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$2.95 • June 7, 2013 65th Year. No. 11

Dream Machines

Special Focus: Destinations P. 18 The devil in disguise P. 10 Helping OKC tornado victims P. 6 Tips to beat ‘get-there-itis’ P. 14

PERIODICALS - TIME-SENSITIVE DATED MATERIALS


June 7, 2013

Briefing

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SkyCraft Airplanes has begun production of its SD-1 Minisport (pictured), which will be available for order as an S-LSA starting in July. The SD-1 boasts a 118 mph cruise speed, 1,400 fpm climb rate, 39 mph stall speed, and five hours of endurance, according to company officials. Price is set at $54,850, which includes a Hirth F-23 dual-ignition, fuel-injected engine, Dynon glass panel, and more. SkycraftAirplanes.com

After three accidents involving airplanes colliding with meteorological towers, the National Transportation Safety Board wants the FAA to require all towers to be registered, marked and lighted. It also proposed that the FAA create and maintain a publicly accessible database for the required registration of the towers. NTSB.gov The Aircraft Owners and Pilots Association (AOPA) Foundation has established a new grant program for nonprofit organizations doing charitable work through general aviation. Grants of up to $10,000 will be made

people who shared aviation experiences with Robertson. Indiegogo.com/projects/CliffRobertson-Documentary Michelin Aircraft Tire has introduced a free app for aircraft mechanics and pilots that shows how to maintain tires to maximize performance and minimize costs. The app includes a Tire Wear Guide that provides photographs and descriptions of the most common wear conditions for quick reference. AirMichelin.com

Photo courtesy Skycraft Airplanes

Online pilot supply retailer PilotMall.com is relocating its operations to the Lakeland Linder Regional Airport (LAL), on the SUN ’n FUN campus. A SUN ’n FUN sponsor for years, the company opened its “aviation superstore” there in 2009. Now it is moving its offices and warehouses from Albert Whitted Airport (SPG) in St. Petersburg to LAL. A small retail pilot shop will remain at SPG. PilotMall.com

New Jersey Governor Chris Christie has declared May “General Aviation Appreciation Month.” The GA industry in New Jersey contributes $1.7 billion to the economy annually. State.NJ.us/governor to non-profits to fund work for one year starting in October. Grants will be awarded in September. Applications will be accepted until July 1. AOPAFoundation.org Virginia has become the first state in the nation to have 100% participation in the AOPA Airport Support Network (ASN), a program that recruits volunteers to act as watchdogs for their local airports, as well as liaisons between their local communities, area pilots and airport management. There are 2,500 ASN volunteers nationwide, including the 66 in Virginia, one at each of its public use airports. AOPA.org Oklahoma Governor Mary Fallin has signed HB 1009, adding aviation

and fly-ins to the state’s recreational use statute covering non-public lands. The new law protects private airstrip owners from litigation from non-commercial aviation activity on their airports. Donations collected at fly-ins on private land are specifically addressed and do not constitute commercial status, according to officials with the Recreational Aviation Foundation. The added protection takes effect Nov. 1, 2013. TheRAF.org An IndieGoGo campaign has been launched to raise $9,500 to cover the development costs of a documentary on Academy Award winning actor — and pilot — Cliff Robertson. The filmmakers note they are open to suggestions on who should appear in the documentary, but add they are specifically looking for

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Nebraska Governor Dave Heineman also proclaimed May “General Aviation Appreciation Month.” The proclamation is the third by Heineman, following ones in 2010 and 2012. GA has an annual economic impact in the Cornhusker state of $721 million. Governor.Nebraska.gov The star of Disney’s animated feature “Planes” will be featured at this year’s AirVenture in Oshkosh during the airshow. Playing the role of Dusty in the airshow performances is Texas-based aerial applicator Rusty Lindeman, who customized one of his own Air Tractor AT-301 airplanes to match Dusty’s paint scheme and features. The movie, which will be shown at AirVenture, opens in theaters Aug. 9. Disney.com/Planes, AirVenture.org

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General Aviation News —  800.426.8538

June 7, 2013

WICHITA, Kan. — The first production flight of Cessna’s Turbo Skylane 182 JT-A took place May 21 at the company’s facility in Independence, Kan. The aircraft is powered by a piston engine specifically designed to run on Jet-A fuel. “The Turbo Skylane JT-A performed just as expected,” said Cessna senior test pilot Dale Bleakney. “The weather conditions were fantastic, and we took the turbo 182 up for what turned out to be a very normal first flight. We flew for 2.3 hours, achieved a flight level of 8,000 feet, and attained a true air speed of 158 kts. We brought it in and did some takeoffs and landings, and everything went as expected.” “The JT-A is the result of years of hard work put in by our engineering,

research, and manufacturing teams,” said Jeff Umscheid, business leader for the Cessna 172, 182 and 206 model aircraft. “This is groundbreaking in that it is the first aircraft powered by a diesel engine specifically designed for aviation.” The 227-hp Safran-made SMA engine burns 11 gallons per hour of the typically lower-cost Jet-A fuel at the estimated maximum cruise speed of 156 knots. Flight at the maximum cruise speed demonstrates greater fuel efficiency, Cessna officials said, noting it is expected to burn approximately 30% to 40% less fuel than comparable avgas engines. The four-seat Turbo Skylane JT-A features the Garmin G1000 avionics. Cessna.com

Photo courtesy Cessna

First production flight for Cessna’s JT-A

Past SNF president Lyle Flagg dies Lyle Flagg, a SUN ’n FUN pioneer, board member and volunteer, passed away Tuesday, May 21, in Brandon, Fla. He was 85. Born Jan. 13, 1928, in Fayette, Maine, he was a Navy veteran of World War II and received his bachelors and masters degrees from the University of Maine. He moved with his wife and children to Florida in 1954, where he served a 40-year career in the Hillsborough County School System as principal of several schools, as well as the Director of Secondary Education for the school system. He retired in 1990. A dedicated community servant, he was a past trustee of Brandon Regional Hospital, past chairman of the Riverview and Brandon Chambers of Commerce, and president of the Brandon Lions and Rotary Clubs. His great joy in life was flying. He was a pilot with a commercial rating, a

member of the Experimental Aircraft Association and one of the original founders, past president and longtime board member of the SUN ’n FUN Fly In, held each year in Lakeland. He held the title of chairman emeritus of SUN ’n FUN. He also was a member of the Florida Air Museum and Quiet Birdmen, an honorary aviation fraternity. He is survived by his wife of 64 years, Vivian Perron Flagg, his daughter Lee Hinkle (Cliff), his sons Reggie (Cherie), Dan, Howard (Lynn), Tom (Linda), Tim (Pam), nine grandchildren and two great grandchildren. In lieu of flowers the family requests contributions be made to the Lyle Flagg Endowment, University of South Florida Foundation, 4202 E. Fowler Ave., ALC 100, Tampa, Fla., 33620. The endowment will be used for students in educational administration.

Cover Photo by Hayman Tam

NOTICE: The next issue will be mailed June 21, 2013.

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June 7, 2013

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Airworthy Autogas takes off Beginning this fall, Airworthy AutoGas will produce and distribute a high purity, low vapor pressure, ethanol-free, 93 octane, premium unleaded automotive gasoline for general aviation. “A growing number of general aviation aircraft do not require 100LL avgas, or a 100 octane unleaded drop-in replacement. That, coupled with the

scarcity of suitable ethanol-free automotive gasoline in the marketplace, resulted in the development of Airworthy AutoGas,” said Mark Ellery, director of business development. “Bringing Airworthy AutoGas to the marketplace provides an alternative for the majority of general aviation aircraft without compromising airworthiness. Our goal

is to get pilots flying more, for less.” While the industry, the FAA and the EPA work to find a drop-in replacement for 100LL, many pilots want to use automotive fuel to power their planes, but can’t because of the scarcity of ethanolfree gasoline, company officials noted. “The quality of the fuel for GA must be controlled for aviation use, because

fuel characteristics affect engine and aircraft performance,” company officials note. It accomplishes this with a patent-pending formulation that meets or exceeds the requirements of ASTM D4814, Lycoming Engines SI-1070 “S” specifications and numerous EAA and Petersen Aviation STCs, officials add. AirWorthyAutoGas.com

EAA asked to cover some AirVenture controller costs The FAA is asking the Experimental Aircraft Association to cover some of the costs for its operations at next month’s AirVenture, including air traffic controllers’ travel, per diems, and overtime, which have traditionally been covered by the FAA. “This issue is significantly bigger than AirVenture,” said EAA Chairman Jack Pelton. “We’ll have full air traffic staffing and operations at Oshkosh and are well-prepared for our event. Unfortunately this is coming at a great cost to EAA. The larger issue, however, is about the unknown and alarming new direction the FAA is taking in charging for an equivalent level of safety that has previously been provided. If the

FAA asks for reimbursement on certain AirVenture operations for which it has always budgeted, where else could the agency unilaterally impose assessments, fees, and other costs on GA? It’s a frightening thought.” EAA and other aviation organizations maintain that GA contributes its fair share through the aviation fuel tax. EAA officials said they will “vigorously oppose efforts to burden aviators with costs for which the FAA already receives funding and has budgeted as part of its stated mission of providing a safe, efficient national airspace system.” Echoing the EAA’s comments are officials with the Aircraft Owners and

Pilots Association (AOPA), who said this is akin to double taxation. “We’ve warned that the Obama administration wants to hit general aviation with user fees, and that’s exactly what it’s doing to the EAA and AirVenture,” said AOPA President Craig Fuller. “To depart from previous practice suggests that the FAA has entered a new, pay-as-you-go era with little regard for safety. General aviation already pays for FAA services through substantial fuel taxes. These user fees — there is no other word for them — are a double taxation.” “These sorts of user fees will stymie a vibrant, innovative general aviation industry that is just starting to realize

economic recovery,” Fuller continued. “This administration seems to feel that it can tax and impose additional fees without consequence. But these tactics will ground dozens of pilots and planes, eliminate jobs and diminish GA’s contribution to our economy.” User fees have again been included in the Obama administration’s latest proposed budget, and GA’s alphabet groups are working to defeat that proposal. A bipartisan group of 223 members of Congress recently signed a letter to the president opposing such fees. Congress has repeatedly defeated previous user fee proposals. EAA.org, AOPA.org

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General Aviation News —  800.426.8538

The view from above By DREW STEKETEE Being a pilot offers a special overview of the world and the events affecting it. It’s part of what makes flying special. Last month’s devastating tornados call this to mind. Our airborne views of human civilization and nature’s ways are perspectives the Average Joe might not see in a lifetime. The destruction in Oklahoma recalls other disasters, reminding us that extremes of weather and happenstance can occur anywhere. It happened outside usually mild Washington, D.C., in April 2002, when an F5 tornado ground through D.C.’s southeastern exurbs. The town of La Plata, Maryland, once a familiar landmark on the old U.S. 301 trek to Florida, was devastated. A week after the tornado, I pulled out the old L-16 to trace the twister’s path. If you saw TV coverage from Oklahoma, you know what it looked like. Their brave news chopper jocks

broke new ground in reporting — not only imaging post-storm destruction, but trailing funnel clouds in real time as they approached the city. Post-storm, those Oklahoma news choppers immediately swept back over the tornado track, offering rescue agencies fast knowledge of storm scope and damage. The Civil Air Patrol did the same later with detailed aerial photos. Even in this day of satellite reconnaissance and drones, piloted aircraft can do some things first and best. My 2002 flight over the La Plata tornado’s 20-mile path was a humbling eye-opener. It revealed not just miles of splintered roofs and flattened buildings, but an absolute scouring down to southern Maryland’s red earth. It humbles the mortal soul. And it encourages everyone NOT to be complacent about nature’s wildest furies. If you’ve seen it, you won’t forget it. There — another life experience open to us because we fly. Few are so dramatic, but all are life-expanding.

We see our world on every flight as others seldom see it. And from this unique perspective, we may understand our world more fully. It’s a noble thing and a unique gift. It makes the investment all the more worth it, despite the price. Understand: I’m not encouraging “Lookie Lous” to go sightseeing and get in the way. The highways around Moore, Oklahoma, were jammed poststorm, as usual. I presume the airspace was the same. Lest you be tempted early in a future disaster, let me recall a bit of obscure, but somewhat related, aviation history, where sightseers “got theirs.” Researching AOPA PILOT’s predecessor, I found a story on the famous 1947 Texas City disaster of freighter explosions and refinery fires, billed as one of the largest non-nuclear explosions in history. It still may be America’s worst industrial accident, killing more than 500 and injuring more than 5,000. The AOPA angle? Turns out two

June 7, 2013

flyers in a Piper buzzed in at 1,500 feet for a look-see just as a blast obliterated the whole place. Even at altitude, the fabric of their wings was blown/ burned off and down they came. AOPA wrote them up as valiant pilots and martyred “heroes.” Perhaps someone with local knowledge can enlighten me, but I thought AOPA was polishing the apple. If those guys were sightseers, they were in the wrong place at the wrong time for the wrong reason. Nota Bene in case you’re tempted. With such exceptions noted, think of your license as a ticket to see the world as few can see it — even if millions today can look sideways out of an airliner every day. YOU have a front-row seat and the freedom to go (carefully) where it’s happening. “It” may be a great island, a fun occasion or — perchance — a first-hand look at what nature and human events have wrought. Savor the opportunity. Partake responsibly.

By TODD HUVARD In the face of a frightening afternoon across the Oklahoma City region, while a massive killer tornado was ripping through their homes, the folks at AIC Title Service were continuing to solve problems for aircraft owners that were depending on them. By the end of the day, the full scope of what had happened began to settle over them. Several of the staff and escrow agents had lost portions of their homes, or had relatives wiped out. Others took in friends who lost everything. Their world is normally one of taking chaos and making it streamlined — corralling loose ends and details and making aircraft buying and selling transactions a miracle of competence.

After the twister, their personal lives are utterly disrupted. The story is the same for people at other escrow and title companies in OKC, for workers at the FAA or aviation companies in the area — FBOs, airport staff and others. The friends we depend on at aviation firms in OKC need our help! The OKC Aviation Community Fund will donate all monies received through June 30, 2013, directly to the victims who are a part of the aviation community. “The generosity of the aviation community is amazing,” said Robin Eissler, Sky Hope Network Founder and President. “Now, it’s time to give back to this incredible community and help our friends in need. If you have ever bought or sold an airplane, you have worked

Photo courtesy Civil Air Patrol

OKC tornado fund created to assist aviation victims

The devastation from the Moore, Oklahoma, tornado has been documented by crews from the Civil Air Patrol, who have taken thousands of aerial and ground photos since the twister. with these professionals in Oklahoma City, and now it’s our turn to support them.” The fund is being managed by Sky Hope Network — a business aviation

non-profit that responds to crisis and disasters with aviation resources. Sky Hope will lead the effort to provide direct and immediate assistance to those aviation industry workers who need assistance. With the larger relief response underway on the ground in the region, the fund allows us to take care of our own during this disaster. Donations can be made via SkyHope.org or by mail at: Sky Hope Network, P.O. Box 1459, Georgetown, Texas, 78627. Please contact Sky Hope Network directly at 561-714-3070 for large donations. All donations are welcome, say officials, who note that any amount will add up as we work together to help our aviation community. Sky-Hope.org


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8

General Aviation News —  800.426.8538

By MEG GODLEWSKI It’s about to get more expensive to land at Santa Monica Airport (SMO) in southern California. On April 30 the Santa Monica City Council approved a landing fee of $5.48 per 1,000 pounds on all aircraft — transient and locally based alike. For the pilot of a Cessna 172, that’s $10.96 for each landing. The fee is slated to go into effect Aug. 1. The current City Landing Fee Program, which applies only to transient aircraft, was put into place in 2005. It requires every non-based aircraft to pay a fee of $2.07 per 1,000 pounds of maximum certified gross landing weight. Vector Airport Solutions, a company contracted by the city, administers the program. Each month departure information from Vector’s database is forwarded to the city, which sends out bills to aircraft owners. According to Santa Monica Director of Public Works Martin Pastucha, the latest fee increase is necessary to cover a “consistent budget shortfall.” “The airport owes $13.3 million to the general fund,” he said, noting that for several years, the general fund was used to subsidize airport operations.

