opened its new Midwest facility in West Chicago in September. AircraftSpruce.com NBT Bank in Manchester, N.H., recently introduced small aircraft financing to its lineup of lending products, offering loans for single and twin-engine planes

Lee Lauderback, the founder of Stallion 51 and the pilot who has logged the most hours flying the P-51 Mustang, is the 2019 recipient of the Bob Hoover Award of Aviation Excellence. The award is intended to “shine a spotlight on those who are doing outstanding work to advance and magnify aviation’s future,” according to officials of the Bob Hoover Legacy Foundation. Lauderback has logged more than 10,000 hours in the P-51. BobHooverLegacyFoundation.org, Stallion51.com Find expanded versions of these news briefs on www.gan.aero

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General Aviation News —  800.426.8538

October 10, 2019

Every Student Flies The Aspen Flight Academy in Aspen, Colorado, is launching “Every Student Flies,” which will provide a free flight lesson to every student at the Aspen Public High School. That’s 556 students, according to officials. Each student will be offered a free flight lesson with a CFI in a Diamond DA40. After the flight, students will be given a private tour of the Aspen/Pitkin County Airport’s Air Traffic Control tower, along with tours of aviation companies on the airfield. An educational package will be offered to each student containing a wealth of information on higher education and career opportunities in all fields of aviation, including piloting, air traffic control, aircraft maintenance, airport management, and more, according to organizers. Free flights are also being offered to the high school’s teachers and administrative staff, to enable them to share with their students the experience of flying in a small aircraft. The Every Student Flies program was created by Captain Michael Pearce, a Boeing 777 pilot for American Airlines

Photo by Diamond Aircraft

A Diamond DA40. and president of the Aspen Flight Academy’s Board of Directors. “We are excited to launch this one-ofa-kind program to offer every Aspen High School student the chance to experience

flight and learn about careers in aviation,” he said. “Our hope is that other public high schools across the country will be excited about our program and look into doing the same in their communities.”

Pearce worked with Diamond Aircraft CEO Scott McFadzean to craft a longterm purchase agreement. Two DA40NG aircraft will be provided to the Aspen Flight Academy every year for 10 years to support this program, ensuring the high school students are flying new aircraft. The 10-year agreement is valued at more than $11 million, officials said. “Encouraging young talent in aviation is a cause we truly believe in at Diamond Aircraft,” said McFadzean. “Every Student Flies is a powerful initiative which will positively impact many young lives and our industry for years to come.” The program will be managed by Kate Short, the Director of Aviation for the Aspen School District. “This program is unique in that we are able to offer these experiences to public high school students at no cost to their families,” said Short, who is also a CFI. The Aspen Flight Academy, Aspen Education Foundation, Aspen School District, and The BettyFlies Foundation joined forces to develop and fund this initiative. AspenFlightAcademy.org

Build and Fly program for RC aircraft takes off

Photo by Connor Madison

The eKadet kit.

The Experimental Aircraft Association and Academy of Model Aeronautics have joined forces to create the new “Young Eagles Build and Fly” program to get kids involved in hands-on building and flying of radio-control aircraft. The initiative provides EAA chapters the opportunity to purchase a specially designed SIG LT-40 eKadet kit, which includes all building materials, electronics, and accessories to complete and fly the radio-controlled model. Thanks to support from the Burgher Fund and discounts provided by SIG Manufacturing and Horizon Hobby, the complete project is available to EAA chapters for $500, approximately one-

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third the usual retail price. “The Build and Fly program meets the challenges of providing hands-on engagement for youth who have an interest in flight,” said Rick Larsen, EAA’s vice president of publications, programs, and marketing. “Fundamental building skills, aircraft design, theory of flight, and flight training are all involved in a fun project that supplies a true sense of accomplishment when completed. It is also another ‘next step’ possibility for Young Eagles who are flown by EAA chapters throughout the country.” EAA chapters will partner with their local AMA club to create a “build project” and a learn-to-fly program for interested kids, according to EAA officials. The LT-40 eKadet is an American-designed and manufactured kit that, when completed, has a nearly 6’ wingspan that can be flown at AMA club flying fields. EAA.org, ModelAircraft.org

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Univair Has Parts For Your Classic Piper FREE SHIPPING on orders over $300. FREE FREIGHT on orders over $3,000. Restrictions apply – see our website for details.

Landing Gear

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All landing gears are sold uncovered. J-5 Landing Gear Vee, Left ........................................U30452-000 ........ $875.46 Right ....................................................................U30452-001 ........ $875.46 PA-12 Landing Gear, Left ..........................................U10028-000 .....$1,402.92 Right ....................................................................U10028-001 .....$1,402.92 PA-14 Landing Gear, Left ....................................... U11353-000A .....$1,507.90 Right ................................................................. U11353-001A .....$1,507.90 PA-15/17 Landing Gear Vee, Left ..............................U11554-000 .....$1,029.90 Right ....................................................................U11554-001 .....$1,029.90 J-3, PA-11, PA-18 Landing Gear, Right .....................U10033-005 ........ $722.56 Left ......................................................................U10033-006 ........ $754.98 PA-18 Heavy Duty Landing Gear, Right ................L10033-007HD ........ $947.34 Left ..................................................................L10033-008HD ........ $947.34 PA-20 Landing Gear, Left .......................................... L13189-000 .....$1,583.44 Right .................................................................... L13189-001 .....$1,583.44 PA-22 Landing Gear Vee, Left ...................................U13016-000 .....$1,621.92 Right ....................................................................U13016-021 .....$1,621.92

PA-12/14 Nose Cowl .................................................U10189-000 .....$1,591.69 PA-12 Bottom Cowl ..................................................U10698-000 ........ $287.44 PA-12 Top Cowl ........................................................U10699-000 ........ $172.48 PA-12 Fuselage Cowl* ..............................................U10691-000 .....$1,061.38 PA-12 Left Side Cowl ................................................U10701-000 ........ $452.70 PA-12 Right Side Cowl ..............................................U10701-001 ........ $452.70 *Must be sent motor freight; additional crating charges CR-BC312 apply

Piper Pulleys

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Standard Shock Cords FAA/PMA

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J-2, J-3 serial numbers 1 to 8277 .............................U30462-002 .......... $38.23 J-5 ............................................................................U30462-002 .......... $38.23 J-3 serial numbers 8278 and up ...............................U31322-005 .......... $30.58 PA-11, PA-15, PA-17.................................................U31322-000 .......... $39.27 PA-12, PA-14 ............................................................U31322-000 .......... $39.27 PA-16 .......................................................................U31322-002 .......... $29.97 PA-18 serial numbers 1 to 3013 ...............................U31322-005 .......... $30.58 PA-18 “135” with hydrasorb unit on serial numbers 3014 and up ..........................................U31322-005 .......... $30.58 PA-18 “150”..............................................................U31322-005 .......... $30.58 PA-18A with standard shock strut on serial numbers 1 to 3013 ................................U31322-005 .......... $30.58 PA-18A with hydrasorb unit on restricted category planes with serial numbers 2187 to 3013................................U31322-005 .......... $30.58 PA-18A with hydrasorb unit on serial numbers 3014 and up ............................U31322-005 .......... $30.58 PA-18 with hydrasorb unit on serial numbers 1 to 3013 .................................U31322-006 .......... $34.03 PA-18 “95” with hydrasorb unit on serial numbers 3014 and up ............................U31322-006 .......... $34.03 PA-18A with hydrasorb unit on serial numbers 1 to 2186 .................................U31322-006 .......... $34.03 PA-20 (1952 and later models).................................U31322-006 .......... $34.03 PA-22 .......................................................................U31322-006 .......... $34.03 PA-22-108 ................................................................U31322-002 .......... $29.97 PA-25 (235-260) ......................................................U31322-006 .......... $34.03 PA-24 .......................................................................U31322-007 .......... $24.02

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Description O.D. • I.D. Part # Price 1) Pulley (Fiber) ....................2¾ inch • 3⁄8 inch ..........U41171-000 ....... $63.49 2) Pulley (Fiber) ....................2¾ inch • 3⁄8 inch ..........U40991-000 ....... $15.07 3) Pulley (Fiber) ...................2¾ inch • 5⁄16 inch .........U41001-008 ....... $52.33 4) Pulley (Fiber) ....................1¾ inch • ¼ inch ..........U80421-000 ......... $9.31 5) Pulley (Fiber) ....................1½ inch • ¼ inch ..............U481-609 ......... $8.59 6) Pulley (Fiber) ..................... 1 inch • ¼ inch ............U43001-000 ....... $14.97 7) Pulley (Aluminum)............2¾ inch • 3⁄8 inch ..........U43061-000 ....... $99.09 8) Pulley (Aluminum)............2¾ inch • 3⁄8 inch ..........U10080-000 ..... $131.26 9) Pulley (Aluminum)............. 4 inch • 3⁄8 inch ............U11008-000 ..... $153.88

Piper Hub Caps • For Piper J-3, J-4, J-5, PA-11, PA-18 • Stamped metal, not plastic! Steel • For original 8.00 x 4 Goodrich wheels • Raised lettering, stamped “CUB” Stamped with “CUB”............ U31702-000 ........$34.41 Plain (Primed Only) ............. U31702-002 ........$29.78 Aluminum • For 6.00 x 6 Cleveland conversion wheels • Raised lettering, stamped “CUB” Stamped with “CUB”................ U1680-00 ........$29.98 Plain (Bare Aluminum)............ U1680-02 ........$27.98

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FAA/PMA

Nose Ribs ............................................................................ Priced from $24.46 ¾ Ribs ................................................................................. Priced from $85.92 Full Ribs ............................................................................ Priced from $104.17 Tank Bay Ribs .................................................................... Priced from $129.61 Tip Ribs ............................................................................... Priced from $94.26

Wing Spars

FAA/PMA

For PA-15 and PA-17 Rear Spar, Left ..........................................................U11515-002 ........ $578.31 Right ....................................................................U11515-003 ........ $578.31 Front Spar, Left .........................................................U11516-002 ........ $578.31 Right ....................................................................U11516-003 ........ $578.31 For PA-16 Rear Spar, Left ..........................................................U11754-002 ........ $596.02 Right ....................................................................U11754-003 ........ $596.02 Front Spar, Left .........................................................U11753-002 ........ $552.96 Right ....................................................................U11753-003 ........ $616.88 For J-5C (Metal Spars) Rear Spar, Left ..........................................................U14823-002 ........ $392.98 Right ....................................................................U14823-003 ........ $392.98 Front Spar, Left .........................................................U14753-002 ........ $441.64 Right ....................................................................U14753-003 ........ $441.64

Tailwheel Spring Assemblies

FAA/PMA

Additional tailwheel springs available on our website. J-3, PA-11 Complete Set ............................................... J3TWSHR ........ $145.18 Tailwheel Spring, Top Leaf ....................................U30522-000 .......... $42.04 Tailwheel Spring, Middle Leaf ..............................U30512-002 .......... $50.45 Tailwheel Spring, Main Leaf .................................U30512-004 .......... $52.42 J-5 Spring Assembly ..................................................... J3TWSHR ........ $145.18 PA-12 Complete Spring Set for Hard Rubber Tailwheel ............................................. J3TWSHR ........ $145.18 PA-12 Complete Spring Set for Pneumatic Tailwheel ........................................PA12TWSPNEU ........ $148.09 PA-15 Spring Assembly (PA15TWS).............................. PA17TWS ........ $109.31 PA-16 Spring Assembly, SN 1 to 272..........................PA16TWS4L ........ $185.75 PA-16 Spring Assembly, SN 273 and up .....................PA18TWS4L ........ $170.69 PA-17 Spring Assembly ................................................ PA17TWS ........ $109.31 PA-18, -18A Heavy Duty 4-Leaf Set, For SN 1707 and up For Hard Rubber Tailwheel ....................................PA18TWS4L ........ $170.69 For Pneumatic Tailwheel ................................... PA18TWS4L-1 ........ $195.63 PA-18, -18A Standard 3-Leaf Set For Hard Rubber Tailwheel ...................................PA18TWSHR ........ $165.92 For Pneumatic Scott/Maule Tailwheel ..............PA18TWSPNEU ........ $165.92

Free Catalog Call us or visit our website to request your free Univair catalog. Foreign orders pay postage. Download also available from www.univair.com.

