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$2.95 • APRIL 27, 2017 69TH YEAR. NO. 8

SUN ’n FUN

PERIODICALS - TIME-SENSITIVE DATED MATERIALS

Love at first flight P. 6 Fairness for Pilots Act P. 9 Tackling fuel myths P. 12 Pilots school ATC trainees P. 25


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General Aviation News —  800.426.8538

April 27, 2017


April 27, 2017

The TOC

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SUN ’n FUN benefactor flies west

SUN ’n FUN Seabirds Splash-In a success High school kids build Redbird sim

Love at first flight 14

16 Bahama air show

News

Plane Tales: Triathalon

6....... STC Group earns Trio autopilot approval for 172s, 182s 9....... Fairness for Pilots Act introduced 16..... Lots of sun, lots more fun 16..... Bahamas, SNF team on island airshow 17..... High school kids build Redbird sim 17..... Cleared to land so others can take off 20..... SUN ’n FUN Seabirds Splash-In a success 21..... My flight with the Aerostars 22..... AERO breaks records 24..... I might not be able to walk, but I can fly 24..... MTOsport 2017 gyroplane debuts 25..... Pilots school ATC trainees 26..... ASRS Reports 28..... New Products

Columnists 10..... Touch & Go: The cost of $3,200 11..... Politics for Pilots: There’s a bigger story behind SUN ’n FUN 12..... Visser’s Voice: Tackling fuel myths 14..... Plane Tales: Triathlon 25..... Human Factors: Pilots school ATC trainees

NOTICE:

The next issue will be mailed May 11, 2017.

General Aviation News • 69th Year, No. 8 • April 27, 2017 • © 2017, Flyer Media, Inc. • All Rights Reserved. EDITORIAL Janice Wood, Editor Janice@GeneralAviationNews.com CONTRIBUTING WRITERS Jamie Beckett •Joseph (Jeb) Burnside Theron Burton •William E. Dubois Joni M. Fisher • Dan Johnson Frederick Johnsen • Jeffrey Madison Paul McBride • Alexa Paprosky Amelia T. Reiheld • Tom Snow Ben Visser • Bill Walker General Aviation News accepts unsolicited editorial manuscripts and photos but is not responsible for return unless submissions are accompanied by a stamped, self-addressed envelope. READER INFORMATION General Aviation News makes its subscription list available to other companies for their products and services. To be excluded from such offers, send a copy of your mailing label to General Aviation News, Attn: Mail Preference Service, PO Box 39099, Lakewood WA 98496.

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For the first time in 31 years, the French National Jet Team, the Patrouille de France, toured the U.S., opening this year’s SUN ’n FUN with a one-day only performance. The tour is to honor the 100th anniversary of America entering World War I on April 6, 1917. Cover photo by Ken Strohm.

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Briefing

General Aviation News —  800.426.8538

At SUN ’n FUN, Daher unveiled the TBM 910 (pictured) as the newest member of its TBM business turboprop aircraft family, succeeding the TBM 900. Key changes are the TBM 910’s Garmin G1000 NXi flight deck, which succeeds the G1000 version on TBM 900s. Another feature is improved cockpit connectivity, allowing wireless transfer of aviation databases from the Garmin Pilot app on a mobile device to the G1000 NXi, company officials pointed out. Deliveries of the TBM 910 will begin after the aircraft’s certification, which is expected this spring. Price for the TBM 910 with standard equipment is $3.68 million. TMB.aero Piper Aircraft has introduced a personalization program exclusively available on the new Piper M600, which allows customers to choose a variety of interior enhancements, including leather wrapped yokes and cockpit assist handles, seat pattern styles, embroidered or embossed logos, as well as customized threshold and cockpit plates. As part of the Expression package, customers also will receive a custom baggage set from Tumi that matches their plane’s interior. Piper.com The Extra 330LE, an electric-powered aerobatics plane, has earned two new world speed records from FAI, the World Air Sports Federation. The records include speed over a 3km (1.86 miles) course, in a plane with a takeoff weight of 500kg to 1,000kg (1,1022,204 pounds): 337.5km/h (209 mph). The pilot was Walter Extra of Germany. The next record was speed over a 3km course, in a plane with a takeoff weight of 1,000kg-1,750kg (2,204-3,858 pounds): 342.86km/h (213 mph). The pilot was Walter Kampsmann of Germany. ExtraAircraft.com

Findings include: 88% will hire in 2017; 71% did not cut jobs in 2016; maintenance and avionics technicians and pilots remain in highest demand; companies report that the shortage of qualified professionals is their biggest hiring challenge. JSfirm.com Aeroplex Group Partners has been tapped to manage the self-serve fueling station at Santa Monica Municipal Airport (SMO) in California, following the departure of American Flyers, the tenant that had been maintaining the facility. Aeroplex.net

Commuter Craft, the company behind the Innovator, reports that ShipTwo, the company demonstrator, and AlphaOne, the first customer built aircraft, are moving down the production line. Company officials expect the two aircraft to be flying by Oshkosh. CommuterCraft.com Continental Motors has received Supplemental Type Certificates (STC) from the FAA and the European Aviation Safety Agency (EASA) for Cessna 172s powered by the jet fuel diesel engine CD155. The certification also includes the integration of the Garmin G1000. The STC allows the direct conversion of an avgas engine equipped 172 to Continental’s diesel powerplants. To display engine data for the R and S models, the integration of Garmin G1000 NAV III with Wide Area Augmentation System (WAAS) is required, company officials explain. All models from Cessna 172 F to S have been validated by the FAA to get CD-135 and CD-155 diesel engine installations. ContinentalMotors.aero

In other news, Continental Motors reports it has manufactured and delivered 5,000 CD-100 series engines over 15 years. Those 5,000 engines have accumulated more than 5.25 million flight hours on more than 2,750 aircraft. The first CD-100-series engine took flight in September 2000 on a Valentin Taifun motor glider. Additional installations include the Cessna 172, Diamond DA40 and DA-42, and Robin DR400. ContinentalMotors.aero Quest Aircraft has received certification from the European Aviation Safety Agency (EASA) for the Kodiak 100, pushing the total number of countries that the Kodiak is certified in to over 50. QuestAircraft.com JSfirm.com’s Hiring Trends Survey for 2017 shows that 51% of those surveyed feel the presidential election will have a positive impact on the aviation industry, while 6% believe the election will have a negative effect. For the survey, 358 aviation companies across various sectors were surveyed.

A D V E R T I S E R Aero Ski Mfg Co Inc....................... 39 Aerotech Publications.................... 12 Aircraft Covers, Inc......................... 34 Aircraft Propeller Service................ 34 Aircraft Specialties Services...............2 Aircraft Spruce & Specialty............. 40 Aircraft Tugs, LLC........................... 31 Airforms........................................ 12 Airpac Inc..................................... 39 Airplane Things.............................. 34 Airtug........................................... 33 Alpha Aviation, Inc......................... 33 AOPA Membership Publications, Inc............................ 13 Arlington Fly-In.............................. 35 Aviation Insurance Resources......... 32

April 27, 2017

Aviation Supplies & Academics (ASA)........................... 29 Avionics Shop, Inc......................... 34 Cannon Avionics, Inc...................... 32 Cardinal Aviaion............................. 31 Cee Bailey’s Aircraft Plastics........... 31 Clay Lacey Aviation........................ 32 Conlin, Maloney & Miller................ 37 Corvallis Aero Service..................... 31 Desser Tire & Rubber Co................ 34 Discovery Trail Farm....................... 39 Eagle Fuel Cells............................. 33 Fallon Airmotive............................. 34 Genuine Aircraft Hardware, Inc........ 32 Gibson Aviation................................8 Great Lakes Aero Products Inc........ 38

Ace Aviation is now the Washington, Oregon and California dealer and service center for Aerocet’s composite aircraft float and cargo pod product lines. Aerocet.com The first Light-Sport Aircraft to enjoy both Chinese and U.S. certification — Triton Aero-Marine’s SkyTrek — made its first sale at this year’s SUN ’n FUN. In addition, Triton has purchased South Lakeland Airport (X49) — just 4.5-miles from SUN ’n FUN’s campus on LakelandLinder Regional Airport (KLAL) — with the intention of opening a training facility that features the SkyTrek airplane. IFlyAirplanes.com Applications are now available for the Karen Johnson Solo Scholarship from the Ninety-Nines. The $3,000 scholarship will be awarded to a young woman between the ages of 16 and 20 who wants to learn to fly. Deadline for applications is July 1, 2017. KJSoloScholarship.com The FAA has restricted drone operations over 133 military bases, the first time the agency has instituted airspace restrictions that specifically apply only to unmanned aircraft.

I N D E X

Hooker Custom Harness................. 39 Idaho Aviation Expo...........................5 Kitfox Aircraft................................. 33 KS Avionics................................... 33 MH Oxygen Systems...................... 12 Micro Aerodynamics..........................9 Niagara Air Parts...............................8 Pacific Coast Avionics..................... 33 Pacific Oil Cooler Service................ 31 Pacific Oil Cooler Service................ 38 Para-Phernalia............................... 38 Petersen Aviation........................... 38 Poly-Fiber Aircraft Coating..................9 Ravalli County Pilots Association..... 31 R & M Steel.....................................5 Schweiss Doors............................. 12

Schweiss Doors............................. 39 Sky Ox Limited.............................. 38 Sporty’s Pilot Shop........................ 38 Tempest Plus................................ 32 Univair Aircraft Corporation................7 Univair Aircraft Corporation............. 38 Val Avionics, Ltd............................ 31 Vantage Plane Plastics................... 31 Willow Run Airport......................... 32 WINGsReality LLC.......................... 38 Wings West Governors................... 38 Zephyr Aircraft Engines................... 37


April 27, 2017

Briefing Operators who violate the airspace restrictions may be subject to enforcement action, including potential civil penalties and criminal charges, according to FAA officials. To ensure the public is aware of these restricted locations, the FAA has created an interactive map online. The restricted areas also are included in the FAA’s B4UFLY mobile app. FAA.gov During this year’s SUN ’n FUN, the FAA awarded eight pilots with the Wright Brothers Master Pilot Award for completing 50 or more years of safe flying: Ronald Roland from McKinney, Texas; Charles Steel from Venus, Florida; Dr. Irvin Gleim from Gainesville, Florida; Jack Irwin from Rancho Mirage, California; Charles Kessler from Weirsdale, Florida; Lee Lauderback from Orlando, Florida; Don Marek from Wimauma, Florida; and John Fow from Indialantic, Florida. Additionally, Randall “Randy” Pickron from Melbourne, Florida, was awarded the Charles Taylor Master Mechanic Award. FAA.gov

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SocialFlight 6.0 was recently released, which adds SocialFlight’s Fly2Win Rewards and Fly2Win Challenge. Fly2Win Challenge users “check-in” and build points by visiting airports, destinations, events and featured airport businesses. Users get to build a virtual aircraft as they gather points, compete on a monthly leaderboard, and take part in monthly grand prize drawings. More than $50,000 in prizes will be given away, including a glass panel EFD1000 PFD Pro from Aspen Avionics, ADS-B systems from L3 Aviation Products and FreeFlight Systems, headsets from Lightspeed and Bose, MightySat Pulse Oximeters from Masimo, and more. SocialFlight 6.0 also includes Fly2Win Rewards. Users can redeem discounts and promotions from participating companies and local aviation businesses. SocialFlight.com Georgia Tech won the first-ever Collegiate Drone Racing National Championship hosted by Purdue University on April 15, 2017, scoring more than $15,000 worth of equipment and prizes. Georgia Tech beat out the other 26 uni-

o h a Id tion a i v A xpo E

versities to claim the top spot. The University of California, Berkeley finished second, Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University-Daytona third, and Purdue fourth. GATech.edu The General Aviation Manufacturers Association (GAMA) hailed the launch of the European Aviation Safety Agency’s (EASA) CS-23 final rule, calling it a true breakthrough for GA. The new CS-23 framework is part of a global effort to develop common certification standards and remove regulatory barriers, GAMA officials said, noting it is similar to the FAA’s Part 23 rule. “This is a landmark day for the general aviation industry,” GAMA President and CEO Pete Bunce said. “This rule is nothing less than a total rethinking of how our industry can bring new models of pistons, diesels, turboprops, light jets, and new hybrid and electric propulsion airplanes to market, as well as facilitating safetyenhancing modifications and upgrades to the existing fleet.” The new CS-23 framework goes into effect Aug. 15, 2017.
GAMA.aero, EASA.Europa.eu

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Teen awarded 10-year volunteer pin at SUN ’n FUN

Photo by Harry Silcox

SUN ’n FUN Board member Steve Thomas presents Jacob Lutz, Harry Silcox’s grandson, his 10-year volunteer pin. Jacob started volunteering at the fly-in when he was 5 years old, helping in Main Registration by carrying program books into the office, and hauling keyboards into the old Florida Air Museum building with IT technician Diana Carlson.

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General Aviation News —  800.426.8538

April 27, 2017

Love at first flight By JONI M. FISHER Braylon Faulkner, 6, fell in love with airplanes on his first flight. Traveling with his mother Michelle Faulkner and grandmother Carol Faulkner-Davis in September 2012 from Orlando to Providence, Rhode Island, his excitement came to the attention of the Southwest Airlines pilot who invited him to the cockpit before the flight. His father, Brian Faulkner, works in business development for a large healthcare company and Michelle was a licensed private investigator in Florida. They encouraged Braylon’s interest in flying. Later that year while traveling in Hiawassee, Georgia, they booked a helicopter ride with pilot Ron Carroll. From there Braylon’s fascination continued. He was living in Winter Haven, Florida, and he would get excited whenever he passed the airport. The Winter Haven airport is also the base of operations for Jack Brown’s Seaplane Base. Braylon enjoyed dining at the restaurant on the field to watch planes land and take off. Grandmother Carol, neighbor of Jon Brown, asked if Braylon was old enough to take a ride in a seaplane. In August of 2013, Braylon flew in a Piper Cub on floats. In the fall, he enjoyed a tour of the Fantasy of Flight Aircraft Museum. In January 2014, Braylon took another helicopter ride in Sevierville, Tennessee. He took more flights in the seaplanes through Jack Brown’s Seaplane Base and developed a friendship with instructor Ben Shipps. His parents gave Braylon a logbook to track his flights. Braylon asked for flights to celebrate birthdays and holidays. Braylon’s grandmother, Carol, introduced Braylon to the granddaughter of a pilot friend. Giana Griner, a year older than Braylon, shares his passion for airplanes. They had playdates at the Winter Haven Airport restaurant to watch planes. Joni M. Fisher is an 800-hour, instrumentrated private pilot, journalist, and author. For more information see her website: www.jonimfisher.com.

Braylon with Ben Shipps (above), and with his friend Giana Griner, who also loves flying. They shared a flight in a Cessna 210. When the Faulkners moved to Texas for a better job opportunity, Braylon returned to the seaplane base for a flight with Ben. Though he has family in Winter Haven, Braylon understood he would not be back as often as he wanted to be. Last November, just before the family moved, Braylon flew again with his favorite instructor. “We found a local airport in Texas,” Michelle Faulkner said. “Our church was loading supplies for missionaries, and Braylon wanted to. They said they’d call us whenever they are loading so Braylon can help.” Braylon has logged 8.25 hours since getting his logbook. With such an intense interest from such a young age, Braylon demonstrates the passion of a future pilot.

STC Group earns Trio autopilot approval for 172s, 182s The STC Group has received an STC for the installation kit for the non-TSO’d Trio Pro Pilot digital autopilot into dozens of models of Cessna 172s and 182s. “Cooperation from the FAA and support from industry organizations, such as AOPA and EAA, has propelled this project at speeds most people never anticipated,” said STC Group Founder and CEO Paul Odum. “We received the STC in only five months and expect to have Parts Manufacturing Authority (PMA) in

time to deliver the autopilot at EAA AirVenture this summer.” The STC Group exists to deliver the capabilities and price points of the autopilots serving the Experimental market to the certified segment of general aviation, according to officials. “Trio’s Pro Pilot autopilot has a proven record of reliability in the Experimental and warbird fleets. It is an excellent offthe-shelf choice to retrofit into the legacy GA fleet based on its record of safety and

reliability,” said Odum. The STC covers most variants of the Cessna 172 and 182 from the earliest models through the 2006 models. STCs for additional makes and models will be developed soon, he noted. Established in 2000, Trio has delivered some 3,000 autopilots around the world. The two-axis Pro Pilot model uses roll and auto-trim pitch servos to provide precise horizontal and vertical navigation capabilities. Altitude control includes climb

and descent functions with altitude preselect. Vertical navigation can be flown at pilot-selected speeds. The STC Group is selling the Pro Pilot installation kits, including the STC and drawings, for $2,000. The autopilot itself, including PMA and documentation, will be available this summer for about $5,000. Addition of the LOC/BC/GS module later will be less than $500. TrioAvionics.com


April 27, 2017

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FAA/PMA and OEM Replacement Parts For Scott, Goodrich Scott 3200 Series Tailwheel and ABI-3200 1, 2

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Scott 2000 Tailwheel Component Parts

The 3200 Series is a lightweight 8-inch tailwheel assembly designed to provide positive steering control far beyond rudder travel, and to release easily and automatically to full swivel when aircraft is turned around. The swivel mechanism is sealed to keep out water, sand and mud. Grease fittings are provided for lubrication. Precision components provide years of troublefree service under severe operating conditions.