The aviation community is skeptical of the budget figures presented by the city, noted Ed Story, a vice president with the California Pilot’s Association. “The city claims they have lost their community redevelopment funds because Governor [Jerry] Brown has cut back on these funds to the city,” he said. “The city claims they’ve lost $50 million and now the staff are under pressure to try to make [the airport] as close to break-even as possible. Under federal regulations the city can’t make money on the airport, but they can’t lose money on the airport either. It’s a delicate balance.” Story was one of more than 100 pilots who spoke against the landing fee increase, telling the city council it is “dumb, stupid and shortsighted.” “I told them that raising fees will cut down on activity at the airport,” he said, noting that it will be especially hard on the airport’s six flight schools because flight training requires repetitive touch and goes. “The schools make up 30% to 50% of the operations at the airport.” According to FAA data, there was an average of 297 daily operations at SMO in 2012. A majority is local traffic. Joe Justice, owner of Justice Aviation, one of SMO’s flight schools, said,

Photo courtesy City of Santa Monica

Landing fees increased at SMO

June 7, 2013

“The cost will have to be passed on to the people who are doing the training, and we will likely have to change the format of our training to minimize the number of landings at our airport. We’d have to fly the pattern here down to 5 feet off the deck to avoid those fees.” In addition to paying more for landing at SMO, Justice predicts student pilots will be paying for more aircraft time as they fly to Jack Northrop Field/ Hawthorne Municipal Airport (HHR) 8 nm to the southeast or Van Nuys Airport (VNY) 12 nm to the north to do repeated takeoffs and landings. The issue has caught the interest of the Aircraft Owners and Pilots Associa-

tion, who share the local pilots skepticism about the city’s figures on revenue generated by the airport and the budget shortfall. According to Bill Dunn, AOPA’s vice president of airports, “The city is not including income from ground leases, fixed-base operator fees, tie-down, or hangar fees as airport income against costs of airport operation. And since Santa Monica has decided to not accept future federal grants, all runway, taxiway, and airport developments are now self-funded.” LANDING FEES | See Page 24

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Positives tempered by uncertainty Charles Spence Capital Comments

WASHINGTON, D.C. — General aviation is getting attention here, but the results are mixed between a favorable outlook and a more pessimistic future. The direction it will take seems to be determined more by affecting influences than on the industry. Airlines cutting back on service presents a greater need for GA to maintain air transportation for all needs, from business travel, to cargo to emergencies. According to Forbes magazine, the 29 largest hub airports lost 8.8% of their yearly scheduled domestic flights in the six years between 2006 and 2012. Smaller airports with scheduled airline traffic reported a 21.3% drop. The expected outlook for domestic airlines in the future is to continue to retrench into fewer places, cutting the less profitable markets. This means a greater need for GA flights and serviceable GA airports. Business, particularly, needs air service to communities not well served by the airlines. That is not just corporate jets, but singles and light twins as well, because businesses of all sizes are helped by air transportation. These are positive signs for the future, but companies today are reluctant to move ahead to buy a plane (or make other large purchases) because of uncertainty about future costs and operations. Much of that uncertainty comes from the Obama administration’s insistence on a $100 per flight user fee for some GA operations and a change in tax write-offs. The flight fee is seen by many as part of the anti-general aviation attitude of the current administration. Some believe the threat to close general aviation control towers, the FAA’s new approaches to safety issues, and the agency’s plan to charge the Experimental Aircraft Association (EAA) for controller overtime, travel and per diem expenses at the annual AirVenture fly-in next month, could be more than a response to sequester. The National Transportation Safety Board has issued a number of recommendations for GA safety. FAA Administrator Michael Huerta recently called together heads of general aviation groups to talk more about

safety. The meeting also included representatives from the NTSB. The current stress on aviation safety is happening despite a decline in accidents, although a slight increase in rates. Some fear it might be an indication of an attempt to clear airspace for commercial flights after NextGen is workable. There are bright spots coming from Capitol Hill, however. GA caucuses are active in both the Senate and the

House of Representatives. When the FAA was publicly talking about closing towers — which many thought was an administration bluff in an attempt to scare Congress into stopping sequestration — a group of 44 senators pushed the FAA to use money included in a bill to end sequester-related airline flight delays to keep the towers open. Representative Mike Pompeo (RKansas) recently introduced a bill to set a deadline for restructuring outdated FAA regulations. A bipartisan companion bill was introduced in the Senate by Amy Klobuchar (D-Minn.) and Lisa Murkowski (R-Alaska). When introducing his bill, Pompeo said the president’s fee proposal, requested reduction in tax breaks for business aircraft, and constant referral

to business flyers as “fat cats” hurts the industry. “The president gives that speech, it spooks the market,” he noted. Meanwhile, Rep. Daniel Lipinski (D-Ill.), who represents a district in the president’s Chicagoland, said he is confident Congress will not go for the proposed flight fees. A member of Congress recently commented that a better understanding of general aviation by the public at large would make their jobs easier. The groups in Washington representing the various segments of general aviation generally are more optimistic than pessimistic about where GA is going. But, like a duck, they look calm on top, but underneath are paddling like the devil.

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5/28/13 2:37 PM


10

General Aviation News —  800.426.8538

User fees: The devil in disguise

June 7, 2013

Michael Magnell Guest Editorial As a worldwide international ferry pilot, I have a lot of experience dealing with user fees. Most countries have them to varying degrees and they can only be described as pernicious. They are not good for pilots and are horrible for general aviation. Our president wants to initiate a humble $100 user fee on GA jet flights only. That sounds innocuous enough, but with government’s insatiable appetite for money, that $100 user fee will soon spread to all GA aircraft and increase to hundreds of dollars. The fees will leech the blood right out of GA with no benefit to GA whatsoever. In fact, there may be no benefit at all, once the government hires thousands of new employees to administer the user fees. After taking the salaries and benefits of these new employees into consideration, it is dubious to think that the government will even make money on such fees. Our current form of paying an added tax on jet fuel and avgas is by far the best and most efficient way to fund GA. When flying in foreign countries I always try to limit my landings as much as possible to cut down on the hassles Michael Magnell is a seasoned ferry pilot who travels around the world. Find out more at TransOceanicFerry.com.

and expense of dealing with user fees. A landing in a foreign country can mean aggravated delays caused by having to deal with several government employees to pay fees. I would rather concentrate on the essential things — checking weather, getting fuel, and filing a flight plan. Many countries, such as Australia, charge more for IFR flight plans than for VFR. That sets up the perfect storm to where pilots try to get around filing IFR to save money. You get virtually no help from ATC if you are flying on a VFR flight plan in Australia. One time I was in a Cessna 210 descending VFR into the Sydney area when suddenly a Metroliner flying “VFR” dropped screaming out of the “clouds” and whisked right in front of me like a streaking meteor. Trust me, that was scary enough, but can you imagine planes flying around in the clouds without an IFR clearance in an area with dense air traffic like Los Angeles? Over the last five years, I’ve ferried 46 planes to Brazil, so I will use it as an example of how user fees work in other parts of the world. I have used many entrance points in Brazil, but during my most recent ferry I entered through Boa Vista, so I will use that experience GUEST EDITORIAL | See Page 24

LETTERS TO THE EDITOR FLYING IN ALASKA

I very much enjoyed your articles on Alaskan flying in the April 26 issue. In 1987 my wife and I, along with two other couples, one from Kansas and one from Wyoming, met in Edmonton and flew to Alaska, entering at Eagle to Ft. Yukon, Prudhoe Bay, Point Barrow, Kotzebue, Nome, Fairbanks, Anchorage and several other places before going down the coast via Juneau and Sitka back to the lower 48. That was a great flying experience and I would highly recommend flying to Alaska. JIM SCOTT Pomeroy, Wash.

RAF CADETS

When the May 10 issue arrived I was all set for a good read of the article about “RAF Cadets” by Bill Walker.

Have something to say? Send comments to comments@generalaviationnews.com or fax 858712-1960. Include your full name, address and telephone number (for verification purposed only). Please limit comments to 250 words or less. Unfortunately, the good Mr. Walker is confused about “RAF Cadets” and doubtless has confused American readers. Please allow this former RAF “type” and also a former “cadet” to untangle the mess so that it makes sense to one and all. The only cadets in the Royal Air Force are those training and graduating from one of the RAF colleges, such as Britain’s RAF College Cranwell, which is the equivalent to the U.S. Air Force Academy. Cranwell turns out highly qualified and commissioned RAF pilots, while one of the several technical colleges produces Britain’s technical

engineering officers. The very young ladies and gentlemen featured in the article are Britain’s equivalent to the US Civil Air Patrol, but with a difference. The Air Training Corps (ATC) in the UK does focus more on flying and its requirements than does the CAP in the USA. In Mr. Walker’s piece he constantly referred to them as RAF “air cadets,” which they are not. To be correct they should have been referred to as ATC cadets. One may enter Britain’s ATC at age 14-1/2 years and it is overseen and commanded entirely by volunteers. These reserve officers are readily identified by

the very small gold letters VR on each lapel of their officer’s tunic. That signifies Volunteer Reserve. Many of those reserves formed the nucleus of early Battle of Britain squadrons in 1940. Many ATC squadrons were set up and “paraded” within the confines of a local high school, as did mine near the ancient Roman city of Bath. My service in the ATC, shortly after World War II, and the stick time gained in Airspeed Oxfords, Tiger Moths, Chipmunks and gliders, led directly to me joining the Royal Air Force and training at one of the several technical establishments. Of course, being an RAF “brat” who was born on an RAF station, did much to guide my direction and to follow in my RAF father’s long service footsteps! JIM NEWMAN Kent City, Mich.


June 7, 2013

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Just like Christmas morning Jamie Beckett Politics for Pilots There are some among us who feel aviation is in decline. I disagree, of course. You might even say I famously disagree, since I am prone to regular outbursts of unrestrained optimism in a public forum. It would be fair to go so far as to say I possess an almost evangelical zeal for aviation and its power to transform and enrich the lives of those who participate in it. Do I overstate the point? I don’t think so. I recently met up with a crowd of aviation freaks at a spectacular hub of aviation awesomeness. What a time we had. The freaks were students from the Central Florida Aerospace Academy and their chaperones. The adults were an even split of CFAA staff, SUN ’n FUN’s educational workforce, and a contingent of administrators from Polk State College’s aerospace degree program. My excuse for being there had to do with my humble role as president of the Polk Aviation Alliance, a unique combination of aviation-centric entities who have banded together in order to make the most out of what we all have to offer each other and the public at large. The spectacular hub of aviation awesomeness was JetBlue University, a Jamie Beckett is a CFI and A&P who stepped into the political arena in an effort to promote and protect GA at his local airport. He founded and serves as a member of the Polk Aviation Alliance in central Florida and is an unabashed aviation advocate. You can reach him at Jamie@GeneralAviationNews.com.

three-story building on the outer fringe of Orlando International Airport. This is where the vast majority of JetBlue’s employees receive the training required to fill their positions with the level of professionalism and customer service expected of them. It’s an amazing place. The dozen high school students in our company were excited, but played it cool as best they could. They are teenagers, after all, and the teenager’s universal code of conduct requires an aloof attitude during most encounters with adults. Unfortunately, these kids failed that standard miserably. They were bright and alert and genuinely interested in what they would discover inside this bastion of aviation training. They got more than their money’s worth, too. They got to enjoy the company of a slew of check pilots and line pilots who explained the basics of JetBlue’s fleet to them. They learned some serious maintenance and troubleshooting techniques that are appropriate to the newer generation fly-by-wire aircraft that are increasingly taking over the marketplace. And they got to tour the full building, all three floors, and see what’s hiding behind closed doors and down hallways that snake out from the central core of the building. The highlight of the day was that everyone, and I mean every single person who arrived to tour the facility, got the chance to sit in the pilot’s seat of an E190 or an A320 and fly the darned thing. I don’t care if you’re a 16 year old who is thinking of a career as a mechanical engineer, or a mid-50s high school administrator who has never flown an airplane before — there is nothing like

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given opportunities they deserve to pushing the throttles up on a multihave and they’ve been asked to step up engine turbine-powered machine, acto the plate and deliver when it counts. celerating down a virtual runway and They have done just that, too. rotating that beast toward the sky. The And so have the team of adults besim flies like an airplane, and everyone hind the Central Florida Aerospace came away with the tingly feeling of Academy, SUN ’n FUN’s educational joy that’s surprisingly familiar — just outreach programs, like Christmas mornand Polk State Coling for a 6 year old. “Any kid can be lege’s newly minted Suddenly the term, aerospace program. “follow the flight dispecial if given If my day out rector” makes sense the opportunity proved anything it’s to them in a way it to fill the bill, and this: Any kid can be never did before. special if given the And flight no longer provided with the opportunity to fill seems out of reach or support necessary the bill, and provided beyond their realm of understanding. to reach that goal.” with the support necessary to reach that I have seen the fugoal. ture, ladies and genThere is hope. There truly is a bright tlemen — and it is largely made up of future for aviation in the U.S., and there kids who we currently wouldn’t trust to is a new generation coming up behind borrow our cars. However, one day in us that is going to instill pride in those the not so distant future, we will trust of us who are paying attention and lendthem to run our corporations, oversee ing them a hand. our various levels of government, as well as expect them to design, mainJoin us, won’t you? As the saying tain, and pilot the airplanes we fly in goes, you can’t help everyone, but you when we launch off to visit the grandcan help someone. So make a plan and help someone get children. started on the right path. You can do it. These kids are capable, confident, and You really can. All you have to do is on the right track. They may be special, try. but that’s only because they have been

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June 7, 2013

The Cherokee Rattle Paul McBride Ask Paul

Q

I just bought a 1974 300-hp Cherokee Six. It has about 1,200 hours to run, has great oil pressure, good compressions, hardly uses oil, no metal in the filter, but during the run-up at 2,000 rpm, the engine makes quite a deep knock. If you go from both mags to either the left or right the noise disappears. If the rpm is lower than 2,000 on both mags the noise is gone; if it is above 2,150 rpm the noise is not there. Paul McBride, an expert on engines, retired after almost 40 years with Lycoming. Send your questions to: AskPaul@GeneralAviationNews.com.

My engineer is a bit stumped. We have run the engine with no cowls at 2,000 rpm and canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t hear any noises outside. The previous owner of 12 years claims it has always done it, but as a motorcycles engineer, unexplained noises worry me. JOHN SHAW Northland, New Zealand

A

John, itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s great to hear from you down in Kiwi land. Having been in your beautiful country many, many times, Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll give it my best shot to solve the mysterious noise coming from your 1974 Piper Cherokee Six 300. The IO540-K1A5 engine installed in your air-

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craft has been a true and reliable workhorse over the years, as you probably know. From the information you furnished, I donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t think itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s anything serious internally with the engine. The first thing that comes to my mind is this may be another case of the infamous â&#x20AC;&#x153;Cherokee Rattle.â&#x20AC;? This is the title given to a strange noise heard from some of the Cherokee series aircraft since the early days of its introduction into the marketplace. While this phenomenon is rare, it has been with us for many years and, unfortunately, to my knowledge, has never actually been successfully pinpointed. Now donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t let this disturb you, because Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve got a few things Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d like you to check just to see if we can narrow the search for this strange noise. I can tell you that both Piper Aircraft and Lycoming spent countless hours and dollars trying to determine what this strange noise was and what was causing it to happen. Most of this research took place in the late 1960s and early 1970s and, as determined as all parties involved were to find the gremlin, nothing definite was ever found, to my knowledge. In my many years attending the Experimental Aircraft Associationâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s AirVenture in Oshkosh, Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve had a few Cherokee owners come to our exhibit and mention this phenomenon. My response was always the same: â&#x20AC;&#x153;If we went out and flew your aircraft right now, could you induce the noise for me and repeat it at will?â&#x20AC;? I donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t recall anyone responding with a definite yes. As you know, there is nothing more difficult than trying to diagnose a problem that is inconsistent and this condition has got to be one of the most difficult.

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Let me ask a few questions to get us started. Can you actually cause it to happen whenever you want? According to your information, you can hear it on the ground during engine run-up, but when the cowling is removed the noise cannot be heard. That being the case, it may be that the cowl is contacting something at a given rpm, so Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d suggest you do a very close visual inspection of the entire engine installation area, including where the exhaust pipe exits the cowl. I find it interesting that you can cause the noise to disappear by going from one mag to the other. Because the flame propagation is changed slightly within the cylinder when you go from both mags to one mag, this may be causing something in the cowling to react differently. You didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t mention whether this noise can be heard during flight. The â&#x20AC;&#x153;Cherokee Rattleâ&#x20AC;? was almost always heard in flight, but couldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t be induced regardless of how hard one tried. There are a couple of other things that come to mind, so letâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s check those out too. When was the last time the engine mount rubbers were changed? If these have been in service for a long period of time or many flying hours, they may be beginning to allow the engine to sag, causing the cowl to make contact with the engine mount, exhaust pipe, or other components, which may be the cause of the noise. Another thing that could possibly cause a strange noise is if one of the cylinders has an odd choke in the cylinder barrel. Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve run across this strange situation a couple of times during my career and itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s one of those conditions that weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d never expect. The condition is caused by the choke in a cylinder barrel coming down the cylinder barrel wall further on one side than the other. It causes the piston to cock slightly at the top of the stroke, which in turn causes the piston skirt to slap the barrel, which we hear as a definite knock. Things we do to make this appear or disappear are changing the engine rpm, going from both mags to either the left or right mag as you mentioned. Using extreme caution, Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d suggest afASK PAUL | See Page 13

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June 7, 2013

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Cirrus introduces new training initiative Cirrus Aircraft has introduced “Cirrus Approach” — a multi-year training initiative designed to train pilots to use all the Cirrus safety features, including the whole airplane parachute. CEO Dale Klapmeier noted that Cirrus planes feature a “cuffed wing to help prevent spins, electronic stability protection (ESP) to protect pilots from unusual flight attitudes, the ‘Blue Level button’ to engage the autopilot while avoiding pilot spatial disorientation, and of course, the parachute. But if pilots do not utilize these features or are not trained properly on how to use them, then these safety devices are not as effective as they could be.” The program will focus on standardizing training for all Cirrus pilots. To do this, the company appointed two new Flight Training Quality Specialists who are travelling around the world to “help enhance flight instructor quality and standardization.” There also is a new dedication to training owners on the need to use the Cirrus Airframe Parachute System (CAPS) in an emergency. CAPS is proven, with 69 lives saved to date. Not a single life has been lost when CAPS has been used within the pilot operating handbook parameters, he noted. By the company’s estimation, potentially more than twothirds of all fatal Cirrus accidents could have had a different outcome if the pilot would have pulled the CAPS handle, ASK PAUL | From Page 12 ter you’ve completed your installation inspection and finding nothing there, you run the engine with the top cowl removed and listen to each cylinder with a stethoscope at various rpms right at the cylinder base. If it is a piston slap condition, you’ll be able to hear it using this method. If the knock is coming from a piston slap condition, I’ve never heard of it causing any serious problems other than being difficult to explain to passengers who may not be comfortable flying in the first place. John, if all else fails, here’s the information of the current Lycoming representative in your corner of the world, who happens to be a fellow countryman of yours: Adrian McHardy, P.O. Box 1159, Rotorua 3215, New Zealand; Phone: 64-7-345-3656; Fax: 64-7-3453657; Email: AmcHar01@lycoming. com. If you need to contact Adrian, have your specific engine model and serial number, plus total time since new or overhaul. As you can tell, the condition you are dealing with is not an easy one to figure out, but hopefully you’ll have success after following some of the suggestions offered here.

