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$2.95 • MARCH 21, 2019 71ST YEAR. NO. 6

An epic cross-country

Paying homage to the sleek Swift Relationship therapy for pilots 10 best-selling airplanes of 2018 The Flying Farmer


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General Aviation News —  800.426.8538

March 21, 2019


March 21, 2019

www.GeneralAviationNews.com — facebook.com/ganews

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The TOC EDITORIAL Janice Wood, Editor Janice@GeneralAviationNews.com

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CONTRIBUTING WRITERS Jamie Beckett • Theron Burton William E. Dubois • Joni M. Fisher Dan Johnson • Frederick Johnsen Jeffrey Madison • Paul McBride Amelia T. Reiheld • Tom Snow Ben Visser • Bill Walker ADVERTISING & SUBSCRIPTIONS Ben Sclair, Publisher Ben@GeneralAviationNews.com PRODUCTION & WEB DEVELOPMENT Russell Kasselman Russell@GeneralAviationNews.com GENERAL CONTACT Phone: 800-426-8538 || 253-471-9888 Fax: 253-471-9888 Internet: www.generalaviationnews.com Social: twitter.com/genavnews facebook.com/ganews General Aviation News accepts unsolicited editorial manuscripts and photos but is not responsible for return unless submissions are accompanied by a stamped, selfaddressed envelope. READER INFORMATION General Aviation News makes its subscription list available to other companies for their products and services. To be excluded from such offers, send a copy of your mailing label to General Aviation News, Attn: Mail Preference Service, PO Box 39099, Lakewood WA 98496. General Aviation News – a publication of Flyer Media, Inc. – endeavors to accept only reliable advertisements, but shall not be responsible for advertisements nor are the views expressed in those advertisements necessarily those of General Aviation News. The right to decline or discontinue any ad without explanation is reserved. General Aviation News (ISSN 1536 8513) is published semimonthly by Flyer Media, Inc., 5409 100th St. SW #39099, Lakewood, WA 98496-0099. Periodicals Postage Paid at Lakewood, Washington, and additional mailing offices. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to General Aviation News, 5409 100th St. SW #39099, Lakewood, WA 98496-0099. Publications mail agreement number 40648085. Return undeliverable Canadian addresses to P.O. Box 1051, Fort Erie, ON L2A 6C7. Courier delivery: 5409 100th St SW #39099, Lakewood, WA 98496.

General Aviation News • 71st Year, No. 6 • March 21, 2019 • © 2019 Flyer Media, Inc. • All Rights Reserved.

Put GAN in your hand! 1 year $29.95 | 2 years $49.95 Name Address City

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CC# Exp. MasterCard or VISA only Mail form to 5409 100th St. SW #39099, Lakewood, WA 98496-0099 Please allow 4-6 weeks for delivery of first issue. Canada - add $10 additional postage per year. The subscription rate is $85 per year for countries outside of Canada and Mexico. All payments in U.S. dollars.

Photo by Glenn Brasch

The COPPERSTATE Fly-In was a hit at its new location, attracting hundreds of airplanes.

News

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6....... Zenith 750 to be built at SUN ’n FUN 8....... Reaching a different audience 8....... 401 saves for BRS parachutes 9....... Vets, students sought by D-Day Squadron 12..... My Story: The Flying Farmer 16..... Paying homage to the sleek Swift 18..... Top 10 best-selling aircraft of 2018 19..... COPPERSTATE Fly-In a hit at new location 20..... A cross-country adventure begins 22..... The best little airshow in the South 23..... Eagle Scout restores Gnat

Columnists 10..... TOUCH & GO Mr. Wiplinger goes to Washington 11..... POLITICS FOR PILOTS Relationship therapy for pilots 14..... QUESTIONS FROM THE COCKPIT Parlez vous aileron? 15..... VISSERS VOICE Why cetane ratings are important to GA 24..... HUMAN FACTORS Distraction: Tow bars

On Final 26..... ASRS Reports 30..... New Products

NOTICE: The next issue will be mailed April 4, 2019.

Photo by Sparky Barnes Sargent

Just one of the many Swifts on display at the Swift Foundation Museum in Tennessee.

COVER SHOT Fly8MA’s Jon Kotwicki and Stephanie Blanchard on their Cessna 170B in the desert during a cross-country adventure the pair estimate will take two to three years to complete. They plan to visit every state, giving discovery flights, seminars, and inspiring new pilots. Cover photo courtesy Jon Kotwicki.


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General Aviation News —  800.426.8538

March 21, 2019

Leading Image The Champ rests

Glenn Cobb submitted this photo, explaining: “After enjoying a late afternoon flight, my 1946 Aeronca Champ rests on the ramp after a light March rain at Spanish Fork Airport Springville-Woodhouse Field (KSPK) in Utah.”

Photo by Glenn Cobb

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Aviation Supplies & Academics (ASA)............................30 Avionics Shop, Inc..........................25 Cannon Avionics, Inc.......................29 Cee Bailey’s Aircraft Plastics............34 CiES..............................................28 Clay Lacy Aviation...........................29 Desser Tire & Rubber Co.................31 Discovery Trail Farm........................38 Eagle Fuel Cells..............................27 Genuine Aircraft Hardware, Inc.........34 Gibson Aviation................................8 Great Lakes Aero Products Inc.........37 Hooker Harness..............................38 Huffy's Airport Windsocks...................6

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March 21, 2019

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Briefing Online applications are being accepted through June 1 for the Experimental Aircraft Association’s flight training scholarships. EAA.org/Scholarships

After 20 years of upgrading aircraft in the United States with its high performance tuned exhaust systems, Power Flow Systems is ready to tackle Europe, thanks to recent changes in EASA rules. The systems provide an increase of 30 to 130 additional RPM, an additional 100250 fpm in climb, and the ability to go the same airspeed for up 2.2 fewer gallons per hour, company officials note. The company has shipped nearly 5,500 systems to owners of a wide range of aircraft, including the Cessna Cardinal (pictured). PowerFlowSystems.com

Front Range Aviation at Great Falls International Airport (KGTF) in Montana has a new owner and a new name: Great Falls Jet Center. The new owner is building a new 40,000-square-foot hangar. FrontRangeFBO.com

Boeing has acquired ForeFlight, a leading provider of mobile and web-based aviation applications. Boeing.com, ForeFlight.com The FAA has approved drone delivery flights beyond visual line of sight in Reno, Nevada, which was chosen as a drone traffic test site by NASA. Flirtey, a drone delivery service, will deliver Automated External Defibrillators (AEDs) and commercial packages during the test. FAA.gov, Flirtey.com, Reno.gov

Photo by Power Flow Systems

The Sporty’s Foundation made bequests totaling $228,541.15 in 2018 to fulfill its goal to attract young people to the aviation community. The foundation also supports organizations and museums that preserve the history of aviation for future generations, officials noted. SportysFoundation.org

Sling Pilot Academy has launched an Accelerated Airline Pilot Program at Torrance Airport (KTOA) in the Los Angeles area, using a fleet of Sling light-sport aircraft. The academy is also offering a $20,000 scholarship. Applications must be received by Aug. 5. SlingPilotAcademy.com

March 21 marks the 20th anniversary of the completion of a record-setting around-the-world balloon flight by pilots Bertrand Piccard of Switzerland and Brian Jones of Great Britain. The nonstop 20 day flight set seven world records, including four that still stand today. FAI.org Historic films will be the focus of the new Alaska Aviation Film Festival. BeartoothTheatre.net Find expanded versions of these news briefs on www.gan.aero

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General Aviation News —  800.426.8538

March 21, 2019

Zenith 750 to be built at SUN ’n FUN

Cessna Tail Slide Protect Your Tail

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Photos by Zenith Aircraft

Construction on a specially modified Zenith 750 Cruzer will begin at this year’s SUN ’n FUN. ties to have equal access to flight training and aviation career training.” “Lakeland is ideally situated close to the Tampa VA rehabilitation center,” adds ACE and SUN ’n FUN CEO John “Lites” Leenhouts. “We hope the disabled veterans in our area will apply for the Able Flight Scholarship. While anyone with a disability is eligible for the opportunities Able Flight gives, we are keenly aware of the needs of the nearby former and current service members.” Able Flight scholarship students will be housed in the Tom Davis Educational Center on the ACE Campus during training and instructed by volunteer certified flight instructors, according to SUN ’n FUN officials. FlySNF.org, AbleFlight.org, ZenithAir.net

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Once complete, the kit plane will be used to train disabled pilots.