• Maximum Working Pressure: 350 lbs • Pedal Pressure: 100 lbs • Recommended Hydraulic Fluid: MIL-H-5606 • Weight as Shown: 21 ounces dry

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Description Part # Price Bracket Assembly ................................................... ABI-3216 ...... $234.15 Bracket Assembly ............................................... ABI-800613 ...... $336.00 Thrust Washer • FAA/PMA ...........................................U3207 .......... $5.48 Thrust Plate Assembly • FAA/PMA ...............................U3234 ........ $42.64 Compression Spring • FAA/PMA ..................................U3233 .......... $3.05 Upper Dust Cap • FAA/PMA ............................... U3235A-002 ........ $24.59 Thrust Washer • FAA/PMA ...........................................U3206 ........ $12.79 Arm Assembly • FAA/PMA ................................. U3214A-000 ...... $243.05 Pawl • FAA/PMA ........................................................U3219A ........ $29.18 Lower Dust Cap • FAA/PMA ............................... U3235A-001 ........ $25.57 Fork Assembly ........................................................ ABI-3224 ...... $280.35 Bearing Cone...............................................................A4050 ........ $41.42 Grease Retainer • FAA/PMA ............................... U1863A-000 .......... $7.36 Spacer • FAA/PMA ............................................. U2504A-001 ........ $13.71 Washer ........................................................NAS1149F0863P .......... $0.15 Shear Nut ................................................................AN320-8 .......... $2.44 Cotter Pin ........................................................MS24665-283 .......... $0.04 Spring • FAA/PMA .......................................................U3222 ........ $11.27 Spacer • FAA/PMA .......................................................U3258 .......... $2.16 Spacer • FAA/PMA ................................................... U3258-1 .......... $2.03 Pin • FAA/PMA.............................................................U3257 .......... $7.41 Axle Assembly • FAA/PMA ................................. U3236A-000 ........ $42.12 Lock Washer • FAA/PMA .................................... U3225A-000 .......... $5.48 Castle Nut ...............................................................AN310-8 .......... $2.75 Hub Half ....................................................................U2598A ...... $120.44 4-ply Tire and Wheel Assembly ............................U2600-A-4 ...... $402.00 6-ply Tire and Wheel Assembly ............................U2600-A-6 ...... $410.00 27 Pin ................................................................................ 3226 .......... $9.95 28 Gasket • FAA/PMA .......................................................U2602 .......... $5.07 29 Bushing.....................................................................U3205A ........ $20.79

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Description Part # Price Self-Locking Nut ................................................. AN364-720 .......... $0.70 Washer ......................................................................U2346A ........ $13.34 Shim .........................................................................U2085A .......... $3.29 Arm Assembly ................................................... U1709A-000 ...... $392.11 Bracket Assembly (includes items 6 and 7) ................... 2077 ...... $263.79 Bushing Cap .................................................................. 1781 ........ $54.11 Bushing.....................................................................U1800A ........ $49.12 Fork ............................................................................... 2078 ............. NLA Grease Retainer • FAA/PMA ............................... U1863A-000 .......... $7.36 Grease Retainer Spacer ..................................... U1862A-000 .......... $8.42 Bearing Set ................................................................... 1883 ........ $50.78 Hub Kit (includes items 20 and 21) ................... U1967A-000 ...... $392.11 Tire ................................................................................ 1879 ........ $82.10 Washer ........................................................NAS1149F0832P .......... $0.09 Nut ..........................................................................AN320-8 .......... $2.44 Cotter Pin ........................................................MS24665-283 .......... $0.04

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Description Part # Price Master Cylinder Assembly, LH...............................U1248A........$1,019.88 Master Cylinder Assembly, RH ..............................U1260A........$1,019.88 1 Vent Screw Gasket ................................................U1159A............... $2.52 2 Bracket, RH Unit ...................................................U1220A........... $240.11 Bracket, LH Unit....................................................U1232A........... $240.11 3 Diaphragm Pad ...............................................U2003-001............. $30.62 4 Spring............................................................U1256A-000............. $13.32 5 Vent Screw ..........................................................UB-1258............. $12.20 6 Compression Cover ...............................................U2728A........... $353.51 7 Piston ............................................................U1383A-000............. $52.39 8 Pedal, RH Unit ......................................................U1715A........... $177.21 Pedal, LH Unit.......................................................U1715A........... $177.21 9 Diaphragm (2844) .............................................U750-384............. $30.84 10 Screw (10 required, priced each) .................. MS35265-45............... $0.36 11 Nut ................................................................ AC356-1032............... $0.40 12 Bolt .................................................................... AN3-20A............... $0.40

Replacement Parts For Goodrich Wheels 8.00x4 Main Wheel Assembly for Pipers with 11⁄4 inch axles and Ercoupes (serial numbers 1 thru 812) 1

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Hub Cap Assembly ....................................................... 1882 ........ $71.37

Screw ...............................................................AN501-10-24 .......... $1.50 Nut (AN365-1032) .............................................MS21044N3 .......... $0.20 Spacer Assembly ............................................... U1478A-000 ........ $64.91 Bushing.....................................................................U1306A ........ $25.57

Spring Connector Kits

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Kit For 2000 Series Tailwheel .................................U2151A-000............. $55.01 Kit For 3200 Series Tailwheel Piper installation...............................................U3239A-101............. $58.60 Cessna installation ............................................U3239A-103............. $58.60 Steering Spring only (2000) ..................................U2134A-000............. $13.05 Steering Spring only (3200) ..................................U3239A-001............. $14.83 Spring Connector Link ...........................................U2133A-000............... $2.42

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Description Part # Price Wheel and Brake Drum Assembly ....................... UD3-13A-1 ...$1,426.50 1 Lock Ring .............................................................. UA85-218 ........ $24.85 2 Felt Retainer Washer ................................................. UA56-4 ........ $11.97 3 Felt Grease Retainer .............................................. UB227-52 .......... $0.92 4 Bearing Cone............................................................... 08125 ........ $49.66 5 Cotter Pin .............................................................AN380-2-2 .......... $0.02 6 Anchor Pin ................................................................ A20-54 ........ $16.22 7 Side Lock Ring......................................................... A85-118 .......... $8.20 8 Side Rim.......................................................................B11-5 ........ $45.33 9 Flat Head Rivet ...................................................AN441-6-6P .......... $0.45 10 Brake Drum ................................................................B13-4* ...... $196.05 11 Bearing Cup ............................................................ 08231** ........ $20.98 12 Wheel Base .............................................................UD10-12 ...... $904.86 *I.D. must be turned after installation. **Do not remove unless damaged.

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General Aviation News —  800.426.8538

April 27, 2017

SUN ’n FUN benefactor flies west

James Ray (center) with some of the kids from the Lakeland Aero Club.

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Association’s Air Academy in Oshkosh, the Aircraft Owners and Pilots Association’s youth aviation and pilot safety initiatives, and SUN ’n FUN’s youth aviation education programs. He also established the James C. Ray Scholarship Fund, providing financial support for flight training to Polk County, Florida, high school students. He believed the self-discipline and self-confidence he learned during flight training helped him achieve success in life and business. He felt strongly that these traits and assuming responsibility for one’s own actions are learned skills and important character traits that can make one free to pursue their dreams. This year, SUN ’n FUN created the James C. Ray Legacy Society, where people can leave bequests in their wills to SUN ’n FUN. Beyond his monetary contributions, Ray would spend time with the students, often spending hours watching them fly from the grass strip behind the Lakeland Aero Club hangar, Leenhouts reports. While he often described himself as a curmudgeon ­— a miserly, ill-tempered old man ­— those who knew him said nothing could be farther from the truth. He shunned the spotlight, often making his donations anonymously. At last year’s dedication of the new Lakeland Aero Club, he declined to make a speech, but once the official ribbon cutting was done, he was quickly surrounded by the kids. That’s when his face lit up. Ray was predeceased by his wife, Joan, in 1986, his son, Jim, in 2005, and daughter Joanie in 2009.

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James C. Ray, 94, of Naples Florida, died peacefully on April 1, 2017, following a short illness. An entrepreneur, Ray donated millions of dollars to SUN ’n FUN, first to help build the Central Florida Aerospace Academy, then the hangar for the Lakeland Aero Club, and numerous other project around the fly-in campus on LakelandLinder Regional Airport in Florida. “It was a sad day to lose such a great man,” said John “Lites” Leenhouts, president of SUN ’n FUN. Born Jan. 1, 1923, in San Francisco, Ray graduated from high school at 17, then went to work full-time as a steelworker. In 1941 he and his crew were sent to Pearl Harbor to build a building for the U.S. Navy. On Dec. 7, he witnessed the Japanese attack from a vantage point about 400 yards from the USS Arizona. Shortly after, he enlisted in the Army Air Corps, where he ultimately served as a B-17 pilot. His business career began in earnest after the war. During a span of more than 40 years, he was actively engaged in venture capital investments, as a seed investor and advisor to more than 300 startup technology companies. Aviation always remained a part of his life. Through the years, he owned many aircraft. One of his favorites was a Cessna 170B, which he flew in the 1950s. For 29 years, he flew Cessna Citation jets, and was rated for single pilot operations. Ray focused much of his philanthropy on aviation, supporting the University of North Dakota’s Odegard School of Aerospace Sciences, the Experimental Aircraft

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April 27, 2017

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Fairness for Pilots Act introduced WASHINGTON, D.C. — U.S. Sen. Jim Inhofe (R-Okla.) has introduced S. 755, the Fairness for Pilots Act, which broadens protections for general aviation pilots provided by Inhofe’s Pilot’s Bill of Rights, which was signed into law in 2012. A staunch advocate of GA, Inhofe is a member of the U.S. Senate Committee on Commerce, Science, and Transportation; a member of the Senate General Aviation Caucus; a CFI with more than 11,000 hours; and a long-time airplane owner. “The Pilot’s Bill of Rights and the implementation of third class medical reform have been great victories for the general aviation community, addressing the concerns brought to my attention by pilots across the country,” Inhofe said. But he says there “remains more work to be done.” “Building on my past efforts, the Fairness for Pilots Act increases due process protections for pilots, ensures greater transparency in dealing with FAA, and reduces the unnecessary bureaucratic barriers preventing pilots from flying,” he said. “I look forward to working with my colleagues in the Senate and the general aviation community to get this bill through Congress and enacted into law.” The Fairness for Pilots Act enhances the due process rights established in the

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and CEO of the Experimental Aircraft Association. “Today, more than ever, it’s essential to recognize and preserve the rights of individuals who seek to pursue the freedom of flight. This legislation is an excellent step in that direction.” “We commend Senator Inhofe for advancing this important legislation,” said Ed Bolen, president and CEO of the National Business Aviation Association. “The reforms contained in the bill will promote fairness, while reducing costs and helping preserve and foster general aviation in America. The Senator has long been a true champion for the industry, and we applaud his continuing work to support its priorities.” Inhofe.Senate.gov, AOPA.org, EAA.org, NBAA.org

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General Aviation News —  800.426.8538

April 27, 2017

The cost of $3,200 Ben Sclair Touch & Go

United Airlines has had a rough few weeks. And yet, the days of overbooked commercial flights are likely here to stay. So what’s an airline to do? When crew must get from A to B and all the seats are filled with paying passengers, the options are often limited. United Airlines recently offered four passengers $800 each — $3,200 in total — to give up their seats on a Louisville, Kentucky-bound flight and be re-booked on another flight. No one accepted the offer, and that’s when things turned ugly. Why? Because that is how painful airline travel has become. I’ve been in that situation. I’d hazard a guess many of us have been. Ben Sclair is Publisher. He can be reached at ben@generalaviationnews.com.

My thought is always, “I need to get where I’m going. If I accept the airline’s offer, who knows when I’ll get where I need to be.” The risk isn’t worth the reward. That’s where the lighter end of aviation could’ve helped avoid the situation. “For the amount United was willing to compensate their four passengers to make room for their team members, they could have booked travel for this entire crew through FlyOtto.com,” said co-founder Rod Rakic. “We could have booked a comfortable Piper Meridian for just $2,930, with a pick up from Chicago Executive Airport going straight into Louisville International Airport.” To make the use of FlyOtto more palatable, the first time anyway, Rakic is offering the “next time United is in a jam like this, we are happy to provide this service to them at no charge, to demonstrate bet-

LETTERS TO THE EDITOR THE DOCTOR KILLER

After reading “The Doctor Killer” in the March 23 edition of General Aviation News, I am extremely disappointed that your paper and the executive director of The American Bonanza Society Air Safety Foundation have besmirched the memories of nearly 200 V-tail Bonanza pilots (including many doctors) who died in in-flight airframe failure crashes of Model 35 Bonanzas. Many, if not all of them, died not because of their failures as pilots, but due to a serious and deadly design flaw in the post-1951 Model 35’s tail. In February 1980, Aviation Consumer published a detailed 12‑page article describing how weaknesses in the Bonanza’s V-tail had probably contributed to over 200 in‑flight fatal airframe failure crashes. The problem was that nearly 18 inches of the stabilizer forward of the main spar was not secured to the fuselage. According to the Aviation Consumer article, the unsupported stabilizer leading edge, in severe turbulence, would begin to twist, leading to a complete failure of the tail. Despite being identical from the tail forward, the straight-tail Model 33 had almost no in‑flight airframe failure accidents attributed to it, compared with over

200 for the Model 35. Aviation Consumer carried on a nearcrusade on the Model 35 issue for more than five years until a new and impartial FAA Administrator, Donald Engen, commissioned a Department of Transportation study. The exhaustive study identified airframe failure modes which could occur without warning within the normally permissible airspeed envelope with severe gust encounters or unusual control movements. Beech came out with a service bulletin and a tail strengthening fix, and the FAA issued an AD. The entire remaining V-tail fleet has likely been modified, and few, if any, in-flight airframe failures have occurred since then. The American Bonanza Society training programs are excellent and praiseworthy. But the best-trained pilot would not have been able to save themselves if the tail came off their airplane! It is unfortunate that Beechcraft/Raytheon/Textron has not seen fit to bring back the now fixed and safe V35. With a G36 type instrument panel it could find a ready market at a price point similar to SR22T Cirruses. JAMES E. ELLIS Harvard, Mass.

Four of the many aircraft FlyOtto can book for would-be passengers. ter alternates for repositioning crews, or helping their customers get to where they are going.” That’s mighty generous Rod, but I imagine you’ll charge United real money for future flights. Which is where it gets difficult for FlyOtto. $3,200 in travel vouchers don’t cost United Airlines $3,200. To book a flight on FlyOtto will cost UAL real money, at least for second and follow-on trips. It is often said, we don’t know what we

don’t know. And in this case, UAL brass likely didn’t know FlyOtto was a viable option for crew “re-accomodating.” While I’d love to believe that FlyOtto — and other charter operators for that matter — will appear on United’s radar, I won’t hold my breath. But if you have a business that needs supplemental travel, FlyOtto is something you should take a look at. It is likely you won’t be forcibly “re-accomodated.” FlyOtto.com

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Send comments to comments@generalaviationnews.com or fax 858-712-1960. Include your full name, address and telephone number (for verification purposed only). Please limit comments to 250 words or less.

As a doctor/aviator for some 58 years now, and following the “doctors-makebad-pilots” stories for most of those years, I can tell you it makes a big difference if a pilot becomes a doctor vs. a doctor becoming a pilot. Everything in medicine is “gray” (opinion v. fact) while most of aviation is pretty simple physics (except weather) … throw in a big ego and pressing schedule and you have a bad combination regarding safety. As a young USN flight surgeon at the Navy’s flight test center at Patuxent River I saw several outstanding pilots kill themselves due to poor planning. If it can happen to those with the “Right Stuff,” it could certainly happen to me — a “wake up” that made a HUGE impression. RICH SUGDEN M.D. via GeneralAviationNews.com I totally agree about doctors for the most part, but a considerable portion are totally insufferable, will not listen, will not follow directions and have all of the answers, even when they do not understand the questions. They destroy Bonanzas, Mooneys, Cessna 310s and whatever they get their hands on. JOHN WESLEY via GeneralAviationNews.com

FAIRNESS FOR PILOTS

Re: “Fairness for Pilots Act introduced” on page 9 of this issue and also online at GeneralAviationNews.com: What, you mean that law-abiding pilots who have strived to better themselves and the world they live in will now somehow get the same rights as murderers, rapists, and other criminals in the U.S. jurisprudence system? How positively heinous that We the People should finally be entitled to the same basic due process constitutional rights afforded to the criminal factions that receive it free of charge from the taxpayers. Thank you for your efforts Sen. Jim Inhofe (R-Okla.). KURT E. MALERICH via GeneralAviationNews.com I wonder if the Fairness for Pilots Act goes as far to include the general law enforcement agencies around the country? I’m thinking of the incident where that glider pilot was detained by local law enforcement, who mistakenly thought him a danger to an electrical power plant he was just passing by. I thought of that incident last year when I flew past such a plant on the Ohio River. LETTERS | See Page 11


April 27, 2017

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There’s a bigger story behind SUN ’n FUN Jamie Beckett Politics for Pilots

Earlier this month, thousands of General Aviation News readers were not at home, but in Lakeland, Florida, at the annual SUN ’n FUN International Fly-In and Expo. Much is made of the economic impact this massive event brings to the city that says of itself, “Close to everything… Away from it all.” That’s good. Events of this size and scope can have a profound effect on the region where they are held. Yes, even general aviation events deliver economic benefits to the folks who live and work in the area. Imagine that. Yet, there is a story behind the SUN ’n FUN story that rarely sees the light of day. It should. It matters. Specifically, it matters to you. Or at least it could if you take what you find here home with you. If you were among the throngs of aviation enthusiasts who streamed through the gates of SUN ’n FUN this year, I hope you took a moment to shift your gaze from the collected eye candy on the ramps and in the skies above, to notice something amazing on the grounds of the airport itself. For several years now the landscape at Lakeland-Linder Regional Airport has been transitioning. This 1,700-acre publicly owned facility, which was home to cobwebs, vacant buildings, and wide open unused spaces not so many years ago, is now a beehive of activity. Economic activity, that just happens to have an aviation theme. Residents of Lakeland and the surrounding area are benefiting from the investments being made on the field every Jamie Beckett is the AOPA Ambassador in Florida. A dedicated aviation advocate, you can reach him at: Jamie@GeneralAviationNews.com

LETTERS | From Page 10 My point being as the FARs make mention of federal/local law enforcement, does the act include pilots rights being disseminated down to these local law departments? PETER WILSON via GeneralAviationNews.com