activating this safety device. “We believe a lack of training and practice are the primary reasons pilots do not use CAPS when they should,” said Rob Haig, director of flight operations. “In most primary training programs, pilots learn to fly in an airplane that does not have a parachute. The pilot is trained to keep flying the airplane in all emergency situations. However, emergency situations, such as a mid-air

collision which is not typically survivable in other airplanes, have the potential for a better outcome due to the parachute in a Cirrus.” The company has created a suite of new online materials, including a video, a guide that details the parachute’s operation and tips on how to fly with CAPs, and a syllabus for teaching CAPS on a regular basis. CirrusAircraft.com

Making A Difference For Airports AOPA is always looking for ways to protect our general aviation airports. Some 16 years ago, that search yielded a simple, yet groundbreaking, idea: Ask AOPA members to serve as our eyes and Support Network was born. This month we are celebrating an impressive milestone—having an ASN volunteer at each of 2,500 airports. That means we now have a volunteer at nearly half of the almost 5,200 public-use airports nationwide, which is truly remarkable. alert us to brewing threats so our experts at AOPA can work with the volunteers, local pilots, airport management, and decision makers to resolve problems before they become crises. But they also do much more. They promote their airports year round to help communities understand just how much value having an airport can deliver. With the help of how-to guides from AOPA, they host aviation events and airport open houses. They take part in city and county council meetings. They speak about the airport and its value at community events of all types. Aviation leaders in one state have demonstrated their understanding of just how important that is. thanks in large part to the efforts of Randall Burdette, director of the Virginia Department of Aviation. As a former ASN volunteer himself, Burdette views the program as a win-win. In his words, “It’s f Virginia to have enthusiastic volunteers help keep track of what’s happening at Virginia’s airports and to share that knowledge.” One day we hope to see every public-use airport in America have an ASN volunteer keeping it safe. If If not, consider becoming a volunteer yourself. Either way, I hope you’ll explore the program and all that it does at aopa.org/asn.

Craig L. Fuller AOPA President and CEO

www.aopa.org today.


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General Aviation News —  800.426.8538

June 7, 2013

Protect yourself from ‘get-there-itis’ It’s a fancy name for “get-there-itis” — plan continuation bias, which is an unconscious bias to continue an original plan in spite of changing conditions — and it can be deadly for general aviation pilots. Plan continuation bias was identified in a 2004 NASA Ames human factors study that analyzed 19 airline accidents from 1991 to 2000 that were attributed to crew error. Out of those, almost half involved plan continuation bias. The problem is in how it manifests. The study offered that it becomes stronger as you near completion of the activity (e.g., approach your destination). It essentially impedes pilots from recognizing that they need to change their course of action and, because it’s unconscious, it often goes undetected. It can also block subtle cues that conditions have changed. Situational awareness can become compromised in these scenarios, blinding the pilot from the outcome he is rapidly marching toward. It is probably no surprise that rapidly changing conditions also played a major role in many of these cases. The NASA study highlighted critical decision-making breakdowns, like the resistance to divert to an alternate airport or the refusal to go-around. Remember, plan continuation bias gets stronger the closer you are to home. A study done by the University of Illinois discusses the coupling of plan continuation bias with other biases, such as confirmation bias. The confir-

Photo courtesy Brent Owens

By BRENT OWENS

mation bias is best described as an inclination to seek out cues that support previously established hypotheses and disregard cues that support a competing belief. You can start to see how these human factor maladies can begin to stack up against you. Plan continuation bias also hitches up with another problem, which is the human condition that says, “reactive responding is easier than proactive thinking.” So once you get too far down the

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wrong road, the biases get stronger, task saturation kicks in, situational awareness goes bye-bye, and you are totally defensive, no longer thinking ahead of the airplane. If we had the resources, we could certainly detect this in a significant number of general aviation accidents. There is no doubt that “get-there-itis” has brought down many an airman. We all know that flying is as much cerebral as it is stick-and-rudder skills. These studies highlight the need to

spend an equal amount of time making sure we are just as prepared mentally. Here are some mitigation strategies I have found useful. It’s all about awareness and resisting human nature — easier said than done. • Know before you go: Know that you can suffer from plan continuation bias and look for signs that you are too fixated on getting there. • Have good options: Having alternatives takes a great deal of the pressure off of needing to stick to the original plan. Always leave yourself an out. • Think ahead: Evaluate the possible negative outcomes when making your decisions. Think about what could happen if you pressed on. • Don’t procrastinate: Make decisions earlier, not later. Making the call to change course, divert, or go-around earlier is almost always the safer option. • Be responsible: Think about your passengers or your loved ones on the ground. Sometimes a little reality check can help overcome your instincts when that decision to discontinue needs to be made. Plan continuation bias is an internal threat that we can manage if we maintain the correct mindset regarding the consequences of our actions. Being a pilot is an awesome privilege, but we must constantly strive to improve our craft. Brent Owens is a professional pilot and creator of iflyblog.com.


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Photos by Thomas Hoff

June 7, 2013

Who turned out the lights? IDAHO FALLS, Idaho — Mylar balloons stuck in power lines caused a power outage for 5,800 north Idaho Falls residents, including all of us in the AeroMark hangar, home to the third annual Idaho Aviation Expo May 17-18. Everyone took the outage in stride and the power came back on at 12:30 p.m. Luckily, all 12 display aircraft were already inside the 30,000-squarefoot hangar. The aircraft and 50 exhibitors made for a nice presentation area. Friday attendees were treated to a wonderful history of Idaho backcoun-

try airstrips by author Richard Holm. His book, “Bound for the Backcountry,” is filled with 1,200 pictures and countless stories of how the network of backcountry strips came into being. Saturday’s luncheon kicked off with the Idaho Aviation Association annual meeting and wrapped up with a talk by Mark Petersen, owner of “Hell-er Bust,” a P-51D Mustang. Forums on backcountry flying, weather, avionics, and more were sprinkled throughout both days of the expo. The Idaho Aviation Expo won’t set

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June 7, 2013

Dream Machines Story and Photos By HAYMAN TAM Close to 20,000 fans of all things mechanical tied up traffic on the Pacific Coast Highway recently to attend the 23rd Pacific Coast Dream Machines show held at Half Moon Bay Airport on the coast of Northern California. Under gorgeous clear skies and pleasant spring temperatures, this weekend event typically signals the start of the airshow season for the San Francisco Bay area. This is not really an airshow — it’s more of a celebration of all things wheeled, winged, tracked, and in between. Imagine a fly-in, blended with a custom car show, plus a dash of carnival atmosphere for the younger ones.

A vast array of machines was brought in for display and demonstration to the crowds of spectators milling about the airport grounds. Well over 1,000 vehicles drove in to be placed on display. The aircraft congregated on the north end of the field, with a variety on display from Warbirds to Cubs. For those wanting a bird’s eye view, several businesses were selling rides. Nostalgic Warbird & Biplane Rides kept its 1930 New Standard D-25 busy all day and Vintage Aircraft’s Beech C-45 spent more time in the air than on the ground. A Bell JetRanger II offered a change of pace for customers looking to see the show from above. By far, the largest plane on display was a C-54E (DC-4) Skymaster. This

former firefighting aircraft now tours airshows and is used to memorialize the Berlin Airlift. Several seaplanes were on hand this year, ranging from classics like the Grumman Mallard and a Piper Clipper to a modern Cessna Caravan on floats. The Civil Air Patrol flew in one of its Cessna Skylanes. Warbird lovers were rewarded with P-51s, Yak-9s, a Yak-11 and a whole bevy of trainers. One of the Mustangs was a rare “H” model, designed to be lighter and consequently much faster than its predecessor’s. Half Moon Bay’s own airshow star, Eddie Andreini, had both of his Yak-9s on the tarmac next to his new P-51, along with his one-of-akind Super Stearman.

While there were no airshow performances or aerobatics, that did not stop folks from doing low flybys of the airfield after takeoff. Eddie Andreini took to the sky in his new P-51 “Primo Blanco” to conduct several formation fly-bys with several other Warbirds. This was the 23rd year for the show, which is traditionally held the last weekend in April. Proceeds from the show help fund the Coastside Adult Day Health Center. Half Moon Bay Airport (HAF) is located right on the coast approximately 20 miles south of San Francisco. Originally built for the U.S. Army in 1942, it was acquired by San Mateo County in 1947. MiramarEvents.com/DreamMachines

A Citabria “C” Package takes off after the Pacific Coast Dream Machines show.


June 7, 2013

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The Piper PA-16 Clipper was produced in 1949 and sold for $2,995.

Eddie Andreini took delivery of this newly built Yak-9U in 1996.

Eddie Andreiniâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Super Stearman is a one-of-a-kind, heavily modified 1944 Stearman.

Only 59 of these Grumman G-73 Mallards were built before being superseded by the larger Albatross.

This Twin Beech was also known as the C-45 Expeditor during its military career.


General Aviation News —  800.426.8538

June 7, 2013

Photos courtesy Amelia T. Reiheld

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From sea to shining sea By AMELIA T. REIHELD

NS TIO NA

A stylish wedding invitation arrived last spring, asking us to our niece’s nuptials in early June. Absolutely, Rob and I would go, but how? We happen to live clear on the other side of the continent. For that many miles, the cheap, sensible answer would have been by airline. But wait, I have the keys to a perfectly good airplane, a valid medical, and a working credit card. Who knows when an excuse to see this magnificent land from coast to coast might turn up again? As we pored over long-obsolete paper charts spread across the dining room table, we tossed ideas around as to the route. First — and last — would be a stop near St. Louis to visit grandsons. AL FOCUS — D ECI E After that, it P S S TI would simply be a matter of getting to the wedding before the bride.

Flying Internet buddies offered intriguing suggestions and invitations, which led me to another thought: Wouldn’t it be fun to see who we could meet along the way? We took off early on a Sunday afternoon in late May, headed for Alton, Ill. The way was clear and smooth, with even a little bit of an unusual easterly tailwind. As we rolled out at St. Louis Regional Airport (ALN), Ground wanted to know where we were parking. I gave him the name of the FBO advertising unusually cheap 100LL, and he chuckled. “You shoulda been here last week. They’re out of business now.” A couple of days adventuring with small boys and their parents, and then we were off to meet some “imaginary friends” from a friendly aviation online forum, a chance to put faces and real names to Internet handles and stories. We opted for an early supper at a nice little airport near Paola, Kansas, just southwest of Kansas City. After a pretty afternoon flight over Missouri and eastern Kansas, we arrived at Miami County Airport (K81) ahead of schedule. Pretty soon, a lovely little Bird Dog showed up, then a Piper

Warrior. Several more pilots opted for ground transportation. We commandeered a corner at the unprepossessing little ramp-side restaurant, the We Be Smokin’ BBQ and enjoyed delicious food and truly great company. Too soon, it was time for our new/old friends to get home before dark. We borrowed the airport crew car, an adventure in itself, and one of our new friends led us to a B&B in town. We got an early start the next morning, with an eye to spending the next night in Arizona. One of the great things about flying GA is the interesting stuff you see when you least expect it: Yup — that seems to be Whiteman Air Force Base, right where it should be. But wait: What are those things parked on the ramp? Why they’re B2 stealth bombers. Cool. Further along, high over the desolate terrain of western Arizona, I looked down at an odd bit of geology immediately below. I’ll be darned. That’s the great meteor crater, right out of my old Junior Illustrated Guide to Amazing Geography. We circled for a closer look. My green electronic sectional charts had turned yellow, mile-wide irrigated circles dotted the landscape, and soon

the terrain became orange and brown to match the chart. The scenery was amazing. Piney mountains gave way to miles of flat, sandy nothingness, interspersed with craggy rock outcroppings and black basalt ridges hundreds of feet high and miles long. There were


June 7, 2013

no people, no cattle, no vegetation, and few roads. It made me happy to know I had a couple of extra water bottles tucked in the back. The rocks took on a distinctly reddish hue as we neared Sedona, our day’s highly recommended destination. “Be sure to take a turn or two around Sedona,” several of my Internet buddies had advised. We did that, and the geologic formations were, indeed, a sight to behold. The SEZ runway, perched atop a tall mesa, runs clear from one side to the other, with steep drop-offs at both ends. Rob observed that this would be a carrier-landing, just like his good old days. I looked for the arresting cables and saw none. The wind was out of the west at 12 knots. The runway had a bit of a downhill slope to the southwest, there was a mountain just off the northeast end looking to rise well into the standard approach profile, and nobody was using the Unicom. The only traffic

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had departed westbound. Well, that appears to be the active runway, though in calm air, people generally land uphill in the other direction. Around we went to a downwind leg to 21, gritting teeth on final approach trying to get set up in the hot bumpy air, not too slow over that inconveniently located mountain, dropping down to short final, full flaps, aiming the pointy end at this end of the runway. Float-float-float-float-float…Oh, dear, this is just too fast and there’s a big drop-off at the other end. Not happy with how this is going. Power up, pitch up, clean-up, and we’ll try again. Around we went, Rob pretending to take pictures instead of mumbling Hail Marys. Next circuit found us much closer to the top of that mountain, yikes, slower, with a perfectly survivable landing at the end of it. He exhaled audibly, with a weak smile and a compliment. At least we fared better than an RV-6 did later that afternoon — we would use our airplane again.

Sedona was a fun stop, with an excellent restaurant right on the field, a hotel within walking distance and a reasonably-priced car rental counter right there in the terminal. Best of all, Arizona’s MST time zone bought us an extra two hours of daylight, and instead of midafternoon, we arrived just after the lunch rush, with a good half-day left to explore the area. The previous day’s turbulence made an early start much easier to contemplate, so we departed shortly after sunrise, headed for Mojave Space Port. The morning sun glanced across rocky outcroppings, casting long shadows pointing the way. As we neared Mojave, the moving map on the tablet was a blessing, showing us in detail all the restricted areas to thread our way between. We pondered the aviation history that had been made at Edwards AFB, and the famed dry lake bed. On short final to Mojave, there was so

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much for an aviation enthusiast to see that it took discipline to pay attention to the task at hand. The roll-out took us past acres of bone yard. Most everything that ever flew must have been out there somewhere, from airliners with paint still shiny to faded military fighter planes, nestled wingtip to wingtip. “Where ya parkin’,” asked the cordial controller. “Wherever you send tourists,” I replied. Ground vectors took us past some intriguing hangars, to the Voyager Café just in time for breakfast. We sipped coffee and watched the aeronautical scenery. Soon, the hangar next door opened, and a tug with a giant wishbone-shaped tow-bar chugged over to pull the Virgin White Knight II spaceship booster out. Let me tell you — that is a big piece of equipment. A Scaled Composites employee confided that it would be flight-tested later that day, but couldn’t say when. Meanwhile, an old Air Force F-4 Phantom with fluorescent-red wingtips and tail to indicate its drone status, did aerobatics and high-speed passes. Several experimental aircraft landed for the $100 omelet special. It was just another day at Mojave, complete with miniairshow. We could have gawked at amazing airplanes all day, but it was time to head north to our destination, Davis, California. We crossed the Sierra Nevada mountains, and pointed north, with snow-capped mountains on our right, and endless fields of lettuce, broccoli, and strawberries on our left, all the way to Sacramento. University Field at Davis was busy that day, with several Cessna trainers shooting T&Gs. We shoehorned our way in, and found a warm welcome from the locals, but no twice-verified rental car, which, as it happened, was waiting for me at the county airport 15 miles away. Much family hilarity and festivity ensued, a grand time had by all. The wedding was worth the trip by itself, but we had other adventures planned, too. CROSS COUNTRY | See Page 23


General Aviation News —  800.426.8538

June 7, 2013

Photos by Amelia T. Reiheld

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Flying High-wa’ii! By AMELIA T. REIHELD