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LAKELAND, Florida — The Aerospace Center for Excellence (ACE), the educational component of the SUN ’n FUN Fly-In, is partnering with Able Flight, which provides scholarships to disabled people so they can learn to fly. As part of the new partnership, construction of a Zenith 750 will begin at this year’s fly-in, with students from the Central Florida Aerospace Academy and Lakeland Aero Club finishing the airplane after the show. Once complete, the homebuilt will be used for flight training for Able Flight scholarship winners. “Our mission at ACE is to engage, educate, and accelerate the next generation of aerospace professionals,” said Ed Young, executive director. “Able Flight’s success in engaging and educating individuals with disabilities in flight training is unparalleled. We have the opportunity to truly change lives by combining our core competencies.” The partnership is also being supported by Zenith Aircraft Co. Recently, an Able Flight scholarship winner built a specially designed Zenith 750 with the support of his community. “The plan is to build the airplane in the Buehler Restoration Center on the ACE campus during the 2019 SUN ’n FUN Fly-In and with the help of the Lakeland Aero Club, the youth flying club on the ACE campus, after the fly-in,” Young said. “We are planning to name the aircraft the ‘Spirit of Lakeland.’” “Our new training partnership with ACE provides an outstanding opportunity to build upon our successful relationships with Purdue University and The Ohio State University,” said Charles Stites, executive director of Able Flight. “Now with three training locations, and the ability to train almost year round in Florida, Able Flight pilots will benefit from the expertise of the dedicated aviation professionals at the Aerospace Center for Excellence who share our mission of creating a pathway for people with physical disabili-

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March 21, 2019

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Univair Offers a Huge Selection of Windows and Windshields!

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FREE SHIPPING on orders over $300. FREE FREIGHT on orders over $3,000. Restrictions apply – see our website for details.

Only Plexiglas® acrylic plastic gives you the clarity, strength and light weight required for classic aircraft. Many of the following windows and windshields are stocked tinted. Prices shown below are for the clear color option. Visit our website for prices on green and gray tints. Aeronca Champion 7AC, 7BCM, 7DC, 7CCM, 7EC and 7FC

Cessna 172

Windshield ............................................ 7-468....$746.21 Front Door Window, Right ..................... 7-537......$63.11 Rear Window, Left or Right.................... 7-463......$74.25

Aeronca Chief 11AC, 11ACS, 11BC and 11CC Windshield ............................................ 7-521....$320.76 Front Sliding Window (Glass Only) ........ 4-715......$49.75 Aft Sliding Window (Glass Only) ............ 4-714......$49.75 Rear Window (Glass Only) ..................... 4-594......$54.95

Alon A2 and A2A Windshield Half, Left .......................A13260-7....$193.05 Right ...........................................A13260-8....$193.05 Canopy Window ..............................A13270-6....$472.97 Rear Window, Left .........................A13250-53....$224.98 Right .........................................A13250-54....$224.98

Cessna 120, 140 and 140A Windshield SN 8001 thru 8799 .................... 0411172-3....$349.72 SN 8800 and up ......................... 0411172-5....$363.83 140A, 1949-1950 .................. 0413419-203....$341.55 Door Window, Left or Right ...............0411182......$69.05 Rear Window, Left or Right................0412145......$54.95 Skylight .............................................0411144......$56.43

Cessna 150 Windshield, SN 17001 thru 67198 and 69309 thru 73658S......... 0413419-203....$341.55

Cessna 170, 1948-1949, SN 18003 thru 18728 Windshield .................................... 0510000-6....$345.26 Door Window, Left or Right ....... 0511106-104......$83.90 Rear Window, Left or Right.......... 0512000-54......$63.86

Windshield SN 28000 thru 47747 ................ 0510000-6....$345.26 SN 47748 thru 49544 .............. 0513300-16....$482.63 SN 49545 thru 50572 .............. 0513230-10....$501.19 SN 50573 and up ..................... 0513230-12....$481.88

Cessna R172 Hawk XP and FR172 Hawk XPII Windshield .................................. 0513230-20....$650.43

Cessna 175 Windshield SN 55001 thru 55702 ................ 0513300-8....$533.12 SN 57003 thru 57119 .............. 0513300-16....$482.63

Stinson 108, 108-1, 108-2 and 108-3 Windshield Half, Left ..............108-3002208-6....$222.01 Right ..................................108-3002208-7....$222.01 Rear Window, Left or Right SN 1 thru 3499 ...................... 108-3001212......$40.10 Rear Window, Left or Right SN 3500 and up ..................... 108-3002212......$40.10 Left Door – Forward Window Assembly SN 1 thru 1989 .................108-3001211-54....$176.18 SN 1990 thru 3499 ...........108-3002211-26....$169.51 SN 3500 and up ................108-3002211-90....$295.28 Left Door – Rear Window Assembly SN 1 thru 1989 .................108-3001211-56....$146.30 SN 1990 and up ................108-3002211-28....$147.42 Right Door – Forward Window Assembly SN 1990 thru 3499 ...........108-3002211-27....$169.51 SN 3500 and up ................108-3002211-91....$303.41 Right Door – Rear Window Assembly SN 1 thru 1989 .................108-3001211-57....$120.98 SN 1990 and up ................108-3002211-29....$147.42

Stinson L-5

Windshield .................................... 0510001-6....$390.56 Door Window, Left or Right ....... 0511106-104......$83.90 Rear Window, Left or Right.......... 0512000-54......$63.86

Windshield Half, Left ....................76-31073-0....$171.52 Right ........................................76-31073-1....$164.84 Windshield – One Piece ...............76-31073-2....$353.43 Rear Window, Left ........................76-31126-0....$164.09 Right ........................................76-31126-1....$164.09

Cessna 170B, 1952-1955, SN 26996 and up

Citabria 7ECA, 7GCCAA, 7GCBC and 8GCBC

Cessna 170A, 1950-1951, SN 18729 thru 26995

Windshield .................................... 0510001-6....$390.56 Door Window, Left or Right ....... 0511106-104......$83.90 Rear Window, Left or Right SN 20267 thru 26504 .............. 0512000-54......$63.86 Rear Window, Left or Right SN 26505 and up ....................... 0591200-3......$63.86

Windshield .......................................... 7-1264....$349.72 Skylight ............................................... 7-1286....$166.32 Front Swinging Window, Left .............. 4-1487....$148.50 Front Door Window, Right ................... 4-1446....$149.99 Rear Window, Left ..........................7-1256-1L....$158.90 Right ..........................................7-1256-1R....$158.90

Decathlon 8KCAB

Windshield .......................................... 7-1418....$390.56 Skylight ............................................... 7-1286....$166.32 Front Window, Left .............................. 4-1487....$148.50 Right ............................................... 4-1446....$149.99 Rear Window, Left ..........................7-1256-1L....$158.90 Right ..........................................7-1256-1R....$158.90

Windshield, Flat Type (no holes).... 415-31042....$180.82 Windshield, Bubble Type .....................F31232....$409.86 Sliding Window (Glass Only – Lexan)* ..F53041......$73.45 Sunshade (Aluminum)* ..............415-53058A....$562.92 Ercoupe Rear Window, Left or Right Glass only .................................. 415-31037......$59.40 Forney Rear Window, Left or Right ......F31248......$60.89 *Sunshades and sliding glass in green or smoke tints are temporarily unavailable.

Mooney M-10 Cadet

Windshield Half, Left .......................A13260-7....$193.05 Right ...........................................A13260-8....$193.05 Canopy Window ..............................A13270-6....$472.97 Rear Window, Left ....................... 310265-019......$61.63 Right ....................................... 310265-020......$61.63

AIRCRAFT CORPORATION

Piper J-5 Windshield (Early Style) ................ 52412-000....$317.79

Piper J-5C Piper PA-11 Windshield .................................... 10673-000....$250.97 Skylight ......................................... 10056-000......$66.83 Front Triangle Window, Left........... 10041-000......$46.04 Sliding Window – Assembly .......U50761-000....$190.79 Glass Only ...............................U50761-002......$54.92 Rear Window, Left ......................... 10046-000......$63.86 Right ......................................... 10047-000......$52.72 Door Window ................................ 10051-000......$83.90

Piper PA-12 Windshield Early Round Top Type................. 10212-000....$297.00 Late Square Top Type ................. 10680-000....$285.12

Piper PA-14 Windshield .................................... 11174-000....$243.54

Luscombe 8A and 8E

Windshield ...................................... 081105-2....$282.89 Door Window, Opening Type ......... 481107-12......$49.75 Stationary Type ............................. 48125-2......$49.75 Rear Window, Left or Right....................19139......$38.61 Skylight ............................................. 08011-2......$43.07

Piper PA-20 and PA-22 (Pacer, Tri-Pacer and Colt)