MISFUELING

Re: The NTSB Accident Report, “Misfueling brings down Cessna 421,” in the April 6 issue: This has given me flash-

single day. Construction laborers, plumbers, electricians, heavy equipment operators, restaurant employees, fuel providers, convenience store workers, and yes, even pilots and aircraft mechanics are bringing in new customers and an increasing number of dollars because this place is booming. Visitors who looked around the field noticed big ticket items like a new hotel going up, right next to the existing hotel, which has been a raging success. They saw the NOAA hangar and offices sprouting up from the ground, where more than 100 well-paying jobs will be based, along with multiple hurricane hunter aircraft. What they may not have noticed is the vacancy rate of the existing buildings. It’s zero. Only eight years ago KLAL felt the shame of a public acknowledgement that 300,000 square feet of rentable space was vacant. The airport’s finances were an embarrassment. Yet today, KLAL doesn’t have an empty broom closet to rent out. They’re full up, and so they’re building to accommodate new clients who are chomping at the bit to hire staff, move in, and start doing business. Add that positive story to the existing success of the Central Florida Aerospace Academy, a public high school that provides students with a high quality STEM education with an aerospace connection. And the Lakeland Aero Club, where high school students learn to fly, maintain, and restore aircraft on site. And Polk State College’s fast growing aviation degree program, which is based right on the field at KLAL. And the row of hangars that provide a base of operations for a growing string of flight schools that serve the local market, as well as regional, national, and interna-

tional students. And the solar electric farm that powers not only the airport properties, but feeds electricity back into the grid to realize additional revenue to the field. Wow. Seriously, say it with me. Wow. So why is Lakeland-Linder Regional Airport thriving, when the airport in your town is probably lying dormant and underperforming, as the airport in my town is? In a word, management. Good management. No, great management. Lakeland-Linder Regional Airport benefits from Gene Conrad, a cheerful but driven man with a clear vision for what this facility could be, and a work ethic that makes the transformation happen. It’s thriving because his staff is fully in sync with the boss, and work their various areas of responsibility with a level of professionalism seldom seen in municipal employees. The airport is growing like a weed because the city commission has confidence in their airport director. They listen to him, they challenge him, as they should, and they support him. It’s for those exact reasons they’re winning. The economy of Lakeland is expanding because city manager Tony Delgado recognizes the airport for what it is — a sizeable chunk of commercial real estate that can be managed and massaged to cre-

ate real economic benefit for the residents and business owners of Lakeland. That’s true whether they’re directly involved in aviation or not. Know this: There is nothing magical about the dirt Lakeland-Linder Regional is built on. There is nothing in the air or the water that differs substantially from that in surrounding cities and towns. There are thousands of reasons that KLAL is thriving while so many other airports are underperforming. And those thousands of reasons have names, and addresses, and jobs, and a desire to be part of a real success story — and they’re willing to work hard to make it happen. The good news is, this is all true. It’s happening. Right in the heart of the Florida peninsula there is an airport that is growing by leaps and bounds, and they’re doing a great job of it. Which begs the question: If they can do it here, what’s stopping you and your airport from doing the same thing in your town? I told you there was a bigger story at SUN ’n FUN than SUN ’n FUN. And there is. Fortunately, it’s one you can take home with you and work to replicate — if you dare. To be honest, I hope you do. FlySNF.org

backs to the time this same problem almost killed R.A. “Bob” Hoover! A perhaps undesired recognition for the late pilot is the “Hoover Nozzle” used on jet fuel pumps. The Hoover Nozzle is designed with a flattened bell shape. The Hoover Nozzle cannot be inserted in the filler neck of a plane with the “Hoover Ring” installed, preventing the tank from accidentally being filled with jet fuel. This system was given this name following an accident in which Hoover was seriously injured, when both engines on his Shrike Commander failed during take-

off. Investigators found that the plane had just been fueled by line personnel who mistook the piston-engine Shrike for a similar turboprop model, filling the tanks with jet fuel instead of avgas. There was enough avgas in the fuel system to taxi to the runway and take off, but then the jet fuel was drawn into the engines, causing them to stop. Once Hoover recovered, he widely promoted the use of the new type of nozzle with the support and funding of the National Air Transportation Association, General Aviation Manufacturers Associa-

tion, and various other aviation groups. The nozzle is now required by federal regulation on jet fuel pumps. COREY LUTH via GeneralAviationNews.com Be present at the airplane when it is fueled. With so many models and conversions, this is an error that can occur, but is easily prevented by monitoring the fueling service. At least verify the correct fuel truck stops in front of the airplane. WARREN WEBB JR. via GeneralAviationNews.com


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General Aviation News —  800.426.8538

April 27, 2017

Tackling fuel myths Ben Visser Visser’s Voice

From my Feb. 23 column “Fuels: What to expect in 2017,” I received a number of responses, both positive and negative. I appreciate readers taking time to write back, even if they disagree with what I wrote. The two areas I would like to address are the belief that all 100 lean rating fuels are equal and that exhaust valve recession is a myth. Claiming that any fuel with a 100 lean rating will provide the same anti-knock protection in every aviation application in the real world, is just NOT TRUE. Ben Visser is an aviation fuels and lubricants expert who spent 33 years with Shell Oil. He has been a private pilot since 1985. You can contact him at Visser@GeneralAviationNews.com.

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This is like saying that every 200-pound man would be equal to every other 200-pound man in a tug of war. I believe that a 200-pound athlete would be able to out-pull a 200-pound couch potato who lives on donuts and junk food. The two men are equal when they stand on a scale, but perform differently in the field. In the same way, many fuels will perform the same in a well-controlled lab CFR test engine, but perform differently in real world aircraft engines. Knocking in the real world is affected by a long list of variables, such as compression ratio, combustion chamber design, head temperature, air temperature, air barometric pressure, and on and on. In addition, there is a thing called a lead bonus, which results in leaded fuels out-performing in the field any unleaded fuels with equal octane ratings. The best real world data for this was mentioned in numerous feedback notes, and that was when 100/130LL replaced 100/130 high lead fuel.

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How will unleaded avgas affect the Experimental Aircraft Association’s Ford Tri-Motor, which is powered by three radial engines? When an oil company blended 100/130 avgas, it would take aviation alkylate and then add lead until it reached 100 lean rating. It would then measure the rich rating, which was almost always well over 130. When the company blended 100/130LL, it would add 2 grams/gallon lead to the alkylate, and then add toluene concentrate to meet the octane targets. But now the rich rating was usually the controlling parameter. The blender would keep adding toluene until it reached the 130 rich rating and then the lean rating was almost always well over the 100 mark. The bottom line is the lean rating usually went UP 2 to 5 numbers, but in the field the knock complaints went up significantly. Let me repeat, HIGHER lean rating fuels had MORE knock complaints. This is confirmed by many tests in the development process for an unleaded avgas. For example, the people at GAMI have a 96 lean rating candidate fuel that ran with significantly less knock in their aircraft engine test bed then another candidate with 102 lean rating.

They, of course, could not market the 96 rating fuel because the GA public thinks that they need at least 100 lean rating fuels. The second area I want to address is exhaust valve recession with unleaded fuels. This is another real world problem that will get significantly worse if 100LL goes away completely. At the present time, if a new or overhauled engine is run on the dyno with leaded fuel and the engine gets a little 100LL every once in a while, the exhaust valves may be safe. According to several rebuilders I have talked to, they are already seeing some cases of valve recession in engines that are field overhauled and then started right off with mogas. Unfortunately, if some guy buys an engine that has been run on a dyno with 100LL and then gets a little 100LL during the life of the engine run mainly on unleaded mogas, and then goes to full TBO, he can write an article on the internet that claims valve recession is a myth, and peoVISSER | See Page 13


April 27, 2017

www.GeneralAviationNews.com — facebook.com/ganews

13

Intended vs. Dumb By BOB MACKEY Fred Fearless went out to the airport one sunny afternoon to take his friend Ernie Excitement for an Bob Mackey airplane ride. Fred owned a 2016 Speedster Blechfire 42 that he built and just recently completed the required Phase 1 Area Restriction fly-off period. During the flight Fred said to Ernie, “watch this,” then proceeded to line-up for a low pass under a bridge. Fred’s stunt did not turn out as planned and the tail of the airplane hit the bridge. In the subsequent crash, the airplane was destroyed, Ernie was seriously injured, and Fred walked away without a scratch. Fred had an aircraft insurance policy. Was Fred covered for the injuries to Ernie? What about the airplane? There is an “exclusion” in aircraft insurance policies to the effect that this policy does not apply to bodily injury or Bob Mackey is senior vice president with Falcon Insurance Agency, the official administrators of EAA Insurance Solutions. A commercial pilot with an instrument rating, he has been involved in the aviation insurance industry for over 35 years. You can reach him at bmackey@ falconinsurance.com.

VISSER | From Page 12 ple believe him. In the real world, not every engine is going to have valve recession, but if lead disappears from the system, the number of cases of engine failure due to exhaust valve recession will rise. If 100LL disappears tomorrow, about 85% to 90% of the fleet will notice only minor changes, like poor starting, different smells, etc. But the remaining 10% to 15% or so may notice pinging or knocking under some conditions. This will necessitate detuning or de-rating the aircraft. In some cases, like with big radials, which may or may not be approved to operate on the new fuel, they may have to be de-rated to the point that they no longer are economically viable for their intended service. Long term, as the lead is flushed out of the fuel handling system and people overhaul their engines, the cases of valve recession will rise. This may not happen to everyone every time. But if your engine needs new cylinders after only a 100 hours or so, you may wish for the good old days when 100LL was still available.

property damage expected or intended from the standpoint of the insured. Fred intended to fly under a bridge, however he did not intend to hit the bridge. Barring any other possible “exclusions,” the aircraft insurance policy that

Fred purchased would provide insurance coverage for the damage to the aircraft and the injuries to his friend. There are all kinds of other possible ramifications to Fred’s actions, but the “exclusion” that applies to intentional

acts by the insured did not apply. Needless to say Fred will find it very difficult — if not impossible — to buy aircraft insurance in the future. The bottom line is that “intended” is not covered, but dumb is.

AOPA looking into high FBO prices FBOs provide an invaluable service to pilots and local communities, but when AOPA members express concerns, we take them seriously. And we take action. After receiving a number of complaints from members, AOPA began looking into allegations of high pricing at some FBOs. Our initial research has shown that the overwhelming majority of the industry is doing a great job, but a handful of FBOs, especially those that have recently experienced consolidation at their airport, are imposing excessive prices. We have already received hundreds of reports from our members, but if you believe you have experienced unreasonable pricing at an FBO, please visit AOPA.org/FBOFees and be sure to include all the pertinent information including date, location, type of aircraft flown, and your specific pricing issue. If you still have a copy of your receipt, please send that as well. This information will allow us to get a more complete perspective of the problems and where they are, so we can engage with government departments and agencies as well as the FBO industry to ensure general aviation has unfettered access to airports. You can read more about our inquiry in this month’s AOPA Pilot.

Mark R. Baker President & CEO, AOPA

*For more information on the Aircraft Owners and Pilots Association and the issues that affect your flying go to www.aopa.org today.


14

General Aviation News —  800.426.8538

April 27, 2017

Photo by Lisa F. Bentson

Ready to race, William stands astride Race 53 watching for the Ramp Marshal to signal engine start. Note the new blade com antenna aft of the cockpit, one of the new speed mods for the 2017 season.

Triathlon William E Dubois Plane Tales

Dispatch from KSPA, Spartanburg, South Carolina: I pull the wicked-looking black helmet over my head and cinch the chinstrap down tight. Next comes the neck guard, a thick foam collar that encircles my neck below the helmet. I step down into the cockpit and settle in, pulling the dual shoulder straps across my chest and snapping them into the fivepoint harness. The Pitt Boss signals me. I lower the helmet’s visor. All I hear is my own breathing — faster than I’d like it to be. The green flag drops. I punch the throttle. The nine-horsepower lawn mower engine roars to life and I’m off. My go-kart jets around the first turn, tires shrieking. I can feel the wind tugging on my shirtsleeves. The steering wheel vibrates in my hands like a jackhammer. I fishtail through a pair of 180s, the rubber tires lining the side of the track a blur. Damn I’m going fast! William E. Dubois is an aviation writer, world speed record holder, and National Champion air racer. He teaches Rusty Pilot seminars for AOPA and blogs his personal flying adventures at www.PlaneTales.net

I’m ecstatic. I’m going to win the first leg of the Bootlegger Challenge, a triathlon that includes a go-kart race, a Moonshine Bottling Contest — we’re in South Carolina, after all — and a short air race. The Sport Air Racing League (SARL) has never had a competition quite like this one before, and it’s the chance for people like me with slower planes to end up atop the podium with a big, shiny gold cup. Then it happens. One of the other pilots passes me on the inside. Then another on the outside. Then a third. In no time at all the entire field passes me. Before long they’ve lapped me. Not once, but twice. I’m clearly testosterone deficient. My colleagues are racing with a level of abandon that I just can’t summon. I up my game with each lap, but I fall far, far, far short of what it takes for victory. My best lap is 28.54 seconds. The winner is new SARL member Matt McSwain, who, when not kicking all our collective asses in a go-kart, flies a Navion. He does the course in 25.43 seconds. If it sounds like I’m not that far behind, don’t kid yourself. I came in dead last of the 17 pilots in the challenge. It’s not even noon yet, I’m in last place, and still I have two challenges go.

Dubois flew 1,287 miles from his home base in New Mexico to Spartanburg, S.C., to reach the first race of the 2017 Sport Air Racing League season. I don’t have high hopes for victory after my go-kart performance, but karts are only one-third of the contest. Here’s how this creative new competition works: Your go-kart time, your bottling challenge time, and a quasi-handicap on the air race are all added up. The air race is still scored like all other SARL races, but for the Bootlegger Challenge we must also predict our course time before the race. Any amount over or under is added to our challenge score. To win, you have to drive fast, bottle moonshine faster, and really know your airplane. We’ve already established I don’t drive fast. Well, fast enough.

Why’s it called the Bootlegger Challenge? Because it’s sponsored by the Spartanburg micro-distillery Motte and Sons Bootlegging Company. Contrary to myth, moonshine ain’t cheap. Not legal moonshine, anyway. So the Bootlegging Company is having us bottle water for the next contest. There are four mason jars on the table and a heavy ceramic jug. The clock starts when you touch the jug’s cork and stops when all four jars are filled three-quarters full and the lids battened down tight. The first few racers have the most trouble with the two-part lids. I step up to the bottling table fifth.


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Photo by Lisa F. Bentson

The Bootlegger Challenge kicked off with a go-kart race at the Speed Factory Indoor Karting in Spartanburg, SC. Modern gladiators suit up for the challenge. Left to right: Race 118’s Ken Krebaum, Race 44’s Pete Fontaine, Race 53’s William E. Dubois, and Race 11’s Les Burrill.

Did Team Ely get stuck in traffic? Last year’s champs were missing from the first race of the season.

Air Racer Les Burrill, who flies the Midget Mustang Race 11, pours “moonshine” from a heavy ceramic jug into mason jars in the second phase of the Bootlegger Challenge. Ready, set, go! I grab the jug and flip it up. Water gushes out into the jars. I move from one to the next, not stopping. There! They’re all full! Quick! Set the jug down! Pick up the lids! Keeping the flat top inside the threaded rim, I flip the first on top of a jar and give it a spin. Then the second. The third. The fourth. I raise my hands into the air and step away. My time is 29.90 seconds. I’m in the lead. But not for long. The guys with the most testosterone haven’t even started yet. The times get shorter and shorter, and the entertainment factor gets higher and higher. Waiting until nearly last, Mike Patey, Race 32, who flies an Extreme Lancair, tucks the jug under one arm and screws each lid on as he’s filling the next jar. His speed is extreme until he drops the last lid on the floor. But he still wins the challenge at 18.5 seconds. Holy cow. Estimating flight time on a cross country is a basic pilot skill. But what about a 40-mile course with three steep turns, un-

known low-level winds, and turbulence? And it’s the first race of the season. Most of us have made new speed mods between seasons. I now have blade antennas for my com and transponder, no more draggy strut-mounted landing light, and wax from Reno’s Team VooDoo covering my wings. I sit down with pen, paper, and a prayer and choose a number. Committed, I mount up for the race. Ahead of me, a draggy-looking Piper Colt is marshalled out onto the runway. Colts and their Tri-pacer cousins don’t look like much, but I’ve come to respect them. At the controls is retired Marine Captain Dan Miller, Race 72, and he can easily outpace me by five mph. Unless he turns right when he should turn left, the best I can do is second place in this race. And I can also do worse. Behind me are two planes that are my equal: A second Ercoupe and a Cessna 150. I’m given the go. I push the throttle to

The trophy that never was: Three Ercoupes entered the Bootlegger air race, creating a “Challenge Class.” The fastest of the three would have won this handsome cup, but one of the three planes was trapped by low ceilings and didn’t make the race. No trio of like-kind planes, no challenge. The plaque on the trophy will be removed and the trophy will used for another purpose. the firewall. Rotation speed! I slide Race 53 off the runway and hold her in ground effect, skimming the runway, building speed. I flash by the starters at 110 mph and lift slowly into the pale blue afternoon sky. I soar over the tree tops, turning south towards the famous Triple Tree Aerodrome, our first turn, slowly gaining altitude. That’s when I notice that something’s wrong. The little blue airplane is nowhere to be seen on my iPad. A quick glance down at my Garmin 345 reveals the problem. It says: Acquiring GPS. You’ve got to be kidding me. I’ve lost nav? Frantically, I pull out my cellphone. Bam! Race 53 jerks as I hit a thermal. The phone flies from my hand and is lost somewhere on the floor beneath my feet. I reach into the back for my backup dashmount GPS, but the air is rough. I can’t

get it to synchronize with the iPad. My fingers bounce and skip across the touch screen. I give up and point my nose in what I hope is the right way, and wait for the stupid Garmin to find the satellites again. It seems like an eternity, but the GPS wakes up after a few minutes. I’m three miles wide of the course. Ahead of me I spy Miller in the Colt. Not surprisingly, I’m not gaining on him. Then, a miracle. Between turns two and three he starts drifting off course. Farther and farther away. He’s lost! Or he’s got a bad GPS coordinate programmed in. I’m going to win the air race! Then, my joy is interrupted. I hear Miller make the call for turn three. The plane I’m watching fades into the distance. It wasn’t the Colt, but some other highwing not even part of our fun. The Colt, which took off 30 seconds ahead of me, crosses the finish line three miles ahead. As expected, he’s beaten me, handily. The top slot in the challenge went to Patey, who bottled fastest, raced his gokart to fourth place, and estimated his air race time to within 7 seconds. Second place went to Bruce Hammer, Race 91. But the third place winner proved the theory that this contest leveled the playing field. Jethro Sepalla, who got his pilot’s license only two weeks ago, and was flying a Cessna 150, took the third place trophy home with him. Me? I’m proud to have come within 8 seconds of my estimated race time, but I was in 13th place when the points for all three challenges were added up. In fact, I lost every challenge in the damn triathlon. But looking back on it, I’ve never had more fun losing in my life. My League Points: 100. Even though I only got 80 points for my 116.58 mph second-place finish in my heat, I picked up 20 more for besting two other FAC6 airplanes. My League Standing: I’m tied for second place with five other factory planes. Dan Miller of Race 72 is at the top of the leader board with 130 points after coming in first in the more-crowded-than-usual FAC6 category. SportAirRace.org


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April 27, 2017

Lots of sun, lots more fun By WILLIAM E. DUBOIS We’re lined up two abreast on Lakeland-Linder Regional Airport’s big Runway 27, slightly staggered like fighters on an aircraft carrier’s deck. Ahead of us a flight of two massive T-28 Trojans in Navy colors thunder down the runway. The T-28s lift into pale morning sky and the tower radios that it’s our turn to takeoff. The lead plane begins his roll. When he breaks ground, the plane ahead of me starts rolling. As he rotates, the plane to my left powers up. As soon as I see daylight under his belly, I advance my throttle to the firewall and give chase. I’m racing in the fifth annual Sun 40 Sprint at SUN ’n FUN...oh wait. My bad. This isn’t a race. It’s a speed trial. No racing going on here in this busy airspace. And it’s true. The leader of the pack has landed and tied down by the time I reach the halfway point, so it could hardly be called a race now, could it? The field was light this year for the event, with four planes competing: Bruce Hammer in a Glasair 1TD-T, Pete Fontaine in an RV-8, Les Burrill in a Midget Mustang, and me in my turbine-powered,

Photo by William Dubois

record-breaking, national champion Ercoupe. OK, I lied about it being turbine-powered. It does, however, hold a world speed record, and it did take the second-place national champion slot for production airplanes in the Sport Air Racing League last year.