NS TIO NA

There I was: Marooned on a tropical island, just me and the palm trees. What to do, what to do? OK, in truth, that island was Oahu, Hawaii, and it was not nearly deserted enough to suit me. My husband and I were visiting his mother, who lives right in the middle of vibrant and noisy Waikiki Beach. Where could I flee the hoard of happy tourists, sirens, and traffic? The answer was as close as the Internet, which yielded lots of ways to escape the madding crowd, and really see that island — all of it! First on this flatlander’s wish-list was to go soaring. There are a couple of sailplane operations that call Dillingham Airfield (HDH) home, over on Oahu’s northwest FOCUS — DE CIAL shore. I picked E ST SP I one at random, and despite heavy traffic, managed to show up promptly at Acro­

flight’s office at the appointed hour. Ah. I didn’t figure in Island Time. The glider pilot would be back “soon,” and be delighted to see me — in maybe an hour or so. It was my good luck that it was past noon, and we had the gift of time to find some lunch. We meandered down to the other end of the airfield where the parachute people were hanging out. There we found a real Hawaiian tradition — a gaily-painted van selling excellent sandwiches, Hawaiian barbecue, and shave ice. Sky-diving? Why sure, the guys at Skydive Hawaii would sell me a quick check-out and a tandem dive. Tempting, but even if they paid me, I didn’t think I could jump out of a perfectly good airplane. As they pointed out, I could go up in the jump plane as an observer, though, and maybe score a little right seat time in a Cessna Caravan. That would have been fun, but our schedules didn’t mesh that day. I had to get back to the glider end of the airport. It was perfect timing. Steve Lowry, CFIG, was just climbing out of a sleek ISCA “Lark,” having turned his student loose to solo. Those long tapered wings and bubble canopy looked like exactly what I had in mind. But it wasn’t what

Steve had in mind. He pointed to a slightly stubbier motor glider, and said, “We’ll be launching under our own power.” Hmm. Wasn’t that like training wheels? Could I perhaps talk him into the real thing, towed aloft and released by a proper Super Cub? “This will be the ride you want today,” he explained. “The winds here are fairly light and from the northeast. We’ll get a longer and much more sce-

nic flight if we motor up the north shore and pick up the breeze on the other side. You’ll see.” We took off through light volcanic haze, and climbed out over the legendary North Shore. Just on the other side of central Oahu’s fields and pastureland, the Ko’o’lau Mountains formed a steep, ragged wall ahead of us. We turned northeast over miles of what looked to be completely impenetrable


June 7, 2013

and near-vertical jungle. Wild canyons scored the earth beneath us, and incredibly green crenellations filled the windscreen before us. Steve banked steeply and pointed out a thicket of native Hawaiian palm, which now exist nowhere else in the wild. The only signs of civilization were a couple of Army helicopters on maneuvers. Just on the other side of the ridge, Steve cut the motor — silence! — and said, “We’re looking for 70 to 80 knots. All yours.” With a little gentle back-pressure, the variometer jumped upward, indicating a steady five knot updraft. Wheeee! We cruised over the beaches of the eastern shore, sometimes cutting so close to the mountainsides that I half wondered if we’d return with foliage. Steve had me circle over a long silver ribbon of water plunging through the jungle, a local landmark called Sacred Falls. Pointing at the island-spanning curve of the Ko’o’lau Range, Steve told of a huge volcanic crater that had collapsed into the Pacific Ocean, leaving only its jagged western edge. “The rest of it is about 70 miles that way,” he said, indicating ocean fading into sky far to the northeast. Flying this Grob 109B was a fair amount like flying most any other slow airplane: Easy-does-it, gentle control input, but with the added thrill of Look Ma, no gas! After most of an hour gliding quietly along the mountain ridge, admiring the zillion shades of blue on one side, and the zillion shades of green on the other, we headed up over the ridge, and began our descent over the North Shore. Steve pointed out the patchwork of fields that once grew sugar cane, then grew pineapples, that now are mostly planted

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with less-labor-intensive crops, as well as small plots of taro, coffee, and papaya. He noted that the waves that were 30 feet high for last week’s major surfing competition were now nearly calm, with not a surfer in sight. With Dillingham shimmering through the haze, Steve reclaimed the controls and we swooped in for a perfect “are we there yet” landing. He offered, “Next time, we’ll take the Fox, our aerobatic glider, and show you what these things can do.” I’m already saving my pennies.

Back to powered flight

The next perfect day dawned with widely-scattered clouds — again. I’d made reservations at Moore Air, a Honolulu flying club, for an hour of dual instruction in a Cessna 172. This time, with the luxury of four seats, my husband and his mother came along for the ride. My instructor, Dr. Kevin Woolley, ushered us out to the GA ramp at HNL, and after a careful preflight, we climbed into the vintage Skyhawk. “I’ll handle the radios, if you don’t mind,” he offered. In that busy and unfamiliar airspace, I was most pleased to accept.

21 “You understand, I haven’t flown a 172 in over 30 years, and my home airport logs about six operations a day,” I apologized. He smiled a tentative “Let’s see how this goes, then,” smile, and we headed for the runway. Ahh. It was just like slipping on a favorite pair of bedroom slippers. Despite its well-worn interior, the little Skyhawk proved responsive, forgiving, and totally familiar. We took off to the north, headed for a freeway just shy of the mountains, and then banked right, toward Waikiki’s high-rise hotels and Diamond Head. Around that promontory, and on a northerly heading, we flew over a little volcanic crater that’s now home to a desert botanical garden, and surrounded by sprawling suburbia. Famed snorkeling spot, Waimea Bay was soon beneath us, revealing in startlingly blue geologic detail just how it came to be, and then over more volcanic craters that hadn’t been at all obvious from the ground. Kevin talked about island geology, history, and culture as we flew, adding a great deal of enrichment to what was supposed to be just a chance to fly a little airplane. He pointed out military airfields, useful emergency landing strips, concrete relics from wars long past, restricted airspace, and unraveled the rapid-fire instructions from HNL Approach. In the back seat, my passengers had their noses — and camera lenses — pressed to the glass, obviously relishing the expert tour-guide commentary and the amazing view. Me, I was looking for traffic, searching for the next landmark, maintaining a steady heading and altitude — in short, doing exactly what I’d hoped to be doHAWAII | See Page 23


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Readers’ favorite destinations

June 7, 2013

acebook fans What’s your favorite destination? General Aviation News · 9,090 likes · Mikey Matthews Sc00 triple tree, woodruff sc, 7000 ft grass strip Mecca

Photo courtesy Cedar Point

Raja Imran My favourite is Dubai UAE Jay Smith Marathon, (Key West) Florida DHC6 Twin Otter Homecockpit St. Barth (TFFJ)... Carlos Escandell The caribbean islands especially Cuba. We asked our readers and Facebook fans to tell us some of their favorite destinations. Here are just a few of the responses:

Tom Dalquist El Capitan Lodge in the pristine Sea Otter Sound in southeast Alaska (ElCapitanLodge.com).

Dan Pimentel My favorite destination is Sunriver Airport (S21) in Sunriver, Oregon. There are a million reasons to head over the Cascades from my home base in Eugene, about a 50 minute flight in my Cherokee 235. I wrote about the free bicycles the airport has (in his online magazine Airplanista at Av8rdan. com). In literally two minutes, you can be pedaling along the gorgeous Deschutes River on a bike trail system that is as good as it gets. There is golfing, hiking, fishing, horseback riding, and great eats at the Sunriver Resort. I highly recommend it to anyone flying in the Western U.S.

Thomas Brown A great destination is Griffing Sandusky Airport (SKY) in Sandusky, Ohio. It is on the shore of Lake Erie in Sandusky, Ohio. They offer a shuttle to and from the Cedar Point Amusement Park (Cedar-Point.com) for a very reasonable fee. Cedar Point (pictured above) has to

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Gerhard Opel (Retired captain from Transamerica Airlines) My favorite destination is the Kalaupapa airport (HLU) on the Hawaiian island of Molokai. It is one of the world’s most remote airports, framed by some of the world’s highest sea cliffs (3,000 feet). It truly is spectacular scenery and only a 30 minute AL FOCUS — D I flight from KahuC E ES SP TI lui (HOG). Sight seeing flights are available at: Maui­ Aviators. com.

John Roe Shannon, Ireland! Picture perfect. Nicky Boogaard EHSE Jay Honeck Mustang Island. Port Aransas, TX. Douglas Allen Haddaway Albert Whitted Airport in St.Petersburg,FL. Brian Stofiel When we lived in the socialist republic of California we use to fly to Columbia for the gold rush days... Cornelius Ndeche Maasai mara in kenya. Orgun Sen The Outer Banks, NC Mark Zito The bathroom at 4 AM, does that count? Chris Gagnon Key West Florida.

Photo courtesy Robert Giere

Stefan Wittgren ESOE Sweden

be one of the best roller coaster parks in the world, with several coasters that are or have been world record holders for tallest and fastest. The park is clean and reasonably priced (as amusement parks go). Land at SKY, take the shuttle to the park, stay on the property, wake up in the morning, stroll outside, ride roller coasters, and have a great time. Robert Giere One of our favorite destinations is Punta Pescadero in Baja California Sur, Mexico (pictured above). We have been flying down here for more than 30 years. It now has a paved strip behind the Punta Pescadero Paradise Hotel & Villas (PuntaPescaderoParadise.com). The rooms and facilities are lovely.

Chris M. Front A flight with a good buddy to First Flight Airport & the Wright brothers’ monument & museum, followed by a stop for crab cakes on Tangier Island on the return home was memorable & outstanding. Mario Sancin Zurich, LSZH Zabih Saalimi To study piloting and be a pilot in an airline in dubai Robert Edward Stapleton Jr It depends on what time of year, and what type of aircraft. My vote goes to the Knik Glacier Lake George area anytime of the year...it’s spectacular. Alan Michael Probert Montery Ca. Mary Honeck Port Aransas, TX Phil Corman Sunriver, OR Emery Smith Monterey, CA. Veronica Opsanger Sørstokken, Stord Island. Western Norway. ( ENSO) Márványi Péter György Aruba Gary R. Hockensmith Branson, MO.


June 7, 2013

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The scenery made me wish I’d read a geology textbook beforehand. It was simply mind-boggling, the breadth and depth of the many canyons, the scope of the deserts and mountains. My passenger would have happily endured the continuous high-country turbulence by sleeping through it, if I hadn’t kept waking him up jabbering excitedly about the view he was missing. Colorado Springs ATIS reported wind 080 to 110 at 32G37. Our landing clearance was mercifully amended to Runway 13, rather than Runway 35 we’d been promised. As I shut down by the fuel pumps, the lineman leaned in close to my window and shouted, “We got a special on hangars tonight. Want

inside?” The airplane was shaking in the wind. I looked over at the nowmenacing sky and made a snap decision. “Yes, please.” Ever seen mammatus clouds? Low, and perfectly-round identically-sized globs of grey-and-blackness, stuck together like giant grapefruits, covered most of the sky. They were remarkable, even to the locals, and as it turned out, full of meteorological ugliness. The next morning’s headlines featured hail horror stories, with much wind and storm damage. Good call on the hangar! We enjoyed dinner and a pleasant evening’s hospitality from wonderful people we’d hardly known until then. The next day we stopped for gas in

Oklahoma and Arkansas, mostly for the excuse to color in states number 48 and 49 on our map. Midafternoon found us back on our own side of the Mississippi River cavorting with St. Louis grandsons. One of them, the 4-year-old aviation enthusiast, hopped in the airplane the next morning, and followed us home to eastern North Carolina. The trip was everything we could have wished. We had the very best GA has to offer — the chance to see something remarkable and to take a closer look, the chance to stop, just because. What fun to make a series of new friends who had been just online pseudonyms. We savored the opportunity to tailor the route to see interesting new places, and when it was time to head for home, we leaped across almost half the country in a single morning. Such grand people we met. And such fabulous scenery we took in, much of it to be seen no other way. From seat 48F at FL370 on the high altitude airways, it all blends into a bluish haze. From a car, you miss the big picture. From just a thousand feet over the tops of mountains, through wide passes, over twisted riverbeds and over endless desert shimmering in the heat, the sheer scale of this country’s west is stunning. If you haven’t flown it, you must. If you have, do it again — there’s just no telling what you might see.

Hawaiian ways to savor the privilege that is general aviation. Here are some of the ones I talked to. The Internet will yield even more choices. There was that parachute operation at Dillingham, where several dozen jumpers seemed to be having a fine time, both in the air and on the ground. While the tandem jump costs $150, and a solo jump for those who are certified is $50, an observer ride up and back in the Caravan is $40. For skydivers who bring their own ‘chutes and a USPA Blicense, the ride aloft is only $24. 808637-9700, SkyDiveHawaii.com There were lots of crazy young people jumping off cliffs and zooming back and forth along the rock faces under ram-air paragliders, eventually landing on the beach far below. That intro tandem ride, perfect for adrenaline junkies, runs $200 for an hour’s flight, all equipment and quickie training included. Call Pete, at Gravity Hawaii, 808-234-7663 or go online to GravityHawaii.com Want a float plane rating? How better to get it than in Island Seaplane Service’s venerable deHavilland Otter? For only about 3,200 clams and maybe seven hours of flight time, you can add ASES to your ticket. Shorter rides are available — but what the heck? — so long as you’re going that far, you might as well spring for the whole deal. 808-836-6273, IslandSeaplanes.com.

There were the ubiquitous helicopter tours, which, because I wanted to do the flying myself, I didn’t pursue. (My mother-in-law, who has done both, swears our C172 flight was a much better ride, anyway.) And most tempting of the aerial roads not taken, I could have arranged for some aerobatic training in a Stearman with Bruce Clements, a retired airline pilot who owns Stearman Biplane Rides, based at Dillingham Airfield. Wind in my hair! Upside-down over those jagged mountains! Endless blue Pacific Ocean overhead! Wheeeeeeee! $170 buys a 20-minute ride; $265 gets a

40-minute ride retracing the World War II Japanese bomber routes toward Pearl Harbor. For aerobatics, add $50 to the price. Next time, I’m in Hawaii, that’ll be on the very short list. 808-637-4461, Peacock.com/Biplane. There are lots of magnificent alternatives to sunbathing with the multitudes beneath imported palm trees and watching muumuu-clad New Jersey expats hula dancing. There’s no need to be swept with the other tourists into Waikiki’s fanciest designer shoe store. Besides, the flying is lots cheaper than the shoes.

CROSS COUNTRY | From Page 19 Another virtual friend offered a glorious aerial tour of San Francisco Bay. I hopped over the coastal hills to Santa Rosa, met the vivacious Kimberly and her boyfriend. The three of us cruised south, and soon the city came into view. BF was in the back seat with my camera snapping away, as Kimberly negotiated with ATC, and pointed out landmarks from what was, for me, a whole new and breathtaking perspective. For a newish Cessna 150-driver, she sure took to the Mooney like a duck to water, handling the controls with impressive finesse. Next on the list of California fun was a wonderful day driving the scenic back roads to a selection of Sonoma and Napa Valley wineries, guided by a delightful pilot-forum friend who didn’t need a sectional chart to find his way on those winding roads. Between our savvy friend, John, and the various vintners’ sales folk, we learned a lot about top-notch wines that day. Now, if we could only remember it... The eastbound journey took us right over Lake Tahoe, just north of Death Valley and the salt flat proving grounds, past hundreds of miles of splendid desolation and national monuments to geological wonders. We threaded our way between the mountain peaks of Utah and western Colorado, avoiding quite a few wildfire TFRs. HAWAII | From Page 21 ing: Flying a nice slow little airplane over a part of the world not many private pilots get to see from the left seat. We did a lazy 360 over the “Mighty Mo,” the Battleship Missouri, and Pearl Harbor, and then entered the traffic pattern at HNL. Soon, I was flaring to land in my 47th state. Squeak!

Headed to Hawaii?

Here are some aerial options: Moore Air is one of three FBOs at Honolulu International Airport with aircraft for rent. Its website offers a list of aircraft and prices. They’ll gladly recommend an instructor for a 30-minute Discovery Flight ($80, including CFI), an aircraft checkout, or, as I did, sign on for an hour of C-172 dual instruction. The spectacular aerial sightseeing is just an added bonus. (~$185). MooreAir.com, 808-833-5628 Acroflight International is one of two glider operations at Dillingham Airfield. It offers several different kinds of sailplanes, including the Grob motor glider I flew. They keep busy selling add-on glider ratings to visiting pilots. Magnificent ride — I give it five stars, out of a possible four. 808-221-4480, AcroFlightInternational.com If I’d had more time and much more money, I could have sampled even more

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Dynon Flying Club takes off

June 7, 2013

“Everyone is very enthusiastic about the plane and the club,” said Robert Hamilton, president. “They’re all very eager to get on the schedule and log time in the aircraft. Other Dynon employees helped on the build, and it was a good educational experience. There are a lot smiles in the shop these days. The big question now is who gets to fly it out to AirVenture this summer.” The four-place Sportsman is featured in Glasair’s “Two Weeks to Taxi” quick build program. GlasairAviation.com, DynonAvionics.com

GUEST EDITORIAL | From Page 10

extra charge. All night landings are charged extra for runway lights. Nothing is provided in the parking area. You must bring your own chocks and ropes if you want to secure your plane since the weather there can get extremely rowdy during monsoon season. In reality you are getting charged a lot for very little. I was charged for things I never used and charged for things I never got. And a landing fee of $54 for a little 3,350 pound single engine plane? These charges are purely a money grab tactic by government. Make no mistake, this will happen here if we allow just one simple user fee to get established. I don’t know about you, but I enjoy what I call my last great freedom, and that is being able to go out to my hangar 24/7 and fly my Cessna 180 anywhere in this large beautiful country. If it is night, no problem, I can land at just about any GA airport by simply clicking my mic on the CTAF and then pulling up to the self serve fuel pump and pulling out my credit card to fill my plane with avgas.