Windshield, Flat Type .................... 13432-000....$358.63 Windshield, Bubble Type ............... 13432-002....$344.52

Piper PA-25 Pawnee

Windshield, SN 1 thru 655............. 61312-000....$190.08 SN 656 and up ........................... 61802-003....$190.08

Piper J-3

Windshield .................................... 10009-000....$208.64 Skylight ......................................... 10056-000......$66.83 Left Front Triangle Window ........... 10041-000......$46.04 Sliding Window Assembly ...........U50761-000....$190.79 Sliding Window (Glass Only) .......U50761-002......$54.92 Rear Window, Left ......................... 10046-000......$63.86 Right ......................................... 10047-000......$52.72 Door Window ................................ 10051-000......$83.90

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Windshield .................................... 00079-020....$282.15

Windshield (Late Style) ................. 10212-000....$297.00

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Piper J-4

Piper PA-15, PA-16 and PA-17 Windshield .................................... 11631-000....$344.52

Piper PA-18 Windshield, 95hp .......................... 12248-000....$281.41 105-150hp ................................ 12430-000....$293.29 Skylight, SN 1215 thru 3013.......... 12249-000....$144.79 SN 3014 and up ......................... 13433-000....$144.79 Door Window ................................ 12279-000......$76.48 Rear Window, Left or Right............ 10545-000......$43.07 Pilot Window, Left ......................... 12253-000......$40.10 Front Sliding Window Complete Assembly. ................U12254-000....$368.87 Glass Only ...............................U12254-002......$33.74 Rear Sliding Window Complete Assembly.................U12255-000....$330.93 Glass Only ...............................U12255-002......$43.17 L21 Greenhouse Window .............. 12250-003....$161.87

Taylorcraft BC12D Windshield ..............................................1551....$332.64

Taylorcraft B 1940-1941, Pre-War BC65 Windshield ..........................................B-A700....$324.47

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ALL MERCHANDISE IS SOLD F.O.B., AURORA, CO • PRICE AND AVAILABILITY SUBJECT TO CHANGE WITHOUT NOTICE • 02-06-19


8

General Aviation News —  800.426.8538

March 21, 2019

Reaching a different audience ICON Aircraft’s A5 light-sport aircraft (LSA) is now on display at a luxury car dealership in North Miami Beach, Florida. ICON partnered with Prestige Imports to include the LSA in the Prestige Imports 2.0 showroom as part of the Prestige Aviation division. “Together, ICON Aircraft and Prestige Imports will introduce adventure flying and personal aviation to customers who until now had likely never considered becoming pilots,” company officials said. The plane will be displayed in the dealership showroom next to high-end exotic vehicles, such as Lamborghinis. “Our customers crave ways to enjoy life and unlock what was believed to be unattainable adventures,” said Brett Da-

vid, CEO of Prestige Imports. “This partnership with Prestige Imports reinforces our mission to redefine what it means to be a pilot and expand the bounds of personal aviation,” said Mike Farley, VP of Sales and Marketing for ICON Aircraft. “Much like the exotic cars in the showroom, the ICON A5 is unreal. Flying with the windows out, wind in your hair, is a visceral experience. The ICON A5 enables you to explore the planet in ways you’ve only dreamed about.” Through the end of April, ICON is offering a special Mentor Pilot Program that includes up to $15,000 of credit toward an ICON flight instructor in the first year of ownership with the purchase of an A5. IconAircraft.com

Photo by ICON Aircraft

The ICON A5.

401 saves for BRS chutes Free Certs

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BRS Aerospace has documented the 400th and 401st lives saved as a result of deploying the company’s whole aircraft parachute rescue system. The milestone 400th and 401st lives were saved March 5, 2019, when the pilot of a Cirrus aircraft with the engine out deployed the whole aircraft rescue system over water more than 20 miles from Grand Turk Island in the Turks and Caicos. Neither the pilot or passenger were injured. They were picked up by a cruise ship. The BRS parachute system is deployed in life-threatening situations by a rocket to slow the aircraft in the airstream and

then lower it and its occupants to the ground in a measured descent, company officials explain. The parachute and solid propellant ballistic rocket assembly are enclosed in a canister mounted inside the fuselage that is activated manually or automatically. With more than 30,000 systems installed during the past 35 years on aircraft ranging from experimental aircraft, lightsport aircraft, certified aircraft, and military trainers, approximately one of every 120 systems has been activated as a last resort for pilot and passenger safety in lethal situations, company officials report. BRSAerospace.com

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March 21, 2019

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Vets, students sought by D-Day Squadron When the D-Day Squadron arrives in Normandy to commemorate the 75th anniversary of D-Day, there will be some special guests included. Organizers are looking for one veteran and one student from each state in America to be on the ground to experience the Daks Over Normandy fly-over in France. “In the pivotal spot that marked the beginning of the end of the war, past and future generations will stand side by side to observe the significance of this historic event,” organizers said. “These ‘100 in Normandy’ will be the special guests of the D-Day Squadron, made possible by the generous support of donors of the DDay Squadron.” The volunteers of the D-Day Squadron will journey across the ocean with a fleet of American C-47s, each vintage aircraft restored to flying condition. The squadron will join up with C-47s from Europe and Australia for Daks Over Normandy, a fly-over of more than 30 aircraft, to drop 250 paratroopers over the shores of Normandy on June 6, 2019, commemorating the 75th anniversary of D-Day. The entire fleet of warbird aircraft will be on static display at public events in both the United Kingdom and France during the commemorations. Fundraising for the effort continues, according to D-Day Squadron officials. The D-Day Squadron is part of the Tunison Foundation, a non-profit charitable organization. The crew of the “Placid Lassie,” the foundation’s C-47 that flew in the original Normandy invasion, is spearheading the D-Day Squadron efforts. DDaySquadron.org

Boeing endows $3 million to Embry-Riddle DAYTONA BEACH, Florida — Boeing plans to establish a $3 million permanent endowment for scholarships at Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University to assist students interested in pursuing a pilot’s license and certificates in aviation maintenance. The scholarships will seek to increase the number of under represented populations in the pilot workforce, particularly women and people of color, as well as veterans, university officials said. Scholarships may be available as early as this fall, according to university officials. According to Boeing’s 2018 Pilot & Technician Outlook, the industry will need 790,000 new civil aviation pilots and 754,000 new maintenance technicians to fly and maintain the world fleet over the next 20 years. Boeing.com, ERAU.edu

Photo by John Willhoff

The C-47 Placid Lassie.

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General Aviation News —  800.426.8538

March 21, 2019

Mr. Wiplinger goes to Washington Ben Sclair Touch & Go

The grunt work of government is not terribly exciting. But for those of you who have met Chuck Wiplinger, president of Wipaire, Inc., I bet you’ll join me in wishing he’d make his way to Washington D.C. more often to make our case for funding. Chuck recently joined Recreational Aviation Foundation (RAF) Chairman John McKenna to testify before the House Subcommittee on Interior Appropriations. At the conclusion of his five-minute testimony before the committee Chuck Ben Sclair is Publisher. He can be reached at ben@generalaviationnews.com.

asked the subcommittee to continue allocating $750,000 to the U.S. Forest Service for maintenance of backcountry airstrips under the USFS purview. Chuck also asked for an additional $750,000 allocation in the Bureau of Land Management budget for maintenance of airstrips under their watch. In both cases, the RAF will continue to partner with the controlling agency to make certain those precious budget dollars are spent wisely. In total, that $1.5 million in budgetary allocation represents about $2.50 for every pilot in the United States. With a bit of levity, Chuck said he could think of only two pilots who would com-

LETTERS TO THE EDITOR MORE ON MILLENNIALS

I am writing this email in response to Ben Visser’s column in the Feb. 21 issue, “Why teaching Millennials to fly is so tough.” There are several things wrong with this article: First off I am confused as to where you get the authority to speak on teaching people how to fly. Based on your bio you have no educational experience including and especially in the field of flight instruction. Second, you appear to be confused as to what a Millennial is. Millennials, or Generation Y, were born starting in the early80s to mid-90s by most metrics. These are people who spent early childhood years most definitely without a cell phone and likely without a computer. Perhaps you meant the current group primarily training to be pilots, Gen Z, but don’t worry, Boomers are confused easily. I will grant you that a graduate of a mechanics program not knowing what a carburetor is a little surprising, but it is important to remember that the last car sold in America with one was in 1994 and they were being phased out as early as the early 1980s. Cars also have much less staying power than airplanes do with the average age being around 10 years old so perhaps it shouldn’t be too important for new mechanics to know. I am very confused as to where you get the idea that whatever subject group you

are referring to refuses to get their hands dirty and refer to fuel as “yucky” as this has not been any experience I have had and seems more typical of a particular type of person, not an entire generation. Anyone confused by what can be found during a walk-around is either completely new to aviation or else had a bad teacher, and if it is the former you can’t expect anyone new to the airplane, whether they be 80 or 18, to know what they are looking for. This is why we teach, why we learn, and nothing about a newbie makes things “tough.” On the topic of an app, I think that would be a great idea, much in the same way that we use checklists to keep track of things. On the topic of clothing I don’t think anyone has worn their pants around their legs since the late 2000s but you do have a point about a lot of them not dressing like every day is an interview. This is not exclusive to Millennials, but also Gen Z; anyone who still wears their pants around their ankles aren’t the kind of people getting a pilots license. You then go on to list a host of “confusions” that, once again, would confuse someone completely unfamiliar with airplanes regardless of age. The only time you mention why Millennials in particular would struggle with a topic is with regards to watches and steam gauges, but I have never seen any truth to the claim that they struggle reading a regular clock face.