ALL MERCHANDISE IS SOLD F.O.B., AURORA, CO • PRICE AND AVAILABILITY SUBJECT TO CHANGE WITHOUT NOTICE • 09-03-19


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General Aviation News —  800.426.8538

October 10, 2019

Only 44% of GA aircraft have ADS-B A recent report from the Department of Transportation’s Inspector General’s Office states that just 44% of general aviation aircraft are equipped with ADS-B Out, with just months remaining before the Jan. 1, 2020 mandate. The report notes that: • 44% of general aviation aircraft (62,494 of 143,322) that are estimated to equip with ADS-B Out  have done so. This segment of aircraft owners has been slow to equip and has seen only a 56% increase in equipage since May 1, 2018. • 63% of higher-end turbojet and turboprop aircraft (14,166 of 22,596) estimated to equip have done so. • Conversely, only 40% of the sin-

gle- and multi-engine piston aircraft (48,328 of 120,726) estimated to equip have done so. For its audit, the IG’s office reviewed monthly data collected by the FAA and MITRE from May 1, 2018, through June 1, 2019, regarding ADS-B Out  equipage rates of commercial and general aviation aircraft. Officials also conducted interviews with FAA representatives, MITRE, and industry stakeholders. The report was put together at the request of Chairmen Bill Shuster and Frank LoBiondo of the House Committee on Transportation and Infrastructure and its Aviation Subcommittee, who cited concerns that aircraft owners wouldn’t meet

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the 2020 deadline. “Overall, we found that ADSB Out  equipage is increasing,” Inspector General Calvin L. Scovel III noted in a letter to Congress that accompanied the report. “As of June 1, 2019, 73,421 commercial, international, and general aviation aircraft were in compliance with the ADS-BOut mandate, an increase of nearly 69% since May 1, 2018.” However, he added, equipage rates vary by segment of the industry. Commercial operators have higher equipage rates than general aviation. While 76% of commercial operators have equipped their aircraft with ADS-B  Out, only 44% of general aviation operators have equipped their aircraft with the technology. Mainline and regional commercial carriers are equipping at a higher rate than smaller commercial carriers. ADS-B Out equipage rates at mainline

(81%) and regional (73%) carriers have more than doubled since May 1, 2018. However, equipage at smaller commercial operators is lagging, with only 44% of the fleet equipped. Equipage rates varies among GA operators. While 63% of higher-end turbojet and turboprop operators estimated to equip with ADS-B  have done so, only 40% of single- and multi-engine piston operators estimated to equip have done so. In his letter to Congress, Scovel notes that these are preliminary results of the audit, with the audit expected to be complete this winter. Included in the complete audit will be specific requests from Congress, including: • Determine the equipage rates for ADSB and other NextGen-enabling technologies  on commercial and general aviation aircraft. • Ascertain the reasons behind aircraft operators’ decisions to equip or not equip with these technologies. • Assess the FAA’s and aircraft operators’ plans to meet the 2020 ADSB Out equipage deadline. To find out more about ADS-B, go to FAA.gov/NextGen/Programs/ADSB/ FAQ.

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Drone deliveries to begin this year Flirtey has unveiled a new delivery drone, the Flirtey Eagle, with the company expecting customer deliveries to begin in 2019. The company also released a video of its first delivery drone making consumer and automated external defibrillator (AED) deliveries to customer homes. You can see it on YouTube. According to Matthew Sweeny, Flirtey’s founder and CEO, the new drone is designed to “safely get packages to customers with the delivery goal of less than 10 minutes.” Along with the introduction of the drone, Flirtey also unveiled the Flirtey Portal, a takeoff and landing platform that fits into one parking space, making it easily scalable to the company’s partners for store-to-door delivery. The company also introduced an autonomous software platform, which has received FAA approval for the first multidrone delivery operation in the United States. This software platform enables a single remote pilot to simultaneously oversee 10 Flirtey drones, company officials note. According to company officials: • Flirtey’s drone is designed to operate in 95% of wind and weather conditions • “If it fits, it flies.” The Flirtey Eagle is designed to fit 75% of packages that get delivered to its customers’ homes during last-mile deliveries

Photo by Flirtey

The new drone making a delivery to a customer.

• The Flirtey Eagle delivers its contents by lowering a tether, while the drone is suspended in air, and once the package is delivered, it then retracts the tether. Flirtey’s regulatory approvals include: • Approval to conduct multi-drone delivery operations, enabling a single remote pilot to simultaneously oversee 10 Flirtey drones • Approval to conduct drone delivery flights beyond visual line of sight (BVLOS), enabling Flirtey to conduct drone delivery operations with a pilot controlling the flights from a remote location • Approval to conduct drone delivery flights at night. Flirtey.com

Photo by Flirtey

The new Flirtey drone and company founder Matthew Sweeny.


10

General Aviation News —  800.426.8538

October 10, 2019

NBAA opens a gate in the fence Ben Sclair Touch & Go

Later this month, the National Business Aviation Association (NBAA) will host its annual Business Aviation Convention & Exhibition in Las Vegas. Oct. 22-24, to be exact. New this year will be the roll-out of the “Professional Member” category. Within the Professional Member category are four sub-categories: • Professional: “Any person with a pervasive interest in business aviation who independently contracts with the business aviation community, including contract pilots, flight attendants, maintenance personnel, and similar functions.” • Aspiring Professional: “Recent graduates, current and former military, persons not currently employed.” • Retired Professional: “Any person previously employed in business aviation.” • Students: “Anyone currently enrolled in a high school, college or vocational Ben Sclair is Publisher. He can be reached at ben@generalaviationnews.com.

program.” NBAA has always been about business. It says so in its name. But this new membership category goes a step further. “NBAA has developed a suite of member benefits for these Professional Members in an effort to help those exploring business aviation careers to establish and grow their network within the community,” said Patrick Haller, NBAA director for membership and member services. “We hope these new resources and membership options will attract a new generation to business aviation and guide them toward success.” Historically, if you were employed by a business that serviced the business aviation industry or if your business owned and operated aircraft to further your business goals, you could join NBAA. Without either of those connectors, you were out of luck. Effectively, Jane or John Q Pilot were outside the fence, looking in. No more. Smartly, NBAA has chosen to open up its membership — and, along the way, its myriad networking opportunities. That

and center. While there is no doubt many would-be pilots and maintainers seek employment in the airline industry, a good many seek the same career at a different target company. Bravo to NBAA for inviting a whole new crop of individuals inside the fence. NBAA.org

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LETTERS TO THE EDITOR OLD IRONSIDE 2

I enjoyed reading Frederick A. Johnsen’s Of Wings & Things column, “Lockheed Constitution on the cusp of change” in the Sept. 5 issue. It’s been a long time since I have seen an article on it. My father was the last owner of XR60 164 that was, unfortunately, ordered scrapped by the city of Opa Locka. He moved the plane out of the airport with plans to make it into a museum and restaurant. I sent you a photo of one of the Curtiss electric prop blades that remained. I own a piece of the stair railing from the first airplane 163 that was destroyed by Howard Hughes in 1969. As of six years ago there was still an ashtray and logbook from that airplane showcased in the lobby of McCarren Airport in Las Vegas. Thank you again for talking about “Old Ironside 2” as they were once called. FRANK SOSA via email

gate in the fence? Just swung wide open. Like most things in aviation, that gate key comes with a cost. Frankly, as it should. The Professional member will shell out $295 a year, while both Aspiring and Retired Professionals will pay $95. Students will outlay just $25. For students, $25 is a small price to pay to keep that dream front

STUPID PILOT TRICKS

Photo by Frank Sosa

Re: The NTSB Accident Report, “Fuel exhaustion leads to forced landing,” in the Sept. 5 issue: Talk about “Stupid Pilot Tricks.” During preflight he “perceived” the tanks were full, but did not actually check them assuming they had been filled after the previous flight (who ever made it). And then after four hours of flight he finally looked at the fuel gauges and noticed that the quantity was low, just moments before he ran out of fuel. Since this was a low-wing aircraft it would seem that he had to switch tanks at some point during the flight, which usually involves looking at the fuel gauges. That is unless some form of header tank allowed him to draw from both tanks simultaneously, but I am not sure if that can be done. This would have to be about the most careless attitude I have heard of in a case of fuel exhaustion that was not triggered by some mechanical fault and it was certainly the most preventable.

I hate to say it, but maybe this guy needs to have his certificate revoked because it seems obvious he is unable, or unwilling, to follow the most basic safety related procedures related to his flying. SARAH A. via GeneralAviationNews.com 1. This costs us all in higher insurance rates, thank you very much! 2. We should identify the perpetrators of this dastardly deed every time it happens. Maybe the embarrassment of having your name plastered across the country when something foolish like this happens will make people stop and think before they assume something. 3. I don’t like a lot of regulations, but if you RUN OUT OF GAS, you should have to forfeit your pilot certificate. RANDY COLLER via GeneralAviationNews.com Maybe we should start a list of all the LETTERS | See Page 11


October 10, 2019

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Connection + conversation = conversion Jamie Beckett Politics for Pilots

Two weeks ago a high school teacher asked if I could come speak to the students taking his aerospace class. Always being up for a good time, I agreed. Wow. Just wow, am I glad I did. The students turned out to be a group of more than 100 teenagers spread over five class periods. Their level of interest ranged from open disinterest, to absolute fascination, with a lot of casual curiosity in between. At least a quarter of the students filling the seats in front of me were motivated enough to give the impression they might really become pilots, or mechanics, and possibly even an engineer or two. In a couple cases, I could see them pursuing all three options. It was a good day, let me tell you. During the third, or maybe it was the fourth, class period of the day, I noticed one particular student went out of his way to sit far back in the classroom. He appeared to fall into the casually interested category, but with a real possibility of shifting into the openly disinterested group. Initially his eyes spent far more time perusing the floor and the ceiling than they lingered on me. However, as the discussion continued through the class period, that changed. He began to ask questions. Quite a few questions, in fact. Some were practical, some were a bit odd. But none of them were out of line for a kid who is in the midst of having an epiphany. By the end of the class he made his way to where I Jamie Beckett is the AOPA Ambassador in Florida. A dedicated aviation advocate, you can reach him at: Jamie@GeneralAviationNews.com

LETTERS | From Page 10 people who run out of fuel, print their names very clearly, and submit it to insurance companies, so at the time of renewal the insurance companies will have some real facts on these people instead of some phony stats. Perhaps after these people start paying more for insurance year after year it will make sense to them not to run out of fuel. It seems that when it starts costing people money or time in jail, it makes an impression on people and they start paying attention, which is good. Otherwise it may cost

was, shook hands, and asked if I was serious about being willing to take students flying. I assured him I was. I am. I will continue to be willing. In fact, that exact experience is one of the great joys of my work. Taking students on their first flight, letting them see the world from above while putting the controls of a single-engine airplane in their hands gives me at least as much of a rush as it gives them. And then he was gone. Shuffling off to his next class, as a new contingent of students shuffled in. The process repeated itself until the last bell of the day rang out. I do this sort of thing from time to time. I enjoy it, too. And sometimes a kid follows up. More often, his or her parents follow up. We get to go flying or at least we have the chance to meet up at a local coffee shop to continue the conversation. This time, it was a bit different. My phone began buzzing at dinnertime. I let that first call go. It buzzed again half an hour later. I missed that one because I was already on the phone chatting with someone else. When we wrapped up that conversation I called back to connect with the missed caller. Man, am I glad I did.  It was a woman. The mother of one of the kids I spoke to earlier in the day. With great excitement she told me that her son had called as soon as he got out of school, while she was still at work, to tell her he knew what he wanted to be. He wanted to be a pilot.  She was clearly overjoyed. She explained that she’d pulled her son from a big city school system more than 200 miles south of where I met him. It was too dangerous for him there, she said. The schools weren’t getting the job done. So, she sent him to live with his sister and grandfather in a town where the high plenty at the end, way too much... Some people have to be led by the hand and spanked on occasion in order to get their attention. Sorry, but those are the facts… JOE HENRY GUTIERREZ via GeneralAviationNews.com

A SOARING LEGACY

Re: Puckett Field’s soaring legacy in the Aug. 22 issue: I was fortunate enough to have had Garland Pack instruct me in the TG-3. He was the FAA examiner and also gave me my glider add-on flight test in

It’s something special when bored kids start to become interested. school has just this year begun offering aerospace as an elective class. Happenstance. Nothing more than happenstance. Near tears she told me her son had never shown a serious interest in anything before. Never. But now he was fired up. Truly motivated. Was I really willing to take him to the airport, show him around, and let him fly an airplane? Yes, I would be happy to. Two days later her son, his grandfather, a friend he’d made at school and the second kid’s father all met with me at the airport FBO. Thunderstorms were lying just off the end of the runway. It was no time to fly. But it was a great time to visit the hangar, let the kids sit in the front seats, talk them through the controls and instrumentation, and explain to the grandfather and father that aviation really was within the reach of these two excited kids, if they chose to pursue it.  Then the question popped up. “If I start learning to fly now, when will I be done with school?” This from a kid who has never shown an interest in education before. A kid with tattoos down both arms from shoulder to wrist. A kid who bears

absolutely no resemblance to Lindbergh, or Armstrong, and talks with an affectation that says, “I’m from the big city, ya’ know.” “Well,” I answered honestly. “If you wanted to be a private pilot you could be finished by the end of this school year, easy.” He nodded to indicate he understood. “But you said you wanted to be a professional pilot. If you fly for a living, education becomes a lifelong requirement. You’ll be going to school, taking tests, participating in check-rides, and learning new equipment and procedures for the rest of your career.” He continued nodding. Made eye contact with his grandfather, gave a slight nod, and asked, “So, when can we go flying?” And just like that, inspiration, motivation, and aspiration all combined in the noggin of one young man. He’s seen the path. Now all he has to do is follow it. At the other end is a life and an experience he never knew was available to him. Yet it is. I wonder how many kids he’ll tell and how many of them will catch the bug as a result? More than one, I’m sure of that.

Lewisburg during his year there. Bill McFarlane also had his turn to correct me in his inimitable way and also would pass an occasional word of praise. There are many fond memories during all of these years and I have made lifelong friends. This article captured the story wonderfully well. TED WILSON via GeneralAviationNews.com

All prospective pilots should be required to solo a glider before a piston powered airplane. My sons were so required, despite their impatience, and have long voiced their gratitude. Possibly the most valuable result is the habit of almost never looking at anything inside the cockpit, resulting in a much higher level of safety and enjoyment than the government’s teachings of putting the windows all over the instrument panel. Ridiculous! DON DRAPER, ATP via GeneralAviationNews.com

Nothing teaches basic flight control and approach path coordination as well as a quiet glider.