I can do this here in the United States without any intrusive fees or counterproductive delays in dealing with such fees and I don’t even have to file a flight plan. And guess what? VFR radar flight following is always there for me, too. All of this is simply not possible in any other country in the world. My wife and I have enjoyed this great freedom for years, but user fees would be a great way for the government to curtail this freedom. Flying in Brazil can only be described as Third World at best. Forget about flying at night. Many GA airports have no lights and, even if they do, it can be a major hassle to get someone to turn them on for you when you arrive. Fuel is not available late at night. Trying to talk to ATC is impossible in many areas of Brazil unless you are above 20,000 feet. Radar does not exist in many areas of Brazil as well and there is no VFR radar flight following, period. WAAS does not exist. It always strikes me as sad that Brazil — with all of its intrusive/expensive

fees — does not have near the aviation system that we have. And that, my friends, is pretty much the situation all over the world. User fees are not helping GA in any of these countries — they are only hurting it. Let’s not become another sad victim of this horrible track record with user fees. What can you do to prevent this destructive government behavior from happening here? First and foremost, join the Aircraft Owners and Pilots Association. It is the largest, and pretty much the only, GA lobbying force in Washington, D.C., and it is very effective. Write to your elected representatives on your own. Many in Congress have already gone on record opposing user fees, but the more they hear from the GA community, the stronger our case will be. Lastly, get your fellow pilots involved. In this instance, especially, the GA community needs to stick together. When it comes to user fees, it’s like Elvis used to croon years ago in one of his songs: “You’re the devil in disguise.”

eral government turned the airport over to the City of Santa Monica. A covenant in the transfer requires it to remain an airport in perpetuity. Today the airport sits on approximately 227 acres. It boasts a 4,973-foot runway, has a control tower and is designated as a reliever field for Los Angeles International Airport (LAX). Dunn’s statement about the city’s efforts to curb activity at the airport is supported by a timeline on the city’s website, which notes the first noise complaint was filed after the introduction of jets to the field. The site describes the history of the airport with headings such as “The 1970s — More Controversy, More Regulation, and More Litigation” and “The 1980s — Continuing Controversy Resolved With a Landmark Agreement,” referring to a lawsuit in regard to jet noise. “Noise is the biggest concern at Santa Monica,” confirmed Story. “Followed by pollution and then safety.”

The safety issue was revisited in 2000 when an increase in jet traffic prodded the city to look at ways to protect homes off the extended centerline of the runway from aircraft overruns. One of the options was reducing the length of the runway to create an over-run area. Another suggestion was closing the airport and redeveloping the land. According to Story, the idea of closing the airport has been put up several times by community members, including members of the city council, who have suggested that it be closed as soon as 2015. At the April 30 meeting, city officials instructed staff to “continue to assess the potential risk and benefits of closing or attempting to close all or a portion of the airport.” The closure would have to be approved by the FAA and, in theory, could only be done after covenants tied to FAA grants have timed out. The expiration of those covenants is an area of contention.

“In the FAA’s view, the city is obligated to keep Santa Monica Airport open through 2023 under assurances it gave in exchange for federal Airport Improvement Program grants,” said FAA spokesman Ian Gregor. “The FAA also believes that the city is separately obligated to operate Santa Monica Airport beyond 2023 because it acquired the land on which the airport is located cost free from the federal government in 1948 under an instrument of transfer. The FAA is fully committed to preserving the federal investment and keeping this airport open and operating.” Pastucha counters the covenant is up for legal interpretation, adding that city staff has been directed to continue to gather information to mitigate noise and risk and to determine the benefits of closing all or part of the airport. In the meantime, the pilot community is looking at ways to block the increase in the landing fees. SMGov.net/Departments/Airport

to show how a simple landing fee can grow and spread into a monster. Let’s take a look at what it cost me to go into Boa Vista in May in a Cessna 185: Landing fee with one person on board

$54

Parking for one night

$4

Air navigation aids charge

$72

Communication with approach control

$30

Communication with tower

$50

Ataero (An airport tariff ) Total

$20 $230 USD

These fees have almost doubled since my first time into Boa Vista five years ago. On this arrival I came in day VFR with good weather using nothing but my GPS for navigation (so why was I charged $72 for nav aids?). If I had to shoot an ILS that would have been an LANDING FEES | From Page 8 Pastucha counters that many of the airport leases are for older buildings that, while leased at aviation market rates, don’t generate enough revenue to support the airport. The city has a long record of seeking ways to restrict and reduce operations at the airport, Dunn noted. Most of those efforts are tied to noise complaints from the community, which has grown up around the airport. SMO was created in 1917 as an informal landing field. In 1922 Donald Douglas established the Douglas Aircraft Co. at the airport. In 1941 operations expanded dramatically as Douglas’s factory became a major defense plant and the United States government took over the airport for the duration of the war. Many of the homes in close proximity to the airport were built by the Douglas company for workers at the factory. In 1948 the fed-

Photo courtesy Dynon Avionics

WOODINVILLE, Wash. — Seven employees at Dynon Avionics recently completed a Glasair Sportsman and launched a company flying club. Ian Jordan, who headed up the construction group, said: “The build time was shared by all and it served as a great bonding experience for us. We all have considerable knowledge of what is in the airframe and a high level of respect for taking care of it. It’s really an ideal way to start a flying club.” As soon as the Phase One flight testing was completed, the club members started lining up for check out rides.

The Dynon employee flying club, known as the Swamp Creek Flyers, includes (left to right): Kirk Kleinholz, David Weber, Robert Hamilton, Ian Jordan, and Paul Dunscomb.


June 7, 2013

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Accident Reports These June 2011 accident reports are provided by the National Transportation Safety Board. Published as an educational tool, they are intended to help pilots learn from the misfortunes of others. Aircraft: Cessna 177. Injuries: None. Location: Boone, N.C. Aircraft damage: Substantial. What reportedly happened: The pilot, who was attempting to land, overflew the runway to determine the wind direction and velocity. He entered the traffic pattern on the downwind leg, extended the flaps and maintained an airspeed of 80 mph. His approach was a little high and the plane touched down on the runway further down than he anticipated. He added power to abort the landing, but there was not enough runway remaining to take off again. The plane went off the end of the runway and into a ditch. Probable cause: The pilot’s delay in executing a go-around. Aircraft: Mooney M20R. Injuries: None. Location: Lake in the Hills, Ill. Aircraft damage: Substantial. What reportedly happened: The pilot had recently purchased the airplane and was receiving instruction to become more comfortable flying it. The accident occurred as he performed a simulated forced landing at the end of an instructional flight. The plane stalled as he attempted to flare. He increased engine power, but it was not in time to prevent the Mooney from coming down hard on the main landing gear. The plane bounced, veered left, went off the runway and down an embankment, coming to rest in a construction site. Probable cause: The pilot’s improper landing flare and recovery from a bounced landing, which resulted in loss of control. Aircraft: Piper Cherokee 6. Injuries: 2 Serious. Location: Bridgeport, Conn. Aircraft damage: Substantial. What reportedly happened: The purpose of the flight was for the pilot to regain night currency, which had lapsed two weeks prior. The pilot, who was familiar with the airport, said he intended to perform three full stop landings. According to the pilot, the first takeoff and initial climb out to a left downwind were normal. He reported that there was a slight haze in the vicinity of the airport. While

turning to the base leg of the approach, he trimmed the airplane for 90 mph and lowered the flaps to the “first notch.” The pilot reported he saw “two white lights” on the vertical approach slope indicator, which indicated that he was above the glideslope, so he adjusted the trim to maintain 80 mph and lowered the flaps to the “third notch.” The left wing collided with a 12-foottall blast fence, which was located 20 feet from the end of the runway. After the accident, the pilot stated that the blast fence was indistinguishable from the runway threshold markings. The blast fence was properly marked with red and white checker markings on the interior side and was not required to be lit by FAA facility requirements. Probable cause: The pilot’s failure to maintain clearance from a blast fence on final approach to land. Aircraft: Cessna 172. Injuries: None. Location: Price, Utah. Aircraft damage: Substantial. What reportedly happened: It was a hot day when the pilot landed on a 3,600-foot-dirt strip at a field elevation of approximately 5,891 feet, then decided to take off again. He reported he took off with 20° of flaps and was never able to get more than 10 feet above the runway surface area. At the end of the runway he noticed two dirt berms about 3 to 4 feet high. He pulled back on the yoke, missing the first berm, but the airplane settled back down and struck the second one. The Cessna nosed over onto its back. The pilot operating handbook (POH) states that soft or rough field takeoffs should be performed with no more than 10° of flaps. Furthermore the airport’s density altitude at the time of the accident was calculated to be approximately 10,000 feet, which is 2,000 feet above the maximum altitude listed in the takeoff performance charts in the POH. Probable cause: The pilot’s decision to attempt a takeoff at a density altitude outside of the takeoff performance envelope of the aircraft, along with using a flap setting higher than the manufacture’s recommended setting for takeoff. Aircraft: RV-6A. Injuries: None. Location: Oakwood, Okla. Aircraft damage: Substantial. What reportedly happened: The pilot was landing on a paved country road to deliver paychecks to his farm crew. During the landing roll the left wing hit a school bus sign and the plane veered

off the road and into a fence. Probable cause: The improper decision to land on a road with obstacles. Aircraft: Glastar. Injuries: None. Location: Canon City, Colo. Aircraft damage: Substantial. What reportedly happened: The purpose of the flight was to test a new cooling modification on the engine. When the airplane was on the base leg of the pattern, the engine began overheating, then seized. The plane came down short of the runway in loose dirt. The impact crushed the outboard portion of the left wing and buckled the upper skin of the right wing. Probable cause: A loss of engine power due to an overheated engine as a result of a malfunction of the modified engine cooling system, necessitating a forced landing on unsuitable terrain. Aircraft: Cessna 172. Injuries: None. Location: Grand Forks, N.D. Aircraft damage: Substantial. What reportedly happened: The student pilot was practicing landings with his flight instructor. The airplane touched down right of the runway centerline and began to bounce. The student attempted to realign the airplane with the centerline. The bouncing continued with an escalating intensity. The instructor took the controls with the intention of aborting the landing, but before he could establish a climb, the airplane experienced an additional hard landing. The firewall was substantially buckled. Probable cause: The CFI’s delayed remedial action to the student pilot’s bounced landing and subsequent loss of aircraft control. Aircraft: Waco Classic YMF-F5C. Injuries: None. Location: Charleston, Ill. Aircraft damage: Substantial. What reportedly happened: The pilot performed a precautionary landing in a field because he thought the engine was running rough. After the landing, he decided that the airplane was airworthy, and attempted to take off from a nearby gravel road. During the takeoff roll, the left wing dragged in the high grass that bordered both sides of the road, which caused the airplane to cartwheel approximately 180°. Probable cause: The pilot’s selection of unsuitable terrain to takeoff after making a precautionary landing.

Aircraft: Piper J3C-65. Injuries: 1 Minor. Location: Shepard, Texas. Aircraft damage: Substantial. What reportedly happened: The pilot, who was practicing touch-andgo takeoffs and landings, said the wind was blowing directly down the runway about 5 to 10 knots during the takeoff roll. When the airplane reached an altitude of 50 feet, he encountered turbulent updrafts and downdrafts, which caused him to have a difficult time controlling the airplane. He tried to abort the takeoff, but the plane encountered an updraft and was turned almost 90° to the right, and was pushed over a heavily wooded area adjacent to the runway. The airplane stalled and crashed in trees in a near vertical nosedown attitude, causing substantial damage to the wings and vertical stabilizer. Probable cause: The pilot’s loss of aircraft control after encountering windshear and turbulence on takeoff. Aircraft: Lancair. Injuries: 1 Serious. Location: Azle, Texas. Aircraft damage: Substantial. What reportedly happened: The pilot departed for a local test flight in a newly completed kit airplane. He reported that about an hour after departure the engine gave a “slight hiccup,” so he turned back to the airport. He turned on both wing fuel tank transfer pumps, but the engine subsequently lost power, so he elected to conduct a gear-up forced landing in a field. The post-accident examination revealed that the left wing and header tanks were empty, while the right wing tank was full of fuel. Probable cause: The pilot’s inadequate in-flight fuel management, which resulted in a loss of engine power due to fuel starvation. Aircraft: Cessna 172. Injuries: None. Location: Cortez, Colo. Aircraft damage: Substantial. What reportedly happened: The pilot made three prior attempts to land, but aborted each landing due to gusty crosswind conditions. On the fourth attempt, the airplane “ballooned” and encountered a strong wind gust. The pilot was unable to maintain control and the airplane landed hard on the nosewheel. Probable cause: The pilot’s failure to maintain aircraft control while landing in gusty crosswind conditions.


26

General Aviation News —  800.426.8538

New Products ForeFlight training course released by Sporty’s

Sporty’s has released a new training program that’s full of basic how-to for the ForeFlight app. “There’s a lot to learn on ForeFlight, and this course is produced for the everyday pilot. You don’t have to be a computer scientist to understand it – in fact, we intentionally made this course jargon free,” says Sporty’s Vice President John Zimmerman. Experienced ForeFlight users will also benefit from this course, he said. The course reveals tips and shortcuts, including an in-depth analysis of route editor to learn how to choose the right route. The 60-minute course is available as an iPad/iPhone app or a streaming online course for $29.99. Sportys.com/apps

rate books, this newlycombined edition shows pilots how to develop total awareness for the situation, the airplane, and the self — and to convert that awareness into perfect takeoffs and landings, the publisher promises. Each chapter defines a specific takeoff or landing situation and the set of characteristics unique to it. Price: $19.95. ASA2Fly.com

Perfect takeoffs and landings

Now available is “Making Perfect Takeoffs and Landings in Light Airplanes” by Ron Fowler. Originally published as two sepa-

three to an overseas shipping container. It will sell these aircraft, as well as supply them to other dealers in the territory. The Stanton Sport Aviation team reassembles these aircraft under the quality control system of the manufacturer. They follow an extensive pre-delivery checklist and fly the aircraft before declaring them suitable to turn over to a new owner. As Stanton is also an active flight training operation, it also can provide customers the five-hour LSA checkout. StantonAirfield.com, FlightDesignUSA.com

Enhanced cargo door for Cessna C-208 introduced

North American Surveillance Systems USA (NASS) has introduced an enhanced cargo door for the Cessna Caravan 208 Series aircraft. The sliding, air operable door turns any C-208 into a multi-role aircraft, according to company officials, who note it requires no modification to the aircraft and installs in place of the standard two piece cargo door in approximately an hour. The new door assembly weighs approximately 45 pounds. With the door installed, the aircraft maintains the same OEM exterior profile, including the same windows. NASSUSA.net

Plane-Power debuts high-power alternator

Plane-Power has received FAA approval for its ALT-FLX alternator, a lightweight, high-output, belt-driven alternator sold as a single part number for both 12V and 24V aircraft. Weighing in at 12.5 pounds, the alternator features a highly efficient hairpin stator that enables extremely high power output even at low engine rpms, company officials noted. During FAA testing, the alternators proved to provide more than 150 amps on 28 volts continuously at typical engine cruise rpm. At 1,000 rpm, it generates more than 70 amps at 14 volts and 60 amps at 28 volts, officials add. Plane-Power.com

products for ADS-B NextGen compliance with accompanying WAAS position source, Garmin officials note. Customers who already own a GTX 330/33 transponder can purchase an ES upgrade for $1,200. For aircraft owners who already have a GTX 330 ES, GTX 33 ES or a GTX 23 ES, a free update is now available through Garmin Authorized Dealers. Garmin.com

June 7, 2013

Aspen Evolution backup display expands to Archer and Seminoles

Piper Aircraft has selected Aspen Avionic’s Evolution Backup Display system for its Piper Archer and Seminole line of aircraft. The fully digital, independent flight display system is designed to replace mechanical backup instruments used in Part 23 glass panel installations. Piper.com, AspenAvionics.com

Garmin gets FAA nod for GTX 330, GTX 33 ES

Garmin has received an Approved Model List Supplemental Type Certification (AML STC) that allows its GTX 330 ES and GTX 33 ES transponders to be installed in hundreds of makes and models of fixed-wing aircraft. This certification qualifies these

‘Aircraft: The Definitive Visual History’ published

Now available is “Aircraft: The Definitive Visual History.” The 300-plus page book is full of more than 800 color pictures, divided into 10 chapters. Each chapter, except the first, dives into aviation history, by decade. The book not only covers the technological developments and manufacture of aircraft, “but also the cultural backdrop against which the various models arose, and the enduring impact that aircraft has had on society as an object of curiosity, a symbol of luxury, and an essential weapon of war,” according to the publishers. The book retails for $40. dk.com

Stanton Sport Aviation new Flight Design distributor

Stanton, Minn.-based Stanton Sport Aviation, led by Kent Johnson, was recently elevated to distributor status with Flight Design USA, responsible for Minnesota, Wisconsin, North Dakota, and South Dakota. As a distributor Stanton will place orders for aircraft commonly arriving

King Schools updates online FIRC

John and Martha King, co-chairmen of King Schools, have updated the King Online Flight Instructor Refresher Course (FIRC) to include a new lesson on scenario-based training (SBT). “Scenario-based training is now part of the FAA Practical Test Standards, but most CFIs have not had training on how to incorporate scenarios in their lesson plans,” John said. “The King Online FIRC now gives instructors tools and insights on how to implement scenarios that will teach their customers to effectively manage the risks associated with each flight.” King Schools released the first version of the online FIRC course in May 2012. It provides an entirely paperless online renewal process with nothing to notarize and nothing to send in. The King Schools FIRC program has been designed to run on the iPad and on all Windows and Mac Web browsers. It sells for $99 without CFI renewal processing or $124.95 with processing included. KingSchools.com/FIRC

Have a new product or service you’d like to tell our readers about? Send press releases (in word documents, no PDFs please) to: Press@GeneralAviationNews. com. Please put “On the Market” in the subject line. Send photos separately.