I lift off, climb out, and turn on course, the planes ahead of me already dwindling to specks. It’s hazy and bumpy out on the course. And even though it’s only mid-morning, and I’m 1,500 feet up, it’s hot. I decide that because it’s SUN ’n FUN ­— and because I have no competition in my class

— I’ll slide my canopy open. That adds some drag, which slows me down a bit, so I don’t normally fly for speed that way, but it seemed in the spirit of the event. What could be more Fun ‘n the Sun than racing…err…speed trialing opencockpit? And it’s a glorious way to welcome spring, with the sun on my face and the wind in my hair. I tuck my notes on turn names, frequencies, and procedures under my right leg so the sheet of paper isn’t sucked out of the cockpit and into the slipstream, and then settle in for the ride, which is over all too soon. How’d I do? I came in third place…uh…third fastest in the speed trial. How did a ‘Coupe manage to out-pace one of the other very fast planes in the trial? Burrill’s Midget Mustang shed its spinner on the course. He withdrew from the trial and executed a textbook precautionary landing at one of the trial’s alternate airports, leaving me a spot on the podium. Here’s the 2017 Sun 40 Sprint speed trial results: Hammer: 197.4 kts; Fontaine: 173.3 kts; Me: 97.22 kts. Join us next year at SUN ’n FUN’s speed trial and see how you measure up! FlySNF.org

Bahamas, SUN ’n FUN team on island airshow By JANICE WOOD For the first time in its history, SUN ’n FUN is sponsoring an airshow away from its campus at Lakeland-Linder Regional Airport (KLAL) in Florida. In conjunction with the Bahamas Ministry of Tourism, SUN ’n FUN is helping organize the second annual Grand Bahama Island Air Show, which will be held May 19-20 at Taino Beach in Freeport. Air Boss is John Wayne of John Wayne Air Cavalry. Bahamas officials were pleasantly surprised at the response to last year’s airshow, according to Omar Isaacs, general manager of sales and marketing for the Bahamas Ministry of Tourism. He noted that last year’s airshow went viral over social media, “so much so that the tourist office in Exuma, as well as in Nassau, the capital, were clamoring to have us organize one down there.” But officials first want to ensure the show in Grand Bahamas is “solidified,” then they plan to create a template that can be replicated throughout the islands, he noted. The four-hour show will have continuous entertainment, Isaacs said. There will be performances on the stage on the ground, followed by the airshow acts, then back to the stage for more performances. “It’s going to keep everyone on their toes,” he said.

The festivities will start with a skydive performance, while the Bahamas National Choir and Children’s Choir perform the Bahamas national anthem. Slated to perform in the airshow are the AeroShell Aerobatic Team, Paul Shulten in his Christian Eagle, and John Black in his Decathalon. Additionally, students between the ages of 8 and 17 will be able to attend a oneday seminar and workshop at the Grand Bahama Airport on May 19, where they can learn more about the aviation industry and career opportunities. SUN ’n FUN began partnering with the Bahamas Tourism Ministry about four years ago, according to John “Lites” Leenhouts, SUN ’n FUN president. “In our quest to convince people that you need to get back in the sky and fly, one of the reasons you want to fly is to go to a destination,” he said. “We wanted to show the general public that it’s easy to fly to the Bahamas. Yes, it’s outside the United States. Yes, you cross an air defense zone. Yes, it is customs oriented, but it’s very easy.” He noted there’s a wall in the Aerospace Discovery at the old Florida Air Museum dedicated to where you can fly on a tank of gas and it shows all the major islands of the Bahamas. “What better way to show our support than to promote an airshow?” he said. Bahamas.com/GBIAirshow


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High school kids build Redbird sim The Lakeland Aero Club on the campus of SUN ’n FUN at Lakeland-Linder Regional Airport (KLAL) in Florida has added a Redbird FMX full motion flight simulator to its fleet. This installation was different from the norm as club members performed the installation themselves. Two of the club’s student leaders, Katie Esker, a sophomore, and Sean Stoltz, a freshman, visited Redbird headquarters in Austin, Texas, recently for installation training. They spent two and half days learning how to assemble and maintain the simulator under the tutelage of Kenyon Odell. After the simulator was completely built at Redbird, it was then dismantled and put in a crate for shipping. The deconstructed FMX arrived in Lakeland during the week of SUN ’n FUN, with the students completing its reassembly in about three days. “Lakeland Aero Club provides its members a variety of amazing opportunities through active participation and practical experience. So, it was only natural that the club ask to build the simulator themselves,” said Redbird’s President, Charlie Gregoire. “We were happy to accommodate and had lots of fun training the students. They are smart, talented, and professional and have been some of the best customers to work with.” Now that the simulator is running, the students will draft operating guidelines and begin to use it for flight training. The simulator can be configured to operate as a Piper Warrior, Piper Seminole,

or a Cessna 172. The Lakeland Aero Club was founded with the mission to introduce young people to all aspects of aviation. The club not

only provides an accessible platform for learning to fly, but its members are empowered to make the decisions on how it is operated and run, according to officials.

Members are also offered experience in aircraft restoration and maintenance. LakelandAeroClub.org, RedbirdFlightSimulations.com

Cleared to land so others can take off By JANICE WOOD At about 8:15 a.m. on opening day of this year’s SUN ’n FUN, fly-in officials learned that traffic was backed up on County Line Road clear back to I-4 — a traffic jam of epic proportions. That’s because ticket sales were 25% higher than last year and 15% higher than the fly-in’s best year ever, according to John “Lites” Leenhouts, SUN ’n FUN’s president. “We also broke the record for exhibitors,” he said. “The 510 exhibitors at this year’s show are the most in our history.” He noted that 85 of the exhibitors were at the show for the first time this year. So what does Leenhouts credit with the boost in sales? You might be surprised at one of the answers: Donald Trump. “No matter how you feel about the guy in the front office, he’s turned the mindset of America around,” he said. “The people with money are excited about the stability and the direction the country is going. People who come to this event have money and they are now comfortable spend-

ing it.” He noted that the people who attend SUN ’n FUN are hard-working Americans, as well as people around the world, “who now feel comfortable letJohn “Lites” ting go of some of Leenhouts their nest egg.” Another reason for the bump in ticket sales is that the community is now realizing that this is a fundraiser, not just a party or Spring Break for Pilots, he said. “It’s a value-added fun, enjoyable, relaxing experience,” he said, adding that “people appreciate that we have a purpose.” Building the next generation of aviators is SUN ’n FUN’s guiding principle. Even this year’s theme, “Cleared to land so others can take off,” references the fact that proceeds from the show go towards more than $500,000 in aviation-related scholar-

ships for students. The Lakeland Aero Club is the largest teen flying club “on the planet,” he said. Besides learning how to fly, the teens also learn how to work on and restore airplanes. “I go over there everyday between 1 and 2 p.m. and it’s like bees in a hive making honey,” he said, noting even the students take supervisory roles on the projects. “Once you get a core group of success stories, the rest of the population sees them and wants to be like them,” he said. “It attracts more people who want to be successful.” He’s quick to note that the students are treated like adults. “If they screw up, they are spoken to like an adult,” he reports. “If they don’t listen, they are asked to leave.” He notes that the Aerospace Center for Excellence (ACE) is all about the educational opportunities, while SUN ’n FUN is a fundraiser for ACE. “ACE is like the American Heart Association and SUN ’n FUN is like the Heart Walk,” he said.

That’s one reason visitors to this year’s fly-in saw signs throughout the grounds thanking them for their donations towards “Building a Brighter Future Through Aviation.” Curious as to where the money goes? Some statistics: More than $2 million annually to educational programs; more than 30 $12,000 flight scholarship a year; $20,000 college scholarships; and FAA approved A&P certification training for dozens of high school students. Want more? How about 100 students who have soloed? Of those, 57 are private pilots. Another eight students are now certified A&P mechanics. Leenhouts notes it’s important for donors to see where their money is going. That’s why they are in the midst of creating an annual report that tracks all the money that comes in and where it goes. He also encourages people to join the Aerospace Center for Excellence (the new name of the Florida Air Museum). “Join the cause and help to continue the legacy of aviation,” he said. FlySNF.org


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General Aviation News —  800.426.8538

April 27, 2017

Photo by Ken Strohm

Photo by Jason McLemore

Photo by Jason McLemore

Photo by Becca Maddux

Photo by Jason McLemore


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Photo by Ken Strohm

Photo by Becca Maddux

Photo by Chris Ronaldson, British Royal Air Force Cadets

Photo by Jason McLemore

Photo by Jason McLemore

Photo by Ken Strohm

Photo by Matt Genuardi

Photo by Ryan Cleaveland

Photo by Jack McKibben


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General Aviation News —  800.426.8538

April 27, 2017

SUN ’n FUN Seabirds Splash-In a success By TOM SNOW Perfect weather and a purpose-built seaplane base combined to make the SUN ’n FUN Seabirds Splash-in a success this year, according to organizers. Previously held on the shore of a lake adjacent to Fantasy of Flight, the annual seaplane event has been without a home for several years. “We are very pleased with the turnout,” said Seabirds co-chair Geoff Nye on April 1. Over the past year, he and his committee worked closely with the city of Tavares, Florida, to organize the first-ever SUN ’n FUN event not located near the LakelandLinder Regional Airport (KLAL). “Since Tavares is 60 miles north of KLAL,” said Nye, “we scheduled a twoday splash-in on the weekend before SUN ’n FUN so pilots could stop here at Lake Dora on their way south.” Branded since 2010 as “America’s Seaplane City,” Tavares (pronounced tuh-vair-ees), features ideal facilities for a seaplane event, including long open docks to accommodate float planes and a large paved parking area for amphibian aircraft accessible from a wide ramp. Both avgas and auto fuel are available and a hotel and restaurants are all within walking distance. The Leesburg Municipal Airport (KLEE) is nearby and a shuttle van was available to take anyone who landed there to the splash-in. Seaplane pilots were invited to participate in various competitions. Spot landing contests and a melon “bomb drop” were favorites with the crowd of observers, many of whom were from the local area. An airplane “beauty contest” offered another opportunity for the public to participate in the event. Jones Brothers, a seaplane ride business based at Tavares, stayed busy during the event with sightseeing flights. On Saturday evening, once all the flying was done, pilots were invited to participate in a “pub crawl” of the numerous waterfront bars and restaurants in the Tavares entertainment district adjacent to the seaplane base. Tavares Economic Development Director Bob Tweedie and Aviation Manager Matt Elia are both certified flight instructors and their enthusiasm for a seaplane event is obvious. In addition to hosting two splash-ins a year, the city’s unique lakefront venue is used for numerous other events, including an antique boat show. Discussions will be held soon to determine whether the SUN ’n FUN Seabirds Splash-in will return to “America’s Seaplane City” again next year. Meanwhile, no matter how you pronounce it, Tavares should be included in the future flight plans of all seaplane pilots. The city’s next splash-in is scheduled for Halloween weekend.

Photos by Tom Snow


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My flight with the Aerostars By TOM SNOW The Aerostars Aerobatic Team showed me a whole new way to get “up close and personal” at this year’s SUN ’n FUN. After 35 years of trying very hard to avoid coming close to other aircraft while flying, there I was in the rear seat of a Yak 52 only a few feet away from two other planes while the entire three-ship formation bobbed up and down in the hot, turbulent air. Fortunately, I was in the capable hands of my front seat pilot, Paul Hornick, who flies left wing for the Aerostars team. And, after flying formation with the same guys for 16 years, it’s second nature for him to fly close…real close…as in sometimes only three feet apart close. The adventure began when my name was drawn for a media ride with the popular air show act sponsored by Phillips 66. I was soon introduced to Hornick and the other team members, Harvey Meek, lead pilot, and David Monroe, right wing. Of the three, Meek is the only former military pilot (F18s) and he now flies for a major airline, as does Monroe. Although Hornick also flew for an airline, he now flies a corporate jet as his day job. After emptying my pockets of anything that might fall out and jam the controls, it was time for Hornick to help me strap on a parachute, which is required for aerobatics. Hornick’s bail-out instructions were short and to the point: “Be sure to bail out head first, so hopefully you don’t hit the tail with your head, and here’s the D-ring you pull to open the chute.” Soon, the 400 horsepower, nine-cylinder supercharged radial engines of the three Soviet-designed, Romanian-built Yak 52 military trainers came to life and we taxied for takeoff. The trio joined up immediately after leaving the runway and that’s when I got my lesson on flying a “tight formation.” We were so close I could count the rivets on Meek’s Yak. The formation broke apart when we reached an area suitable for maneuvers south of the Lakeland-Linder Regional Airport in Florida, where SUN ’n FUN is held. The additional weight of passengers prevented the team from demonstrating its aggressive airshow routine, but a series of loops and rolls was exciting enough. Hornick was so smooth on the controls that I felt no need for the sick sack he provided, especially after being told that I would be responsible for cleaning the plane if I missed. The three pilots all live close to one another in northern Illinois and meet up to practice often. A typical airshow season includes 12 to 14 appearances, although they’ve booked as many as 19 events in one year, including an air show in the Dominican Republic. TeamAerostars.com

Photos by Tom Snow


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General Aviation News —  800.426.8538

April 27, 2017

AERO breaks records This year’s AERO Friedrichshafen, held April 5-8 in Germany, set two new records: A new attendance record of 34,200 visitors from around the world, and a record-setting 707 exhibitors, surpassing the previous high of 606 set in 2016. Mike Taylor attended the show and submitted these photos. Next year’s AERO is slated for April 18-21, 2018. AERO-Expo.com

This Savage Cub provides training, rundflug (“round trip” or sightseeing flights), and banner towing.

Special guests were invited to get a close look at the electric Volocopter.

A JH Corsair by JH Aircraft.

The Stream Turbo TP100 by TL Ultralight.

A 1947 vintage Cessna 140 was for sale.

A Messerschmitt KR 200 Super, a.k.a. Cabin Scooter.


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A mock-dirty paint scheme on the Shock Cub.

A pair of Pitts S1-D Specials.

An Italian-built Cub look-a-like is the Groppo Trail, sold complete and in kit form.

Siemens displayed the all-electric Magnus eFusion aircraft.

The highly prized Stampe was a French and Algerian primary trainer that is now available in replica form from Belgium, with three engine options.

The Junkers F13 replica is expected to make its way to the U.S. soon.

The cockpit of the Junkers F13 replica.

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Justin after his first solo.

April 27, 2017

Finding freedom in flight.