12

General Aviation News —  800.426.8538

October 10, 2019

Iowa aviation school finds a new home It’s not every day you see large aircraft moving through your city streets, but the construction of a new training facility for the Des Moines Aviation Technology Academy led to the ground transfer of several helicopters and airplanes. In operation since 1943, the Des Moines Aviation Technology Academy recently lost its lease at the Des Moines Airport. The program was faced with eliminating the FAA-approved aviation program or building its own hangar. A $3.5 million referendum produced an off-site building with a main hangar, mechanical shop, tool and equipment rooms, four classrooms, and office space. “There’s been 100% support to keep the program alive,” says Tim Harmer, an aviation technology instructor with the program. “With the new facility, we’ll be able to accommodate up to 120 students or more, because it’s larger. We are also able to store more aircraft and we’ve expanded the pilot side of the program by adding Redbird fully enclosed MCX and MX2 flight simulators.” The academy has a hangar full of aircraft, including a Bell “Huey” AH-1 Cobra helicopter, an OH58 Jet Ranger helicopter, a Learjet Model 35A, a Mitsubishi MU2 twin-engine turboprop, a Stinson,

Photo by Schweiss Doors

The academy has a hangar full of aircraft that include a Bell “Huey” AH-1 Cobra helicopter, OH58 Jet Ranger Helicopter, Learjet Model 35A, Mitsubishi MU2 twin-engine turboprop, a Stinson and Cessna 172RG and a Cessna 310. Cessna 172RG, and a Cessna 310. The program is divided into four categories: General, airframe, powerplant, and pilot training. The program also is offered to adults and students from other school districts who are interested in aviation. Harmer, a teacher at the aviation acad-

emy for four years, is a CFI who previously worked as an emergency medical service helicopter and commercial pilot and mechanic. He also served 16 years in the Iowa National Guard. He is assisted by up to four other instructors who can be called in to teach aircraft airframe mechanics and ground school. “We produce federally licensed gradu-

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ates in a program that starts in 10th grade,” he says. “Being that all the classes here are federal level and for college credit, all the high school students get college credits, as well as federal recognition in order to receive their aircraft mechanics license. Because of that, it also has to be open to adults. Our oldest student is 71. Next year, we will open the program up to ninth graders. It doesn’t cost veterans a dime to come here and some of our students have gone on to join the military.” Until recently, the program was heavily focused on the mechanical side of operating aircraft. The aircraft are all flyable, but will never actually take off. Harmer says they are kept in flying condition for the students’ learning benefit. In addition to their high school credits, students in the pilot class can earn up to 44 college credits, up to 72 hours in the flight simulator, and potentially save $7,000 in education expenses. That adds up to three-fourths of an associate degree and A&P Mechanics License completed before they graduate high school, according to school officials. The school’s new 100’ by 96’ hangar features a hydraulic door from Schweiss Doors. CentralCampus.DMSchools.org/ Transportation/Aviation

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Flight Safety Detectives podcast debuts John Goglia and Gregory Feith are two of aviation’s most well-known and outspoken aviation safety insiders. In their new podcast, “Flight Safety Detectives,” they discuss a wide range of aviation issues, as well as provide listeners with the “backstories” that are important to the flying public and the aviation industry.   Goglia and Feith talk about technical aspects of aviation and aerospace incidents and accidents, as well as bluntly discuss the “politics” and policies behind many issues that can mean life or death in the skies. In addition, they inform listeners about technologies and improvements in the industry that make aviation the safest form

of transportation today. Goglia has more than 60 years in the aviation safety business. He is the only airframe and powerplant mechanic to get a presidential appointment as an  NTSB board member. Feith  is a former NTSB Senior Air Safety Investigator and “Go-Team” captain. He has more than 40 years of aviation safety experience. He spent more than two decades with the NTSB serving as the Investigator-In-Charge for numerous high-profile accidents including Valujet in the Florida Everglades.  He  has  investigated more than 2,500 aircraft accidents worldwide. A number of episodes of the podcast are available, which include discussions

about a variety of aviation subjects, such as the October 2018 crash of Lion Air Flight 610, a Boeing 737 MAX 8 jet, and

the second MAX 8 jet crash that crashed in March 2019 involving Ethiopian Airlines Flight 302.  Goglia and Feith talk about how the industry, regulators and Congress are reacting not only to the controversial crashes that have grounded Boeing’s 737s, but also how the world regulators and the industry are reacting as well. Other podcast episodes address the regulatory and legal aspects of maintaining an aircraft, and “issues-of-the-day” that affect both commercial and general aviation pilots and mechanics. The podcasts are available at  FlightSafetyDetectives.com  or wherever you get your podcasts. FlightSafetyDetectives.com

System to avoid drones in the works Drone Traffic, an aviation research and development start-up in Denver, Colorado, has won a NASA grant to create an airborne drone monitoring, reporting, and avoidance system for aircraft pilots. Drone Traffic and its partner Mosaic ATM recently received a Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) grant to begin the first phase of the project. The FAA estimates that 2.4 million drones have been sold in the United States. While most drones operate safely, the FAA continues to document more than 100 unsafe drone operations a month, including airspace violations, near-collisions, and actual collisions. Drone Traffic founder Rick Zelenka, a patent attorney, former NASA engineer and Boeing executive, as well as a longtime pilot, recognized the need for an airborne real-time drone avoidance system. The product resembles popular cardriving apps that alert drivers to important traffic risks — think Waze for pilots. The airborne drone avoidance system acquires drone information from a variety of sources, including airborne and ground-based radar, air traffic management databases, and pilot crowd-sourcing. The system enables pilots to report drone presence and transgressions, creating a pathway to a safer flight, according to company officials. A user interface provides flight status, future trajectory information, and safetyfocused drone warning information embedded in 2D and 3D mapping displays, company officials explained. The product can be used as a stand-alone or a supplement to existing flight applications a pilot already uses. Drone-Traffic.com, MosaicATM.com

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General Aviation News —  800.426.8538

October 10, 2019

Research tackles spatial disorientation Four hours of training — that’s all it takes to tackle the problem of spatial disorientation in pilots and save their lives. That’s according to Dr. Braden McGrath, a research professor in EmbryRiddle Aeronautical University’s Department of Human Factors and Behavioral Neurobiology. Spatial disorientation occurs when what pilots feel clashes with reality — when they believe they’re flying upward but their plane is actually headed toward the ground, for example. Blinking lights, heads-up displays, and a variety of other safety controls are already available in the flight deck to counteract this occurrence, but those features are all visual, said McGrath, who conducted his doctoral thesis on this topic and believes that the complete solution lies in also using another of our five senses: Touch. “Tactile cueing keeps pilots aware,” he said. “It gives them the right information at the right time and in the right modality. It keeps them in the loop.” Many pilots who find their vision obstructed or attention distracted are not in the loop, however, and they might not even realize it. That’s where the Tactile Situation Awareness System (TSAS) comes in — a haptics band invented by Dr. Angus Rupert of the U.S. Army Aeromedical Research Laboratory that vibrates at different locations and intensities along a pilot’s torso, alerting him or her to irregularities in an aircraft’s orientation. If a plane is rolling slightly left, for instance, the band will lightly rumble on the pilot’s left side, and it will continue to do so until the roll is corrected. The vibration takes visuals and even intellectual processing out of the equation. Tactile processing takes place at a more reflexive, “midbrain level,” according to Rupert. “The goal is to align the information in the cockpit with the way we take in information on Earth.” TSAS also addresses a problem that can affect any aviator at any experience level.

Photo by David Massey

Dr. Angus Rupert, a medical research scientist with the U.S. Army and the University of Toronto, helps Dr. Braden McGrath with a haptics band that will transmit vibrations during the movement of flight at Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University’s Daytona Beach Campus.

Photo by David Massey

Masters student Tyson Richards operates a Spatial Disorientation Simulator. “The Air Force has never lost less than five pilots per year due to spatial disorientation,” he said. “They lost more than 150 aircraft and 150 pilots from the 1980s to the early 2000s.” But TSAS, a fireproof garment with

miniature tactile actuators sewn inside of it, can change all that. And graduate students at Embry-Riddle are working to make sure it does. Before pilots can use the haptic band in the air, they need training from grad

students Tyson Richards and Qianhong “Echo” Liu. “I’m not an aviator, so I didn’t realize how big of an issue spatial disorientation was until I got involved in this research,” Richards said. “When you’re disoriented in an aircraft, it can take up to 30 seconds for you to get reoriented. That’s a huge amount of time.” Risks are eliminated in virtual worlds, however, and so before test subjects are ever equipped with tactile bands on the flight line, they go to the Aerospace Physiology Lab, strap on a 3-D headset and tactile band, and learn to read the rumbles they feel pulsing up and down their sides every time the yoke on their simulator leans off-center. Once pilots acclimate and can reorient using just signals from the tactile band's actuators, even with their eyes closed and after simulating mid-flight barrel rolls, they’re ready for the real world. With an unobstructed pilot safely controlling the aircraft from the left seat, Richards and Liu set up their test subjects in the right seat and outfit them with a tactile band. The goal is for the pilot to use the band’s tactile cues to prove that they understand where the horizon line is — even though most of tests are conducted at night, and in one of the five test scenarios, they wear either a blindfold or a pair of tinted goggles, simulating poor visual environments where spatial disorientation is most common. Afterward, Richards and Liu conduct post-flight interviews to compare the pilot’s perceptions to what they actually experienced. “Every single time we do these trials, there is always something unscripted,” Richards notes. “It’s always a challenge and you have to solve problems and come up with solutions to make it work.” That’s what makes the process rewarding. That’s why it’s exciting. RESEARCH | See Page 16

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General Aviation News —  800.426.8538

October 10, 2019

Drone prices hit by tariffs By TERRY JARRELL It hasn’t taken long to feel the effects of the Trump Administration’s recent tax on goods imported from China for drone operators. The biggest name in the industry, DJI, has already raised prices to reflect the increase. Other major manufacturers have yet to follow suit, however if there is no change in the trade situation between the countries, it is likely we’ll see more price increases. The more prominent increases are seen in highly popular models of the DJI Mavic line. The same Mavic Pro 2 that was priced at $1,499 is now listed on DJI’s website at $1,729. The Mavic Zoom now lists for $1,439, while the little sibling Mavic Air is now $919. Not only are the drones’ prices impacted, but also extras like the Smart Controller, which is up to $749, well over its initial release price of $649. While DJI may be the first to reflect these adjusted prices, there is considerable question as to which drone manufacturer will be next. Autel, maker of the very popular Evo model, has posted an official announcement on its website where RESEARCH | From Page 14

An Obvious Solution

Nearly 30 years ago, when Rupert began his work on spatial disorientation by building a prototype outfitted with 69-cent toy speakers as his tactile cues, he says that the industry resisted even acknowledging that the phenomenon of spatial disorientation existed at all. “Back then, people looked on spatial disorientation as a weakness of the pilot,” he said, adding that some saw the addi-

Tim Matthews explains that the company first felt the impacts of the tariffs on May 10, 2019, but has worked to shield customers from the tariff’s impact on pricing. However, as of Oct. 1, 2019, the company began increasing prices on some of its products due to the increasing impact of the tariffs. Matthews goes on to say that Autel is working to help offset this by creating better values with bundled items and exclusive deals to ease the impact to the customer.

What are the options if you want to buy a drone?

If you’ve been wanting to buy a new drone, it may be too late to get one at the old price. Many of DJI’s models are sold out, presumably from a pre-tariff flood of customers wanting to get a new DJI drone before the price hike. Autel, as of this writing, still has the Evo at the usual $999. It’s assumed other manufacturers will increase their prices, as well, as they feel the impacts of the tariffs. Another option is to look to third parties such as Amazon, B&H, or eBay. tional safety feature as a “crutch” to good pilots. Then, when autopilots became standardized in modern aircraft, safety improved — but pilots still became disoriented, and crashes still occurred, the researcher noted. “We knew we had the solution to the problem at that point and have fought ever since to bring it into the public,” Rupert said. Dr. Jon French, a Human Factors professor at Embry-Riddle, is one of many to

The DJI Mavic Pro drone. There are still some models to be found at these sites, but quantity and availability can vary considerably. Also be aware of the seller’s reputation when buying from unknown third parties to ensure a safe, smooth transaction.