Photo from YouTube video

Chuck Wiplinger testifies before the committee. plain about their tax dollars being spent in such a way. Chuck promised to cover one and was certain John would happily cover the other. Few of us truly know how the federal budgetary sausage is made. A five-minute

video clip on YouTube sheds a bit of light on the process. Thank you to both Chuck and John for your ongoing efforts. Wipaire.com, TheRAF.org

Have something to say?

Send comments to comments@generalaviationnews.com or fax 253-471-9888. Include your full name, address and telephone number (for verification purposed only). Please limit comments to 250 words or less.

What kid grows up without understanding what “roger” on the radio means? Pilot/controller phraseology is in a sense a foreign language, but once again no one already familiar with it would immediately understand everything being said, even if they were 40, 50, or 60 years old, and based on listening to the radio I’m confident that most pilots have no idea what proper phraseology is anyway. Millennial/Gen Z obsession with selfies aside, you clearly underestimate their drive to get the perfect one and that the only reason selfie sticks exist is for old people who still want to be hip without breaking something. The only student I have had try to text while flying was older than I am, and no one has ever tried to call someone while flying with me; regardless the NTSB does not seem to believe there is a generational problem with distracted flying but instead something everyone needs to come together to address. We could also look at studies for driving and conclude that the parents of Gen Y/Z (X and Boomers) and conclude that, like driving, the older folks are more likely to be distracted while flying. These “points” all seem to be less about why teaching millennials is hard and more just trying to get cheap laughs based on cliche behavior. Your final lines about high school classes is completely unrelated to teaching people to fly and seems more like another

soapbox topic for you to decry. Overall this article has very little substance and seems to have very little relevance to the title and appears to be much more of a satirical comedy piece. Your sweeping generalizations do not hold up under any kind of scrutiny. If your intention was comedy, then excellent job, but perhaps avoid using the tired trope of old person complaining about young person. If this was meant to be taken seriously then I suggest a little humility, introspection, and maybe an intro to persuasive writing course. I’m sure a millennial professor wouldn’t have a tough time teaching you how to use a computer. KYLE HAINES, Millennial CFI via email This is the first time I have ever written a complaint to a newsroom. I am saddened that you would publish a bash on millennials, a cheap and tired grab for clicks in 2019. I say this as a reporter in a television newsroom that leans heavily on social media engagement and page views. I also say it as a flight instructor. All of my students have been millennials. Remember, they’re 30, not 15. That’s Gen Z. Worse than the implied factual error, I am disappointed that General Aviation News LETTERS | See Page 11


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Relationship therapy for pilots Jamie Beckett Politics for Pilots

Although many readers will find this difficult to believe, I find myself to be in a committed relationship with a significant number of relative strangers. I depend on these folks to keep me on the straight and narrow, to advise me from time to time, and to be there 24/7 just in case I feel the need to talk. Yet, we’re not all that close. Not really. In fact, I’ve never even met most of them. It’s complicated. You see, I’m having a long-term relationship with ATC. As sad as I am to say it, things aren’t quite as rosy as they might be. And at least part of the fault lies with me. And you. It’s a pilot thing. When is the last time you were at a gettogether where you overheard someone say, “Oh, you’re an air traffic controller? That’s so cool. Do you have any stories about procedures or proper phraseology?” Among the general public, pilots are generally considered to be smart, capable, maybe even cool. Controllers are essentially invisible. Even in the pilot community controllers are often thought of as little more than disembodied voices that belong to individuals who don’t really exist out in public. We just assume they live in an ATC compound somewhere. Kind of like a super-secluded gated community with some of the most rigid rules any home owners association ever dreamed up. Yet pilots and controllers are inextricably linked by the responsibilities of our chosen activities. It seems strange that we interact so rarely in our day-to-day lives, Jamie Beckett is the AOPA Ambassador in Florida. A dedicated aviation advocate, you can reach him at: Jamie@GeneralAviationNews.com

LETTERS | From Page 10 — once a bastion for important aviation content — would publish such garbage filler. Aviation needs to welcome new generations, not ostracize them. Please do better. PETE MUNTEAN via email You kids nowadays have no respect for your elders and don’t know how good your generation has it. You would not know hard work if came up and smacked you in the ass. Things are just so easy for

when at least one of us is literally putting our personal safety in the hands of the other so often. If we were part of a marriage it would be a dysfunctional one at best. Don’t believe me? Most pilots aren’t controllers. Most controllers aren’t pilots. We know the same words, but speak different languages. Pilots know almost nothing about the pressures and distractions controllers face on a regular basis, and for the most part we just don’t care. That lack of compassion or interest is something we engage in at our own peril, of course. On the flip side, many controllers have very little frame-of-reference to what life in the cockpit is like. That’s especially true when things start to go from bad to worse. Commonly used pilot phrases like “I’m partial-panel,” “I’ve got them on the fish-finder,” and the ever-annoying, “no joy,” may mean absolutely nothing to a controller. Adding to the aggravation is that controllers often work in a darkened room populated by people concentrating intently on moving targets on screens while monitoring as many as 14 discrete radio frequencies simultaneously. Perhaps it’s time for some relationship therapy. It’s high time we make an effort to put pilots and controllers on the same page, or at least get them to acknowledge that our less than ideal communication skills aren’t doing either group any favors when it comes to improving our understanding of each other. I recently had the opportunity to hear five controllers address an impressively large gathering of Cirrus pilots. Their presentation was part of an effort to mend the sizeable holes in this aeronautical fence. And I learned something from their your generation, you will be lucky if your generation accomplishes anything. So quit your complaining, set your goals, and achieve them. Sound familiar? It was told to me by my Mom when I was 18 years old in 1970. Things never change from one generation to another. What will you be saying to the next generation when you are the older ones? CHARLIE ROYALTON via GeneralAviationNews.com A sad commentary on our politically correct society. Whatever you say or do

comments. Quite a few somethings, as a matter of fact. The question was posed to them: “What do controllers hate to hear on the radio?” Surprisingly to a great many pilots, they’re annoyed by words and phrases you and I hear on frequency all the time. I know I’ve blown it on these specifically frustrating radio no-nos a time or two. If you’re in a propeller driven single engine airplane flying out of an American airport to another American airport, you don’t have to include the “K” in the airport identifier when you ask for VFR Flight Following. The controllers are pretty bright folks. If they ask for your destination and you say, “Oscar Uniform November,” they can be pretty sure you mean the one in Norman, Oklahoma. The “K” prefix is unnecessary. Similarly, when you call up for pretty much anything, you don’t need to include the “N” in your aircraft’s call sign. “Aeronca 12345,” is fine. They’ll assume the “N” since you’re in the US. Of course, if you’re flying a Canadian or Mexican registered aircraft, including the “Charlie” or the “X-ray, Bravo,” is perfectly appropriate. Don’t say “With you,” when calling in to a new facility while on VFR flight following. Just give your call sign and altitude. They’ve already gotten the handoff from the previous ATC facility. They know you’re coming their way. Keep it short. And speaking of call signs, lots of pilots seem to be unsure when they can abbreviate their call sign from the full form to just the last three characters. A good rule of thumb is that you can abbreviate your call sign after the controller does it first. You never know, the controller may be working with someone with a substantially similar call sign — even if you haven’t heard them. So, use your full call sign until they use the shortened version. From then on, you’re good to go with the last three characters. But never less than three. They hate that. They really do. And for IFR practice flights, just request one approach at a time. The controller is busy, often working traffic on will offend someone. Our ability to take a joke and laugh at ourselves has become a lost art. DALE WEIR via GeneralAviationNews.com I think there are truths from both sides of this. Why don’t we just acknowledge and respect these generational distinctions and press on as a group in support of aviation? After all, we’re on the same team. We have enough enemies of aviation without arguing from within. 52 years in aviation this year, liking both steam and the magenta line. There