I might not be able to walk, but I can fly By BILL WALKER For North Carolina pilot Justin Falls, flying an airplane represents a freedom denied him on the ground. Falls, 28, overcame a devastating spinal cord injury as a student and has rebuilt his life to include completing college, earning a pharmacy degree and, most recently, passing his sport pilot check ride. Falls, who suffered a broken neck in a college accident when he was 18, said, “When I first had my injury after falling off a fire escape I could barely move my right arm, and I didn’t have any sensation below my shoulders. The doctors said there was nothing else they could do.” His initial reaction was despondency. “I thought ‘why didn’t you just let me die,’” he said. “It was like my worst nightmare.” “I was on a ventilator at first, then began small rehabilitation steps like picking up light objects. After six weeks I still wasn’t able to take care of myself independently. My mom helped take care of

me. If she hadn’t been there, I would’ve ended up in a nursing facility.” Falls, from Gastonia, N.C., finished two separate degrees at Wingate University over the next eight years after the accident, including graduating pharmacy school in 2015. Along the way he began outdoor adventure pursuits. “Adaptive sports allowed me to meet others with similar injuries,” he explained. “One of the guys I played quad rugby with finished the Able Flight program the year before me. I had always wanted to learn how to fly, so I applied.” Able Flight, founded in 2006 by Charles Stites, is a North Carolina-based nonprofit organization best known for its aviation scholarships that enable people with disabilities to learn to fly. Falls began working as a pharmacist at Frye Regional Medical Center in Hickory, N.C., in February 2016 and not long after that got a call from Stites offering him a Shell Aviation/Able Flight Wings scholarship. His supervisor at Frye let him take a six-week break from his new job for the

Able flight program. Falls did his sport pilot training at Purdue University in Indiana. “First, we had to do some online ground school studying,” he said. “Once we got there, I was in the air the second day. The plane we used is a tandem Sky Arrow light-sport aircraft, and it’s designed to be flown with your hands.” “The control stick is on the right for the ailerons and elevator. The rudder and throttle are controlled on the left with a Thandle lever. Twisting the T-handle clockwise adds power and twisting counterclockwise reduces power. You pull back on the T-handle for left rudder and push forward for right rudder. There are also separate sticks for the finger-controlled brakes to the right of the control stick.” “My first solo in early June 2016 was a little nerve-wracking, but also exciting,” Falls continued. “I’m a bit of a perfectionist, so I had about 20 hours before soloing. Everybody was watching, but I ended up having really great landings.” He took his sport pilot check ride about

MTOsport 2017 gyroplane debuts AutoGyro unveiled its newest gyroplane, the MTOsport 2017 at SUN ’n FUN. It took just nine months from first drawing to first production of the gyroplane, according to company officials. The new exterior design provides easier access for the pilot and passenger, officials note. Adjustable seats and pedals improve comfort and usability. Options include lumbar support and heated seats. A new rotor head and pre-rotation mechanism allows up to 320 rpm in prerotation, which shortens the takeoff distance, allowing operation at shorter airfields. AutoGyro also added a quick remov-

able, fully functional stick for the rear seat of the MTOsport, which makes flight instruction easier. An optional rear seat cockpit provides vital information, such as engine and rotor RPM, low oil pressure, fuel warning light, speed and altitude, as well as the magneto switches. The magneto switches are secured by an “instructor key” so passengers can’t kill the engine. The new split mast, together with the new rotor system, reduces stick shake, company officials said. The rotor mast folds to make transport easier and allows storage in a standard car garage. Auto-Gyro.com/en

three weeks after his solo. “There’s no gimme or anything,” he said. “I had to fly it to the same standard as everyone. I was nervous, but felt ready for it. I was told if the examiner shook your hand at the end, you know you passed. Well, it took some time for us to get out of the plane, but then he shook my hand.” Falls has not been able to fly much since he earned his license last summer. “There aren’t many planes around that have hand controls,” he said. “The closest Sky Arrow for rent is a four-hour drive from my house, so I’ve been saving up to get my own airplane.” He would also like to earn his private pilot’s license, but will need to find a medical examiner to fly with him in order to get a third class medical. “My ultimate dream in flying,” Falls said, “is to get some land and be able to land my plane in my own backyard. Flying gives me a feeling of freedom. I no longer feel paralyzed while in the air. I might not be able to walk or run, but I can fly.”


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Pilots school ATC trainees Jeffrey Madison Human Factors

A Cessna 162 Skycatcher appeared to be slowly floating right to left across my windscreen directly in front of me, half a wingspan above me, about 40 feet away. Tower had just vectored me into the Skycatcher’s path by amending one instruction with another to proceed “direct to the numbers” of Runway 34L. I banked right and down behind the Cessna. A quick look ahead of that airplane as I passed behind it confirmed that its flight path was for 34L, not my assigned runway 34R. So I radioed Tower and mentioned that I was no longer “direct to the numbers,” that I’d squared up my base to avoid the Cessna traffic on short final for 34L. Tower thanked me. I joined final approach for 34R and landed without incident. On the taxi out before switching me to Ground, Tower thanked me again for my “help with that situation.” That’s when I figured what had just occurred was a pretty good reason to file a report with NASA’s Aviation Safety Reporting System. After all, Manassas Regional Airport/ Harry P. Davis Field (KHEF) near Washington, D.C., is an ATC training airport, and mistakes do happen. But that kind of mistake caused a near mid-air collision. I was on an IFR flight plan and though I had been assigned a visual approach, I was still entitled to IFR separation. I remember clearly seeing the Skycatcher pilot. He never once looked at me. Both runways shared the same Tower frequency. Never did the Skycatcher pilot call out my plane, nor did Tower call me out to him. Neither knew I had been vectored directly into that airplane. Hopefully, my NASA will help ATC trainee controllers at KHEF improve their situational awareness. Whether ATC or aviator, everyone has to get trained in the real world. ATC gets real-world training at towered airports scattered around the U.S. Turns out I’m not alone in my quest to help educate trainee controllers. More than 30 pilots and controllers filed NASA reports about issues surrounding airports and airspace controlled by ATC training facilities. Jeffrey Madison, a pilot since 1995, is an ATP CFI/MEI. He has over 1,000 hours dual given. He has flown into more than 250 GA airports throughout most of the Lower 48. He is a former Part 121 and Part 135 airline captain. You can reach him at HumanFactors@GeneralAviationNews.com

Situational Awareness

“I was given an intercept vector of 050° while heading 170° and cleared to intercept final and maintain 3,000 feet. This vector was given while offset 2-3 miles from final,” wrote one pilot in his NASA report. He was in IMC and flying an approach into Fairbanks, Alaska (PAFA). The airspace in which he was flying was controlled by an ATC training facility. The approach he’d been assigned was an RNAV one. “The intercept would have been more than 20° and onto the intermediate approach segment,” he reported. In other words, the intercept angle exceeded the maximum allowable angle for intercept on an RNAV approach. That wasn’t the only problem with the instructions. The turn would have been through the approach course by at least a mile, in IMC, toward rising terrain. Also the crossing of the final approach course would have been less than three miles from the FAF during a time when ceilings were just 400 feet above minimums. Finally, the aircraft’s position, crossing the final approach course, would have been at an altitude precluding a stable descent to the FAF crossing altitude. That would have not allowed for a normal descent via the LPV-generated glideslope either. All this combined to create an unstable approach. The pilot elected to go missed and start over. “This time, I was given crossing restrictions 700 feet above my present altitude.” The pilot felt that the controller had lost situational awareness. He requested “pilot navigation on the approach with direct to the Initial Approach Fix” instead. He was denied, and again given bad vectors. This time the pilot refused the vector and repeated his pilot navigation request. Ultimately it was granted. He made the approach successfully. In his NASA report, the pilot wrote that he regretted having to submit the report. But he also concluded the report was necessary to send in for a variety of reasons. One major reason stated was the general lack of confidence his local pilot community had in the controllers and in that facility. The basis for their lack of confidence stemmed from the numerous times pilots had been given improper and unsafe vectors while being sequenced to that airport’s final approach course.

Aircraft Spacing

A Cessna 182 pilot expressed similar frustration regarding Dekalb-Peachtree Airport (KPDK) in Atlanta in his NASA report. “I had already had to make one goaround because of the controller’s failure to space aircraft on intersecting runways,” he noted. At the time, KPDK was using intersecting runways 34 and 3R, the former for light aircraft and the latter for jets. The pilot was given clearance to land on Runway 34 at the same time a Gulfstream G4 was cleared to taxi into position and hold on Runway 3R. A few seconds later, the controller cleared the G4 for takeoff, while the C-182 pilot was on short final for Runway 34. “Just as I started to query the controller, he realized his mistake and told the G4 to stop his takeoff roll. If the G4 had not heard or obeyed the order to stop, it would have created a dangerous situation for both of us.” In his report, the pilot complained that the use of KPDK tower as a training facility was a gross error in judgment by the FAA. “Trainees cannot cope with the extremely high volume of traffic at PDK. We need full performance controllers, not trainees, who often use non-standard phraseology and/or difficult to understand directions.” KPDK is one of the 25 busiest business aviation airports in the United States. That makes sense as it is considered a “reliever airport” for Hartsfield-Jackson Atlanta International Airport (KATL), the busiest commercial airport in North America. But, controllers gotta learn to handle busy, right? Pilots who submitted NASA reports about ATC training incidents all agree with the sentiment, just not in their backyards.

Take Off Over a King Air

A Saratoga pilot who submitted a NASA report after being forced to take off over a King Air at Laurence G. Hanscom Field Airport (KBED) in Bedford, Mass., might agree. The Saratoga had just been cleared for takeoff on Runway 5 by the Tower. “As we accelerated, there was a taxiing King Air south of the runway, approximately mid-field,” he reported. “His speed made it appear he would stop at the hold short line.” The Saratoga pilot then performed a normal takeoff roll instrument scan. “Noted we were at rotation speed,” he wrote. Meanwhile, the King Air pilot thought he had been cleared to cross the active runway. “As I looked forward again, the King Air was entering Runway 5,” wrote the

Saratoga pilot. He elected to rotate and fly over the King Air rather than attempt to abort. “Once airborne, I asked Tower if they saw the King Air and they replied they were just looking at that.” He attributed KBED being an ATC training airport for the reason behind the lack of communication and situational awareness from the Tower between the King Air and the Saratoga. In my NASA report, I concluded, “It might be better in the future not to clear an aircraft approaching from the southwest for 34R ‘straight to the numbers’ when that flight path will take it across the downwind and base and final legs for 34L. That directive set up the situation for the NMAC to occur.” In talking to other pilots, I discovered it has happened more than once before. Throughout my flight training, I was reminded that it was okay to make mistakes. What was NOT okay was to make the same mistakes repeatedly. The challenge facing pilots who fly at ATC training airports and in ATC training airspace is precisely that. They repeatedly encounter the same mistakes, just made by different trainee controllers. Establishing certain airports as permanent ATC training sites may develop consistency for the FAA’s ATC training department. But it’s not clear if the FAA understands how that protocol solidifies inconsistency in ATC performance at those facilities, thereby permanently undermining pilot confidence. Pilots have what can be described as a complicated relationship with air traffic controllers. Pilots are independent, self-regulating people, capable of complex decisionmaking while operating complex equipment in dynamic environments. We are the antithesis of people used to being told what to do or where to go. Air traffic controllers are independent, self-regulating people, capable of complex decision-making while solving complex puzzles in four dimensions and in dynamic environments. They are precisely the people most comfortable with telling other people what to do and where to go. If we remember that we’re essentially two sides of the same coin, we might be able to help each other improve. I could have refused the “straight to the numbers” vector. I could see where that vector was going to put me, even if the controller couldn’t. By doing so, I might have proactively educated that ATC trainee. The PAFA pilot who flew the RNAV approach tried, repeatedly rejecting bad vectors. Ultimately, we both hope our NASAs are educational. He certainly taught me about requesting “pilot navigation on the approach with direct to the Initial Approach Fix” if I don’t like what I see.


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ASRS Reports These are excerpts from reports made to the Aviation Safety Reporting System (ASRS.arc.nasa.gov). The narratives are written by pilots, rather than FAA or NTSB officials. Aircraft: Cessna 150 Primary Problem: Human Factors Cessna 150 in VFR conditions descending from 8,000 feet in contact with Approach. Approach said to hold at 5,000 feet. After passing the destination airport, Approach said to descend at pilot’s discretion. Field was at steep slope/angle so pilot changed to rapid descent. Noted some slight engine roughness and engine was not producing full power at this steep angle. The engine was still about 2,400 rpm because of rapid descent. Moving throttle, couldn’t notice any difference in power, so reported to Approach of possible engine problem. Established best glide, moved throttle, full mixture, tried carburetor heat, checked fuel and magnetos. Approach asked if pilot wanted to turn around, but had next field in glide. Pilot asked Approach to check in case airplane didn’t make the field as pilot picked alternate field, but was easily able to make the intended field. Upon landing approach, pilot changed descent angles and engine power was normalized. Approach said to contact them upon ground, but unable on radio so called Tower Supervisor by phone. Upon ground check, no debris was found in my fuel filter and both fuel tanks had evidence of fuel, but most likely fuel starvation at a steep angle. Pilot believed steep angle disrupted fuel flow, causing engine to miss. Factors are flying too close to minimum usable fuel and assuming fuel gauges are consistent. Pilot needs to better understand minimum fuel and affects of steep nose angles with low fuel. Perception was fuel would not ever be an issue. Be more conservative with fuel. Aircraft: P-51 Mustang Primary Problem: Human Factors I had asked for flight following out of Chino to the east. I was given a squawk code and on departure told to contact Socal Departure. I called Socal and was told to ident, which I did. As I continued east I entered Riverside Class D airspace. Then Socal called again and asked me to ident again. Once I did, he said RADAR contact and told me in the future I should be told RADAR contact before entering another Class D. As the controlling area was Class C airspace, I was under the impression that you only needed to establish radio communication, not RADAR iden-

tification (as needed for Class B). Anyway, I think that hand offs from Tower to Approach with flight following should be handled much like IFR hand offs, where RADAR identification is automatic if you already have a squawk code. Aircraft: PA-24 Turbo Comanche Primary Problem: Aircraft In cruise flight, about to start descent, when the engine quit. I declared emergency while switching fuel tanks, electric pump on, and mixture rich. Checked fuel gauges and tank being used showed half. After about 15 to 20 seconds the engine came back on and seemed fine. Canceled emergency and continued on without incident. When plane was checked, a problem with a stuck fuel sender was found. Aircraft: Skylane 182 Primary Problem: Aircraft On landing and braking, right main blew and I ran off the end of runway. Aircraft: PA-18 Super Cub Primary Problem: Ambiguous The airplane and aerial banner were set up, preflighted and deemed to be in good working order with no appearance of abnormality during engine run-up. Upon pickup of aerial banner, the airplane encountered a significant downdraft and was unable to climb further. A turn to lower terrain was made and Tower was notified of non-standard turn. The airplane began to sink and it was determined the situation was unsafe with the banner attached. I declared an emergency and released the banner. After release of the banner the plane was able to climb and a normal pattern was flown back to the departure airport. The problem is determined to be the result of multiple contributing factors, including downdraft, large banner size and less than optimal engine power. The airplane will undergo maintenance to ensure maximum performance before banner towing is continued in the aircraft. Aircraft: Warbird Primary Problem: Ambiguous This flight was to relocate an antique warbird. The route of flight was planned to the Daggett (DAG) VOR, then on slightly eastward to avoid the large restricted airspace located southwest of Las Vegas. Preflight planning included a weather briefing and use of the current chart applicable to the route, including a review of the restricted airspace. Upon departure, radar flight following was utilized as an additional safety net while

operating in the vicinity of restricted airspace. The flight flew to the DAG VOR and then went slightly east as planned. Then the turn was made in a northerly direction along the planned route. The flight was using GPS navigation with moving map to aid in navigation. LA Center initially advised that our aircraft had entered R-2502E. We were positive that we were clear of all restricted airspace. A vector (turn) to exit was offered and immediately complied with by the flight crew. Then LA Center offered that our flight had entered R-2502A. This area was not depicted on the GPS moving map display. This is a new area that has been recently added as a restricted area. This area was not located on our current sectional map. LA Center offered no warning until the advisory that the flight penetrated the R-2502A. This situation occurred after failure of multiple safety safeguards. The crew was aware of the restricted airspace from the preflight planning. The crew was utilizing radar flight following/advisories. The lack of the depiction of the restricted area R-2502A on the moving map, the lack of any warning by ATC prior to the penetration of restricted airspace, and the lack of any information by chart, Controller, or NOTAM that R2502A was a new and problematic area and a recent change/addition were contributing factors. Aircraft 1: Skyhawk 172 Aircraft 2: Unknown Cessna Primary Problem: Human Factors I was flying a Cessna back up the coast. My buddy flew down with me in another Cessna for the day. We were departing around the same time. I took off first and I heard him on the radio maybe 10 minutes behind me. I maintained an altitude 2,000 feet above where he was, but he was still a few miles behind me. We were both on flight following and I told ATC that I saw the other traffic as did he. He was maintaining separation behind me. As we progressed up the coast directly over land, he took a more westbound route over the water. I saw him several miles off our left wing. ATC told him to head up the shore line, so he did. He turned northeast-bound and it looked like he was going to cross in front of us with no issue. I had him in sight the entire time, so I proceeded north. He did not see me until he came pretty close (75 feet approximately). At that point he took evasive action and descended, informing ATC that he was descending for traffic. There was no conflict after this. We proceeded our separate ways both on flight following. All in all, although I saw him the whole

April 27, 2017

time, it was a too close for comfort. I misjudged his projected flight path and my projected flight path. I should have made a turn earlier rather than let it get that close. I thought he would cross at a safe distance in front of me, but he came rather close. It happened very fast. I attempted to turn left to go behind him, which I did right before he descended. I learned from this incident that traffic really can become dangerously close very fast. I learned to always take more precautionary action than you think you should take. In the future I will provide myself more separation. Aircraft: PA-38 Tomahawk Primary Problem: Ambiguous Experienced fuel exhaustion. Landed on desert road with no injury or damage. Aircraft: Skyhawk 172 Primary Problem: Human Factors I was giving a dual flight to a student in a 2005 G1000 Cessna 172. It was his first flight in a G1000 aircraft and we were on an orientation flight. He soloed recently and we were doing some additional dual work. We started the flight by performing some air work, giving him an opportunity to get a feel for the late model aircraft before doing some touch and goes at an outlying field. He commented that it flew like a Ferrari in comparison to the 30-year-old airplanes he’s been flying. He had a tendency to over-rotate a few times, which we worked on correcting. Upon returning to our departure airport he over-rotated again on landing, this time scraping the tail skid. The Tower queried us as to whether we had struck the tail, which I acknowledged in the affirmative. We parked the aircraft to await a maintenance inspection. Maintenance found nothing wrong with the aircraft. This is a Part 61 student who is coming along very well. We reviewed takeoff and landings the last two flights and the overrotating tendency is gone. It appears this shouldn’t be a problem again. I’m using this situation as a training experience to introduce him to NASA reports and NTSB 830. Aircraft: Skyhawk 172 Primary Problem: Human Factors I was cleared to land Runway XY with winds at 240 at 8 knots. Being a student pilot, Tower gave me the option to land on Runway YX. I chose that runway because there was less of a crosswind to land. On final the winds were shifting a little bit, but I had a good crosswind control into the wind and was tracking center line. I was


April 27, 2017

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ASRS Reports stabilized. Over the threshold on Runway YX I pulled power to idle and started my round out. At approximately 15-20 feet off the ground the winds were at almost a direct crosswind and not enough crosswind control was put in. This caused me to have a hard landing and once on the ground the wind pushed me off the runway to the left. I had crosswind control in, ailerons to the right, and I tried to stay on the runway by putting in right rudder, but I didn’t want to put too much in because it would’ve cause a skid on the runway or a flip of the aircraft. It was a poor decision on my part not to go around. That comes from lack of experience. There was no way of telling exactly where the winds were going to be or at the speed they were at. Aircraft: Cessna 150 Primary Problem: Ambiguous The incident occurred during a student lesson. A student weighing about 220 pounds and an instructor (person filing the report and pilot in command of the airplane) weighing about 200 pounds were the only occupants. To keep gross weight under approved C150M gross weight limits, it was necessary to use partial fuel. Cessna C150M published payload is 340 pounds with full fuel, which necessitated reduction of weight by partial fueling. The first flight of the day started with 3/4 fuel by visual inspection and by fuel gauge indication. No other fuel measurement method was available. The amount of fuel according to the fuel gauges and visual inspection was 3/4 of 22.5 gallons usable, or 17 gallons. The first flight after the initial inspection lasted 1.5 hours during which active leaning procedures were used. Ten more gallons were added after the first flight. A second flight of 1.2 hours was then flown during which active leaning procedures were used. Five gallons were added and a third flight of 2.1 hours during which active leaning procedures were used resulted in an off-airport landing. Engine surging was experienced during the takeoff portion of the flight at about 500 AGL. Partial power was available during the flight. An off-airport landing was chosen to ensure safe outcome due to surging and a plowed field was chosen for landing. No property damage or personal injury took place. The airplane was refueled and repositioned to the airport shortly after the event. A factor was a defective fuel gauge which indicated half-full during the flight. The faulty indicator was observed and verified by two independent observers. A replacement sending unit for the defective fuel gauge was to be installed according to the owner.