New vs. Used Drones

Another thing you may consider is finding a good pre-owned model. This might make more sense, especially if you are a new drone pilot. Rather than spending big bucks on a brand new model, which may get a little wear-and-tear as you climb the learning curve, a nicer pre-owned model will not join in the fight, and he’s brought arguably the most important resource to the research: Students. “This project is at the nexus of three specialties, which are quite rare at any university — hardcore mathematics, human factors, and aviation,” McGrath said. “The fourth piece of the puzzle is the students. Students bring the energy and new ideas.” Additionally, when it comes to any project — especially one that has had involvement from every military branch as

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well as NASA — where Rupert used to work — affordable brainpower is key, and that’s something students bring in bunches, according to Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University officials. Students endlessly explore and learn and test and develop, McGrath said. They contribute, and they earn course credit. It’s a win-win. Throw enough brainpower at a problem, Rupert said, involve enough people, and eventually something is bound to “click.” “That involvement may be the key that transitions it all — that moves this project from research to real-world application,” Rupert said. “You never know who that key person is going to be.” ERAU.edu

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Will this engine work on a Velocity? Paul McBride Ask Paul

Q

Paul, I read your brief discussion on narrow versus wide deck Lycoming O-360s. While this is true, my need is perhaps a bit different. I am building a Velocity and am approaching the engine phase of the project. The Velocity is a pusher configuration and it’s generally recommended to use an IO360 or equivalent engine. I have found a nice mid-time IO-360-A1B6 wide deck (900 hrs SMOH, no prop strike and good compression). I certainly like the 200 hp, fuel injected engine, but want to know any drawbacks or advantages to standard IO-360s. Terry Hartford

A

Terry, maybe I can put a smile on your face and tell you that if the engine is as you described, it should be a real winner for your Velocity RG project. All Lycoming engines may be installed either in a tractor or pusher configuration. I can’t think of anything that would steer me away from using an engine like this, and there is no doubt the 200 hp will make it a rocket ship. Let me just mention a few things that you might want to check before putting your money on the table. With no known prop strike and good compression, you’re starting off with some good signs of a decent engine. However, I’d suggest you check the actual calendar time or previous service life Paul McBride, an expert on engines, retired after almost 40 years with Lycoming. Send your questions to: AskPaul@GeneralAviationNews.com.

of the engine to be certain there were no extended periods of inactivity during its time in service. It’s always a good thing to review the entire engine logbook to see just what kind of maintenance this engine had. Positive things like frequent operation and regular oil and filter changes are all good indicators that it has been well cared for in the past. Also, check how many calendar months this engine has been in storage and what the environment was where it was stored. My reasoning behind this is we want to make sure there is no internal corrosion in the cylinder barrels or elsewhere in the engine. Since I don't know why or how this engine was removed from service, I’d encourage you to remove and cut the oil filter can open and inspect the elements for any signs of contamination, and also inspect the oil suction screen in the oil sump for the same. Let’s say after doing a borescope inspection we find indications of slight corrosion in the cylinders. Probably, in most cases, this situation could be corrected by removing the cylinders, having them honed at a good cylinder repair facility, and installing a new set of piston rings. If the cylinders must be removed for this condition, it’ll provide an excellent opportunity for you to carefully inspect the camshaft for any corrosion too. Of course should all of these things look good, the seller may demand a higher selling price, but if all looks good, go for it.   Some may say I’m going overboard in some of my recommendations, but I’ve seen and heard too many stories where

people think they’ve found the perfect low time engine only to find out it had a checkered past with little or no real logbook history. Once you’ve paid the money it’s too late, and I hate to see anyone taken advantage of when their heart and soul is being put into probably the biggest undertaking of their lives. The old carpenter’s rule of “measure twice, cut once” is a great rule to follow when it comes to buying a used engine — check everything twice to avoid coming up short of what you expected. Terry, I hope my thoughts regarding your project did not dampen your enthusiasm, but help you understand how to make a better decision regarding the purchase of any used engine. If this should all work out, I’m certain your Velocity RG will be one beautiful aircraft.

Q

I have a mount I am told is for a Lycoming engine. I thought an O-235, then I am told O-320, but I see the O-320 lord points are angled, while mine are flat. Mount points are 9-1/2” top to bottom and 11-1/2” side to side. Can you please tell me just what engine this fits? Richard L. Jack

A

This is a good photo Richard, and I can tell you that this mount is a conical type mount. The conical type mounts were primarily used on the Lycoming O-235-C series of engines and several different models of Lycoming O-320-A, B, and C series. The easy way to determine if it is a conical type mount is to keep in mind that the straight mount configuration mounts parallel to the crankshaft. On the other hand, dynafocal mounts are set at a specified angle to the crankshaft with Type 1 being 30° and Type 2 being 18° for four cylinder engines. That means any of the aforementioned engine models should be capable of using the engine mount you have.

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General Aviation News —  800.426.8538

October 10, 2019

Commandos go civilian Frederick A. Johnsen Of Wings & Things

The big Curtiss C-46 Commando transport of World War II was a milestone in air transport. With a wingspan greater than that of a four-engine B-17, the C-46 used a pair of R-2800 radial engines to get it aloft at a gross weight of 56,000 pounds. It was the largest twin-engine aircraft in the U.S. Army Air Forces during World War II. Military Commandos hauled troops and carried vehicles and light aircraft, loaded through a large aperture in the left side of the fuselage. The C-46 in popular literature has been viewed as a maintenance-prone airlifter when compared with the smaller Douglas C-47. And yet the Commando’s weightlifting and altitude performance made it the star of the ongoing Allied airlift over the Himalayas in the China-Burma-India theater of operations. Peace in 1945 cut short the production of C-46s after more than 3,000 were built. The War Assets Administration (WAA) worked with the Air Force to make C-46s available to civilian operators. Type Certificates 789 and 808 were among those issued for civilianized C46s. Curtiss-Wright had the type certificate for rebuilding the C-46E variant, recognizable for its use of a stepped windscreen that gave this model the moniker of a dolphin-nosed C-46. Slick Airways held another type certificate, and United Services for Air had type certificates for reworking C-46A, D, and F models of the Commando. Surplus Commandos initially were offered by the government at prices around $10,000 to $15,000. By October 1947, that had been cut to only $5,000 in an effort to move more C-46s into the private sector. The available pool of the aircraft in government storage at that time was numbered at 627 Commandos. The largest holding was at Walnut Ridge, Arkansas. The C-46s could be purchased for 15% down with the balance due in 36 monthly payments. The government also offered a flat $300 monthly lease on C-46s to private operators. Historian Joseph P. Juptner said Fred Johnsen is a product of the historical aviation scene in the Pacific Northwest that has fostered everything from museums to historical publishing. An author, historian, curator and photographer, you can reach him at Fred@GeneralAviationNews.com.

about 100 such leases were made with civilian companies from 1947 to 1949, including to Pan American, Eastern, and Delta airlines. The leased C-46s were returned to the government by 1953. In April 1948, the Air Force withdrew hundreds of C-46s from public sale. Some speculated this reflected a smaller-thanhoped-for market for the big transports;

others opined it meant the Air Force had other uses for the aircraft. Meanwhile, United Services for Air (USAir) had an enterprise at Niagara Falls, New York, that converted Commandos and offered them for $23,595 under the name Cargoliner. USAir said considerable re-engineering was needed to make a civilianized C-46 that met the requirements of the type certificate. Most of the conversions were used as cargo haulers; some could be airliners, with rows of windows added. USAir manufactured C-46 parts as needed, and this contributed substantially to the company’s bottom line in the late 1940s. The company even became a vendor of C-46 parts to the Air Force, which

kept some of the transports in service. So lucrative was the C-46 for USAir that it established a second facility in Buffalo, New York, and a third operation in West Palm Beach, Florida, strategically located to service C-46s operated in Central and South America. At one point in 1948, USAir had a pool of 25 surplus C-46s to upgrade and civilianize. The company figured more than 300 C-46s were still available at a variety of surplus airfield locations. USAir offered a pool program, in which individual purchasers could join a pool of buyers for at least five C-46s, with economies realized when all the aircraft in the pool were scheduled to go through the refurbishing line at one time.

Photo by Gerald Balzer collection

This C-46F operated by Zantop Air Transport earned its keep by hauling parts for the automobile industry in the U.S. during the 1950s.

Photo by Gerald Balzer collection

Curtiss-Wright flew this C-46E with a stepped, or dolphin-nose configuration, as a demonstrator to show postwar customers the value of a civilianized C-46.


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Photo by Gerald Balzer collection

Interior Airways of Alaska flew this brightly painted C-46 when photographed in April 1971. Post-war users showed a preference for flying smaller surplus Douglas C-47s, converted to DC-3 airliner standards, as passenger aircraft while the bigger C46s excelled as freighters, but there were crossovers of both types in freight and passenger service. Passenger C-46 conversions were officially limited to 62 passengers when modified. Three emergency exits, in addition to the main entry door, were required. More than two dozen civilian C-46s in U.S. registration crashed between the late 1940s and 1980s. Factors included weather, maintenance, and pilot error. One mishap that caught the public eye was the Oct. 29, 1960, Ohio takeoff crash of a C-46 on a charter flight carrying the Cal Poly Mustangs college football team. Twenty-two of the 48 people onboard died, including 16 football players and two others associated with the team. Mishap investigators said the crash was influenced by a one-ton overload, a premature liftoff, partial loss of power on one engine, and weather conditions at the time of takeoff. A second C-46 arrived to take the deceased back to California. The tragedy made national headlines. As heart-rending as the mishap was, the old veteran C-46 Commando deserves a better epitaph. Commandos continued to haul freight across the United States for more than two decades, their numbers dwindling with age. And still a few may be seen and heard, far north of the Lower 48 states, where freight needs to move. Until about eight years ago, the Southern California Wing of the Commemorative Air Force flew a silver C-46 nick-

Photo by Kenneth G. Johnsen

This passenger-configured C-46 (N9514C) was chocked on the ramp at Salt Lake City when photographed in June 1961. GAN’s Wings and Things correspondent was a kid in a plaid shirt walking the ramp with his Dad when this photo was taken. named “China Doll” to air shows. Time and the cost of avgas burning at 160 to 180 gallons per hour caught up with China Doll, and the CAF Wing had to make the decision to keep it on the ground for static tours at its base in Camarillo, ac-

cording to group public information officer Pat Brown. The city of Monroe, North Carolina, owns a restored C-46 called “Tinker Belle” that attends aviation events. Many museums around the country in-

clude a C-46 in their static displays, a permanent tribute to a transitory time. Many of the photos used in this article were generously provided by Gerald L. Balzer.


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General Aviation News —  800.426.8538

The first HARRAH By JIM ROBERTS “Is this Heaven?” ... “No, it’s Iowa.” As I strolled the grass of Antique Airfield in Blakesburg, Iowa, surrounded by acres of antique and vintage aircraft, this memorable exchange from the 1989 movie “Field of Dreams” resonated in my head. Feet wet with morning dew, I drank in the sights and sounds of these glorious machines, and marveled at the dedication and persistence of the restorers and pilots who bring them here year after year. The occasion was the 66th National Antique Airplane Association (AAA) Fly-In and Convention, held this year on Aug. 28 through Sept. 2 at the association’s private airfield (IA27). 

Photo by James W. Roberts

Ryan Lihs, with an enthusiastic load of sightseers, climbs away from Runway 36 in his 1929 Pitcairn PA-6.

Typical for Midwest weather, the forecast was first promising, then ominous. The reality was mixed, with morning storms moving through on the 29th and clearing out by noon. The passage of that system brought mostly pleasant flying conditions, inviting many pilots to enjoy the grass runway for the rest of the week.   The Antique Airplane Association was formed in August 1953 with the mission to “Keep the Antiques Flying.” According to AAA officials, there are more than 20 active chapters, as well as close working relationships with many aircraft type clubs. Founder Robert L. Taylor relates that the airport property was purchased in 1970, and the first fly-in at IA27 was held in 1971. Since then, a few annual fly-ins have been held at other airports, but now Antique Airfield is home base.  Each year brings a new theme for the gathering, and in 2019 it was the Historic Airfield Rally to the Antique Airfield Homecoming (HARRAH). AAA members

were encouraged to stop en route to IA27 at historically significant airports, and 25 pilots registered for the event. Some planned to stop in Bird City, Kansas, where a young Charles Lindbergh performed as a flying circus wing-walker and parachute jumper five years before his famous Atlantic crossing.   Dave and Jeanne Allen, from Elbert, Colorado, stopped in Red Oak, Iowa,  to visit the town’s popular history center. Growing up near a crop duster strip, Dave got the flying bug early. He remembers as a child waking up at 3:30 in the morning to the bark of a radial engine coming to life, whereupon he would throw on a pair of Levis, jump on his bike, and pedal to the airport.  If one of the pilots waved, he recalls, “My feet didn’t touch the ground for the rest of the day.”   Today he and his wife Jeanne enjoy the

October 10, 2019


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22 symphony of their very own radial, a 275hp Jacobs R-755. Their beautiful 1934 WACO YKC is a perennial award winner, including the prestigious “Antique Grand Champion-Gold Lindy” at EAA AirVenture in 2013. The aircraft was operated by the Ohio National Guard from 1934 to 1939, then sold and flown by the Civil Air Patrol during World War II. It last flew in 1948, until the completion of a ground-up restoration in 2013. Those flying into Antique Airfield are cautioned that operations are strictly “see and avoid.” The AAA website advises to “….put down the moving map GPS, turn off the radio, look outside the cockpit, and put your head on a swivel.” Some participating aircraft lack electrical systems or radios, so experienced flaggers control takeoffs and landings. While everyone enjoys the fun and camaraderie of hopping rides and “beating up the pattern,” safety is foremost, and each morning begins with a Flight Ops briefing. Pilots are reminded of the Antique Airfield traffic pattern rules, the runway in use, weather forecast, and flagger procedures for takeoffs and landings.  My favorite admonition is: “Aircraft equipped with smoke systems should not blow smoke on takeoff…it obscures the flaggers’ vision when the field goes IFR!” When not viewing Iowa from the air, there’s much to be enjoyed on terra firma.  Many appreciate simply wandering the rows of matchless aircraft or hangar flying in the shade of their favorite plane.  At Antique Airfield, families and friends reunite against a backdrop of wood and fabric or steel and aluminum artwork. Aircraft on display in 2019 ranged from the classic Cub family (J3, J4, and J5) to a heavy iron Beech 18. Two aircraft in the spotlight were a 1928 Laird LC-B-200, owned by Vaughn Lovely of Webster, Minnesota, and a Luscombe Model 4, owned by Ron Price of Sonoma, California. Lovely’s LC-B-200, which came out of the Laird Airplane Company’s Chicago factory in 1928, is powered by a 220-hp Wright J-5 engine like the one that pulled Charles Lindbergh to Paris in 1927.    It was the personal aircraft of company founder E.M. “Matty” Laird, who had a reputation for building custom, highperformance aircraft. Laird’s race planes won Thompson and Bendix Trophies in the 1930s.  The LC-B-200 is known today as the “Honeymoon Laird” because Matty used it to transport his bride, Elsie, to their New York honeymoon. Vaughn characterizes the Laird as “luxurious — the Packard of its day.” The aircraft flew for many years until it ended up abandoned at a crop duster’s operation in Hayti, Missouri, where it was discovered and purchased by Kenny Love in 1966.  Restoration moved slowly until 1978, when Kenny enlisted the help of his friend and noted vintage aircraft restorer,

General Aviation News —  800.426.8538

October 10, 2019

All Photos by James W. Roberts

Ron and Chris Price arriving in their 1938 Luscombe Model 4.