The FAA Air Traffic Control Tower at Bedford-Hanscom Field in Massachusetts. frequencies you can’t hear. Giving them your plan for the full flight is frustrating for them, and useless to you. So just request one approach at a time. After you go missed you can request the next. I’m glad I got to sit in on a presentation that really taught me something. Now, I think it’s time for me to go find a controller and make a new friend. They’ve got something to teach me, and I’m pretty sure I’ve got some insight they might find worthwhile, too. And so do you. is the doofus contingent in aviation regardless of age or experience. Cooperate, graduate, and adapt. To quote that eminent philosopher, Rodney King, “Why can’t we all just get along?” MANNY PUERTA via GeneralAviationNews.com What a diverse set of opinions — the common thread of which is the next generation will master the changes in technology and the freedom of flight will prevail. BOB STEENSON via GeneralAviationNews.com


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General Aviation News —  800.426.8538

March 21, 2019

My Story: The Flying Farmer Having just turned 92, Glenn Kinneberg of Spring Grove, Minnesota, has more than 70 years of flying in his logbook. He shared his aviation story with us in a feature we call “My Story.” “I became interested in flying as a child when my uncle gave my older brother Donald and me books on aviation as a Christmas gift. We had our first flight lesson in 1947 in Decorah, Iowa. For several weeks the instructor would fly to our farm and give us each a lesson. Then a group of local pilots, including us, formed a flying club in Spring Grove, Minnesota. I soloed in the club’s J-3, then the club sold it and bought a PA-11. That’s the airplane I got my private pilot certificate in February 1948. Over the years, I become the sole owner of the PA-11 and still own it today. Later Donald and another pilot and I purchased a Cessna 140 with 400 hours. When I was stationed at the Air Base in Rapid City, South Dakota, I would fly the 140 to the base from the family farm. After the service I attended the University of Minnesota and met my wife, Sally. After taking over operation of the home farm, we sold the 140. Then we purchased a Piper Cherokee 180 with 400 hours. As we had joined the Flying Farmers in 1948, we used the 180 to go to meetings. When my wife, Sally, became the Flying Farmers’ International Queen in 1974-75 we flew all over the U.S. and Canada for the chapter conventions. Our son, Russell, also got his training in the Cherokee and flew to San Diego for the Flying Farmers convention and was awarded the youngest pilot to fly in. He now has his own Cessna 180. Back on the farm, I used the Cherokee for getting machinery parts and flew to the Dakotas and northern Minnesota to

Long-time pilots Russell (in front) and Glenn Kinneberg. buy feeder cattle for the feed lot. Now the Cherokee is sold and I am back flying the PA-11 as I am the sole owner. The Cub has been recovered three times (still the same blue and yellow color). The last time it was recovered was in 1978, at the same time the Continental 85 engine was overhauled. The Cub has a metal prop, a handheld radio, and an intercom. It has always been hangared. Every winter for the first 65 years skis were installed. The longest trip the Cub has made was to Dayton, Ohio, for an International Flying Farmers convention. The best thing about the PA-11 over the J-3 is flying from the front seat. The Cherokee was great for going some place, but the Cub was more fun to fly. I wrote a book, “Flaps Up,” of the history of flying in the area. It was published four times and all the books sold out. In 2009 I received the Wright Brothers

Glenn Kinneberg and his Cub right after Oshkosh 2012. “Master Pilot” award. In April, I will be inducted into the Minnesota Aviation Hall of Fame. So many memories, I can’t remember them all!”

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Kinneberg’s PA-11 flying high.


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March 21, 2019

Parlez vous aileron? William E Dubois Questions from the Cockpit

James, a student pilot from Wisconsin, writes: “I know that, like many of the names of airplane parts, aileron is French, but what does it mean? And why are there so many French words in aviation, anyway? Wasn’t the airplane invented in the USA?” First to ailerons. Aileron translates to little wing or small wing. For those of you who are detail-oriented, aile is French for wing, and the suffix on is a common masculine diminutive in the French language. In addition to being an airplane part, the word aileron is also apparently used in French to describe the flight control feathers of birds. As to why we use a French word for our wing’s control surfaces, many people will tell you it’s because the French invented them, but that’s not true. Sorry. Instead, it was an Englishman, Matthew Piers Watt Boulton. In 1864. Of course, Boulton’s control surfaces were strictly theoretical. He introduced the concept in a scientific paper, and later patented them. He also called them “vanes,” not ailerons. But it was the French who first deployed them in real world use in 1871, on an unmanned glider, and later were the first to use them on a powered aircraft — so I guess it’s only fair that they should get to name them. As to why we have so much French William E. Dubois is a commercial pilot, ground instructor, and doesn’t actually speak French — other than the aviation words.

words in aviation, many historians note that at the birth of manned flight, France was the global center of science, technology, and culture; and the French language was one of the premier languages of science. Or it might simply be the fact that, starting with the Montgolfier brothers, the French went absolutely nuts over anything that flew, and stayed aviation batty at least up until World War I, dominating the scene like no one else. Meanwhile, this same widespread passion for the air didn’t seem to exist over here in America, where most people didn’t take airplanes seriously. Well, other than a couple of reclusive bicycle mechanics from Dayton, Ohio. So while it’s true that the Wrights were first out of the gate, the French weren’t far behind on their own. And while the French widely shared their discoveries in the spirit of their culture at the time, the Wrights — who had perfected the airplane to a much higher degree — were secretive, highly focused in that most American of ways, on patents and profits. Meanwhile, France stayed on the cutting edge throughout the formative years of the airplane. All things airplane featured prominently in both the popular and the scientific press. France was the first country to issue pilot’s licenses for airplanes. It held the first major international air show in 1908. It was attended by a whopping 100,000 people. The show, called the Paris Air Show, is still alive and well, 111 years later. France was also host to the world’s first

Photos courtesy Wikimedia

A 1912 Farman HF.20 biplane with single acting ailerons hinged from the rear spar. The ailerons hang down when at rest and are pushed up into position when flying by the force of the air, being pulled down by cable to provide control. international air race, giving birth to a sport that would grow to do more to advance aviation technology than anything other than war. The first race was in Reims. Half a million people came to watch, and an American — Glenn Curtiss — won first place. The Wrights didn’t attend. Maybe if they had engaged with the rest of the aviation world at the outset, we’d have more English words in our aviation vocabulary, but better for us that they didn’t. French words sound sexier and lit-

eral descriptions in English can be clunky. Can you imagine your instructor teaching slips? “Right little wing and left floor pedal! More little wing, more little wing!” Speaking of the French, next time on Questions from the Cockpit we’ll look at another aerial tradition with French roots, and we’re talking about more than a French kiss here… Do you have a question you’d like to ask William? Email it to william@ generalaviationnews.com.


March 21, 2019

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Why cetane ratings are important to GA Ben Visser Visser’s Voice

In my January column, “All 100 octane fuels are not equal,” I explained some of the problems with assuming that an octane rating is an absolute number. One of the comments from that column concerned cetane rating for compression ignition — diesel cycle — engines. In general, octane ratings and cetane ratings are more or less opposite. In other words, the higher the octane rating the lower the cetane rating and vice versa. In octane rating we are measuring a fuel’s ability to limit auto-ignition, while the cetane rating is a measurement of a fuel’s quickness or ease to auto-ignite. The cetane engine test is run in a single cylinder diesel test engine. The cetane rating engine has a variable volume precombustion chamber to raise or lower the compression ratio. The main measurement in the test is the crank angle degrees between the activation of the injector and Ben Visser is an aviation fuels and lubricants expert who spent 33 years with Shell Oil. He has been a private pilot since 1985. You can contact him at Visser@GeneralAviationNews.com.