Aircraft: Cessna 210 Primary Problem: Ambiguous At HOT, I picked up my IFR clearance on the ground by radio from ATC. The clearance was “as filed” and I was given a void time. Since radio contact was clear and established, I expected them to provide a release. When none was forthcoming, I queried the Controller, who then told me that they do not provide a release when a void-time clearance is given, even though they have established clear and continuous radio communications. This is a bit confusing, since usually a void-time clearance is given only when there is not any good radio communication with you on the ground (and usually obtained by telephone). Another confusing issue was that after contacting Departure after takeoff, I expected to be told to proceed on course, on my own navigation, but that was not forthcoming. Again, I queried the Controller and was told that being cleared “as filed” meant that I could proceed on course at will, implying that when to turn, and therefore my ultimate track to my destination, would be up to me. I’m so accustomed to operating out of towered airports and receiving vectors that his statement that I should assume it was all up to me and my choice as to when to turn was not initially clear to me. Finally, when I proceeded on my own navigation on a track that would avoid a 24/7 (continuous) restricted area, the Controller said that since I was on IFR, I could fly through it, and therefore I should have been flying an exact direct line to my destination. That made me uncomfortable because I am familiar with controllers making errors in respect to restricted areas, especially since this one was a 24/7 restricted area. Aircraft: Cessna Stationair Primary Problem: Aircraft While beginning a climb from 3,000 to 4,000 MSL on an IFR departure, the engine began running very rough. Checked basic aircraft operational settings, engine continued to run rough. Notified Departure and began a turn back toward the nearest airport. Engine continued to make power. Elected to return to the departure airport because of on field emergency services. Engine continued to make some power and landing was uneventful. Aircraft: Skyhawk 172 Primary Problem: Human Factors My student was performing touch and go landings when on the third landing the plane landed hard and bounced back into the air. The go-around procedure was initiated when the plane was hit by a gust

of wind and turned directly towards a building. The building was located west of the runway and was a garage/hangar of a personal residence adjacent to the airport. The aircraft was still in ground effect and not accelerating to climb out to clear the building. The aircraft was turned to avoid the building and was heading towards a residential neighborhood. The aircraft came back down to the ground, power was reduced to idle, and the plane proceeded through an open lot before impacting the fence of the personal residence. No injuries were sustained, but the aircraft did receive damage. The cause was the student’s inability to maintain directional control and getting behind the power curve and proximity of the building to the runway environment. To prevent a recurrence, the shape and height of a building in close proximity to an airport should be assessed. Aircraft: Unknown Primary Problem: Procedure I called Flight Service, asked for a complete briefing. There was no mention of TFRs in the brief at all. I took off and flew IFR for most of the flight, canceled with Chicago Center, telling them I was going to run the Lakeshore up to the north; again, no mention of any TFRs. I also had XM weather in the cockpit, which normally shows TFRs, none shown. Upon landing I was asked to call Chicago Center and they advised me that I was involved in a possible pilot deviation. They asked for my name and phone number. I gave them both and am waiting to hear from them. I think the government, briefing system (and/or briefers), the system to inform GPS-XM real time services of TFRs, and local ATC controllers all knew or should have known and had an obligation to inform me a TFR existed on my flight path, but failed to do so despite my proper preflight, briefing, and inflight actions. Several members of an airshow team that I belong to had performed the previous day were returning home and, due to weather, overnighted. Three members had similar flight paths and two had almost identical paths to return home. Each of those three called Flight Briefing before departing and received a full standard briefing including all NOTAMs that should have included area TFRs. We all discussed our briefings and plans prior to flight. During my briefing during the NOTAMs that include TFRs my briefer said, “There is a TFR but it is way west of your flight route, do you want to hear about it?” I replied, “If it was way west, then there is no need.” (I knew that the president was way west of my flight path). Why when three of us made individual briefing calls were not a single one of us

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told there was a TFR in Chicago that was in our destination area, but instead were told of one “way west?” I believe the briefer failed all three of us, even though we each had different briefers and individual briefings. Either Flight Service did not have the data or all three briefers failed to give it to us. I continually fly with a Garmin that is XM linked in real time weather and TFRs. The device has never failed to show TFRs before. Continuously during the flight I checked and no TFR showed in the Chicago area. I checked with other pilots that day, and a teammate using the same equipment just 20 minutes behind me, all failed to show the TFR. Could it be it was not posted to the service so XM could broadcast it? Just short of Gary, Indiana, I was handed off to Chicago ATC. I checked in and received the altimeter setting. I replied, “Chicago when you have time I have a request.” ATC said “state your request.” (It was CAVU not a cloud in the sky and low humidity.) “Chicago, I would like to cancel IFR at this time and continue VFR to the north.” ATC replied, “cancellation received squawk VFR, have a good flight.” I pushed over to get under the Chicago Class B airspace but still remain over Gary Airport Traffic Area (3,200 feet). I then continued to descend below 3,000 down to 1,900 and fly from Gary to the north and my destination. I know an ATC controller does not have to inform you of TFR NOTAMs, but the Chicago Controller knew I was overflying Gary going to the north, could he not have said, “are you aware there is a TFR just a few miles north of Gary, Indiana, and you will be in it in less than 2 minutes? I suggest you keep your IFR flight plan.” That would have prevented the violation. I did not know of any TFR despite my efforts to learn of it. I admit I flew through a TFR, but I certainly made several efforts, as I do every flight, to learn of any TFRs, but was not informed that there was a TFR or aware in any way there was any TFR except one 250 miles west of my departure the briefer told me a little about. It is very upsetting that I could be charged with a violation for taking reasonable actions to find out about a TFR but the government and its contractors, that had or should have had the information, failed to inform me of it. It is the old saying...if a mechanic makes a mistake, it is the pilot that still dies, if a briefer makes a mistake, it is still the pilot that dies, if a controller makes a mistake, it is still the pilots who dies. In my case it is the pilot who is subject for being cited for flying through a TFR that many others could have and should have informed me existed.


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New Products New DVD saves time, money on aircraft preventive maintenance A new how-to video from the Experimental Aircraft Association gives certificated aircraft owners a better understanding of preventive maintenance and ways to save money by personally completing some of the tasks. “Aircraft Ownership: Understanding Owner Preventive Maintenance” is a multi-part video series combined on one DVD that shows owners how to legally maintain an aircraft in accordance with FAA preventive maintenance regulations. More than four hours of video are organized in easy-to-follow categories, so a viewer can find ex-

actly what is needed, according to EAA officials. Included are discussions of the legal and technical requirements, plus dozens of hands-on demonstrations with step-by-step guidance on basic preventive maintenance projects, such as landing gear and tires; safety wire and cotter pin replacement; hydraulic fluids; safety belts and seat parts; landing and position lights; spark plugs and batteries; and fuel and oil screens and filters. The DVD is available at EAA.org/Shop for $36.95, with discounts for EAA members.

ForeFlight 9 released ForeFlight has released ForeFlight 9, the latest software release that includes Checklist, Glide Advisor, SiriusXM Audio, and more. With Checklists, ForeFlight has integrated one of the most important aviation tools into the app, company officials noted. Familiar paper checklists derived from aircraft POHs are transformed into digital templates that fit into procedural workflows and help pilots conduct safer flight operations. Glide Advisor helps pilots quickly assess landing options in an emergency situation, according to company officials. ForeFlight customers flying with the

SiriusXM SXAR1 Aviation Receiver can now connect their Bluetooth headset or audio device to the SXAR1 and stream XM Satellite Radio while in the cockpit. Select radio stations via ForeFlight. In addition, the portable SXAR1 provides access to satellite aviation weather in ForeFlight Mobile, including NEXRAD

with storm cell attributes and tracks, Lightning, Cloud Tops, Echo Tops, Surface Wind Analysis, Winds/Temps Aloft, METAR/TAF, AIR/SIGMET, PIREP, and NOTAMS. ForeFlight.com/9

Piper M600 approved for Hartzell five-blade prop

Piper Aircraft reports the Piper M600 has received approval from the FAA for the Hartzell five-blade composite swept tip propeller. The propeller, designed specifically for the Piper M600, features thin, maximum efficiency airfoils, providing the opportunity for increased performance, according to company officials. The design of the carbon composite propeller blades allows for an unlimited life certification and makes them five to 10 times stronger than similar wood core blades, Piper officials note. The design features a stainless steel shank, nickel cobalt leading edge, and mesh erosion screen for FOD protection. The new propeller is offered as a Piper factory option for 2017 on new M600 aircraft. Piper.com, HartzellProp.com

SkyView software updated

Sporty’s now on Apple TV Sporty’s has introduced a flight training app designed specifically for the Apple TV. The Learn to Fly Course companion app for Apple TV allows you to watch Sporty’s HD video training on the big screen in the comfort of your home. Viewers can study the Private, Recreational or Sport Pilot training modules. Video progress is automatically synced between your Apple TV, iPhone and iPad using your Apple iCloud account. Sportys.com

April 27, 2017

Dynon’s SkyView software has been upgraded to version 15.1, adding Yaw Damper capability, VP-X support on HDX, improved Rotax 912iS fault/troubleshooting information, support for the new SV-ASDB-472 Dual Band Traffic and Weather, and dozens more improvements and fixes. DynonAvionics.com

iFly GPS 9.8 released G3X Touch display for experimental aircraft introduced Garmin has unveiled a new addition to the G3X Touch glass flight display family, the 7-inch G3X Touch portrait display. For first generation G3X customers, the new 7-inch portrait display offers an easy upgrade path as the existing footprint is easily adaptable to the new display and includes all of the same features as the G3X Touch 10.6-inch and 7-inch landscape displays, company officials noted. Additionally, the new GMU 11 magnetometer allows for more flexible installation options for Experimentals and LSA. The 7-inch portrait display can be used as a primary flight display (PFD) or multifunction display (MFD) when paired with

multiple G3X Touch displays or as a single standalone screen comprising a combination PFD/MFD, officials note. Integration options include the display of engine indication system (EIS) information, ADS-B traffic and weather, SiriusXM aviation weather, transponder, remote COMM radio, autopilot and more. Additional features include built-in Bluetooth, wireless flight plan transfer and additional connectivity with Connext, synthetic vision (SVX), as well as worldwide VFR/IFR charts. A single G3X Touch display starts at $2,995. Garmin.com

Adventure Pilot has released Version 9.8 for iOS, Android, and all iFly GPS devices. New features and enhancements include automatic loading of IFR procedures into a flight plan. Also with this release, Adventure Pilot has begun a full scale beta test of the iFly GPS application for Windows. Beta customers are currently using the app on Windows tablets, such as Microsoft Surface and other Windows based computers. iFly GPS for Windows is scheduled for full release Summer 2017. iFlyGPS.com Send press releases to: Press@GeneralAviationNews.com.


April 27, 2017

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New Products

Creative Electronics introduces 406 ELT tester

uAvionix launches foursome of ADS-B products uAvionix Corporation, an Unmanned Aircraft System (UAS) ADS-B avionics solution provider, has entered the general aviation market with four products: EchoUAT, SkyFYX, SkyEcho, and EchoESX. EchoUAT promises affordability, EFIS compatibility and ease of installation in a remotely mounted ADS-B transceiver for Experimental and Light-Sport Aircraft. At 95 grams and $999, it incorporates duallink (1090MHz and 978MHz) receivers and a 978MHz UAT Class B1S transmitter. EchoUAT includes integrated Wi-Fi, which supports many popular iOS and Android EFB applications. It also features a direct wired communication for use with popular transponders and EFIS models from Dynon, GRT and MGL Avionics. A zero-install, automatic reply decoder integrates with Mode C and legacy transponders for retrofit capability. EchoUAT is designed for use with the aircraft’s existing altitude encoder and

ADS-B compliant GPS position source. SkyFYX combines a WAAS GNSS sensor with an integrated RAIM processor. At less than $500, SkyFYX is the most affordable ADS-B rule-compliant position source companion for the EchoUAT and EchoESX, officials said. It is designed for Experimental and LSA aircraft. On the international front, uAvionix introduced the SkyEcho, a portable ADS-B Out solution that combines an integrated WAAS GPS, barometer and WiFi in a battery powered package. The EchoESX, available in late April for $1,699, is an ADS-B enabled Mode S Transponder for Experimental and LSA. uAvionix.com

Garmin Pilot App wireless data capabilities expanded

grated flight deck with Flight Stream 510 will now be able to wirelessly transfer Jeppesen terminal charts through the iOSbased Garmin Pilot app to their avionics systems. The Flight Stream 510 MultiMediaCard (MMC) from Garmin includes Database Concierge, the tool that transfers Jeppesen aviation database updates from the app to supported Garmin avionics.

Garmin and Jeppesen recently unveiled new wireless data transfer capabilities for Jeppesen terminal charts that are accessed through select Garmin avionics and the iOS-based Garmin Pilot app. Pilots using the GTN 650/750 touchscreen navigator or the G1000 NXi inte-

Study & Prepare Pass your test & know the essentials to become a safe, competent pilot. INSTRUCTOR GA_ASA_TestPrep2017.indd 1

Creative Electronics has introduced a user friendly tester for 406 Mhz emergency locator beacons. The tester does a comprehensive test of the beacon and provides a pass or fail indication, displaying not only the message content, including the all important HEX identification code, but also the results of the actual measurements and, if any discrepancies, a list of them. This tester provides for a direct connection to the antenna of the beacon, allowing for the actual power output of the beacon to be measured, or for off the air measurement of the relative radiated strength

coming from the beacons antenna. It also tests 121.5 Mhz beacons. The tester is available from Northwest Aviation Services for $648, plus shipping and handling. nas@cpcinternet.com

Electronic ignition and Thunderbolt options for Van’s Aircraft Van’s Aircraft customers now have the option to add an electronic ignition system on their Lycoming engines. In addition, a new Lycoming Engines and Van’s Aircraft partnership allows Van’s customers to select performance and color options for their engines via Lycoming’s Thunderbolt product line. Lycoming.com, VansAircraft.com Jeppesen terminal charts can be viewed within Garmin Pilot from the charts page and in split screen mode alongside the moving map. Geo-referenced Jeppesen charts can also be overlaid on the moving map for seamless navigation. An electronic Jeppesen chart subscription for Garmin Pilot is required to access Jeppesen terminal charts through the app. Jeppesen.com, Garmin.com

Have a new product or service you’d like to tell our readers about? Send press releases (in word documents, no PDFs please) to: Press@GeneralAviationNews.com. Please put “On the Market” in the subject line. Send photos separately.