A WACO YMF-F5C, built in 2011 by Classic Aircraft, departs Runway 36. Forrest Lovely (Vaughn’s father). Forrest and members of “Marginal Aviation,” the Minnesota chapter of AAA, completed the project in time for the Blakesburg homecoming in 1982. The highlight that year was a visit by Matty and Elsie Laird, who were treated to flights in their “honeymoon” plane. Though Love sold the Laird to Bob Howie in 1997, he continued to fly it until his death in 2004. Recalling the restoration project, Vaughn remembers helping with a rib-stitching party when he was 3 years old, so it’s no surprise he acquired the plane from Howie’s estate in 2016.

Vaughn is a dedicated caretaker of the Laird, and notes that he is amassing a stock of Wright J-5 parts to keep it flying for years to come. Ron Price’s 1938 Luscombe Model 4 is the only flying example of four produced. It was also known as the “Model 90,” owing to its seven-cylinder, 90-hp Warner Scarab radial power plant. Ron relates that the Model 4 fell between the earlier Luscombe “Phantom” and the “Model 50,” which was powered by a Continental A-50 engine. Selling for half as much as the Model 4, the Model 50 rapidly eclipsed the 4 in

popularity, relegating the radial-powered craft to relative obscurity. Today we know the 50 as the Luscombe Model 8 Silvaire. Ron purchased the Model 4 in 1978 from a museum in Morgan Hill, California. The plane sat in storage until he turned it over for restoration to Mark Anderson and Bill Bradford of Kansas City, Missouri. The three-year project was completed in July 2019, in time to fly to EAA AirVenture Oshkosh, where it was awarded the Bronze Age (1937-1941) Outstanding Closed Cockpit Runner-Up Trophy. Ron reports that the Model 4 cruises at


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Stearman Country at the fly-in.

Jeff Cain brought his pristine Piper J-4A from Denver. It’s framed by a 1929 Travel Air.

Photo by Jeff Cain

Vaughn Lovely’s 1928 Laird LCB-200 in its element at Antique Airfield.

Brianna Hill, 17, with the 1947 Aeronca Chief she flew from Bellevue, Nebraska.

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110 mph on six gallons an hour. The plane has two flap settings and very effective ailerons, similar to a Model 8. The Model 4 arrived at Blakesburg from Brodhead, Wisconsin, under the capable pilotage of Ron’s son, Chris. Besides the matchless display of antique aircraft, another aspect of Blakesburg that sets it apart is the family atmosphere. It is truly a multigenerational gathering, where kids get up close and personal with aviation history, and seeds are sewn for the next crop of pilots, mechanics, and restorers. Most attendees remain on site all day, enjoying meals served in the 24th Fighter Squadron Mess Hall, socializing in the Pilots’ Pub, and watching nightly outdoor movies. A perennial favorite is pie day on Saturday, when local bakers provide a delicious selection of homemade pies and ice cream. Sales benefit the Blakesburg Historical Preservation Society. According to AAA President Brent Taylor, an estimated 300 aircraft attended this year. Pilots came from as far away as Seattle, San Diego, Kalispell, Montana, and upstate New York. International visitors made the journey from Australia, England, Canada, and Switzerland.  And the “Youngest Pilot Award” went to 17 year-old Brianna Hill, flying a 1947 Aeronca Chief from Belleville, Nebraska. Brianna is a fourth-generation pilot: The daughter, granddaughter, and greatgranddaughter of long-time pilots and AAA members. If her smile was any indication, the future of the AAA and the Blakesburg fly-in convention is bright! AntiqueAirfield.com


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General Aviation News —  800.426.8538

October 10, 2019

Didn’t make it to the Reno Air Races this year? Photographer Bradley Orr was at the 2019 races and sent us these photos. Enjoy! Next year’s races are slated for Sept. 16-20, 2020. More info at AirRace.org

Greg McNeely in Race 90 “Undecided” leads John Siegfried in Race 5 “Big Red” and Vitaly Pechersky in Race 50 “Abracadabra” to start the White Flag lap in Sunday’s T-6 Silver Final. McNeely won the race at 223.468 mph.

Steve Temple in Race 8 “Heat Stroke,” Kent Jackson in Race 26 “Fast & Easy,” and Chris Weaver in Race 47 “Mach Chicken” running up and waiting for the green flag to drop to start the Formula One Bronze Race on Saturday morning.

The ramp was ecstatic to see Vicky Benzing in her newly acquired P-51 Mustang Race 64. Owned and flown for many years by Clay Lacy, this airframe has a long history at Reno, most notably as the 1970 Unlimited Champion.


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Vince Walker in Race 2 “Modo Mio,” Joe Coraggio in Race 611 “Ramp Rat’s Ride,” and John Flanagan in Race 34 “White Lightning” roll past Pylon 8 — two Lancair Legacies and a Glasair III battling it out in the Sport Class.

Sam Swift and crew with four minutes to go before the Biplane Heat 3A on Friday morning. Race 3 “Smokin’ Hot” qualified at 197.918 mph and placed fourth in the class this year.

Andrew Findlay in Race 30 “One Moment” after a test flight on Tuesday afternoon. He qualified at 398.346 mph early in the week and repeated as the Sport Gold Champion on Sunday at 390.744 mph.

The SNJ-5 Texan from the Commemorative Air Force’s Southern California Wing in Camarillo, California, arriving in front of a dark sky at dusk on Tuesday. The group’s contingent also included a PBJ-1J Mitchell, P-51 Mustang, F6F Hellcat, F8F Bearcat, and an A6M3 Zero.


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General Aviation News —  800.426.8538

October 10, 2019

3 ways to buy a used LSA Dan Johnson Splog

Halfway through its second decade, the Light-Sport Aircraft sector is showing one clear-cut sign of maturity. Used LSA are increasingly common and some represent exceptional values, helping to put aircraft ownership within range of a larger group of pilots. A vigorous market for used LSA is good for the customer, good for the reseller, good for the new manufacturer, and good for aviation. It’s literally all good. Customers get better prices on fairly late model LSA, making aircraft ownership more achievable. Brokers are pleased to have a greater selection and supply of more affordable aircraft from which they can earn a living. New manufacturers also like used aircraft sales, as the sale of a previously owned aircraft frees a new aircraft customer to go forward on his purchase. Everyone benefits by more pilots flying. The used LSA market has developed in different ways, imitating the automobile market in its diversity of ownership opportunities. As LSA crossed several thousand planes delivered, a growing market for used aircraft has emerged. These aircraft frequently have 250 to 500 hours logged, which represents not much more than a good break-in period. Such LSA can deliver many years of use for the average buyer.

How to buy a used LSA

I have nothing to do with the sale of individual aircraft. All my observations are just that — observations. You should do your own research. Many people are willing to help in most pilot communities. By all means, get a second opinion about an aircraft that interests you and seek out assistance as needed. That said… I can identify at least three distinct ways LSA are being sold today.

Conventional/Traditional

If you have looked through the classified ads of an aviation magazine, such as General Aviation News, for a used aircraft, you used a time-honored, market tested way of buying an aircraft. A quick glance at the classifieds will show you a healthy market for legacy aircraft and aviation products of all sorts. They are also a great place to sell your aircraft as you Dan Johnson, president of the Light Aircraft Manufacturers Association, is an expert on LSA. For more on Sport Pilot/LSA, go to ByDanJohnson.com.

prepare to buy the next one. My best success has been to take an airplane to an airshow. Every aircraft I’ve owned has been sold at an event. This technique may work best if you have something very special or if you are flexible on price. You cannot deny that showing your flying machine to a large number of clearly interested pilots helps to expose your pride-and-joy to those who may prefer to put hands on the aircraft. These proven methods are solid ways to consider either buying or selling, but they do require you to be a good judge of character and knowledgeable about equipment, including powerplants. Not everyone is comfortable with those tasks. So, consider a newer method.

Photo courtesy Phil Lockwood

A used Flight Design CTSW in flight.

Premium/Concierge

Even in a market that increasingly uses technology to connect sellers and buyers, this concept is emerging as one of the best, especially if a buyer chooses not to do the mechanical inspection themselves. In this intriguing new development for the LSA or Sport Pilot kit aircraft space — this is familiar ground for any car dealer — some producers and sellers of new aircraft are seeking out used examples of their brand, going over them thoroughly, and then reselling them. They have a reason to want these aircraft to satisfy customers as it is their brand to defend. A customer may feel reassured to “deal with the factory.” Concierge resellers can “cherry pick” the best examples and, since they know their brand intimately, customers can get an exceptional purchase. Some brokers, like Scott Severen of US Sport Planes, see used aircraft as an alternate revenue producer for his enterprise. At a recent airshow he displayed two pristine Jabiru LSA with prices 50% less than a new model. Current new models may have some tempting features or qualities, but Severen’s used aircraft presented very well and many buyers find them desirable. Plus, Scott backs these up in a way no one else can, as he is also the representative for new Jabiru aircraft. “My reasoning best serves the customer,” he explains, “as a pilot looking for a new aircraft isn’t interested in used and a customer who wants to spend less is motivated by a lower price.” At recent airshows, I have interviewed an expanding number of vendors who are

Photo by Dan Johnson

A used AirCam for sale. already embracing this trend or thinking about it to aid their enterprise. That’s good for customers, too, as it makes for more stable enterprises. When you eventually need parts, service, or advice, you want your vendor to remain in business.

Modern/Technological

More familiar than “Premium/Concierge” is using tech as found on any smartphone, tablet, or laptop. This presents the same aircraft found in print publications on your phone or tablet. That’s handy, plus you can search and mark as a favorite aircraft that interest you. The tech method brings sellers in direct contact with a prospective buyer in an efficient way that did not exist when the LSA market came into being. Social media further adds to this research opportunity. Light Sport Aviation on Facebook, for example, often lists attractively priced aircraft in the sector. It changes frequently.

Fulfilling the LSA Dream?

More than 15 years ago LSA first burst on the scene, bringing with it the driver’s license medical that aided many lighter kit aircraft sales. Deliveries measured by FAA registrations for LSA and Sport Pilot kit aircraft are approaching 9,000 aircraft. When LSA first arrived, many enthusiasts and observers had a view that these new aircraft would be simple (that was specifically one of the FAA’s goals) and

would therefore be light and low cost. The common price expectations centered around $50,000 to $60,000 in 2002. Let’s keep the field level. Reduced dollar purchasing power (inflation) makes $50,000 to $60,000 from 2002 equal to $70,000 to $85,000 in 2019. You can buy brand new LSA for $70,000 to $85,000, fulfilling the dream. However, carbon fiber speedsters with big-screen digital panels and autopilots are priced from $150,000 and up — in a few cases way up. A $200,000 LSA is going to be spectacularly well equipped and be a very comfortable aircraft, but it is nonetheless priced well out of many budgets. So, to get the aircraft you want without paying the premium of brand new, used LSA represent a growing opportunity, with some exceptional aircraft being offered by concierge sellers. With care and some effort, you might find even better values on your own, although you may prefer to trust an expert you know. One thing is certain: The Special and Experimental Light-Sport Aircraft and Sport Pilot kit sector is alive and well and the number of available aircraft has never been larger and more diverse. The market literally has something for every interest and every budget. All that’s before the FAA dramatically expands the category in the next two to three years, but that’s a story for a future General Aviation News SPLOG column.


October 10, 2019

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Accident Reports These October 2017 accident reports are provided by the National Transportation Safety Board. Published as an educational tool, they are intended to help pilots learn from the misfortunes of others.

First flight after maintenance goes awry

The pilot, who was conducting a personal flight in the Piper PA-32R, reported that, while the plane was climbing after takeoff, the engine began to run roughly and lose power. He began a descent for an emergency landing and, during the descent, he sensed a “bad” engine vibration, which was followed by a complete loss of engine power. He selected an area on an asphalt-covered automobile racetrack in Dawsonville, Georgia, to make a forced landing, which resulted in substantial damage to the wings and fuselage. A post-accident engine examination revealed a crack in the accessory case and a large hole in the crankcase near the No. 6 cylinder pad. A subsequent internal examination revealed damage to the engine’s internal components, including the main bearings and the No. 6 connecting rod, that was consistent with oil exhaustion. The airplane was equipped with a remotely mounted oil filter. A B-nut on one of the oil filter lines was found to be loose with about 2-½ threads showing. The Bnut was tightened by hand and rotated about 1-¾ turns, which resulted in about ½ thread showing. The pilot was not an airframe and powerplant mechanic, but had replaced the oil line about a week before the accident. The accident flight was the first flight after that maintenance. Probable cause: The failure of the pilot, who was not a certified mechanic, to tighten the B-nut on a remotely mounted oil filter line, which resulted in oil exhaustion, a total loss of oil pressure, and a subsequent total loss of engine power.