actual pressure rise from combustion. The bottom line is that a higher cetane rating fuel advances the ignition timing a few degrees. So why is that important? The rating system was developed because of diesel-powered submarines. It was found that higher cetane rating fuels ran quieter in subs. The quieter engines were easier on the men in the sub and it reduced the detectability of the sub. So what difference does it mean in today’s world? Well, not that much. In the United States, most diesel fuel has a minimum cetane rating of 40. That is not a hard spec, it is just the norm. Therefore, most of the engines on the market have injection timing optimized for about 40 cetane, so a higher rating does not make that much difference in performance. So what is the most critical parameter for fuel in aircraft diesel engines? The three primary fuels available are Jet A, #2 diesel, and kerosene/#1 diesel fuel. These fuels are all straight run distillates and are chemically similar. They come off the distillation column and are then “cleaned” up with hydro treating to

reduce sulfur content and may go through other processes. Jet A has more specifications on it like the Jet Fuel Thermal Oxidation Test (JFTOT), so please do not think you can run diesel fuel in a jet aircraft. I know that most diesel cycle aircraft engines are qualified only on Jet A, but I also know there are people out there who will run diesel fuel based on availability. What are the most important criteria for fuel if it is not cetane? The main concern is low temperature flow characteristics. There are two important low temperature characteristics for these fuels, the pour point and the cloud point. These are usually at different temperatures. When a distillate is cooled down, the first thing that happens is that the long chain wax molecules solidify. This is the cloud point. If you continue to cool the fuel, the wax molecules will coagulate to form a solid and block flow. This is the pour point. Both temperatures are important because once you get to the cloud point, the engine can still run, except for the fuel filter, which will plug if the filter is not heated. Jet A has a pour point of -40°F, but the cloud point can be higher. #1 diesel and

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kerosene usually have a pour point of -20°F, more or less, depending on location. The pour point of #2 diesel depends on where you buy it, with higher values in the summer and in southern climates. The cloud point of these fuels is anyone’s guess. A final point is that over-the-counter diesel fuel additives may lower the pour point of a fuel, but usually have little or no effect on the cloud point. Another concern is that with biodiesel the wax acts very different. With conventional fuels if a filter plugs with wax, once it gets to a warmer temperature, the wax goes back into suspension. With bio­ diesels, the wax usually does not go back into solution. You would need to replace the filter to get the engine running. Why is all of this important to aviation? First, it is important where you mount the filter in a diesel cycle engine. It needs to be in a heated area. Second, even if you use Jet A, which has no cloud point spec, you could clog a filter at altitude without filter heat. Third, if a pilot uses regular diesel fuel or even #1, he can get into problems at altitude. And, finally, the use of biodiesel could cause a problem since a plugged filter will choke off the engine quickly.

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March 21, 2019

Photo by Sparky Barnes Sargent

Close up view of a Swift formation flight during Swift Nationals 2001. Foreground: Kerby Warden’s polished 1946 GC-1B from Texas; Middle: Steve Whittenberger’s 1947 GC-1B from Florida; Right: Bill Shepard’s 1946 GC-1B from Washington.

Paying homage to the sleek Swift By SPARKY BARNES SARGENT Ahhh, the sleek and racy Swift! Popular today in all of its various airframe and powerplant configurations and modifications, it has acquired a reputation for demanding full respect from its pilot. If you’ve ever seen a Swift — or better yet, been aloft in one — you’ve more than likely been enamored with it. If you’re intrigued by the Swift’s persona, be sure to stop by the Swift Museum Foundation’s top-notch and recentlycompleted museum at McMinn County Airport (KMMI) in Athens, Tennessee. The Swift Museum has come a long way from its humble beginnings in an old, small hangar on the airport. The new facility is thoughtfully laid out, highlighting the evolution of the Swift from the first prototype to stock models and highlymodified 1946 to 1951 models. Remarkably, the first and last production Swifts are in the museum. A T-35 Buckaroo USAF trainer also is on display. It is an armed version used and donated by the Saudi Arabian Air Force. The Johnson Rocket is also on display, as there is an apparent and intriguing con-

nection between it and the Globe GC-1 prototype. These aircraft are handsomely exhibited in all their stunning, polished-aluminum or painted glory. Perhaps best of all, visitors can walk right up to these aircraft and behold them up close and personally. The Swift was originally manufactured by the Globe Aircraft Company and then the Texas Engineering & Manufacturing Company (TEMCO), with more than 1,500 built. Two displays at the first phase of the museum neatly represent this history. One is a display case featuring 150 antique “Groesbeck Reds” bricks salvaged from the original Globe Aircraft factory at Fort Worth. The bricks serve a unique fundraising role — donors can have a personalized plaque affixed to these bricks. The other historical element is the original flagpole and base from Globe Aircraft. This artifact was originally presented to John Kennedy, owner of Globe Aircraft Company, in 1942 by his employees. Phase one of the new facility was completed in 2013. This 40’ x 80’ building houses the main office and the extensive Swift Parts Department. The phase two

Jim “Frog” Jones, honorary president of the Swift Museum Foundation, with NC3824K, his award-winning 1948 Temco GC-1B. 80’ x 80’ main museum hangar was finished in time for Swift Nationals 2016. The third and final phase was completed in time for Swift Nationals 2018, thanks to a significant financial contribution from Ken Coughlin (Swift member #310) of Oklahoma. This 40’ x 80’ building is

primarily used for storage of tooling and large salvage parts, with space available for maintenance of museum aircraft. Funding for the museum came from many donations. Additionally, a number of donated Swifts were sold, and a fundraising raffle is held annually.


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Photo by Sparky Barnes Sargent

N80637, a 1946 Globe GC-1B, was the late Charlie Nelson’s Super Swift, on loan for display by his Navy pilot granddaughter, Candi Nunley. “Hundreds of people visit each year, and many schools bring large groups fairly often,” says Scott Anderson, executive director of the Swift Museum Foundation. “The first thing I hear from visitors is ‘Wow, this is an amazing collection!’ We have just acquired the LoPresti Fury for museum display, and it will bring another chapter in the Swift history to light for everyone to see in person. Other people and members are continuing to donate personal Swift artifacts as they see that this museum is a worthy place for these things to be shared by many aviation enthusiasts.” It’s rather unusual for a type club to have the wherewithal to build and maintain such an impressive facility. Naturally, that begs the question: How did the Swift group progress to this point? Well, the genesis was in 1968, when Tennessean Charlie Nelson placed an ad in Trade-A-Plane stating that a group was

being formed for “mutual aid to owners and improvement of the Swift.” More than 100 pilots responded, launching the Swift Association, later to be known as the International Swift Association. As founder and president of the Swift Association and Museum Foundation, Charlie became the paternal head of the Swift family. He was also the newsletter editor for 43 years, which must be a record for a type club! By 1977, the association evolved into the Swift Museum Foundation, a nonprofit group whose purpose remains “dedicated to preserving the history and heritage of the Globe/TEMCO Swift and keeping them flying.” The personalities making up the family of “Swifters” are as varied as their professions and the geographic areas where SWIFT | See Page 25

Photo by Sparky Barnes Sargent

Close up view of the logo on this 1945 Globe Swift GC-1A (the first all-metal Swift), produced by Globe Aircraft at Fort Worth, Texas.


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March 21, 2019

Top 10 best-selling GA aircraft of 2018 By JANICE WOOD

Source: General Aviation Manufacturers Association

1 Cirrus SR22T

The year-end figures for aircraft sales in 2018 are in and they show that Cirrus Aircraft continues to dominate general aviation, claiming four of the top 10 spots of best-selling aircraft of the year. Joining the company’s piston line is the Vision Jet, tying for the ninth spot in its second full year of sales. See what other models made the list below:

180 sold.

2. Cirrus SR22 135 sold.

3. Cessna 172S 129 sold.

4. Piper PA-28-181 Archer III 107 sold.

5. Gulfstream 450/500/550/650/650ER

92 sold. (Model specific numbers were not available.)

6. Pilatus PC-12 80 sold.

7. Cessna Grand Caravan EX 79 sold.

8. Cirrus SR20 65 sold.

9. Cirrus SF50 Vision Jet 63 sold.

10. Tecnam P2008 63 sold.


March 21, 2019

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COPPERSTATE Fly-In a hit at new location The 2019 COPPERSTATE Fly-In was held Feb. 9-10 at Buckeye Municipal Airport (KBXK) in conjunction with the Buckeye Air Fair. According to Airport Courtesy Cars’ Glenn Brasch, the event was a huge success. “There were hundreds of planes and thousands of people,” he reports. Next year’s fly-in is slated for Feb. 6-9, 2020. Copperstate.org, AirportCourtesyCars.com