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t Kid friendly weekend with expanded Adventure Zone and KidSpace workshops t Pilot friendly weekend with airplane judging, aviation seminars, building workshops and air show t 2013 will be the 34th annual Rocky Mountain Regional Fly In in Colorado

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GA News Calendar_Layout 1 3/15/13 5:17 PM Page 1

28

General Aviation News —  800.426.8538

June 7, 2013

Calendar of Events

POWERED BY

WEEK OF APRIL 1, 2013

June 22, 2013, Longmont, CO. Longmont Airport Expo 303-651-8431 June 22, 2013, Fort Morgan, CO. Glenn Miller Flyin and Lions Club Breakfast 970-467-3088 June 22, 2013, Cascade, ID. Unique FAA Safety Seminar, Cascade Airport 805-218-0161 June 22, 2013, Hobbs, NM. Lea County Regional Airport Fly-In June 22, 2013, Chehalis, WA. 2013 Fantasy Field Fly-In 360-262-3060 June 23, 2013, McMinnville, OR. Fly-In/Classic Car Drive-In Breakfast 503-472-6293 June 25-28, 2013, McCall, ID. Advanced Backcountry Flying Course at Sulphur Creek 208-634-1344

South Central United States SocialFlight is the most comprehensive tool ever created for finding aviationrelated events! Aircraft Fly-in's, Airshows, Pancake Breakfasts, Conventions, FAA Safety Seminars... they're all here! With SocialFlight, you can also chat with other attendees and even upload & view photos of the events! Whether you love flying, watching airplanes, ultralights, balloons or anything else airborne, this is the place for you. Keep exploring to discover all the features that SocialFlight has to offer.

Now get out there and FLY! www.socialflight.com Western United States

June 14, 2013, McCall, ID. FAA WINGS approved instruction in the Idaho Backcountry, 208-634-1344 June 15, 2013, Hanford, CA. Display Day, Breakfast & Young Eagles, 559-585-2589 June 15, 2013, Erie, CO. Young Eagles Rally, 720-675-8643 June 15, 2013, Carson City, NV. Carson City Airport “Flight Plan for the Future” 775-841-2255 June 15, 2013, Concord, CA. EAA Chapter 393 Young Eagles Rally June 15, 2013, Pasco, WA. Pancake Breakfast & Fly-In 509-547-6271 June 15, 2013, Helena, MT. Spring Burger Burn June 15, 2013, Bellingham, WA. HFM’s Greatest Generation Dinner-Auction 360-733-4422 June 16, 2013, Las Cruces, NM. EAA 555 Pancake Breakfast 5755411198 June 16, 2013, Boulder, CO. 5th Anniversary 1940’s WWII Era Ball at Boulder Airport 720-924-1945 June 17-18, 2013, Albuquerque, NM. Double Eagle Aviation Adventure, 505-974-5305 June 21, 2013, Angel Fire, NM. First day of summer Angel Fire Fly-In, 505-572-1482 June 21, 2013, Tahoe City, CA. Gathering of Mooneys, 805-227-0480 June 21, 2013, Garden Valley, ID. Top Fun Flyers Garden Valley Camp Out, 208-880-3110 June 22, 2013, Camarillo, CA. Customer Appreciation BBQ & Open House

June 14, 2013-June 16, 2013, Groesbeck, TX. International Cessna 120-140 Association Fly-In 254-747-0592 June 15, 2013, Winfield, KS. Cessna 172 Club National Fly-In June 15, 2013, Angelina, TX. EAA Chapter 1219 Cook’s Choice 936-831-3465 June 15, 2013, Winfield, KS. Wings & Wheels: Honoring Melvin Current 620-221-9280 June 15, 2013, Denton, TX. Hidden Valley Airpark Fly-In 972-989-6770 June 20-23, 2013, Mountain View, AR. Ercoupe Owners National Fly-In 870-652-3925 June 20-23, 2013, Creve Coeur-St. Louis, MO. American Waco Club Fly-In 317-989-2274 June 22, 2013, Cookson, OK. Jubilee FlyIn Pancake Breakfast 918-457-4774 June 22, 2013, Odessa, TX. Odessa ECAA Fly-In June 22, 2013, Grand Prairie, TX. Pylon Airport Reunion 817-776-7505

North Central United States

June 14-16, 2013, Greenfield, IN. 16th Annual Indianapolis Air Show 317-335-7252 June 14-16, 2013, Urbana, IL. Frasca Annual Fly-In 217-367-8441 June 14-15, 2013, Holdrege, NE. Holdrege Swedish Days Fly-In 308-991-3641 June 15, 2013, Keosauqua, IA. Fly Van Buren 800-868-7822 June 15, 2013, Pekin, IL. Wings and Wheels Fly-in/Cruise-in 309-221-0076 June 15, 2013, Greenwood, IL. Barnstormers! Aeroplanes & Automobiles Fly-In 847-912-5122 June 15, 2013, Red Wing, MN. Young Eagles Rally 715-441-1790 June 15, 2013, Appleton, WI. Civil Air Patrol Open House and Pancake Breakfast, 920-205-1352 June 16, 2013, Rockford, IL. EAA Chapter 22 FlyIn/Drive-In Breakfast 815-978-7864 June 16, 2013, Plymouth, MI. EAA Chapter 113’s Pancake Breakfast Fly-In 248-890-6767 June 16, 2013, Geneseo, IL. Annual Father’s Day Fly-in/Drive-in Breakfast 309-944-8126 June 16, 2013, Clarinda, IA. Clarinda FlyIn and Air Show 515-681-3458 June 16, 2013, Sheboygan Falls, WI. 23rd Annual Wings & Wheels 920-565-2594, June 16, 2013, Elkhart, IN. Father’s Day Breakfast 574-361-6522, June 16, 2013, Crystal, MN. Father’s Day Open House 763-533-4162 June 16, 2013, Lacon, IL. Father’s Day Breakfast 309-246-2870 June 16, 2013, Lake Elmo, MN. Father’s Day Pancake Breakfast Fundraiser, 651-773-1210 June 16, 2013, Hutchinson, MN. Pancake Breakfast, 320-587-3802

June 16, 2013, Juneau, WI. Chicken BBQ 920-210-8565 June 16, 2013, Hutchinson, MN. Pork Chop Dinner 320-587-3802 June 17, 2013, Lacon, IL. Safety Seminar 309-246-2870 June 22, 2013, Walworth, WI. Big Foot Airfield Fly-in/Drive-in Breakfast 262-275-2679 June 22, 2013, Ludington, MI. Fly-In Breakfast and Car Show 614-296-9126, June 22, 2013, Jackson, MI. Pancake Breakfast/Fly-In 517-783-3988 June 22, 2013, Havana, IL. Havana’s 7th Annual Fly-in/Drive-in Breakfast 217-725-3406 June 22, 2013, Boone, IA. Boone Breakfast Fly-in 515-432-1018 June 22, 2013, Peru, IN. GUS Fly In 574-398-1451 June 22, 2013, Royalton, WI. Sport Aviation Olympics, 920-225-9881

North Eastern United States June 14-16, 2013, Marysville, OH. Ohio Aerobatic Open-IAC 34 614-505-6555 June 14-15, 2013, Carlisle, PA. 24th Annual Father’s Day Fly-In 717-243-7923 June 15, 2013, Toughkenamon, PA. EAA Chapter 240 Pancake Breakfast & Young Eagles June 15, 2013, Myerstown, PA. Lebanon Valley Fly-In 717-865-4642 June 15-16, 2013, Millbury, OH. PLANE FUN 2013 419-466-7908 June 15, 2013, Hamilton, OH. Aileron Bushing Madness 513-519-7008 June 15, 2013, Ashland, KY. 2nd Annual Open House June 15, 2013, Bennington, VT. Picnic/Seminar 802-447-2149 June 15-16, 2013, Columbus, OH. Discover Aviation 614-292-5473 June 15, 2013, Bethel, PA. Golden Air Flying Circus Air Show 717-933-9566 June 16, 2013, Beach City, OH. Beach City Pancake Breakfast June 16, 2013, Massena, NY. Fly-in Drivein Breakfast 315-385-1230 June 16, 2013, Somerset, PA. Father’s Day FlyIn/Drive-in Breakfast 814-442-7700 June 19-22, 2013, Lock Haven, PA. Sentimental Journey to Cub Haven 570-893-4200 June 22, 2013, Middlefield, OH. Wheels and Wings 440-382-3090 June 22, 2013, Columbus, OH. Scioto Valley 99s Poker Run & Raffle June 22, 2013, Zanesville, OH. EAA 425 FlyIn/Drive-In breakfast 740-704-9677 June 22, 2013, Schenectady, NY. Pistons & Props

South Eastern United States

June 15, 2013, Valkaria, FL. EAA 1288 Pancake Breakfast June 15, 2013, Dallas, GA. Cookout 678-384-8510 June 22, 2013, Gallatin, TN. Steam Plant FlyIn and Aviation Expo 615-512-6297 June 22, 2013, Beaufort, NC. Fly-In & Pig Pickin’ EAA Chapter 1523 252-247-2575 June 22, 2013, Greenwood, SC. Aviation Expo 864-993-9726

International

June 14, 2013, Arviat, NU. High Arctic trip, 250-652-1340 June 15, 2013, Carstairs, AB. Carstairs Bishell’s Pancake Breakfast 403-337-2564 June 16, 2013, Cornwall, ON. Father’s Day Fly-In Breakfast 613 936-9151 June 22, 2013, Debert, NS. Annual Lobster & Steak BBQ 902-662-3342

For more events and to stay up-to-date, go to www.socialflight.com


June 7, 2013

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Sporty’s awards Legend Cub at fly-in

in the

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Call Ben Sclair (800) 426-8538 Ben@GeneralAviationNews.com GeneralAviationNews.com/Advertise

Sporty’s Ninth Annual Fly-In went off without a hitch last month despite the all-day threat of thunderstorms. About 100 aircraft made the trip to Ohio’s Clermont County Airport (I69), coming from as far away as Virginia, Maryland and Michigan. “We’re thrilled with the number of attendees, especially from the local community,” says Sporty’s President Michael Wolf. “Despite the weather, the airport was a busy place and we were able to provide several first flight experiences as part of International Learn to Fly Day.” Attractions included dozens of commercial exhibitors, free seminars, shopping at Sporty’s retail shop and, of course, Sporty’s signature free hot dogs. At noon, Wolf telephoned the winner

of Sporty’s 2013 Airplane Sweepstakes. Christopher Boyle of Arcata, Calif., who won a new Legend Cub. Boyle’s boss had been contacted by Wolf earlier and arranged for Boyle to come to work on Saturday to be surprised by Wolf’s phone call, with fly-in guests listening on speaker phone. “When Christopher realized the Saturday work was a ruse, he seemed almost as excited about not having to work on Saturday as he was in winning the Legend Cub,” said Wolf. Boyle will travel to Ohio to take delivery of the Cub within the next few weeks and fly it back to California. Free seminars were once again popular, with presentations on Flying with the iPad, hosted by Sporty’s Vice President Bret Koebbe, as well as seminars presented by Garmin, Aspen Avionics,

ForeFlight and NFlightcam. As part of International Learn to Fly Day, Sporty’s Academy provided several introductory flights to aspiring pilots. Next year’s fly-in is scheduled for Saturday, May 17, 2014. Sportys.com

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www.GeneralAviationNews.com —  Classified Pages — facebook.com/ganews Cessna 190/195 - 1910

Luscombe - 3300

AERO COMMANDER “Darter”, 4pl, Lyc O-320, 1900 TTAF&E. Owned 25 years. Hangared Kelso, WA, $12,500 obo, 360-423-4795. Aeronca - 1050

1948 CESSNA 195A. 4000-TT, 80-SMOH, 210-SPOH, Mark 12D navcom, xpdr, 275hp Jacobs, new P&I, fresh annual $56,900. 208-305-7804. laramie57@msn.com Cessna 300 Series - 2005

LUSCOMBE SUPPORT: Parts, PMA, NOS, used; knowledgable technical help. www.Luscombe.org. 480-6500883.

CITABRIA, Aeronca, Scout, Decathlon, salvage, surplus, 5-ply birch formers, gear legs straightened, repair, wing inspection kits. RAINBOW 509-765-1606. ronp@qosi.net www.rainbowflying.com

CLASSIC WELL-KEPT 1963 CESSNA-310H. Low Engine Times. IFR-certified, Garmin-530, GDL 49 WeatherDatalink. S-TEC 50 Autopilot w/GPSS Roll-steering. NDH. $77,500. CA/530-867-6652.

FREE 400-PAGE UNIVAIR CATALOG with hundreds of FAA-PMA’d parts. Order toll-free 888-433-5433, info@univair.com or www.univair.com Foreign orders pay postage.

1961 C-310F, 4596TT, LE-485-SMOH, RE-977-SMOH, 20hrs on NEW Hartzell 2-blade prop, Cleveland wheels&brakes, Good P&I, Very clean, $42,000. 641933-4316, 641-777-0494. Cessna 400 Series - 2010

FREE 400-PAGE UNIVAIR CATALOG with hundreds of FAA-PMA’d parts. Order toll-free 888-433-5433, info@univair.com or www.univair.com Foreign orders pay postage. Maule - 3400

American Champion - 1190

1970 C-421 8380-TT, RE-95SMOH, LE-1600SMOH, 95SPOH, Robertson STOL-kit, Long-Range fuel. This is a Very Nice, Clean C-421B. $109,000. 641-933-4316. 641777-0494. Cessna - 2020

2003 7GCAA, 1035TT, 35SMOH, GNC250, GTX-327, PM-1000, 406ELT new batt/prop/tires, baggage-door. All logs, hangared. Fresh annual w/sale. $69,900 WA509765-1606, 509-750-2327. Beech Bonanza - 1505 1957 H Model, 3640-TT, 92 on-prop, 1090-SMOH, audiopanel, 2-KX-155’s, KT76A-Transp, II-Morrow GPS, Many mods &upgrades. For More info/pictures: 509-638-3898. Beech Baron - 1602 2000 BARON 58 1542 TTSN, Cont IO550C3-1B Special Edition, NDH, complete original logs. Call for price, Art Berard, 813-287-8000, 813-928-4141. Cessna 150 - 1904 1961 CESSNA 150, 3657-TT, 1510eng, compl 70’s all, RT-328, shoulder harness, strobe, ext9, int8, annual 9/13, $15,000, 716-877-1082, 716-283-5585, Roy. 74 CESSNA 150L Commuter, TT-3459. TSMOH-460, PSMOH-27, Garmin-250XL, new interior, much more. $30,000 firm. kmoes@minetfiber.com for more info/ pics. BUYING OR FLYING A CESSNA 150/152? Read the complete, authoritative guide! Second Printing! Officially endorsed by the 150/152 Club! Fly safer, save thousands. You’ll love it! www.cessna150book.com 1976 C-150M Digital 720 NavCom, colored GPS, ModeC. Recent windows/ annual. Inexpensive Flying. Pics on request. $17,500. 858-518-4622, jsilva35@verizon.net Cessna 152 - 1905 SIX C-152’s For Sale! Price Range $17,000-$25,000. All Flying and have annuals. Olympia Airport. Earl Pearson 360-754-5221, 360-292-7220.

CESSNA WING rebuilding, using factory jigs. CRS #UDIR892K. Aircraft Rebuilders 2245 SO. Hwy 89, Perry UT 84302 435-723-5650. Cessna Parts - 2030

MAULE AK WORLDWIDE has various MAULES for sale at competitive prices. High performance 3&2 blade props, floats, etc. 707-942-5934, www.maules.com. Mooney - 3500

LAKE AERO STYLING YOUR ONE STOP MOONEY “MALL” Lasar Plane Sales, service, parts, engine work, mods, upholstery, avionics, etc. Servicing your Mooney needs since 1966. Free Mooney buyers guide or mod brochure: Email: LasarMods@aol.com www.lasar.com PARTS: 800-954-5619 or 707-263-0581 OFFICE 707-263-0412 FAX 707-263-0420 LASAR PLANE Sales has many Mooneys on consignment. Call for info & free Mooney Buyers Guide, 707263-0452, Fax: 707-263-0472. See us on the internet: www.lasar.com, email: planesales@lasar.com

FREE 400-PAGE UNIVAIR CATALOG with hundreds of FAA-PMA’d parts. Order toll-free 888-433-5433, info@univair.com or www.univair.com Foreign orders pay postage.

MOONEY’S LARGEST Factory Authorized Parts Service Center. Large supply of discontiued parts. Lone Star Aero, 888-566-3781, parts@LoneStarAero.com, fax 210979-0226.

SELKIRK AVIATION Inc. has FAA approval on composite cowlings for all Cessna 180, 185 & years 1956-1961 Cessna 182 planes. Also interior panels, extended bag kits, glare shields & nose bowl for most C-170 to U206 models. www.selkirk-aviation.com or 208-664-9589. Champion Parts - 2055

RELIANT AVIATION. Mooney parts/ service since 1972. Large inventory. Email reliant.aviation@mindspring.com Navion - 3600

CITABRIA, Aeronca Scout, Decathlon, salvage, surplus, 5-ply birch formers, gear-legs straightened, repair, wing inspection kits. RAINBOW 509-765-1606/fax1616 ronp@qosi.net www.rainbowflying.com Citabria Parts - 2155 FREE 400-PAGE UNIVAIR CATALOG with hundreds of FAA-PMA’d parts. Order toll-free 888-433-5433, info@univair.com or www.univair.com Foreign orders pay postage. DeHavilland - 2400

Piper Cherokee Series - 3806

Luscombe Parts - 3310

CESSNA WINGS REBUILT ON JIGS BEECH/CESSNA Control surfaces reskinned on jigs Call for quotes. West Coast Wings 707-462-6822.