Pilot hits wrong switch

The pilot reported that, while on final approach, after passing over the perimeter fence at the airport in Chandler, Arizona, the Titan T-51’s engine lost power. The plane hit the ground about 100’ from the approach end of the runway, and slid to a stop about 3’ from the runway threshold. Post-accident examination revealed that the instrument panel layout had the flap position buttons adjacent to the unguarded engine control switches. The pilot  reported that,  while on final approach, he  inadvertently contacted the engine control unit (ECU) toggle switch while he was positioning the flaps, which shut down the engine. Engine download data indicated that

the ECU was turned off while on short final. The fuselage and inboard wing spar structure were substantially damaged. Probable cause: The pilot’s inadvertent contact with the engine control unit toggle switch during flight, which resulted in the engine shutting down.

Pilot crashes after putting landing gear up too soon

The pilot of the multiengine, retractable-landing-gear Aerostar 600A reported that, during the initial climb, he “noted 105 IAS [indicated airspeed] as normal and reached down to retract the gear.” He “glanced down” to make sure he had grabbed the landing gear selector, and when he looked back outside, the airplane was “near the runway.” He “pulled back hard on the yoke,” but the propellers struck the runway at the airport in Tallahassee, Florida, and the airplane settled on the runway and skidded into the grass. The pilot reported in the National Transportation Safety Board Form 6120.1 Pilot/Operator Aircraft Accident/Incident Report Safety Recommendation section that the plane was “not high enough above the ground to raise the gear,” and he may have “relaxed back-pressure on the yoke after rotation,” and when leaning slightly forward for the gear handle, the yoke may had been pushed forward slightly. The airplane sustained substantial damage to the fuselage. Probable cause: The pilot’s incorrect pitch control and premature landing gear retraction during the initial climb.

Deer hits plane

The flight instructor reported that, in day visual meteorological conditions, during the landing roll, a deer “appeared from high grass and bushes” from the right of the runway at the airport in West Seneca, N.Y. Before he could react, the deer hit the inboard section of the Piper PA28’s right wing. The flight instructor stopped the airplane on the runway and then taxied to the ramp without further incident. The right wing sustained substantial damage. The FAA Chart Supplement for the airport stated, in part: “Deer on and invof [in the vicinity of] arpt [airport].” Probable cause: The airplane’s collision with a deer during the landing roll.

First solo ends in crash

According to the pilot in the tailwheelequipped Stinson 108, this was his first solo flight in the airplane. During the landing roll at the airport in Lewiston, Idaho, the plane decelerated and veered to the left. The pilot overcor-

rected, and the airplane veered to the right, leaving the runway. The left wing hit the ground during the right ground loop. The airplane sustained substantial damage to the left-wing spar and aileron. The METAR at the airport reported that, about the time of the accident, the wind was calm, and the sky was clear. The pilot noted in the National Transportation Safety Board’s Pilot Aviation Accident Report Operator/Owner Safety Recommendation section that this type of accident could have been prevented if he had “flown with a properly rated pilot (tailwheel endorsed) and practiced landings before flying solo.” Probable cause: The pilot’s failure to maintain directional control during the landing roll. Contributing to the accident was his failure to obtain appropriate training in the airplane before flying solo.

Fuel exhaustion leads to forced landing

Following a 1.5-hour local flight, the pilot was returning to his home airfield. Due to inbound traffic to the airport, he circled once to the west and descended for the runway. About eight miles from the runway, he lowered the landing gear and set 10° flaps. While on the base leg, the engine did not respond to the throttle inputs. He switched fuel tanks, turned on the auxiliary fuel pump, and increased the mixture. Engine power was not restored, and he notified the tower that the Cessna T210N had a total loss of engine power. Traffic was too heavy on a nearby road, so he performed a forced landing to a vacant field near Eagle, Colorado. The airplane touched down, and the pilot applied brakes. The airplane traveled for about 90’, hit a ditch, and nosed over. The pilot thought that he had about 45 gallons of fuel before takeoff, but he told the FAA inspector that he had miscalculated his fuel. Only residue fuel was found during recovery of the airplane. The circumstances of the accident are consistent with a total loss of engine power due to fuel exhaustion. Probable cause: The pilot’s inadequate preflight fuel planning, which resulted in a total loss of engine power due to fuel exhaustion.

Biplane ‘weathercocked’

According to the pilot in the Great Lakes biplane, he was unable to determine the wind direction during his approach to the airport in Dayton, Ohio. He circled the airport multiple times and attempted to communicate on the common advisory traffic frequency. During the landing roll on the runway, the biplane experienced an “unexpected turn to the left similar to being weath-

ercocked,” according to the pilot. The biplane left the left side of the runway and continued across descending terrain before it nosed over. The plane sustained substantial damage to both wings and the rudder. The METAR nearest to the airport reported that, about the time of the accident, the wind was from 170° at 16 knots, gusting to 19 knots. Probable cause: The pilot’s failure to maintain directional control during the landing roll in gusting wind conditions.

Plane crashes after landing with emergency brake on

The pilot of the Aviat A1 reported that, during touchdown at the airport in Williamsport, Pennsylvania, he saw that the left emergency brake was partially engaged. He added that the left wheel was locked and that the airplane ran off the left side of the runway. The right landing gear collapsed, and the right wing tip hit the ground. He added that, before the previous takeoff from a grass airstrip, he had performed his preflight checklist, which was normal. But, “upon reflection,” he realized that he had changed his normal routine by shutting down the engine, setting the parking brakes, and exiting the airplane after completing the checklist. After re-entering the airplane, he only did a “visual left to right flow check.” He then pressed and released the brakes and applied power, holding the left rudder and brake down to turn the airplane in the direction of the departure and then departed after a “very short ground roll downhill.” He added that, by immediately turning left during the takeoff roll, he “may not have released enough pressure on the parking brake to turn it completely off.” He believed that, due to the combination of the large tire, wet grass, and downslope hill, he was unable to determine that the emergency parking brake was engaged. The airplane sustained substantial damage to the fuselage and right wing. Probable cause: The pilot’s failure to verify that the parking brake was disengaged before landing, which resulted in a runway excursion.

Planes crash on runway

The pilot of the tailwheel-equipped Pitts departed from Runway 3 at the airport in Farmville, Virginia, flew out to the aerobatic practice box, completed his practice, and returned to the airport. He entered a downwind for Runway 3 and announced his location relative to the traffic pattern throughout the landing. He heard another aircraft making calls in the traffic pattern, but nothing he was concerned about.


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October 10, 2019

Accident Reports After he landed, during the rollout about midfield, he heard someone announce on the radio that there was an airplane on the runway. This was the last thing he remembered before hitting the Staudacher S600. The pilot of the tailwheel-equipped S600 reported that, while he was en route to the designated aerobatic box, he decided he needed to return to the airport and land. He added that, because the winds were calm, he chose to land on Runway 21. He made a right base call and did not hear anyone else on the radio. He touched down about 300’ to 500’ down the runway at about 75 mph. He added the impact with the Pitts came without warning. According to the FAA inspector, the S600 pilot had taken off from Runway 3 en route to the practice box. While en route, he noticed a loose water bottle inside the cockpit and returned to the airport to drop it off. He flew a tight right steep approach for Runway 21. The inspector noted that all the S600 radio traffic calls were for Runway 3. During the landing roll, the two airplanes collided. Post-accident examination revealed substantial damage to the forward fuselage. Probable cause: The other pilot’s failure to see and avoid the other airplane landing in the opposite direction on the runway. Contributing to the accident was the other pilot’s failure to use the correct runway call sign in his radio communications. 

Pilot dies after crashing into Yukon River

The non-instrument-rated pilot was conducting a VFR cross-country flight in an area of low clouds and fog layers near Russian Mission, Alaska, in his Cessna 210. He hit the Yukon River, sustaining fatal injuries and destroying the airplane. Instrument meteorological conditions

prevailed at the accident site. No record of the pilot receiving a preflight weather briefing could be found. According to a pilot of an airplane that departed about 10 minutes ahead of the accident airplane on the same route of flight, widespread areas of low-level fog (between 400’ and 600’ above ground level) existed along the route. This pilot said he talked with the accident pilot about the fog layers. No further radio communications occurred between the pilots. After arriving at PABE and loading passengers, the interviewed pilot departed for a return flight to Kako. During that flight, he searched for the accident pilot’s airplane, but could not locate it. After landing at Kako, the interviewed pilot notified the FAA Flight Service Station about the overdue airplane, and the FAA issued an alert notice. The accident airplane was eventually located submerged in the Yukon River about 10 miles southwest of Russian Mission. Meteorological information indicated that the accident pilot would have encountered instrument meteorological conditions during the flight. Specifically, the area forecast that was valid at the time of the accident included an AIRMET for instrument conditions, a broken to overcast ceiling at 300’ with cloud tops at 10,000’, and visibilities below 1 mile in mist. Also, images from the FAA’s aviation weather camera facing the direction of the accident location indicated a low bank of clouds toward the accident site and along the intended flight route. The pilot’s relatively low flight experience, lack of an instrument rating, and the lack of visual references due to fog and cloud layers created a situation conducive to the development of spatial disorientation. The airplane wreckage and impact information indicated that a loss of control occurred, which is consistent with the known effects of spatial disorientation.

Probable cause: The pilot’s decision to continue visual flight into instrument meteorological conditions, which resulted in spatial disorientation and a subsequent loss of control.

Two die when plane hits power lines

After takeoff, the pilot proceeded south until reaching the Mississippi River when he proceeded to fly along the river at a low altitude. As the Cessna 172 approached a bend in the river near Ramsey, Minnesota, the pilot entered a shallow left turn to follow the river. The airplane hit power lines spanning the river that were located about 200 yards beyond the bend. Both the pilot and passenger died in the crash. Ground-based video footage and witness statements indicated that the airplane was at or below the height of the trees lining both sides of the river shortly before encountering the power lines. One witness initially thought that the pilot intended to fly under the power lines due to the low altitude of the airplane. Weather conditions were good at the time of the accident, however, the sun was about 9° above the horizon and aligned with the river. It is likely that the position of the sun in relation to the power lines hindered the pilot’s ability to identify the hazard as he navigated the bend in the river at low altitude. FAA regulations prohibit operation of an aircraft less than 500’ above the surface in uncongested areas unless approaching to land or taking off, and at least 1,000’ from obstacles in congested areas. Based on the available information, the airplane was less than 100’ above the river and within 400’ of the residences located along the river during the final portion of the flight. The pilot’s flight instructor described the pilot as “reckless” because of his habit

of low-level flying. Probable cause: The pilot’s decision to fly along the river at a low altitude contrary to applicable regulations and safety of flight considerations, which resulted in the impact with the power lines.

Prebuy inspection flight ends in crash into fence

During a prebuy inspection flight, the pilot reduced engine power to test the Airbike’s slow-speed handling characteristics. He then increased the throttle to restore full engine power, but the engine seemed to “bog down” and  lose power. He then lowered the airplane’s nose and engine power was restored. The pilot then chose to return to the airport in Ocean Springs, Mississippi, and while on approach,  the engine again began to lose power, but lowering the nose did not increase the rpm this time. The pilot realized the airplane would be unable to reach the airport, so he conducted an off-airport landing in a residential area. The airplane hit a fence. A post-accident engine run  revealed that, after running at various power settings, when the power was reduced, the engine bogged down and  backfired through the power takeoff (PTO) carburetor, and the rpm would not increase. The PTO cylinder ignition coil was replaced with a serviceable coil, and the engine was restarted for several minutes and run through various power setting. The engine accelerated normally without backfiring, hesitating, or stumbling. It is likely that, during the accident flight, the PTO cylinder ignition coil broke down, which resulted in an intermittent spark at the PTO spark plug and a partial loss of engine power. Probable cause: An intermittent failure of the power takeoff cylinder ignition coil, which resulted in a partial loss of engine power.

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New Products

October 10, 2019

Send press releases to: Press@GeneralAviationNews.com.