Photos by Glenn Brasch


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March 21, 2019

A cross-country FLY8MA Founder and Chief CFI Jon Kotwicki has set off on a trip flying a Cessna from Alaska to Florida, and from there to all 48 remaining states. The trip will last two years, and is being documented on the FLY8MA Vlog Channel and Flight Instruction Channel, as well as YouTube. The purpose of the trip is to attract more interest to GA and promote aviation safety with “real-world” flying experiences that occur on long cross-country flights, according to Kotwicki. In August 2018, Jon left his job as an airline pilot to return to being a CFI and seize this opportunity to promote GA. “Flying a Cessna was my first love of aviation, it was my starting point in this amazing community, and I want as many people as possible to have that same experience I was lucky enough to have,” he said. Jon and his girlfriend Stephanie are working as a team flying their airplane from state to state, and chasing the airplane with their camper trailer that serves as a mobile office to manage the logistics of the trip. Additionally, Jon continues creating educational content along the way for Fly8MA. The key goals of this trip are: • Provide a free discovery flight in each state to a follower or subscriber who has not yet taken the plunge to pursue training. • Provide them the easy next steps to pursue aviation. • Produce vlog style videos documenting the trip, as well as educational and flight safety oriented videos. • Provide a FAAST Wings safety seminar in every state. • Help current pilots improve their skills, and highlight GA friendly airports and places to get people out and flying. • Incorporating real-world experiences into the online ground school at Fly8MA.com. The two to three year trip will have more than 1,000 hours of flying, visiting more than 500 airports, while creating more than 300 videos, and more than 120TB of content, Jon noted. Fly8MA.com


March 21, 2019

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adventure begins

Photo by Jon Kotwicki

Photos courtesy Jon Kotwicki


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March 21, 2019

The best little airshow in the South Story By JAMES BRITT, Photos By TERENCE GORDON The Charlotte-Monroe Executive Airport (KEQY) in North Carolina is normally a training field for aspiring pilots and a stop-over for business travelers and general aviation enthusiasts. But over the weekend of Nov. 10-11, 2018, the roar of big metal warbirds resounded throughout the quiet countryside, heralding the Warbirds Over Monroe Air Show. The show allowed the more than 35,000 people who attended the chance to get up close to a variety of warbirds, including a P-40 Warhawk, a number of P-51 Mustangs, and a mammoth C-46, one of just six still flying. “Tinker Bell,” the iconic Air Force C-46 transport plane of the 1950s, is based on the airfield, carefully maintained by a volunteer group at the field. “The ability for people to get close to and touch vintage aircraft, not only watch them fly and do aerobatics, but put their hands on them, makes this show a fan favorite for aviation enthusiasts across the

states of North Carolina and South Carolina,” said Bruce Johnston, a flight instructor at FlyCarolina Flight School. First-timers at the 2018 fly-in included a Curtis P-40 Warhawk tandem trainer, a Boeing B-17 Flying Fortress, and a Navy and Marine Corps heralded gull-winged Vought F4U-Corsair fighter.

“Its like stepping out of a time machine to see a B-17 flying formation with two P-51 Mustangs and a P-40 Warhawk, a visiting Spitfire from the RAF and a Navy F4U-Corsair,” said Cpt. Gary Moore of Civil Air Patrol Squadron N.C.-121 based just down the road in Concord. While the warbirds garnered most of

the crowd’s attention, a display by the Civil Air Patrol, including a Cessna 182, was a favorite among kids and teens. They got to sit in the pilot’s seat, as well as talk to other teens who are cadets in the squadron. MonroeNC.org/Departments/Tourism/ Warbirds-Over-Monroe-Air-Show


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Eagle Scout restores Gnat By MICHAEL W. MICHELSEN, JR. To describe Timothy Carlson’s love for aviation as a passion would be a gross understatement. In fact, nearly everything Carlson, 18, does from the time he gets up in the morning until he goes to bed at night involves aviation in one form or another. Last June, he graduated from Flabob Airport Preparatory Academy in Riverside, California, then enrolled in the aviation maintenance technology program at nearby San Bernardino Valley College. And if that’s not enough aviation fuel for your blood, Carlson is just a few flights from earning his pilot’s certificate. It only stands to reason that when it came time for Carlson to begin a community service project for his Eagle Scout award, he would select a project from a list of things that needed doing at March Field Air Museum in Riverside. Carlson’s project called for him to perform a complete cosmetic restoration of a Folland MK1 Gnat, a British compact swept-wing subsonic fighter aircraft that was used primarily by the Indian Air Force. His restoration began Sept. 24, 2016, and was officially completed on Feb. 25, 2018, after more than 1,300 man hours of work. “My project took so long because, first Photo by Michael W. Michelsen, Jr. of all, it needed a lot of work,” Carlson explained. “But the other reason was beTimothy Carlson and the Folland MK1 Gnat he restored as his Eagle Scout project. cause I wanted to meet a high standard ever she looked at the Gnat, it took her with the end result. Without a doubt, this back to her homeland. was the most challenging project I have “I think that being a Scout is important, ever undertaken.” partly because it makes you part of someJeff Houlihan, the museum’s director thing that is bigger than yourself,” Carlfor Collection, Exhibits and Restoration, son said. “But when that volunteer told wrote a letter to the Boy Scouts’ Califorme that, I realized that this project was nia Inland Empire Council explaining the bigger than just an Eagle Scout project. complex challenges of restoring the vinIt made me realize that tage Indian Air Force doing this project was F-1 Gnat jet fighter. something truly impor“During each phase “His Eagle Scout tant to a lot of people.” of this complicated Carlson turned 18 on restoration process, project is the most May 6, 2018, the day planning, organizaintense I have he was awarded the tion and execution, witnessed in my rank of Eagle Scout. Tim exhibited a level The formal Eagle of competency worthy scouting career.” Photo by Timothy Carlson Scout presentation cerof the finest museum professional,” wrote — Russell Mills, who has emony was held at the Carlson’s 1965 Bellanca 260B. Houlihan, who also been involved with scouting museum. ports he’s close to taking his private pilot He said the most important lesson he “His Eagle Scout served as Eagle Projthe past 50 years checkride in his own aircraft, a 1965 Bellearned while giving up weekends, holiproject is the most inect coordinator. “His lanca 260B. days, and vacations to complete his Eagle tense I have witnessed attention to detail and “Tim uses his passion for flying to guide Scout project is how important it is to in my scouting career,” great respect for the his enthusiasm for life,” wrote Shawna keep your word. said Russell Mills, unit commissioner for fragility and historical import of the airLewis, Teaching Vice Principal at Flabob “If you say you will take on a task, you California Inland Empire Council BSA craft ensured success.” Airport Preparatory Academy, in a recomkeep doing it until it’s finished,” he said. for the San Jacinto Valley, who has been Carlson attracted many admirers with mendation letter. “There were times when I went to work involved with scouting the past 50 years. the painstaking work he put into the projCarlson said he likes the freedom he on this project alone, not because I necCarlson has served as a Junior Docent ect, sometimes in unexpected places. feels when he’s at the controls. essarily wanted to but because it was my at March Field Air Museum since 2016, One day, as he was at the museum “You don’t worry about anything when responsibility to make it happen. I gave guiding visitors and training volunteers. working on the project, one of the volyou are flying — you leave all your probmy word it would be done.” Now he will be able to show his own unteers, who was from India, pulled him lems on the runway,” he said. Now that the project is done, Carlson work. Today, the restored Gnat sits at the aside and thanked him for restoring a MarchField.org is concentrating on his flying. He refront of the museum in its main hangar. “piece of her home.” She said that when-


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March 21, 2019

Distraction: Tow bars Jeffrey Madison Human Factors

I surfed over to the Aviation Safety Reporting System website to research a topic for this column. I typed in “cracked windshield” and waited. A thought popped into my head that reminded me to check out an airplane seller’s website. I scrolled through a plane or two from the inventory when I remembered this was not the reason I was on the internet. I jumped back over to the ASRS tab. My search had yielded hundreds of “cracked windshield” hits, but they were all reports from pilots flying heavy iron. “Iron” reminded me I needed to fold the clothes in the dryer, which somehow led me to think about what kind of railing we were mulling to put on our refurbished back deck, which got me to thinking about how I always text my wife “on the deck” when I go flying and safely reach my destination. A loud, metallic clanging noise somewhere in my neighborhood reminded me of that one time at my old airline… The captain and I were called back from our hotel to the airport, at 2 a.m., to fly a company Boeing 717 to another airport. This kind of thing came with the territory. Unlike the airline, the airport was not obliged to be staffed at 2 a.m. So, as there was no other vehicle or aircraft movement around that part of the airport, we decided to use the “powerback” method to push ourselves away from the gate. The thrust reversers on Boeing 717 engines are the old “clamshell” type that close over the back of them and divert exhaust thrust air about 150° in the opposite direction. Great braking action on landing rollout. An expensive, noisy, gas-guzzling way to put a 717 into reverse from a standstill, too. But short on sleep, eager to do an unusual procedure, and also urged by Dispatch to get a move on, we forgot one thing. The tow bar had been pre-positioned on the nose wheel. A loud clanging sound as we began our reverse roll reminded us. Amazing how loud an abnormal sound is over the blast of those motors! Distraction led to an embarrassing situation… Deep into that memory my wife walked Jeffrey Madison, a pilot since 1995, is an ATP CFI/MEI. He has over 1,000 hours dual given. He has flown into more than 250 GA airports throughout most of the Lower 48. He is a former Part 121 and Part 135 airline captain. You can reach him at HumanFactors@GeneralAviationNews.com