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REMOTE PILOT 7/14/2016 12:11:47 PM


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Calendar of Events

POWERED BY

WEEK OF APRIL 1, 2013

Western United States

Apr. 30, 2017, Half Moon, CA. Pacific Coast Dream Machines 2017, 650-726-2328 Apr. 30, 2017, Kernville, CA. AOPA Members Campout at Kern Valley Airport, 661-345-7755 Apr. 30, 2017, Livermore, CA. Vintage Aircraft Display, 925-915-0120 Apr. 30, 2017, Renton, WA. Free Seaplane Operations in the Pacific Northwest Seminar, 425-336-7445 May 02, 2017, Los Gatos, CA. Los Gatos Hangar Flyers Weekly Coffee, 408-209-3067 May 02, 2017, Palo Alto, CA. Private Pilot Ground School, 650-600-1021 May 03, 2017, Tucson, AZ. US Flight Expo, 703-307-6775 May 03, 2017, Carson City, NV. Carson City Flight Civil Air Patrol Meeting, 775-546-9805 May 03, 2017, Truckee, CA. Tahoe Flying Club Monthly Meeting, 530-378-4832 May 03, 2017, San Carlos, CA. RESCHEDULED: So You Had To Make An Off Airport Landing, 408-981-6424 May 04, 2017, Mountain View, CA. Hangar Flying & Coffee Drinking May 05-07, 2017, Aztec, NM. Aztec Wings & Wheels, 505-419-1248 May 05-06, 2017, Palo Alto, CA. California Aircraft Expo, 480-363-0058 May 05-07, 2017, Kernville, CA. Kern Valley Airport Backcountry Fly-In, 919-457-2855 May 05, 2017, San Diego, CA. Fly Days, 619-259-5541 May 06-07, 2017, Chino, CA. Planes of Fame Air Show, 909-597-3722 May 06-07, 2017, Travis AFB, CA. Thunder Over Solano, 707-424-2011 May 06, 2017, Hillsboro, OR. EAA 105 Pancake Breakfast May 06, 2017, Placerville, CA. Chapter 512 Pancake Breakfast Fly-In, 916-337-6700 May 06, 2017, Concord, CA. Monthly MDPA Safety Meeting, Breakfast & Fly-Out May 06, 2017, Reno, NV. EAA Chapter 1361 Meeting, 775-393-9403 May 06, 2017, Casper, WY. EAA Chapter 420 Monthly Meeting, 208-313-4903 May 06, 2017, Chula Vista, CA. San Diego Ultralight Association Meeting, EAA 114 May 06, 2017, Hollister, CA. Frazier Lake Airpark Antique Aircraft Display Day (First Saturday of the month), 831-634-0855 May 06, 2017, Modesto, CA. Airport Lunch May 06, 2017, Redding, CA. Cafe Dinner & Hangar Movie, 530-241-4204 May 09, 2017, Los Gatos, CA. Los Gatos Hangar Flyers Weekly Coffee, 408-209-3067 May 09, 2017, Denver, CO. IMC Club at IA Regular Meeting, 719-581-2010 May 09, 2017, Tucson, AZ. CAP Squadron 104, 520-307-5775 May 11, 2017, Mountain View, CA. Hangar Flying & Coffee Drinking May 11, 2017, Bellingham, WA. Vancouver BC to Martinique in the Caribbean, 360-303-8540

South Central United States

Apr. 30, 2017, Centerville, TX. Critters Lodge Fly-in and Camp Out, 903-536-7000 May 01, 2017, New Orleans, LA. Volunteer Gulf Pilots Wanted, 504-717-4737 May 02, 2017, Springfield, MO. Civil Air Patrol meeting, Springfield Regional Com-

posite Squadron, 417-849-6923 May 04, 2017, Austin, TX. Austin Aviators Monthly Meetup, 512-656-1101 May 06-07, 2017, Barksdale AFB, LA. Defenders of Liberty Open House & Airshow, 318-227-8611 May 06, 2017, Gardner, KS. VAA16 Pancake Breakfast at K34 May 06, 2017, Ottawa, KS. Third Saturday Breakfast Fly-In, 785-893-0242 May 06, 2017, Hot Springs, AR. Hot EAA Breakfast May 06, 2017, Topeka, KS. A.E. Post 8 Ground School & Meeting May 06, 2017, Huntsville, TX. Huntsville Aviation 2017 Spring Fly-In, 936-295-8136 May 06, 2017, Conroe, TX. AOPA: Back to Your Roots Seminar, 832-654-9831 May 08, 2017, Paragould, AR. How to Fly In and Out of Large Airports for the GA Pilot, 870-215-5411 May 09, 2017, Springfield, MO. Civil Air Patrol meeting, Springfield Regional Composite Squadron, 417-849-6923 May 09, 2017, Olathe, KS. Civil Air Patrol Meeting, 913-927-1317 May 11-14, 2017, Cass, AR. Byrd's Spring Fly-In May 13, 2017, Garnett, KS. Garnett K68 Airfair, 785-448-6931 May 13, 2017, Topeka, KS. A.E. Post 8 Ground School & Meeting May 13, 2017, Hallettsville, TX. Second Annual Fly-In and Pig Roast, 361-772-6434 May 13, 2017, Branson, MO. Flyin Lunch, 417-334-8234 May 13, 2017, Mountain View, AR. Free Hangar Concert, 636-234-5954

North Central United States

Apr. 30, 2017, Dubuque, IA. University of Dubuque Flight Team Pancake Breakfast May 01, 2017, Chicago, IL. Chicago Executive Pilots Association (CEPA) Board Meeting, 847-4981597 May 02, 2017, Naperville, IL. Monthly BFC Meeting, 630-712-0059 May 02, 2017, Fargo, ND. Pilot Safety Discussion, Vic’s Aircraft Sales, 701-793-2444 May 02, 2017, Davenport, IA. IMC Club Meeting, 309-798-2282 May 03, 2017, Danbury, WI. $4 Burger Night 5-8 pm at Voyager Airport (9WN2), 715-259-3910 May 04, 2017, Waterford, MI. First Responders Training Workshop, 734-487-7455 May 04, 2017, Rush City, MN. IFR Ground School, 320-358-3665 May 04, 2017, Bolingbrook, IL. EAA 461 Chapter Meeting, 630-465-9842 May 04, 2017, Ray, MI. EAA Chapter 13 Monthly Meeting, 586-918-3838 May 05, 2017, Hot Springs, SD. Coffee and Dessert May 06, 2017, Midland, MI. Pancake Breakfast Fly-In (KIKW), 989-835-3231 May 06, 2017, Peoria, IL. EAA 563 Pancake Breakfast, 309-696-1428 May 06, 2017, Eden Prairie, MN. Wings of the North Fly-In & Open House, 612-708-0728 May 06, 2017, Antigo, WI. Wisconsin Flying Hamburger Social and Unmanned Systems Inc, 715-219-2711 May 06, 2017, Omaha, NE. EAA Chapter 80 Young Eagles Rally, 316-213-7093 May 06, 2017, Greenwood, IL. Young

Eagles Rally, 815-648-2433 May 06, 2017, Granite Falls, MN. Minnesota 99s Fly-Out/Drive-Out to Fagen WW2 Museum May 07, 2017, Rockford, IL. EAA Chapter 22 Fly-In Drive-In Breakfast May 08, 2017, Omaha, NE. EAA Chapter 80 Meeting May 09, 2017, Kearney, NE. EAA Chapter 1091 Monthly Meeting May 09, 2017, Muskegon, MI. AOPA Nontowered Cases Studies: What Went Wrong, 800-638-3101 May 10, 2017, Danbury, WI. $4 Burger Night 5-8 pm at Voyager Airport (9WN2), 715-259-3910 May 10, 2017, Gaylord, MI. EAA Chapter 1095 May 10, 2017, Green Bay, WI. EAA Chapter 651 IMC Club Monthly Meeting, 920-819-4774 May 10, 2017, Brighton, MI. EAA Chapter 384 Monthly Membership Meeting May 10, 2017, Lansing, MI. AOPA Nontowered Cases Studies: What Went Wrong, 800-638-3101 May 11, 2017, Fremont, MI. EAA Chapter 578 Monthly Meeting, 616-667-7837 May 11, 2017, Bemidji, MN. EAA Chapter 1397, 218-368-3162 May 11, 2017, Rush City, MN. IFR Ground School, 320-358-3665 May 11, 2017, Omaha, NE. Omaha IMC Club, 402-934-5300 May 11, 2017, Chicago, IL. Fox Flying Club Membership Meeting

North Eastern United States

Apr. 30, 2017, Lumberton, NJ. All you can eat Pancake Breakfast at the Flying W Airport Patti Wagon Cafe, 609-265-2233 Apr. 30, 2017, Berlin, MD. Cooked-toorder breakfast, 410-726-7207 Apr. 30, 2017, Bethel, PA. Golden Age Air Museum Opens for the 2017 Season, 717-933-9566 Apr. 30, 2017, Cleveland, OH. A Celebration in Honor of Margaret Hurlburt setting a speed record in a Corsair, 216-623-1111 May 01, 2017, Wilmington, DE. DellPenn Flyers Club New Member Drive May 01, 2017, Columbus, OH. Civil Air Patrol, Columbus Senior Squadron Meeting, 740-990-9169 May 01, 2017, Hampton, VA. AOPA Nontowered Cases Studies: What Went Wrong, 800-638-3101 May 01, 2017, Gaithersburg, MD. US Coast Guard Aux Flying Flotilla 24-4 monthly meeting May 02, 2017, Rutland, VT. EAA 968 Monthly Meeting May 02, 2017, Palmyra, PA. Monthly Scenario Discussion, 717-304-4187 May 02, 2017, Culpeper, VA. AOPA Nontowered Cases Studies: What Went Wrong, 800-638-3101 May 02, 2017, Chesapeake, VA. EAA Chapter 339 Monthly Meeting, 757-647-1564 May 03, 2017, Blacksburg, VA. AOPA Nontowered Cases Studies: What Went Wrong, 800-638-3101 May 04, 2017, Morehead, KY. EAA Chapter 1525 Meeting, 606-356-1941 May 04, 2017, Portland, ME. Hangar Flying/Burger Night, 207-619-0236 May 04, 2017, Richmond, VA. AOPA Nontowered Cases Studies: What

SocialFlight is the most comprehensive tool ever created for finding aviationrelated events! Aircraft Fly-in's, Airshows, Pancake Breakfasts, Conventions, FAA Safety Seminars... they're all here! With SocialFlight, you can also chat with other attendees and even upload & view photos of the events! Whether you love flying, watching airplanes, ultralights, balloons or anything else airborne, this is the place for you. Keep exploring to discover all the features that SocialFlight has to offer.

Now get out there and FLY! www.socialflight.com Went Wrong, 800-638-3101 May 05, 2017, Washington, PA. Washington Flyers Club, 724-344-0569 May 06, 2017, Morehead, KY. FlyIn Drive-In Pancake Breakfast May 06, 2017, Cincinnati, OH. AOPA/KLUK Seminars & Airplane Swap, 513-319-9620 May 06, 2017, Baltimore, MD. Essex Sky Park Fly-In Pancake Breakfast, 443-831-7609 May 06, 2017, Cleveland, OH. Family Day at the International Women's Air and Space Museum Burke Lakefront, 216-623-1111 May 07, 2017, Moraine, OH. Moraine Airpark Sunday Funday Fly-In, 937866-2489
May 08, 2017, Richmond, VA. IMC Club, 804-564-3233 May 08, 2017, Carlisle, PA. Carlisle Flying Club Monthly Meeting, 717-830-8773 May 08, 2017, Garden City, NY. AOPA Nontowered Cases Studies: What Went Wrong, 800-638-3101 May 09, 2017, Fitchburg, MA. Fitchburg Pilot’s Association (FPA) Monthly Meeting May 09, 2017, Poughkeepsie, NY. AOPA Nontowered Cases Studies: What Went Wrong, 800-638-3101 May 10, 2017, Nashua, NH. EAA IMC Club Chapter Meeting, 978-873-0507 May 10, 2017, Albany, NY. AOPA Nontowered Cases Studies: What Went Wrong, 800-638-3101 May 11, 2017, Frederick, MD. Sugarloaf 99s Chapter Meeting, 301-471-9103 May 11, 2017, Reading, PA. Reading Aero Club Monthly Meeting, 610-370-7101 May 11, 2017, Wadsworth, OH. EAA Chapter 846 Monthly Meeting, 330-321-6274

For more events and to stay up-to-date, go to www.socialflight.com


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For more events and to stay up-to-date, go to www.socialflight.com South Eastern United States

Apr. 30, 2017, Beaufort, SC. MCAS Beaufort Airshow, 843-228-7675 Apr. 30, 2017, Rock Hill, SC. South Carolina Breakfast Club (KUZA), 803-446-0214 Apr. 30, 2017, Live Oak, FL. Wings Over Suwannee Regional Fly-In, 352-498-5533 May 02, 2017, Stuart, FL. EAA Chapter 692 Monthly Meeting May 02, 2017, Pooler, GA. EAA Chapter 1514 Monthly Meeting May 02, 2017, Tampa, FL. AOPA Nontowered Cases Studies: What Went Wrong, 800-638-3101 May 03, 2017, Fort Myers, FL. AOPA Nontowered Cases Studies: What Went Wrong, 800-638-3101 May 04, 2017, Hollywood, FL. AOPA Nontowered Cases Studies: What Went Wrong, 800-638-3101 May 05, 2017, Fort Myers, FL. Fly-in Fridays Hot Dog Social, 239-590-6600 May 06, 2017, Burgaw, NC. EAA 297 Chapter Meeting, 910-880-5669 May 06, 2017, Winchester, TN. EAA 699 Fly-In Breakfast, 931-967-0143 May 06-07, 2017, Fort Lauderdale, FL. Fort Lauderdale Air Show, 321-395-3110 May 06-07, 2017, McEntire ANGB, SC. Go Guard! SC Air and Ground Expo May 06, 2017, Rome, GA. EAA Chapter 709 Pancake Breakfast, 864-316-5250 May 06, 2017, Titusville, FL. FlyIn and Pancake Breakfast May 06, 2017, Lawrenceville, GA. First Saturday Aviation Program and Pancake Breakfast, 404-314-7573 May 06, 2017, Grantham, NC. Grantham

Aero Club Spring Fly-In, 919-922-5346 May 06, 2017, Brooksville, FL. EAA Chapter 1298 Monthly Meeting, 813-758-4196 May 06, 2017, Statesboro, GA. EAA Chapter 489 Fly-In Breakfast, 615-400-5914 May 06, 2017, Siler City, NC. NC Sonex Spring Fly-In May 06, 2017, Greeneville, TN. EAA Chapter 1355 Young Eagles Rally, 423-588-8908 May 06, 2017, Shelby, NC. Fly-In and Open House, 704-487-1161 May 06, 2017, Groveland, FL. Annual Fly-In (6FL0), 904-382-9614 May 07, 2017, Lexington, SC. South Carolina Breakfast Club (SC99), 803-446-0214 May 09, 2017, Vero Beach, FL. EAA Chapter 99 Members Meeting, 772-532-7493 May 11, 2017, Stuart, FL. IMC CLUB Monthly Meeting, 586-801-6146

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Apr. 30, 2017, Ottawa, ON. Sunday Morning Coffee and Pilot Chat, 613-791-6267 May 03, 2017, Pitt Meadows, BC. Aero Club General Meeting, 604-465-0446 May 05, 2017, Cambridge, ON. Gyro Information Night, 519-497-9828 May 06, 2017, Hawkesbury, ON. Breakfast and Meet & Greet, 819-923-6767 May 06, 2017, Gatineau, QC. COPA Flight 169 Monthly Breakfast Meeting/Dejeuner Mensuel, 819-360-0706 May 06, 2017, Three Hills, AB. Coffee Break, 403-443-8434 May 07, 2017, Penhold, AB. Red Deer Airport Fly-In Pancake Breakfast/

Rust Remover, 403-391-2140 May 07, 2017, Ottawa, ON. Sunday Morning Coffee and Pilot Chat, 613-791-6267

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• Sales & Fractional Ownership Contracts www.cmmlawfirm.net • FAA Enforcement Actions blw@cmmlawfirm.net • Aviation Business Entities Phone (509) 624-3020 • sUAS (Drone) Compliance Facsimile (509) 623-1650

Experimentals - 5300 VANʼS AIRCRAFT RV-14. Roomy, Fast, Aerobatic, Beautiful. The easiest to build RV yet! 49% Just Went Further. Visit www.vansaircraft. com for more info. Floatplanes - 5400 FLORIDA SEAPLANES- High Perf/Complex Seaplane Training and Ratings - New M7-235 Maule Super Rock-ets and Classy G44 Grumman Widgeon. Seaplane Main-tenance and Repairs. www.flyfloatplanes.com Orlando area 407-331-5655. SEAPLANE RATINGS AND SOLO RENTALS in central Florida & Minnesota. PA12 & C172 available. 612-868-4243 - 612-749-1337, www. adventureseaplanes.com Light Sport Aircraft - 5620

PILOTʼS AGE forces sale of AVID FLYER Model “C”. 385 TTAF, new Jabiru engine. Call Centralia WA, 360-807-8401, 360-789-3362-cell for details.

Light Sport Aircraft - 5620 KITFOX VIXEN (LSA tri-gear). 225 TTAF/ ENG, Con IO240-B 125hp, instruments, gyros, Garmin GNC 250XL, JPI-700, Garmin GTS-320 xpdr, intercom, stereo. $52,500, 509-630-0045 Announcements - 6375

PLEASE DONATE your aircraft, engines, avionics, avia-tion equipment. We provide Humanitarian Air Service World Wide. Donations tax deductible. 800-448-9487. www.wings-of-hope.org Business Opportunities - 6576 HILLSBOROUGH COUNTY AVIATION AUTHORITY RFI No. 17-411-801, for Peter O. Knight Airport Hangar Development. Sealed RFIʼs for Hangar Development at Peter O. Knight Airport will be received from firms by the Authority at Tampa International Airport Offices located at 4160 George J. Bean Parkway, Ste 2400, Administra-tion Building, 2nd Level, Red Side, Tampa, Florida 33607. Solicitation documents and detailed requirements will be available on the Tamps International Airport web-site at www.tampaairport.com > Airport Business > Pro-curement Department > Current Opportunities on March 29, 2017. Employment - 6900 FLY-IN RANCH Foreman. Hunting/fishing/vacation ranch in Idaho's Frank Church. Skills in Farming, Outfitting, Management 4-9 staff, Communications, Hospitality, Pilot a plus. Salary commensurate with experience. Tamflyingresort@gmail.com EXPERIENCED A&P Mechanic for long standing repair station (KL2R056K) full service FBO at KPTK. Must have reasonable amount of experience performing mainte-nance, preventive maintenance and annual inspections on piston powered aircraft. Inspection Authorization not necessary. Turbine experience helpful but not necessary. Excellent benefits (medical, dental, savings plan), family atmosphere, competitive pay. Single shift, weekends off, guaranteed 40+ hours per week. Call Mike Slocum at Michigan Aviation 248-666-3440 ext 2, 8am-4:30pm EDT, Monday-Friday. LOOKING FOR IA and licensed A&P mechanic with GENERAL AVIATION experience. Must have own tools. Top pay for the right individual. Full benefits include: health insurance, 401K plan, sick & vacation, uniforms. Need energetic self-starter. Vista Aviation is a full service FBO on Whiteman Airport in Calif, in business 35 years. 818-896-6442.