FREE 400-PAGE UNIVAIR CATALOG with hundreds of FAA-PMA’d parts. Order toll-free 888-433-5433, info@univair.com or www.univair.com Foreign orders pay postage. Citabria - 2150

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1962 NAVION Range Master G-H. IO-520BA-(285hp), 902-SRMN, 168 STOH, 902-SN-3-bl-prop, 5,246-TTAF, dual GS, fresh annual. Very well maintained, $84,900/OBO. 937-430-2482. North American - 3680

1945 NORTH AMERICAN P51D Mustang, 1305TTSN, 135SMOH by Nixon, Rolls Royce Merlin 1650-7 with transport-heads. Dual-controls. New Martin-radiator, new hoses, new tubes new hydraulics, fresh annual. $2,145,000, will accept Harvard or AT6 on partial trade. Ron Fernuik 806-662-5823, ronfernuik@hotmail.com Piper Single - 3800

Cessna 172 - 1907

LOW TIME Wisconsin (always!) 1966 Cherokee 140. 2100 TT, 225 SMOH, 160hp. Gran Aire Inc Milwaukee WI, www.flymilwaukee.com, sales@flymilwaukee.com, 414-461-3222. Piper Comanche - 3809 1964 PA-24-250, 3043-TT, 504-TSMOH, “0”SPOH, new tires, new strut seals, new bungees, KX-155, always hangared, $58,500 obo 951-313-7156. Piper Parts - 3920 1958 PIPER Pacer Parts For Sale By Owner. Lycoming 320 A2B-propstrike. SMOH-1653.7HRS. STOH189.24hrs. Carburator MA4, Spinner, Nosebowl, 4-Tail control surface frames and a Vertical Fin. This is all thats left from a crash. Please call if you can use any of these parts. Grace 541-417-1033. Pitts - 3950 PITTS SPECIAL S1, TTAF 201.0, TSMOH 896.0, O-320 150hp. Spars like new. Experimental 1 seat. Exterior 9. $36,900. 907-223-9773, 907-688-7115. Stinson - 4455 FREE 400-PAGE UNIVAIR CATALOG. Thousands of type certified parts direct from our factory. Order toll-free 888-433-5433, info@univair.com or www.univair.com Foreign orders pay postage. Taylorcraft Parts - 4605 FREE 400-PAGE UNIVAIR CATALOG. with hundreds of FAA/PMA’d parts. Order toll-free 888-433-5433, info@univair.com or www.univair.com Foreign orders pay postage. Floatplanes - 5400 SEAPLANE RATINGS AND SOLO RENTALS in central Florida & Minnesota. PA12 & C172 available. 612-8684243 - 612-749-1337, www.adventureseaplanes.com Helicopters - 5600

2002 BELL 206L4, excellent corporate history. $1,975,000. Ron 806-662-5823, ronfernuik@hotmail.com Announcements - 6375 SELMA AIRPORT Display Day Held on the third Saturday of each month. Info/ Contact, Call CA/559-896-1001.

1978 C-172N, Texas Taildragger, 1702 TTSN, 225 SFRMAN, Nice original P&I. IFR. One family California plane. $39,950. 510-783-2711, www.americanaircraft.net 1980 CESSNA-172RG, TT-14229, SMOH-1439, “Price Reduced” Good-int, KMA20 audio-panel, McCoy-MX170 NavCom KT76A-xpdr, KX170B, David Clark intercom. Vista Aviation. $35,000. 818-896-6442. 1971 SKYHAWK 172L, TTAF-6775, O-SMOH, O-SPOH, new urethane-paint, new-uphol, AF-resurface, (2)King 170B, IFR-pkg, fresh-annual, NDH, complete-logs. Like new! $62,500. 360-371-2489, ifrbrown@aol.com Cessna 180/185 - 1908

REDUCED!! $400,000. DeHavilland HERON-DH-114-X2 owned by Queen Elizabeth. Gipsy Queen/30 Mark-2 engines. 2-1/2planes+spares. Last-one flying. Parts-forever. New leather-interior. Standard Airworthy. OR/541-2201000. happymiles@comcast.net Ercoupe - 2550 1948 ERCOUPE(415E) N3460H, C-85, 194-SMOH, 4.5gal/hr Millennium-cyl, auto-gas STC, no rudder-pedals, fabric-wings, King-radio, full-panel, 3gyros, hangared. fresh-annual, Non-LSA. $17,000. 307-250-4739

1973 C-180J, 2630 TT, 360 since total rebuild. 2863.5/ 383.9 SMOH, Wheel gear and Aqua-3190’s. $129,900. AK/907-254-2163, www.waterfallproperty.net

DAVID CLARK headset $60, windshield $85, Bill Shea, Woodland CA 530-406-1386.

1954 C-180, 4030 TT, 30 SMOH, 30 SNPROP, King, Strobes. New P&I, much more! $79,000. 641-933-4316, 641-777-0494.

FREE 400-PAGE UNIVAIR CATALOG. Thousands of type certified parts direct from our factory. Order toll-free 888-433-5433, info@univair.com or www.univair.com Foreign orders pay postage.

Cessna 182 - 1909 1973 182P, P-Ponk ,530W, 340 audio, HSI, ME406-ELT, SR8A analyzer, 3bl prop, King-155, 2Lightspeed, 4pl oxy. Loads of TLC. LnCmorstad@charter.net. 1979 CESSNA Turbo R182RG Skylane 3260 TT, 985 SMOH, Garmin GNS-430 WAAS, PMA-8000 Audio-panel/3lit, Wing-Tip Strobes, $99,500. John, 512-869-6153, 512-863-6883

LSA AIRCRAFT: 1946 Ercoupe, 787.4-SMOH, 1770.8TTAF 1682.5-SPOH, no rudder pedals, very nice aircraft, fresh annual, $27,500. Earl Pearson, 360-292-7220, 360754-5221. Luscombe - 3300 1946 8A 2662TT, 1105SMOH. Light Sport, 8E upgrades. C-85, starter, Gen, night-kit, BASI-handle, 25gal wing tanks, 4/13-annual. $17,900. 805-642-3315, 805-2084589.

NEW CONTROL LOCK for Pipers! Holds the ailerons neutral and the stabilizer down. Installs in seconds, weighs 3oz., easy to store. Only $39.95. Airplane Things, Inc, 866-365-0357 or see at www.airplanethings.com Piper Archer - 3802 PIPER ARCHER III 2001 990TT, Dual-Garmin 430/GPS, 340, GTX330, WX500, STEC55X w/auto electric-trim, air conditioning, standby-vac system. $148,000. 818-8966442, vista@vistaaviation.com Piper Cherokee Series - 3806 1964 CHEROKEE 180, TT-3390, SMOH-80, KA-134 audio-panel, Garmin SL40 radio, Collins 720-NavCom, AT50A w/mode-C, shoulder-harnesses, copper wiring. Skytec hi-torque starter, hangared. $28,000. 541-8833982, or snowy.owl@charter.net

For some good results call Dodie to place your classified ad. 800-426-8538

PLEASE DONATE your aircraft, engines, avionics, aviation equipment. We provide Humanitarian Air Service World Wide. Donations tax deductible. 800-448-9487. www.wings-of-hope.org Appraisals - 6405 NAAA/USPAP APPRAISALS / CONSULTING. Northwest US and Western Canada. Call Russ, Bow Aviation, www.bowaviation.com 360-766-7600. Charts & Maps - 6590

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866-880-4686 www.pilotsguide.com CHARTS, WIDEST range of NOS/NIMA, Canada, Worldwide charts. Lowest cost. Next day service available. The Pilot Shoppe. 623-872-2828 Fax 623-935-6568. Cylinder Overhaul - 6605 CYLINDER FLOWMATCHING for more power and efficiency for Continental & Lycoming cylinders! Aircraft Cylinder Repair. www.aircraftcylinderrepair.com 1-800-6227101.


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General Aviation News —  Classified Pages — 800.426.8538

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AIRJOBSDAILY.COM -Comprehensive source of Aviation and Aerospace Jobs on the Internet! New Jobs Posted Daily. visit our website: www.AirJobsDaily.com Engines - 6950

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LYCOMING O-320-E2D. Running strong when removed. Removed from a C-172. 2500 hrs SMOH. Includes complete logs. $6,000. 360-371-2489, ifrbrown@aol.com KAWASAKI PACKAGE - SAVE 50% Engine, reduction drive, carburetor, and tuned exhaust. 0-time, 64 lbs, 40hp. J-Bird, 262-626-2611 ENGINES FROM $200 GUARANTEED: Kawasaki, Rotax, Hirth, and most other brands with the BEST reduction drive, carburetor, exhaust selection of accessories with top-notch service from our friendly staff. J-Bird, 210 Main St, Kewaskum WI 53040, 262-626-2611 CASH: WE BUY Cont & Lyc engines & parts. Used, new, damaged. Jerry Meyers Aviation 888-893-3301. mtaviation@littleappletech.com Engine Parts - 6955 PARTING OUT Lycoming and Continental engines, all parts, large & small! Cores & overhauled parts available. Jerry Meyers Aviation. mtaviation@littleappletech.com 888-893-3301.

For PORTBLE OXYGEN SYSTEMS Or WINDSOCKS

www.GeneralAviationNews.com Avionics - 6500

VERY TIDY T-hangar at Palomar. Doors completely rebuilt/clean throughout. Email me levylandnz@gmail.com w/your phone number and I will call you. AUBURN WA (S50) box hangar 55’Wx45’Dx14’H. All steel, bi-fold door, windows, polished-floor, bay-lighting, 220V, plumbed, 8-years old. Sell-$168,000. 206-7908908. montybird747@yahoo.com

AUBURN WA AIRPORT Box Hangar for rent. 50x60’. Available Now. Call for details. 425-503-8511, or ask for George at 206-878-7271

Financial - 7050 TITLE SEARCHES: Same day reports if called before noon CT, most searches. 800-666-1397 or 405-2328886. Visa/ MC. Aircraft Title Corp. Established 1957. Float Equipment - 7170

Hangars & Tie-Downs - 7300 POWER METERS for hangars. Recover the cost of electricity used by tenants, Davidge Controls, 800-824-9696, www.ezmeter.com Door Seals - 6700

ENCLOSED T-HANGARS near Yelm WA. $85.00 per month. Ultralights also welcome. Call Bill 360-894-3453. Door Seals - 6700

Door and Window Seals engineered with the latest technology • FAA-PMA approved Flying Club - 7200 FLYING CLUB- Pilot & GA bulletin board, share expenses, make new friends & have fun flying. FREE FREE FREE: www.pilotsharetheride.com

• air tight “leak proof”” • adapts to form the perfect seal

NEW LSA FLYING CLUB. Members will own the Aircraft. Olympia Airport and surrounding area. Need 5 people. I have one already. Aircraft is Ercoupe. Earl Pearson, 360-754-5221, 360-292-7220. Avionics - 6500

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PEARSON FIELD VUO. T-hangars w/42’doors, pavedfloor, electrical, $308-$345. Full service airport w/instrument approach. Closest to downtown Vancouver & Portland. Contact Willy willy.williamson@ci.vancouver.wa.us 360-487-8619, www.cityofvancouver.us/pearson

Or visit us at Oshkosh and AOPA

June 12, 5 p.m. (PST) Upcoming Classified June 28, 5Deadines: p.m. (PST) July 10, 5 p.m. (PST)

(800) 426-8538

PT TOWNSEND WA hangar for sale. 70x60 R&M Steel bldg. 50x14-Schweiss bI-fold door. Walls/ceiling/ door insulated. 200amp service. $150,000. Pictures available. 830-990-8185

RIO VISTA Muni Airport(O88)has hangar/ tiedown space available now at a low rate. Hangars: $263-$327.50/mo, tiedowns $32/mo. 707-374-2716, www.flyriovista.org

call 800-253-0800

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June 7, 2013 Hangars & Tie-Downs - 7300

www.GeneralAviationNews.com —  Classified Pages — facebook.com/ganews Parachutes - 8150

Propellers - 8400

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Title Services - 9210

"THE NEW LIFT STRAPS" BI-FOLD DOORS By Schweiss for airplane hangars. Electricall operated. Lose no headroom, we install and deliver. Schweiss BiFold Doors 800-746-8273. Visit www.bifold.com

TITLE SEARCHES: Same day reports if called before noon C.T., most searches. 800-666-1397 or 405-2328886. Visa/ MC. Aircraft Title Corp. Established 1957. Vacation - 9350

BEAVER ISLAND, Mich: Hangar for sale 48x56x14, bifold door, living quarters, bath, laundry. On paved runway. $89,000, 231-448-2099.

VACATION RENTAL: John Day Valley Chalet In John Day, Oregon. One mile from Airport. Rental car available. www.vrbo.com ,see 454253 Video, Audio, DVD - 9400

NEWER HANGARS at Chico Airport: 42’ Electric Bi-folding Doors, Electrical Outlets, Compressed Air, Restrooms. Concrete Floors. dan@danjayair.com 1522335. Dan/Heather, 530-898-1800 COMING THIS SUMMER -BOX HANGARS AT HAYWARD EXEC AIRPORT (HWD), California. 3 sizes: 42’x34’, 50’x40’, 50’x50’. www.haywardhangars.com ECONOMICAL AIRCRAFT HANGARS with the Banyan Steel Arch Systems. Will ship worldwide. (800)533-7773, (317)849-2246, Fax: (317)849-5378, www.banyansteelarchsystems.com ELMA, WA T-Hangars $97.50/mo Completely enclosed w/lockup. Pilot controlled runway lights. 360-482-2228. Instruction - 7350 TAILWHEEL SPECIALIST Maule & J 3-PiperCubs. BFR, private, tailwheel, mountains spin-awareness, EMT, SportPilot or just plane fun! 20,000hr George Kirkish, 206-567-4994. www.island-air.com, info@island-air.com

QUAD CITY CHALLENGER VIDEO. 45 minutes of flying fun on floats, ski’s, soaring and other neat stuff. Send $10 to QCU, POBox 370, Moline IL 61266-0370. Money back if not totally satisfied Also see our web site. www.quadcitychallenger.com For VISA/MC order call 309-764-3515. Real Estate/Airport Property - 9650

PARACHUTE SALES AND SERVICE Pack Jobs, Repairs, New and Used pilot parachutes for sale at low prices. Western Parachute Service LC, 1961 S. Carriage Ln Chandler, AZ 85286, 602-617-4464 PILOT’S EMERGENCY Parachutes --hundreds of new and used rigs --military and aerobatic types. Prices from $250 and up. Western Parachute Sales, Inc., 29388 SE Heiple Road, Eagle Creek, OR 97022. 503-630-5867 or fax 503-630-5868. Partnerships - 8200

Arizona - 9650

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OUR FREE web-based partner and partnership-finder works worldwide for any aircraft. Join today to fly more and pay less! Parts - 8225 Software - 8890

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VERDE VALLEY AIRPARK AZ-Very Nice Home, Wrap Around Porch, Large Attached Hangar/Garage, Views And More. Ready To Move in Conditions. $340,000. 928301-2212, 800-483-9621. Arkansas - 9650

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Survival - 9000

Insurance - 7400

ONE ACRE and Hangar on taxi-way. $115,000. Adelanto Airpark, So. Calif, near Victorville, Broker Bill 760-7928072, billbergsjo@verizon.net CALIFORNIA IDEAL climate, Pine Mountain lake. (E45) Taxiway homes or lots in the Sierra foothills near Yosemite Nat'l Park. Gated community with boating, golf, tennis and stables “Red” Rossio, The Flying Broker, Pine Mountain Lake Realty, 209-962-7156. EVERY PILOT’S Dream (O61) Excellent-level .43acrelot-joint use roadway. $160,000. Yvonne Rand, Lyon Real Estate 916-673-8226 yrand@golyon.com, CA DRE# 01834318.

TITLE SEARCHES & INSURANCE: Same day reports if called before noon CT-most searches. 800-666-1397, 405-232-8886. Visa/MC. Aircraft Title Corp. Est 1957.

PINE MTN Lake, CA(E45). Taxi to your airpark home or live on the lake. Championship golf, tennis, stables in gated community near Yosemite. Capt LarryJobe. “UAL” retired. www.YosemiteAreaRealtors.com 209-962-5501

Maintenance - 7460 MAGNETO SERVICE. Quality Bendix magneto overhauls and repairs. Mansfield Magnetos, Inc. 318-8722026, egormancpa@wnonline.net

LIVE WITH Your Plane. Home/hangar. 3000’paved/lighted runway, near fishing/boating/water/snowskiing, major shopping, boat launch to Sacramento River, Only!! $350,000. melandann@charter.net Mel 530-347-3164. Florida - 9650

Materials & Supplies - 7465 RAMOS PLATING and POLISHING: Repolish your aluminum spinners, chrome pitot tubes, airsteps, valve covers, nuts, bolts. Also cadmium plating. 45yrs OK City, OK 405-232-4300.

HOME NEEDS pilot: Love’s Landing Airpark, Central Florida, cute 2/2, pool in/out, hangar doors, on runway. Patty 352-362-4206, $369,900.