Limited edition watch commemorates AOPA’s 80th anniversary Mühle-Glashütte has released a limited-edition watch to celebrate the 80th anniversary of the Aircraft Owners and Pilots Association. Just 500 of the AOPA AeroSport Limited Edition watches will be sold. The aeronautical theme begins with the white AOPA logo set against the jet-black dial, along with white numbers and hands. Color is added with red markings at the quarters and a red tip to the minute hand for visibility, according to company officials. The watch is available for $1,899. AOPA members receive a discount, company officials add. AOPA.org, MuhleglashutteUSA.us/ Product/AOPA-Aerosport-Limited-Edition

Hartzell brings back Sky-Tec starter Hartzell Engine Technologies (HET) has reintroduced its SkyTec starter specifically for 12-volt electrical systems. The starter is FAA PMA certified for non-geared Lycoming piston aircraft engines. Features include: • Kickback Protection System (KPS), featuring a field-replaceable shear pin • Weighs 9.4 pounds • All-metal gears and steel ball bearing races. Hartzell.aero

Handheld COM Radio introduced Sporty’s has introduced the PJ2 Handheld COM Radio, the only handheld aviation radio that can be connected to standard aviation headset plugs without using a special adapter, according to Sporty’s officials. In addition to push-button frequency entry, the PJ2 has a last frequency button to quickly switch back and forth between tower and ground, or approach and CTAF. Pilots also can access NOAA weather radio stations for updated forecasts, company officials add. Headsets with standard twin plugs require no adapter; for Lemo/6-pin plug headsets, an adapter is available for $39.95. The radio is priced at $199. Sportys.com

New book celebrates Wichita as the Air Capital

What’s your pilot performance score? CloudAhoy has released CFI Assistant, which allows automatic scoring of pilot performance. The CFI Assistant is included in CloudAhoy Pro, along with additional features for post-flight debriefing, according to company officials. “We believe that data-driven, objective, automated scoring of a pilot’s performance provides valuable feedback to any pilot at any level, for flight training and for proficiency of experienced pilots,” says Chuck Shavit, founder and CEO. “The CFI Assistant certainly does not replace a human flight instructor — flight instructors are indispensable — but specific aspects of pilot performance and proficiency are objective and measurable, and that’s where the CFI Assistant comes in.” The CFI Assistant scores individual maneuvers, as well as the entire flight. The user interface and visualization enables drilling down and highlighting areas for improvements, using smart graphs and visualization. The subscription price of CloudAhoy Pro is $150 a year, while the price of CloudAhoy Standard is $65 a year. CloudAhoy.com

Greteman Group, a Kansas-based agency specializing in aviation marketing, has released “Wichita: Where Aviation Took Wing.” The book is based on research and content the agency developed for a history display at Wichita Eisenhower National Airport. The aviation-themed terminal opened in 2015. The book takes readers from the early birds and barnstormers to the pioneers and entrepreneurs who established dozens of aircraft and associated factories in the 1920s. The story continues with the founding of Cessna, Beechcraft, and Stear­man (which became Boeing Wichita, then Spirit AeroSystems) and the massive build-up during World War II. Post-war growth got another boost when Bill Lear came to town and launched the business jet revolution with his Learjet. The book is available online at Wichita­ AviationHistory.com. Price: $39.99. WichitaAviationHistory.com

Daughter’s story of dad’s record-setting homebuilt now available in paperback On July 25, 2010, Arnold Ebneter flew across the country in a plane he designed and built himself, setting a world record for aircraft of its class. He was 82 at the time and the flight represented the culmination of a dream he’d cultivated since his childhood in the 1930s. In the book, “Propeller Under the Bed,” Eileen Bjorkman — a pilot and aeronautical engineer — shares her father’s journey from teenage airplane enthusiast to Air Force pilot and Boeing engineer. She gives us a glimpse into life growing up in a “flying family” with two pilots for parents, a family plane named Charlie and, quite literally, a propeller under her parents’ bed. Bjorkman offers a personal take on the history of aircraft homebuilding, as well as how the homebuilt aircraft movement has contributed to aviation and innovation in America. The hardcover book was published in March 2017 and is still available for $29.95. The paperback version, released in August 2019, is priced at $22.95. ThePropellerUnderTheBed.com

tailBeacon STC’d uAvionix has received FAA Supplemental Type Certificate (STC) approval for its tailBeacon integrated rear position light ADS-B OUT solution. According to company officials, the tailBeacon can be installed in less than one hour, including documentation, by an A&P with Inspection Authorization (IA), as long as the installation does not require airframe modification. Price: $1,999. uAvionix.com


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Calendar of Events

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Western United States

Oct. 20, 2019, Los Gatos, CA. Hangar Flying and Coffee Drinking in Los Gatos every Tuesday morning at 7:30 am, 408-209-3067 Oct. 22, 2019, Reno, NV. Reno Area IMC Club Meeting, 775-393-9403 Oct. 24, 2019, Mountain View, CA. Mountain View Hangar Flying & Coffee Drinking Oct. 24, 2019, Concord, CA. Monthly Meeting, 925-813-5172 Oct. 26, 2019, Springerville, AZ. FlyIn Breakfast, 928-333-5746 Oct. 26, 2019, Redwood City, CA. BAY FLIGHT 2019, 650-946-1700 Oct. 26, 2019, Livermore, CA. Vintage Aircraft Display Days, 925-915-0120 Oct. 26, 2019, Renton, WA. IFR Workshop And RFS Safety Seminar, 425-728-8922 Oct. 26, 2019, Camas, WA. High Altitude Physiology Safety Seminar, 360-281-0196 Oct. 27, 2019, Los Gatos, CA. Hangar Flying and Coffee Drinking in Los Gatos every Tuesday morning at 7:30 am, 408-209-3067 Oct. 27, 2019, Livermore, CA. Vintage Aircraft Display Days, 925-915-0120 Oct. 30, 2019, Phoenix, AZ. Operation Raincheck; A Tour of Phoenix TRACON, 480-284-7434 Oct. 31, 2019, Mountain View, CA. Mountain View Hangar Flying & Coffee Drinking Nov. 01, 2019, Groveland, CA. PML Aviation Association Meeting Nov. 02, 2019, San Bernadino, CA. SBD Fest 2019 Nov. 02, 2019, Lincoln, CA. Pancakes and a movie Nov. 02, 2019, Groveland, CA. Vintage Aircraft Display At Pine Mountain Lake Nov. 02, 2019, Fresno, CA. Young Eagles Rally, 559-824-5246

Nov. 02, 2019, Upland, CA. EAA Chapter 448 Pancake Breakfast, 909-295-2284 Nov. 02, 2019, Perris, CA. Ultralight & Sportpilots of America Monthly Meeting/ Competition, 714-913-0215 Nov. 02, 2019, San Diego/El Ca, CA. Gillespie Pilots Association Monthly Meeting, 619-980-8941 Nov. 02, 2019, San Diego, CA. Plus One Flyers Club New Member Safety Briefing, 619-925-4100 Nov. 02, 2019, Corning, CA. PIC Seminars hosted by IASCO Flight Training & The Grand Flying Club Nov. 02, 2019, Hollister, CA. Frazier Lake Airpark Display Day, 831-634-0855 Nov. 02, 2019, Missoula, MT. EAA Chapter 517 Annual Meeting, 406-549-2933 Nov. 02, 2019, Sacramento, CA. CAF Sacramento Delta Squadron Monthly Meeting, 916-531-9397 Nov. 02, 2019, Groveland, CA. EAA Chapter 1337 Meeting, 209 962-5061 Nov. 02, 2019, Yuba City, CA. Dreams Take Flight Fundraising Dinner, 530-300-5988

South Central United States

Oct. 20, 2019, Fort Worth, TX. Bell Helicopter Fort Worth Alliance Air Show, 800-318-9268 Oct. 20, 2019, Houston, TX. Wings over Houston Air Show, 713-266-4492 Oct. 21, 2019, Chickasha, OK. Chickasha Safety Meeting, 405-574-6842 Oct. 21, 2019, Fort Worth, TX. Difficult Decisions: What would you do? 301-695-2175 Oct. 22, 2019, Hammond, LA. Hammond Flying Club Monthly Meeting, 504-450-7718 Oct. 22, 2019, Addison, TX. Difficult Decisions What would you do?, 301-695-2175 Oct. 25-27, 2019, Dallas, TX. Wings

Over Dallas WWII Air Show Oct. 26-27, 2019, Sheppard AFB, TX. Sheppard AFB Air Show, 940-676-2732 Oct. 26, 2019, Oklahoma City, OK. Pancake Breakfast & Young Eagles Flights, 405-495-1612 Oct. 26, 2019, North Little Rock, AR. EAA Chapter 165 Super Breakfast, 419 360-7414 Oct. 28, 2019, Houston, TX. Difficult Decisions What would you do?, 301-695-2175 Nov. 01, 2019, Kingman, KS. Friday Aviators Coffee 0800 Hour, 620-755-4440 Nov. 02, 2019, Houma, LA. Cajun FlyIn Festival, 985-859-5771 Nov. 02, 2019, Ponca City, OK. Ponca City Fly-In/Drive-In Breakfast, 580-762-3794 Nov. 02-03, 2019, Burnet, TX. 99s 90th Birthday Party And Young Eagles Event, 512-507-6521 Nov. 02, 2019, Rockwall, TX. Rockwall Airport Appreciation Day, 972-771-0151

North Central United States

Oct. 22, 2019, Minneapolis, MN. Identifying Managing Mitigating Risk, 952-210-8600 Oct. 22, 2019, Detroit, MI. Civil Air PatrolWillow Run Composite Squadron meeting, 734-674-3239 Oct. 23, 2019, Anderson, IN. Weekly Chapter Gathering, 765-208-0299 Oct. 23, 2019, Chicago/Prospec, IL. Chicagoland Regional Aviation Leadership Townhall with AOPA, 630-781-8890 Oct. 23, 2019, Chicago/Prospec, IL. Chicago Executive Pilots Association and AOPA ASI "Difficult Decisions" present, 630-781-8890 Oct. 24, 2019, Anderson, IN. Weekly Chapter Gathering, 765-208-0299 Oct. 25, 2019, La Porte, IN. Lunch on the Fly, 219-324-3393 Oct. 25, 2019, Clinton, IA. Lunch at CWI Oct. 25-26, 2019, Oshkosh, WI. EAA AirVenture

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October 10, 2019

For more events and to stay up-to-date, go to www.socialflight.com 37 Breakfast, 260-348-4776 Oct. 26, 2019, Shelbyville, IN. Murat Shrine Wings & Wheels, 317-469-3227 Oct. 26, 2019, Waterford Township, MI. Barnstormers Fly-In DriveIn, 248-666-2211 Oct. 27, 2019, Juneau, WI. Fifth Annual Pumpkin Drop, 920-386-2402 Oct. 28, 2019, Green Bay, WI. Difficult Decisions: What would you do?, 301-695-2175 Oct. 29, 2019, Detroit, MI. Civil Air PatrolWillow Run Composite Squadron meeting, 734-674-3239 Oct. 29, 2019, Milwaukee, WI. Difficult Decisions: What would you do?, 301-695-2175 Oct. 30, 2019, Anderson, IN. Weekly Chapter Gathering, 765-208-0299 Oct. 30, 2019, Madison, WI. Difficult Decisions: What would you do?, 301-695-2175 Oct. 31, 2019, Anderson, IN. Weekly Chapter Gathering, 765-208-0299 Oct. 31, 2019, Eau Claire, WI. Difficult Decisions: What would you do?, 301-695-2175 Nov. 02, 2019, Peoria, IL. EAA Chapter 563 Pancake Breakfast, 309-696-1428 Nov. 02, 2019, York, NE. York Hangar Breakfast Nov. 02, 2019, Sterling/Rockfa, IL. Sauk Valley Pilots Association Meeting, 815-213-7939 Nov. 02, 2019, Waukesha, WI. November Young Eagles, 414-732-6782 Nov. 03, 2019, Nappanee, IN. EAA Chapter 938 Meeting, 574-453-6642 Nov. 03, 2019, Peoria, IL. VMC Club in EAA 563's Hangar at Mt Hawley Airport (3MY), 309-691-3613

North Eastern United States Oct. 20, 2019, Meriden, CT. EAA

Chapter 27 Monthly Meeting Oct. 21, 2019, Columbus, OH. Civil Air Patrol Columbus Senior Squadron Meeting, 740-990-9169 Oct. 21, 2019, Pittstown, NJ. EAA Chapter 643 Monthly Meeting, 908-487-7757 Oct. 21, 2019, Rochester, NY. Artisan Flying Club, 585-615-5710 Oct. 22, 2019, Stevensville, MD. Difficult Decisions: What would you do?, 301-695-2175 Oct. 22, 2019, Ithaca, NY. Difficult Decisions: What would you do?, 301-695-2175 Oct. 23, 2019, Frederick, MD. Difficult Decisions: What would you do?, 301-695-2175 Oct. 23, 2019, Buffalo, NY. Difficult Decisions: What would you do?, 301-695-2175 Oct. 24, 2019, Louisville, KY. Louisville IMC Club, 502-396-2880 Oct. 24, 2019, Brockport, NY. Difficult Decisions: What would you do?, 301-695-2175 Oct. 24, 2019, Monroe Township, NJ. EAA VMC Club Meeting Oct. 25, 2019, Tonawanda, NY. TAK Composite Squadron Weekly Meeting, 716-873-5657 Oct. 26-27, 2019, Hagerstown, MD. ABS Maintenance Academy Oct. 26, 2019, Norfolk, VA. EAA Chapter 339/ CAF ODS Breakfast, 757-679-8842 Nov. 01, 2019, Tonawanda, NY. TAK Composite Squadron Weekly Meeting, 716-873-5657 Nov. 02, 2019, Suffolk, VA. SFQ FlyIn Social, 757-287-7318 Nov. 02, 2019, Stow, MA. Hangar Talk, 978-897-3933 Nov. 02, 2019, Cleveland, OH. Books Breakfast and Book Signings, 216-623-1111

Nov. 02, 2019, Lancaster, PA. Lancaster Fly-In Drive-In Breakfast, 717-712-1007 Nov. 02, 2019, Winchester, VA. A Data-Driven Approach to Lowering GA Accidents, 402-200-8930