ISEe! ADVmEaRrkTetp lac in the

Call Ben Sclair (800) 426-8538 Ben@GeneralAviationNews.com GeneralAviationNews.com/Advertise

37 Employment - 6900 FLIGHT OPERATIONS DIRECTOR, Idaho Division of Aeronautics, Boise, ID JOB DESCRIPTION To pilot state aircraft; manage state flight operations, su-pervise state pilots and aircraft maintenance personnel; coordinate and conduct search and rescue (SAR) opera-tions for missing aircraft; perform related work. Incumbent may be required to respond for SAR or spe-cial flight missions. This position reports to the Aeronau-tics Division Administrator. PRINCIPAL ACCOUNTABILITIES 1. Flight operations. Serves as chief pilot of flight opera-tions. Directs daily operations of state aircraft fleet (King Air B-200, Cessna 206, Cessna 182) to ensure compli-ance with federal air regulations. Supervises flight sched-uling, makes hiring recommendations, establishes duties and trains staff and evaluates performance. Develops training manuals and procedures for pilots. Monitors pilot proficiency and currency. Identifies appropriate pilot and aircraft mechanic training, serves as pilot-in-command for transporting personnel or cargo, promotes state aircraft passenger usage, develops flight operations budgetand monitors expenses. 2. Safety and training. Supervise all state aircraft opera-tions for safety; assists in providing safety training to oth-er general aviation pilots in the state. 3. Search and rescue operations. Responsible for state search and rescue coordination. MINIMUM QUALIFICATIONS Commercial Pilot certificate with rating as airplane single and multi-engine, land and instrument, with current class two medical certificate. Must have a minimum of 2000 hours flight time which in-cludes 1500 hours multi-engine time; and 500 hours pi-lot-in-command time of multi-engine fixed-wing aircraft with at least three years recent experience in light cabin class twin-engine aircraft (other than center line thrust) under VFR and IFR conditions equal to requirements for operating under FAR, part 135. Good knowledge of: High Altitude and unimproved air-fields; federal air regulations. Experience: developing flight operations policies and pro-cedures; and monitoring budgets. Salary: $50,600-$72,300 with excellent benefits. More information: https://itd.idaho.gov/careers/ Idaho Division of Aeronautics 208-334-8775. Engines - 6950

Custom Engine Overhaul 2-YEAR 500-HOUR WARRANTY

800-204-0735 FAA Approved Repair Station # VI4R597M

Aviation Abbreviations A/C .................................. Air Conditioning ADs ......................Airworthiness Directives ADF ................. Automatic Direction Finder AH ...................................Artificial Horizon A&P ........................Airframe & Powerplant AP .........................................Audio Panel A/P ............................................Autopilot CDI ...................Course Deviation Indicator CHT ................. Cylinder Heat Temperature Com .......................Communication Radio C/R ................................ Counter Rotating CT ........................ Carburetor Temperature DF ...................................Direction Finder DG ...................................Directional Gyro DME ..........Distance Measuring Equipment EFIS ................................Electronic Flight Instrument System EGT.................... Exhaust Gas Temperature

ELT ............ Emergency Locator Transmitter FD ......................................Flight Director FWF .................................Firewall Forward GPS .................. Global Positioning System GS ...................................... Groundspeed G/S ........................................ Glide Slope GSP ...........................Ground Service Plug HF ................................... High Frequency hp.......................................... horsepower HSI ............... Horizontal Situation Indicator IFR ....................... Instrument Flight Rules ILS.................. Instrument Landing System LE ...........................................Left Engine LMB..........................Light Marker Beacon LOC ........................................... Localizer Loran............. Long Range Area Navigation LR..........................................Long Range LRT ...............................Long Range Tanks

MB ...................................Marker Beacon MDH .......................Major Damage History MP ...............................Manifold Pressure NDH ...........................No Damage History NM .................................... Nautical Miles Nav................................ Navigation Radio NavCom .................................Navigation/ CommunicationRadio OAT...................... Outside Air Temperature OH ............................................. Overhaul RB ..................................Rotating Beacon RDF ........................Radio Direction Finder RE ........................................Right Engine RG ................................. Retractable Gear RMI ....................Radio Magnetic Indicator RNAV ............................... Area Navigation SBs ................................Service Bulletins SCMOH .......Since Chrome Major Overhaul

SFRM .......... Since Factory Remanufacture SHS ..............................Since Hot Section SMOH......................Since Major Overhaul SOH.................................. Since Overhaul S/N ....................................Serial Number SPOH ....................... Since Prop Overhaul STOH .......................... Since Top Overhaul STOL........................Short Takeoff/Landing TBO ......................Time Between Overhaul TT ............................................ Total Time TTAE ................ Total Time Airframe/Engine TTAF ........................... Total Time Airframe TTSN .......................Total Time Since New XPDR .................................... Transponder VLF ............................ Very Low Frequency VOR ............................... VHF Omni Range


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Phone: 308-832-2200 http://autofuelstc.com Hangars - 7300 ECONOMICAL AIRCRAFT HANGARS with the Banyan Steel Arch Systems. Will ship worldwide. (800)533-7773, (317)8492246, Fax: (866)-886-0547, www.banyansteelarchsystems.com NASHUA (NH) Airport: 2 hangars/ 1 p;roperty. 3960sqft hangar with 8880sqft office, R&D space plus 5482szft hangar with 1260sqft office. Prolmanrealty.com 603-880-6655. AUBURN WA AIRPORT Box Hangar for rent. 50x55ʼ. Available Now. Call Marty for details. 425-503-8511 or call the Auburn Airport at 253333-6826.

POWER METERS for hangars. Recover the cost of elec-tricity used by tenants, Davidge Controls, 800-824-9696, www.ezmeter.com

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KRNO T-HANGARS, 976-2742 sqft. Monthly or multi-year leases. Move-in incentives. Google: renoairport.com T-Hangar Leases or call 775328-6486.

CORPORATE HANGARS for rent; Tacoma Narrows Air-port, 10 minutes to Tacoma; 65'X56'; 62' door, office, bathroom $2331 month. Without office/bath $1798. 253-798-2421, LBehm@ co.pierce.wa.us LARGE STAND-ALONE8 hangar Tacoma Narrows Air-port, 10 minutes to Tacoma; 7200 sf, three offices, bath-room, 3-phase power, fire sprinkler system overhead gas heat, 60' door.. $2642 month. 253-798-2421, LBehm@co.pierce.wa.us, RIVERSIDE MUNICIPAL AIRPORT, So. California, Exec T-hangar for rent or sale, perfect for single engine. $12,000 to buy, $350/month to rent. Call or email for ex-act dimensions. Available now. Michelle, Pacifica Com-mercial, 805-237-4040, michelle@pacificare.com

50ʼ x 48ʼ Mammoth Yosemite (MMH) hangar for sale. Two story living area with hot tub, full kitchen, washer, dryer and more. Owner can carry down payment. $255,000 OBO Danny Cullen, 310-714-1815 dannycullen59@yahoo. com DEER PARK, WA (DEW) 10 unit “T” hangar, building rental business FOR SALE All units rented. Built 1998. 509-467-1997, jch467@ msn.com T-HANGARS with 40ʼ doors, Tacoma Narrows Airport, $336.45, 253-798-8550.. ELMA, WA T-Hangars $97.50/mo Completely enclosed w/lockup. Pilot controlled runway lights. 360-482-2228. PEARSON FIELD VUO. T-hangars w/42ʼdoors, paved-floor, electrical, $300-$330. Full service airport w/instru-ment approach. Closest to downtown Vancouver & Port-land. Contact Willy willy.williamson@cityofvancouver.us 360487-8619, www.cityofvancouver.us/pearson Inspections - 7340 AMATEUR BUILT/ Light Sport Aircraft AW inspection. Frank Sperandeo, DAR, function codes 46/47/48/11-(UAVʼs)/12-(air racing, unlimited, horsepower). 479-521-2609, miss_ pearl@cox.net

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Complete your Private Pilot Ground School Instruction-Seaplane - 736026 January. live from your home! Starts Space limited – Enroll Now! FLORIDA SEAPLANES - High Perf/Complex SeaplaneWINGsRealityEDU.com Training and Ratings. New M7-235 Maule Super Rockets and Classy G44 Grumman Widgeon. Seaplane Mainte-nance and Repairs.Pvt, www.flyfloatplanes.com 407-3315655. ORLANDO AREA. Insurance - 7400

TITLE SEARCHES & INSURANCE: Same day reports if called before noon CT-most searches. 800-666-1397, 405-232-8886. Visa/MC. Aircraft Title Corp. Est 1957. Aviation Insurance Resources Best rates, Broadest coverage. All markets. Access the entire market with just one call. Toll free 877-247-7767 www.AIR-PROS.com Miscellaneous - 7700 TEXAS AVIATION ONLINE. All things related to Texas aviation. www.texasaviationonline.com Parachutes - 8150

Para-Phernalia, Inc. has designed and manufactured the SOFTIE line of pilot emergency parachutes since 1979. Our emergency parachutes are known world wide for being the highest quality, most comfortable, and reliable emergency parachutes available.

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For 70 years, Univair has been a leading supplier of quality parts and supplies for General Aviation enthusiasts and “classic” aircraft owners. Remember, we’re as close as your phone, computer or mailbox! Toll Free Sales: 1-888-433-5433 2500 Himalaya Road • Aurora, Colorado • 80011 Info Phone ................................... 303-375-8882 Fax ....................800-457-7811 or 303-375-8888 Email ........................................info@univair.com Website ...................................www.univair.com HANGAR SWAP: BUY/SELL AIRPLANE PARTS. The one place to find great deals and sell your unwanted parts. www.hangarswap. com Polishing and Plating - 8380 RAMOS PLATING and POLISHING: Repolish your alu-minum spinners, chrome pitot tubes, airsteps, valve cov-ers, nuts, bolts. Also cadmium plating. 45yrs OK City, OK 405-232-4300. Propellers - 8400

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Advertising (800) 426-8538


April 27, 2017

www.GeneralAviationNews.com —  Classified Pages — facebook.com/ganews

Skis - 8870

WHEEL REPLACEMENT METAL SKIS FAA Approved Up To 3700 Lbs.

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Real Estate/Airport Property - 9650

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Cessna 120 to 210F Champ Scout Citabria Decalathon

LONGMERE LAKEFRONT, 5 min from Soldotna, 8.34 acres. Three rental homes (condo, townhome, duplex), 40x60 warehouse/hangar w/mezzanine & drive-through doors. 1000' natural sandy beach and float plane basin. Monthly income of $2450 from three rentals. Less than a mile to Sterling Hwy (main road from Anchorage to Hom-er). Stocked lake, great for fly-in fishing lodge to wilder-ness areas. Bring your PILOTS & people of vision Realty One Group, Diana@AZLuxuryRE.com, 480-683-2000, http://39321hallelujahtraildrive.ihousenet.com California - 9650

LARGE, AFFORDABLE 2.5 acre lots for sale in S. Calif. on the runway: www.ancientvalleyairpark.com Florida - 9650 ORLANDO AREA Aviation-properties, hangars, hangar-rentals, Some priced like bank-owned. Chandelle Proper-ties. Ron Henderson 407712-4071 Keller Williams/Ad-vantage II Realty www.chandelleproperties.com

PACIFIC SCIENTIFIC Tensiometer p/n T52002-104-00, a 30-300lb. $495 OBO. kohelmichael@yahoo.com 425-374-3460. Video, Audio, DVD - 9400 QUAD CITY CHALLENGER VIDEO. 45 minutes of flying fun on floats, skiʼs, soaring and other neat stuff. Send $10 to QCU, POBox 370, Moline IL 61266-0370. Money back if not totally satisfied Also see our web site. www.quadcitychallenger.com For VISA/MC order call 309764-3515. Real Estate/Airport Property - 9650

FLYING EAGLE Airpark (77NV): Near Reno, Nevada, 15 minutes to major shopping, 40acre parcels w/taxi access to paved runways 16/34 and 7/25. Max 775-772-8049.

Americaʼs Premier Fly-In & Country Club Community, Daytona Beach, (East Coast of Florida). Taxiway homes from $450,000, non-taxiway homes from $200,000, con-doʼs from $139,000. Lots available. Long/ short term rent-als avail. Spruce Creek Fly-In Realty, Pat & Lenny Ohlsson, 800-932-4437. www.fly-in.com sales@flyin.com SARASOTA FL Hidden River Airpark, 2640ʼ paved and lighted runway, lots w/homes 5-20acres. Katty Caron, Realty Executives. www.floridaaviationproperties.com katecaron@ realtyexecutives.com 941-928-3009 Georgia - 9650

AVIATION, INVESTMENT & residential properties. Li-censed in both Carolinaʼs. Sell airpark & airstrip property Thatʼs what we do www. NC-Airparks.com 877-279-9623. Pennsylvania - 9650 HORSE RANCH with private 2480-ft airstrip (Crown Creek- 57WA). 3000+ sq-ft custom home w/4-car garage, 35-acres fenced. Barn w/4 matted stalls. Covered riding arena w/heated tackroom. Heated hangar w/Schweiss door. Quality outbuildings. $895,000. Call Ron Matney, 509-684-1012. www.windermerecolville. com NEW AIRPARK: Northeast Pennsylvania, 29lots for sale. 1.25-3 acres, great views, underground utilities, sewers, some lakefront. EZ flight/drive to NYC, Philadel-phia, New Jersey, Connecticut. At Seamans Airport (9N3), 2500ʼpaved IFR approach, lighted, all services, Build Your Dream Home This Spring! “Model Home Be-ing Built Now”. 866-924-7787 or www.SkylineEstates.us South Carolina - 9650 NORTH of Hurricanes, SOUTH of snow 3300turf. 10mi to Myrtle Beach. 1, 5,10,acre lots Low taxes/insurance, “free DVD”. 843-6028220. www.hardeeairpark.com Texas - 9650

PRIVATE ISLAND Retreat on Coast of GA (72GA, Bar-bour Island). Quick access to Atlantic Ocean, 2500ʼ run-way, owner finance/lease purchase available. $329,900, Dana Gregory, 770-616-8889. Illinois - 9650 CHICAGO, IL Suburbs Residential Airpark Specialist. Get expert advice and knowledge from, Albert Miranda, man-aging broker, pilot & airpark resident. 10+ homes for sale in 5 different airparks from $325,000 to over 3 million. Pictures and information of available homes and airparks at www.HangarHomesRealty.com or call 312-543-1220

FAIR WEATHER FIELD Aviation Community (TX42) west of Houston. Pilots - live on the runway or just hang-ar/ build your plane(s). 1 acre lots. Three runways: 3400ʼ paved, 2500ʼ grass, 2000ʼ water. No state income tax. Temperate winters. www.fairweatherfield.com 281-7023331, Leonard@fairweatherfield.com NORTH TEXAS PILOT'S DREAM! Exclusive community of 140 homesites in a 340-acre residential airpark. Live with your plane in quiet seclusion only 5 minutes from shopping, restaurants and universities, just 25 minutes North of DFW, near 23,000-acre lake. Taxi from the paved runway to your home. Several 1-acre lots availa-ble, also some homes. www.hiddenvalleyairpark.org 940-765-2382, realestate@ hiddenvalleyairpark.org

PRIVATELY OWNED, Public Use airport/ airpark (3K6). For sale or lease. 2700ʼ lighted paved runway. Full serv-ice FBO. 21-miles from St. Louis MO $890,000. 618-644-5411.

DISCOVERY BAY @ Table Rock Lake. 60-miles long lake near Branson, MO. Lake and LakeView Lots. Un-derground utilities, 2300ʼ hard surface strip (MO06). Hangared lots with lake views starting at $40,000. 28ʼ boat slips available. Lake view home and townhouse for sale. www.norwalklanding.com 605-366-5447.

QUALITY BUILT 2bd/2.5ba home, includes large hangar w/office and separate bdrm. Adjacent to 1850ʼ paved run-way, 20 acres, very near Chelan WA, for details call 509-630-0045. IF YOU are interested in owning a residential hangar property on the Lynden Municipal Airport, I have some options for you. Please call Rod Blankers at 360-815-0325. AWESOME VIEWS of majestic Lake Roosevel (7 Bays Airport). 3bd/2ba, 1995sqft. Hangar.. $399,000. Tina Craig, Winderemere City Group, 509-977-2002. tinacraig@windermere. com MLS#201617570, www.lakerooseveltproperties.com

Discovery Trail Farm Airpark Sequim, Washington

A neighborhood for pilots and their families

www.DiscoveryTrailFarmAirpark. com

Let us help you sell some of your stuff! Call my buddy Ben at (800) 426-8538 and I’ll get him to hook you up with an ad in our classifieds.

Missouri - 9650

Publishers Notice: All real estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to the Fair Housing Act which makes it illegal to advertise “any preference, limitation or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status or national origin, or an in-tention, to make any such preference, limited or discrimination.” Familial status includes children under the age of 18 living w/pa-rents or legal custodian, pregnant women & people securing cus-tody of children under 18. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate which is in violation of the law. Our readers are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are avail on an equal opportunity basis. To com-plain of discrimination call HUD toll-free 800-669-9777. Toll-free for the hearing impaired: 800-927-9277.

BLAKELY ISLAND, WA. San Juan Islandsʼ Premier Airpark. Paved lighted runway. Marina. Owner access to two 70ac lakes in 3000+/-ac protected private forest-land. NEW LISTINGS of Runway/Marine View Homes: Architect designed 2 Bedroom Home: $465,000 and 3 Bedroom Home with dream kitchen: $485,000. Taxi-way Cabin with room for hangar: $375,000. DETAILS: Judy, Flying Island Realty, 360-375-6302 www.flyingislandrealty.com judy@flyingislandrealty.com

North Carolina - 9650

SPRUCE CREEK FLY-IN REALTY SERVING THE SPRUCE CREEK COMMUNITY since 1985

Title Services - 9210 TITLE SEARCHES: Same day reports if called before noon C.T., most searches. 800-6661397 or 405-232-8886. Visa/ MC. Aircraft Title Corp. Established 1957. Tools & Machinery - 9225

MONTANA, WINDSOCK SKYPARK. The Last Best Place! Only 20-lots left for sale. 1-acre or larger, on Shores of Beautiful Fort Peck Lake in NE MT. City water, sewer, nat-gas, underground utilities installed, paved streets, taxiway to 37S public airport. Lanny Hanson Visit: www. windsockskypark.com 406-526-3535, 406-2631154. Donʼt miss the opportunity to Live in a beauti-ful hunting and fishing recreational paradise! LOTS NOW SELLING $60,000. Nevada - 9650

AeroVillas: LOCATION! LOCATION! LOCATION! West Houston Airport: 10,000 sqft lots-you design your perfect hangar home. 4000ʼ runway, AWOS, full service ameni-ties. Jet A/100LL fuel will be delivered to your hangar door. Full service Maintenance & Avionics Shops located on field. www.aerovillas.com to see what AeroVillas has to offer, woody@westhoustonairport,com 281-492-2130. Washington - 9650

RARE RESIDENTIAL HANGAR LOT! $395,000. Hangar lot on the Lynden Municipal Airport. 212ʼ runway front-age, 20,000ʼ for large house and hangar. Rod Blankers, Broker, 360815-0325.


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General Aviation News —  800.426.8538

April 27, 2017

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Apr. 27, 2017  

The April 27, 2017, edition of General Aviation News

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