Miscellaneous - 7700 TEXAS AVIATION ONLINE. All things related to Texas aviation. www.texasaviationonline.com Parts - 8225

Arizona Airparks are the answer. Check them out. Be ready for next winter. Great price range of homes, hangars, and hangar homes. www.airporthomesandhangars.com Martha Home (928) 231-9500.

Arkansas Valley Cotter Airport, Final Sale. One runway lot $30,000. Seller pays all closing costs. 3% financing avail, 870-430-5545, aerov@centurytel.com

Instruction-Multi-Engine - 7355

Instruments - 7380

VERDE VALLEY AIRPORT HOME. ARIZONA GATED AIRPARK, LARGE ATTACHED HANGAR/RV/GARAGE AND MORE. PAVED/LIGHTED RUNWAY, CLOSE TO SEDONA. GREAT FLYING WEATHER. $595,000. 928301-2212, 800-483-9621.

Parts - 8225

Parts - 8225

Parts - 8225


38

General Aviation News —  Classified Pages — 800.426.8538

Real Estate/Airport Property - 9650

Real Estate/Airport Property - 9650

Real Estate/Airport Property - 9650

SARASOTA FL Hidden River Airpark, 2640’ paved and lighted runway, lots w/homes 5-20acres. Katty Caron, Realty Executives. www.floridaaviationproperties.com katecaron@realtyexecutives.com 941-928-3009

A MUST SEE IN CLARENDON COUNTY SC

SPRUCE CREEK FLY-IN REALTY SERVING THE SPRUCE CREEK COMMUNITY since 1985

Palmetto-POBox 777-Manning-SC 29102-803-473-2199

America’s Premier Fly-In & Country Club Community, Daytona Beach, (East Coast of Florida). Taxiway homes from $450,000, non-taxiway homes from $200,000, condo’s from $139,000. Lots available. Long/ short term rentals avail. Spruce Creek Fly-In Realty, Pat & Lenny Ohlsson, 800-932-4437. www.fly-in.com sales@fly-in.com ORLANDO AREA Aviation-properties, hangars, hangarrentals, Some priced like bank-owned. Chandelle Properties. Ron Henderson 407-712-4071 Keller Williams/Advantage II Realty www.chandelleproperties.com CANNON CREEK Airpark. Florida’s Finest just got better. 600+acres, 2-Runways along I-75 North Fl. at Lake City and I-10. The best approaches, Golf and Tennis and snack Bar by Golf Cart. 4,000Ft Turf 4,000 paved. 150 Homes Now and growing. New section greater than 40 lots, Incredible Beautiful Lots. No rush to build, Finance and no interest, 10 lots set at $19,000. Each DoorBuster Pricing. CCAIRPARK.COM Call 386-984-0283, Ray Sessions After 35years of Building this Airpark and starting others at Sun N Fun, This is my last Subdivision, time to find a Honey, give her a Home. I’ll be 70 this year. Time to see The Grandchildren in Kissimmee and San Antonio. Call me, you will get the buy of a LifeTime. No Salesmen, Direct to you. DAD’S ESTATE SALE: 2 Airports, 3 Runways. 30 Acres Lake Front with an Airstrip located near Lake Nona::This gorgeous piece of property is on Lake Gentry. It is inclose proximity to The Lake Nona Project as well as being 10minutes from Orlando. This property is loaded with potential and has the added bonus of being green-belted with low taxes. It has 700ft of lake-frontage. It also has additional room for expansion. This is a must see for any investor or developer as well as private individuals. 100 acres on Lake Gentry. This a one of a kind piece of property with an income producing citrus grove. It has paved road-frontage on Lake Gentry and is located in Osccola County. Additional Option to Purchase Properties Including 5-6 Houses as well as 17 Separate Parcels of Land. Please Contact Christy @ 386-466-4838 for more info. Illinois - 9650 PRIVATE AIRPORT home located in Brookeridge Aero. (LL22) Huge attached heated hangar/ seperate garage/ workshop. $599,000. Details/pics: www.HangarHomesRealty.com or/call 312-543-1220

“WE’RE IN THE MIDDLE OF IT ALL” Gated airpark with underground utilities in place.

www.palmettoairplantation.com MONTANA, WINDSOCK SKYPARK. The Last Best Place! Only 20-lots left for sale. 1-acre or larger, on Shores of Beautiful Fort Peck Lake in NE MT. City water, sewer, nat-gas, underground utilities installed, paved streets, taxiway to 37S public airport. Lanny Hanson 406-526-3535 or 263-1154. Visit our website: www.windsockskypark.com Don’t miss the opportunity to Live in a beautiful hunting and fishing recreational paradise! LOTS NOW SELLING $60,000. Nevada - 9650 NW NEVADA Airstrip property. 5+acres 35 miles SE Lake Tahoe $115K Terms. Also A 62 M20C Mooney.and C-172 NV 775-266-3796 North Carolina - 9650 AVIATION, INVESTMENT & residential properties. Licensed in both Carolina’s. Sell airpark & airstrip property That’s what we do www.NC-Airparks.com 877-279-9623. Oregon - 9650

FREDERICKTOWN, MO. 4cd remodeled home. 2400 sqft hangar w/one piece Hydro door and office/media room. 3.61 acres lot. Lots of wildlife. 80' x 2000' grass runway. Homeowners association contract, restrictions being drafted and available. Pictures on request. Scott Frisella 314-359-2392. Montana - 9650

Fly in to your own backyard. Enjoy sun 300 days a year

2 br, 2 bath on 2/3 of an acre, on private airstrip. New decks, carpet, blinds, kitchen appliances, washer, dryer, furnace & metal roof. Includes airstrip ownership. www.PineHollowAirport.org Contact Jim @ 425-864-1732

VACATION RENTAL: John Day Valley Chalet In John Day, Oregon. One mile from Airport. Rental car available. www.vrbo.com ,see 454253 AWESOME SALE!! 320acres (1.295km) Christmas Valley, land. surveyed. Hunt elk/antelope/ deer/rabbits/quail/ grouse. Dunes in area. Reduced!!/$125,000. Dave/Meg 541-347-4318 christmasvalley@mycomspan.com PINE HOLLOW Airpark 3BD/ 2BA home with part airport ownership/ hangar w/full size 1-bdrm apt. $260,000. 503625-7079, 503-502-7954.

NICE AIRCRAFT hangar 50x60 on four acres in Silver Wings Fly-in Ranch (TS36).Central Texas. 3800’x80’ lighted/paved runway. All utilities. $264,900. Barry McCollom Realtor 830-896-2587, Barry@KerrLandCo.com Call/email for addl info/pics.

TAILWIND AIRPARK A quiet country airpark 50 min east of Dallas near Canton, TX. Lots for Custom Homes and Hangar/Homes www.tailwindairpark.com facebook.com/tailwindairpark 903-896-4647

NO INCOME TAX!! 4622sqft acreage. 2masters! 5bd, 6ba, theatre/hotub/pool, much more! 5060sqft hangar 45X12 door. $750,000. 360-921-3844. Parkside Airpark YEAR ROUND living at Lake Roosevelt, Seven Bays WA. 3BR/ 2-1/2 Bath with 2000’ hangar. (2 Lots). $375,000. nancy.staudt@yahoo.com 310-508-4046.

Discovery Trail Farm Airpark Sequim, Washington A neighborhood for pilots and their families

DiscoveryTrailFarmAirpark.com

2912 SQFT, 3bd, 3ba house, 3600SQFT hangar, 20+ acres on 2200’ runway, 15mi NE of The Dalles, OR, 360903-7540. KAPOWSIN AIRPARK (86WA) custom-rambler 4-bedrooms, 2.5-bath, 3317sqft. Gazebo off 5-pc. Master-bath, huge hangar w/shop. 5-acres. $459,950. 425-270-3210. pictures at www.tourfactory.com/912026. Wisconsin - 9650

GREAT OPPORTUNITY to own an entire airport in the Houston area! This property can be commercial or residential. 3110’x100’ grass runway, a total of 46+ acres, and out of Class B airspace.

SEAPLANE PILOT’S Paradise w/float/plane/hangar on 1.45acre-frontage on Lake Menomin. 4BD/3BTH Chalet style-home loaded w/custom upgrades. Spectacular views&year-round-outdoor-FUN.. $479,900. 715-5565064, peggy.terry@century21.com

NORTH TEXAS PILOT'S DREAM! Exclusive community of 140 homesites in a 340-acre residential airpark. Live with your plane in quiet seclusion only 5 minutes from shopping, restaurants and universities, just 25 minutes North of DFW, near 23,000-acre lake. Taxi from the paved runway to your home. Several 1-acre lots available, also some homes. 940-321-5758, www.hiddenvalleyairpark.org HiddenValleyAirpark@prodigy.net

CUSTOM HANGAR home near Dallas. Pilots dream come true! 2150 sqft w/ 5200 sqft hangar. McKinney, TX. www.10010MooneyDr.com, Shirley@ShirleyLong.com 972-741-8626 Washington - 9650 Publisher’s notice: All real estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to the Fair Housing Act which makes it illegal to advertise “any preference, limitation or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status or national origin, or an intention, to make any such preference, limited or discrimination.” Familial status includes children under the age of 18 living with parents or legal custodian, pregnant women and people securing custody of children under 18. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate which is in violation of the law. Our readers are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available on an equal opportunity basis. To complain of discrimination call HUD toll-free at 800-669-9777. Toll-free number for the hearing impaired is 800-927-9277.

PRICE REDUCED, LET’S NEGOTIATE! 6bd/5ba, 9car garage w/RV parking inside. 1acre land. Very quiet neighborhood. Fully landscaped withtimed watering, large decorative pond. Gas heated with AC and the latest energy efficient systems. One minute drive to Aurora Airport &Langdon Farms Golf Course. Two minutes to I-5. Fairly priced in the current market at $595,000. Call Don at 503-260-4949. Pennsylvania - 9650

BEAUTIFUL 5-ACRE lot on private-airpark. OUTSTANDING PANORAMIC VIEWS in all directions. All utilities. $125,000. Possible owner-financing. 406-862-4932, georgeshryock@yahoo.com.

For some good results call Dodie to place your classified ad. 800-426-8538

NORTH of Hurricanes, SOUTH of snow 3300turf. 10mi to Myrtle Beach. 1, 5,10,acre lots Low taxes/insurance, “free DVD”. 843-602-8220. www.hardeeairpark.com Texas - 9650

Pine Hollow, Oregon (32OR)

MI-TORCHPORT (59M) For Sale 200+ acres. Call for price. Venture North Inc. 231-632-2412. For more info see: www.torchport.com

WALKOUT RANCH with 60’x78’ hangar & workshop on 24M. 10ftx2543ft lighted grass strip. N of Grand Rapids, MI. $190,000. 616-678-7582. Missouri - 9650

Real Estate/Airport Property - 9650

South Carolina - 9650

DWIGHT, IL Private Airport Home. Built 2005. Brick ranch, 5-acres. 72’x48’ heated hangar. $499,000. Hangar Homes Realty. 312-543-1220. info/pics: www.IL51.org Michigan - 9650

SUGAR SPRINGS Airpark (5M6) properties available. Build your dream hangar/home on well-maintained 3500’ grass airstrip. Ownership gives access to beautiful recreational community, pool 18-hole GC, 2 all sports lakes, more. Alice 989-430-0966 www.SugarSpringsRealty.com

June 7, 2013

SAN JUAN AVIATION ESTATES BLAKELY ISLAND, WA. Premier Recreational Airpark. Paved lighted runway. Exceptional marina. Owner access to 3000ac forest preserve w/2 - 70ac lakes: fish/swim/boat. MARINE VIEW top-of-the-line PanAbode home near runway & marina. Owner Financing $129,000. Sunset bathed waterfront cabin near runway: $515,000. Superb no-bank waterfront hangar/home: $850,000. Taxiway cabin with room to build hangar.: $379,000. Build your hangar/home on marine view lot: $205,000. Judy, Flying Island Realty, 360-375-6302 www.flyingislandrealty.com judy@flyingislandrealty.com WA STATE near Mossy Rock. 1850ft paved runway on 2+Acre on pvt. Kadwell Field. View of Mt. Rainier. $75k w/financing. Info/pics at pooroldgreen@netzero.com 425-335-1375. IMPRESSIVE COMBINATION of 20+ level acres of land w/deeded access to private airpark. $590,000. Evergreen Sky Ranch(51A) KeyRealty, 206-276-2651. www.tourfactory.com/724806.

NEW AIRPARK: Northeast Pennsylvania, 29-lots for sale. 1.25-3 acres, great views, underground utilities, sewers, some lakefront. EZ flight/drive to NYC, Philadelphia, New Jersey, Connecticut. At Seamans Airport (9N3), 2500’paved IFR approach, lighted, all services, Build Your Dream Home This Spring! “Model Home Being Built Now”. 866-924-7787 or www.SkylineEstates.us

TURF AIRSTRIP, Rambler, Barn, Private, Quiet, Green, 38 acres, Skagit Valley. $487,950. 206-595-1409. DESERTAIRE (M94) custom SWhome, 3bd, 2ba, 2700sqft, pool, 1500sqft hangar, golf, boating, fishing nearby, $375,000 or reasonable offer, 206-660-1325, www.desertairehome.com

Put GAN in your hand! 1 year - $35 2 years - $55

Sample copy only $4.50

GeneralAviationNews.com


June 7, 2013

www.GeneralAviationNews.com — facebook.com/ganews

Greater aviation freedom Dan Johnson Splog

Icon Aircraft has been (probably not too patiently) waiting for the FAA to answer its formal request for an exemption to the Light-Sport Aircraft (LSA) gross weight parameter. The Southern California company submitted a proper package to the FAA after carefully laying the groundwork by talking to key leaders in and out of government. The FAA normally replies in 120 days. More than a year passed … and then the Small Aircraft Directorate asked for more detail on the request. One can imagine the frustration level at Icon, despite where you land on the pros or cons of allowing them extra weight. Meanwhile, on another front, a new ASTM subcommittee was just established as part of a standards writing group that has prepared all the requirements for a fully manufactured Special LSA to be accepted by the FAA. The new subcommittee will work on a standard for aircraft weighing less than 120 kilograms (about 260 pounds) for use primarily in Europe. A German official, stating that the German LBA (Federal Aviation Office) wanted to “deregulate” these sub-120 kg aircraft, said all they had to do was create a new standard they could meet. I suppose that’s the government way of non-regulating in rule-driven Germany, but at least it slightly relaxes their grip. So, Icon is asking for 250 pounds more (114 kg) to be added to the 1,430 pounds (650 kg) it is presently allowed, while an industry group called DULV is working on a standard for aircraft weighing less than 260 pounds in total empty weight. You just have to marvel at the diversity in light aviation. Perhaps these dual requests illustrate the main message. Even though governments here and abroad are still very much involved in regulating aviation, they have stepped back a few inches (centimeters) from complete control. When the FAA first released the Sport Pilot/Light-Sport Aircraft rules in 2004, it unleashed the most explosive pace of development aviation has ever seen worldwide. More than 130 new aircraft models of every description came to market in only eight years. If the government, here and abroad, would step back another yard (meter) or For more on Sport Pilot and LSAs: ByDanJohnson.com

two, who knows what might happen? Good luck to both Icon and DULV as they pursue their chances at greater aviation freedom.

COOL IT

Across the northern U.S. states and much of Europe, it was a lousy, cold, snowy winter. It seemed everyone I spoke to at AERO in Friedrichshafen, Germany, complained about the crappy winter and their laments mirrored those from America’s northlands. However,

the weather appears to be going directly from winter to summer. That’s great, as it foretells an active flying season. However, as the weather warms, it can get mighty hot in the cockpit and not only because you’re on short final on a gusty day in a responsive LSA. US Aviation previewed its integration of the AMT FlyCool air conditioning system in the Flight Design CTLS at SUN ’n FUN 2013. The Dallas-area company’s Scott Severen said, “We are seeing a 20° drop in less than 10 minutes on a 100° day.” The FlyCool system is a 9,500 BTU per hour, all-electric system that fits in the right side baggage area of the CTLS (photo). US Aviation will perform installations at its sprawling facility at Denton Municipal Airport (DTO). The hardware swallows up half of CTLS’ baggage area, but small shelves behind

39 Proudly sponsored by

each seat will suffice for short trips. The cost is less than $15,000 and takes about a week, he said. USSportPlanes.com, AMT-aero.com

VAN’S SWITCHES GEARS

Leading the kit industry is Van’s Aircraft with a remarkable 8,100+ RVs flying. Now the top dog is moving slowly into what it calls a “trial production” phase of fully-built RV-12s. Van’s announced a deal to build ready-to-fly RV-12s at last year’s AOPA Summit in concert with partner Synergy Air of Eugene, Oregon. I understand the initial run is almost finished, with deliveries expected by this summer. I’m excited by Van’s entry to fully build and their way to do it shows one of the many ways the LSA rule is unique. VansAircraft.com

VIDEO BONANZA

We were busy at AERO Friedrichshafen 2013, knocking out more than 30 videos for your viewing information and entertainment. That’s more than seven videos a day and a sum of more than five hours total running time (more than three Hollywood movies in minutes of viewing time). With these and all the videos shot at SUN ’n FUN the week before AERO started, we expect to offer more than 300 videos on our LSA Video page. ByDanJohnson.com


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June 7, 2013  

The June 7, 2013 edition of General Aviation News

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