South Eastern United States

Oct. 20-21, 2019, Evergreen, AL. SERFI Southeast Regional Fly In Oct. 20, 2019, Sumter, SC. South Carolina Breakfast Club at KSMS, 803-446-0214 Oct. 22, 2019, Arcadia, FL. Touch N Go Tuesday, 863-494-7844 Oct. 22, 2019, Chamblee, GA. Civil Air Patrol/ PDK Senior Squadron, 404-829-3732 Oct. 24-27, 2019, Greenville, SC. Wings of Freedom Tour Oct. 25, 2019, Fort Myers, FL. Fly-in Fridays Hot Dog Social, 239-590-6600 Oct. 26-27, 2019, Jacksonville Beach, FL. Jacksonville Sea and Sky Spectacular Oct. 26, 2019, Dayton, TN. Civil Air Patrol Fly-In Drive-In Breakfast, Oct. 26, 2019, Merritt Island, FL. Young Eagles Rally, 321-266-7410 Oct. 26, 2019, Savannah, GA. Savannah Aviation Pancake Breakfast and Fly-In, 757-329-0266 Oct. 26, 2019, Shelbyville, TN. Shelbyville Fly-In Breakfast, 931-680-9652 Oct. 26, 2019, Oneida, TN. Scott County (KSCX) Tennessee Fly-In, 330-347-0700 Oct. 28, 2019, Lawrenceville, GA. Civil Air Patrol/Gwinnett Composite Squadron, 404-444-9852 Oct. 29, 2019, Arcadia, FL. Touch N Go Tuesday, 863-494-7844 Oct. 29, 2019, Chamblee, GA. Civil Air Patrol/ PDK Senior Squadron, 404-829-3732 Nov. 01-02, 2019, Stuart, FL. Stuart Air Show

Oct. 26, 2019, Wetaskiwin, AB. Wetaskiwin (CEX3) Coffee and Treats, 780-370-3456 Oct. 27, 2019, Smiths Falls, ON. 33 Full Stop Fly-In Breakfast Nov. 01, 2019, Cambridge, ON. Gyro Information Night, 519-497-9828 Nov. 02, 2019, Three Hills, AB. Coffee Break Fly-In, 403-443-8434

(PS Form 3526)

1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9.

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10. 11. 12. 13. 14. 15.

A. B. C. D.

Garmin G600txi

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30th Anniversary Event, 772-781-4882 Nov. 01, 2019, Fort Myers, FL. Fly-in Fridays Hot Dog Social, 239-590-6600 Nov. 01-03, 2019, Punta Gorda, FL. Florida International Air Show, 941-268-0968 Nov. 02, 2019, Winchester, TN. EAA Chapter 699 Fly-In Breakfast, 931-967-0143 Nov. 02-03, 2019, Moody AFB, GA. Thunder Over South Georgia Nov. 02, 2019, Titusville, FL. Pancake Breakfast at X21, Arthur Dunn Air Park Nov. 02, 2019, Rome, GA. EAA Chapter 709 Breakfast Fly-In, 678-362-3123 Nov. 02, 2019, Morristown, TN. Morristown Airport Fly-In/Drive-In Breakfast Nov. 02, 2019, Brooksville, FL. EAA Chapter Monthly Meeting, 813-758-4196 Nov. 02, 2019, Sumter, SC. Wheels and Wings Nov. 02, 2019, Apalachicola, FL. 56th Annual Florida Seafood Festival & Pancake Breakfast Fly-In, 850-290-8282 Nov. 02, 2019, Gilbert, SC. EAA Chapter 1467 Fall Fly-In, 803-359-3886 Nov. 02, 2019, Weirsdale, FL. EAA Chapter 1236 2019 BBQ Fly-In, 203-217-2851 Nov. 02, 2019, Salisbury, NC. EAA Chapter 1083 First Saturday Lunch Nov. 03, 2019, Orangeburg, SC. South Carolina Breakfast Club at KOGB, 803-446-0214

E. F. G. H. I. 17. 18.

Publication Title: General Aviation News Publication Number: 1536-8513 Filing Date: September 23, 2019 Issue Frequency: Semi-Monthly Number of Issues Published Annually: 24 Annual Subscription Price: $29.95 Complete Mailing Address of Known Office of Publication: 11314 Huggins Meyer Rd. SW, Lakewood WA 98498 Complete Mailing Address of Headquarters or General Business Office of Publisher (Not printer): 11314 Huggins Meyer Rd SW, Lakewood WA 98498 Full Names and Complete Mailing Addresses of Publisher, Editor, and Managing Editor: Publisher, Ben Sclair, 11314 Huggins Meyer Rd SW, Lakewood WA 98498; Editor, Janice Wood, PO Box 39099, Lakewood WA 98496 Owner: Flyer Media, Inc., 11314 Huggins Meyer Rd SW, Lakewood, WA 98496; Ben Sclair, 11314 Huggins Meyer Rd SW, Lakewood WA 98496 Known Bondholders, Mortgagees, and Other Security Holders Owning or Holding 1 Percent or More of Total Amount of Bonds, Mortgages, or Other Securities: None Tax Status. The purpose, function, and nonprofit status of this organization and the exempt status for federal income tax purposes: Has Not Changed During Preceding 12 Months Publication Title: General Aviation News Issue Date for Circulation Data Below: September 20, 2019 Extent and Nature of Circulation Average no. copies Actual no. copies each issue during single inssue published preceding 12 months nearest to filing date Total Number of Copies (Net press run) ................................................................24,553 ........................... 24,595 Paid Circulation (By Mail and Outside the Mail) 1. Mailed Outside-County Paid Subscriptions Stated on PS Form 3541 ...............22,414 ........................... 22,175 4. Paid Distribution by Other Classes of Mail Through the USPS ................................17 .................................. 15 Total Paid Distribution ............................................................................................22,431 ........................... 22,190 Free or Nominal Rate Distribution (By Mail and Outside the Mail) 1. Free or Nominal Rate Outside-County Copies included on PS Form 3541 .........2,009 ............................. 2,355 4. Free or Nominal Rate Distribution Outside the Mail................................................ 113 .................................. 50 Total Free or Nominal Rate Distribution ...................................................................2,122 ............................. 2,405 Total Distribution ....................................................................................................24,541 ........................... 24,580 Copies not Distributed ..................................................................................................12 .................................. 15 Total .......................................................................................................................24,552 ........................... 24,595 Percent Paid .........................................................................................................91.41% .......................... 90.28% Printed in the October 10, 2019 issue of this publication. I certify that all information furnished on this form is true and complete. (signed) Ben Sclair, Publisher


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3300 - Luscombe Northern California 1947 Luscombe 8E. 235 Lycoming, Garmin ADS-B Out. Day/Night VFR. $31,500 or make offer. Must sell. 808358-0740. 3310 - Luscombe Parts FREE 400-PG UNIVAIR CATALOG w/hundreds of FAA-PMA’d parts. info@univair.com or www.univair.com Order toll-free 888-4335433. Foreign orders pay postage. 4455 - Stinson FREE 400-PG UNIVAIR CATALOG w/hundreds of FAA-PMA’d parts. info@univair.com or www.univair.com Order toll-free 888-4335433. Foreign orders pay postage. 4600 - Taylorcraft 1940 Taylorcraft BC65/75. Always Hangared. 2600-TT, 1030-SMOH. LSA. Arizona Plane. $15,000 OBO. 503-630-7547. Leave Message. May 2019 Annual. 4605 - Taylorcraft Parts FREE 400-PG UNIVAIR CATALOG w/hundreds of FAA-PMA’d parts. info@univair.com or www.univair.com Order toll-free 888-4335433. Foreign orders pay postage. 5300 - Experimentals

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Aviation Abbreviations A/C .................................. Air Conditioning ADs ......................Airworthiness Directives ADF ................. Automatic Direction Finder AH ...................................Artificial Horizon A&P ........................Airframe & Powerplant AP .........................................Audio Panel A/P ............................................Autopilot CDI ...................Course Deviation Indicator CHT ................. Cylinder Heat Temperature Com .......................Communication Radio C/R ................................ Counter Rotating CT ........................ Carburetor Temperature DF ...................................Direction Finder DG ...................................Directional Gyro DME ..........Distance Measuring Equipment EFIS ................................Electronic Flight Instrument System EGT.................... Exhaust Gas Temperature

ELT ............ Emergency Locator Transmitter FD ......................................Flight Director FWF .................................Firewall Forward GPS .................. Global Positioning System GS ...................................... Groundspeed G/S ........................................ Glide Slope GSP ...........................Ground Service Plug HF ................................... High Frequency hp.......................................... horsepower HSI ............... Horizontal Situation Indicator IFR ....................... Instrument Flight Rules ILS.................. Instrument Landing System LE ...........................................Left Engine LMB..........................Light Marker Beacon LOC ........................................... Localizer Loran............. Long Range Area Navigation LR..........................................Long Range LRT ...............................Long Range Tanks

MB ...................................Marker Beacon MDH .......................Major Damage History MP ...............................Manifold Pressure NDH ...........................No Damage History NM .................................... Nautical Miles Nav................................ Navigation Radio NavCom .................................Navigation/ CommunicationRadio OAT...................... Outside Air Temperature OH ............................................. Overhaul RB ..................................Rotating Beacon RDF ........................Radio Direction Finder RE ........................................Right Engine RG ................................. Retractable Gear RMI ....................Radio Magnetic Indicator RNAV ............................... Area Navigation SBs ................................Service Bulletins SCMOH .......Since Chrome Major Overhaul

SFRM .......... Since Factory Remanufacture SHS ..............................Since Hot Section SMOH......................Since Major Overhaul SOH.................................. Since Overhaul S/N ....................................Serial Number SPOH ....................... Since Prop Overhaul STOH .......................... Since Top Overhaul STOL........................Short Takeoff/Landing TBO ......................Time Between Overhaul TT ............................................ Total Time TTAE ................ Total Time Airframe/Engine TTAF ........................... Total Time Airframe TTSN .......................Total Time Since New XPDR .................................... Transponder VLF ............................ Very Low Frequency VOR ............................... VHF Omni Range


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9650 - Montana New Airpark lots available at Great Falls International Airport in Montana. Multiple hangar sites now available in a planned hangar development. Full utilities and road to sites. KGTF has 10,500+ ft all weather runway and a 6,000+ ft crosswind. Customs onsite. Hangar your plane within 30 miles of top trout fishing in the US! Low land rents of $0.20 per sf per year. Call Lara at 406-727-3404. 9650 - North Carolina We Sell Airpark & Airstrip Properties in North & South Carolina. Call or email us to find or sell your aviation real estate in these states. 704-798-5214 or geneva@nc-airparks.com. 9650 - Pennsylvania

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Roads are Paved! Fly/Drive in today to check out the beautiful, quiet land available at Skyline Estates in Factoryville, PA next to Seamans Airport! Just 10 minutes away from Interstate 81. Call 570-335-9000 or visit website for more details on just one of the lots for sale. Skylineestates.us

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9650 - Real Estate Publisher’s Notice: All real estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to the Fair Housing Act which makes it illegal to advertise “any preference, limitation or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status or national origin, or an intention, to make any such preference, limited or discrimination.” Familial status includes children under the age of 18 living w/parents or legal custodian, pregnant women & people securing custody of children under 18. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate which is in violation of the law. Our readers are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available on an equal opportunity basis. To complain of discrimination call HUD toll-free 800-6699777. Toll-free for the hearing impaired: 800927-9277.

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and scenic views of Mt. Baker. Enjoy the outdoor covered area for barbecues or sitting around the fire! 360-920-4159.

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Another one going up! AeroVillas at West Houston Airport. Build your dream home and live with your plane. On a 10,000 sq. ft. lot, West Houston Airport offers full service amenities, Jet A or 100LL fuel delivered to your hangar, concrete lighted taxiways, AWOS, a 4000’ runway and much more. Maintenance and Avionics Shops are located on the field. Visit the website www.aerovillas.com to see what the AeroVillas have to offer. 18000 Groschke Rd, Houston, TX 77084, or call 281-492-2130, woody@westhoustonairport.com. 9650 - Washington

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Fly Into Your Own Private Valley w/2600’x32’ Irrigated Lawn grass Runway, Extendable To 4000ft. 430 Acres With Adjudicated 1st Class Water Rights. Turn Key Operation w/1.5 Miles Creek Frontage And Ponds. Hunting, Fishing, Hiking, Skiing, Horseback Riding And Snowmobiling Out The Front Door. USFS on three sides. County Road. Seller Financing. jzwar51@gmail.com or 509-923-2564.

October 10, 2019 $399K. Lush Waterfront Parcel near runway: $415K. Taxiway Cabin w/Tie-Down & Room for Hangar: $339K Judy, Flying Island Realty, 360-375-6302 Cell: 360-420-4346, judy@ flyingislandrealty.com, www.flyingislandrealty. com Build dream home/hangar. Wooded half-acre lot in Sunshine Acres, Diamond Point in Sequim, WA. Ocean view. Taxi plane to airport. 714-615-8062 or 858-472-3320.

20 words $27 SAN JUAN AVIATION ESTATES: BLAKELY ISLAND, WA. The San Juan’s Premier Airpark. Paved Lighted Runway. Exceptional Marina. Owner Access to 3000ac protected forestland w/2 - 70ac Lakes. NEW LISTING: Turn-key Runway/Marine View Home: $490K. Superb Wft Home - all New Decks & more: $1,129,000 - adjacent Wft Parcel: $439K. Contemporary Runway/Marine View Home:

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