in and asked me why I had such a silly grin on my face when I was supposed to be writing my column. I sheepishly returned to my computer and typed “tow bar” into the search window. See what happened there? I got distracted. And that is the common theme of 18% of the almost 700 NASA reports on general aviation tow bar incidents. All of those incidents occurred because the pilot — or the mechanic — got distracted. A Piper PA-46 pilot submitted a NASA report after he departed his home base one cold, winter, pre-sunrise morning with his tow bar attached. “Since I had so thoroughly pre-flighted the airplane the previous evening, I believed I had pre-flighted this airplane more thoroughly when in the hangar than I had ever pre-flighted an airplane before,” wrote the pilot. He wrote that because he had spent the previous day cleaning, lubricating, sumping, updating and polishing the plane. The only thing he hadn’t done was fuel it. He hadn’t fueled it that evening because the last time the pilot had filled the tanks of his hangar-warmed PA-46 Malibu, it was from a cold-soaked fuel truck. As the Jet A warmed in his tanks, it expanded and spilled out through the overflow ports onto the pristine hangar floor. To avoid that snafu again, the pilot waited until the morning of the flight to gas up. He used the outside frigid temperatures as an excuse to zip through pulling the Malibu from the hangar with a tractor. Then he drove the tractor back into the hangar and shut the doors to preserve the interior heat. Meanwhile, the pre-dawn darkness and the shadow cast from an overhead light hid the tow bar from him. He wrote, “When my co-pilot arrived with two pets, they immediately boarded the airplane because of the cold temperature, as did my employer, the airplane owner. I put some more pressure on myself then to get the airplane started to get some heat into the cabin.” Two pets and a cold airplane owner. Distraction, distraction, distraction. He also had to refile his flight plan because of destination weather changes. More distraction, which created additional pressure to quicken the pace to meet the agreed upon departure time. The previous day’s pre-flight fresh in his mind, the pilot did only a cursory walk-around. He then boarded, buttoned

up, started up, and departed. “The only indication I had of the problem was a slight thump, and the ‘gear warn’ light on the CAWS panel remained illuminated after I put the gear lever into the up position,” wrote the pilot. He lowered the gear and got three green lights. That prompted him to return to the field and deal with the problem there rather than continue the flight. Tower cleared him to land. Upon doing so, Tower advised him of sparks under his airplane. The pilot taxied clear and stopped. He shut down and discovered the tow bar still attached to the airplane. In his conclusion, the pilot admitted the outcome could have been much worse. He also determined to not let internal pressures distract him from doing a thorough pre-flight every time he has to move an aircraft. An experienced Grumman AA5 pilot filed his NASA report after landing at his destination and was unable to locate the tow bar he always kept inside his airplane. He wrote that he’d gotten distracted by a conversation he was having with his passenger about aviation. The two climbed into the AA5, taxied to the runway, and departed. The pilot didn’t sense anything unusual on takeoff in his fixed-gear aircraft. He flew about 1.4 hours to the destination. “When ready to push aircraft into hangar,” he wrote, “was unable to locate tow bar. Realized the only remaining possibility was that I had taxied with it attached.” He called back to his departure airport. Personnel there found the tow bar almost 2,000’ from the departure end of the runway, undamaged save for the bar’s retention spring and some paint scrapes. The airplane suffered no real damage to the fuselage, propeller, landing gear, or paint. A Cessna 182RG pilot was not so lucky. He had to stop enroute to his destination due to a Temporary Flight Restriction (TFR) and because he desperately needed to use the bathroom. “I used the tow bar to park the plane,” he wrote. “I used the restroom and upon TFR cancellation, I started the engine and taxied for takeoff for the short, 20 nm flight.” He noted that gear retraction was normal on climb-out, including seeing a good “gear up” light. However, when he se-

lected gear down during his approach, he did not get a green “gear down” light. He contacted Tower and performed a low pass over the airfield. Tower confirmed he had two main gear down but the nose gear was still up. Several turns in the pattern while cycling the gear still produced no joy. The pilot left the pattern to attempt more extreme maneuvers to perhaps shake the nose gear down. Those attempts failed, too. He decided to perform a partial gear-up landing. Tower had the crash vehicle onsite and cleared the pilot for the approach. He landed with flaps 40, 60 knots, and gear down. He managed to land the plane with minimal property or aircraft damage. Once the rescue crew raised the nose with a hydraulic lift, the pilot discovered the tow bar lodged in the nose wheel well. “I helped dislodge the tow bar and the nose gear deployed,” wrote the pilot.

Mind-Wandering

Like me, the pilots above all suffered varying degrees of tow bar problems due to distraction. The problem with distraction is it’s both endemic to modern life and inherent in human nature. We like to think it’s something we can overcome. Hence the mountain of books and articles on how to focus more, avoid distraction, and become better people. The reality is distraction is the opposite side of a genetic coin called “mindwandering.” Psychologist Alex Pang describes it aptly: “Mind-wandering is psychologically restorative and contributes to your creative energies.” We let our minds drift when we wash the dishes, fold clothes, mow the lawn, or walk the dog. Mind-wandering lets our conscious mind take a break, while allowing our subconscious to keep working, testing combinations and trying out scenarios without us being aware of it. We need both to do good work, to be creative and productive, and to have a good life. That’s why I’m not going to admonish people for being distracted. Adhering to checklists can help address the problem, but not entirely. Most important is recognizing that distraction is part of our nature. After all, recognition of the problem is the first step. ASRS.ARC.NASA.gov


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SWIFT | From Page 17 they live. Today, the organization has members from more than a dozen countries and numerous loyal volunteers who contribute their time and talents to ensure the group’s ongoing success. The “Swifters” are ardent admirers of the Swift and staunch supporters of the Swift Museum Foundation. For example, Honorary President Jim “Frog” Jones of Georgia bought his Swift, learned to fly in it, and joined the International Swift Association in 1974. “My Swift has allowed me to come in contact with like-minded people and make lifelong friends. It has opened doors to many adventure opportunities, trips to Alaska, formation flying, and aerobatics,” said Jim, “and it has created a pride of ownership with its ramp appeal.” You may have deduced by now that the museum and foundation are inseparable. It’s difficult to talk about one without including the other. Jim elaborates that the organization bears the “responsibility of protecting the history, heritage, and soul of the Swift. It supplies needed parts, drawings, engineering data, encouragement, and knowledge to preserve the Swifts in the museum, as well as member-owned Swifts. We assist those who are interested in Swift ownership by educating them on things to look for when inspecting one. Our members

want to help protect the Swift and those who buy and fly them.” To facilitate those efforts, the Swift Museum Foundation has available an Initial/Recurrent Pilot Training Handbook, Maintenance and Operation Information Handbook, Operators Handbook, and Hydraulic Manual. Engineering drawings have been digitized and are available to members for their specific Swifts. Regarding archival material, Ken Coughlin has been the Swift Museum Foundation’s formal historian for 16-plus years. Ken bought his Swift in 1965 and has logged 3,960 hours in it to date. Additionally, Pam Nunley, Charlie Nelson’s daughter, fulfilled an integral role in the organization for 30 years, particularly in the Parts Department. Around 700 Swifts are still listed on the FAA registry, and an estimated 350 are flown regularly. The organization celebrated its 50th anniversary during Swift Nationals in 2018. Among the attendees for that special occasion was Aircraft Owners and Pilots Association (AOPA) President Mark Baker. He was treated to the memorable experience of a formation flight with Paul Mercandetti, a member of the Swift Museum Foundation executive committee and longtime Swift owner. The Swift Museum Foundation has been holding formation clinics for its members since 1999. The Swift Formation Committee was accepted as a signa-

tory to the Formation and Safety Training (F.A.S.T.) organization in 2007. When asked what else sets the Swift organization apart from other type clubs, Jim responded: “The Swift Museum Foundation may be the only type club that owns the type certificate, engineering data, spare parts, and tooling to support owners in keeping their Swifts flying or restoring a Swift. The Swift Museum Foundation holds an annual convention/ fly-in, has a monthly newsletter, has great representation at Oshkosh, SUN ’n FUN, and other fly-ins around the country. The Swift Museum Foundation is probably the only type club that has a museum dedicated to one airplane.” A glimpse into the past reveals the provenance for the location of the museum. Back in 2001, Charlie shared some of the history of the Swift Nationals with me: “The first one was held in 1969 at Ottumwa, Iowa. We adjourned at Kentucky Dam in 1981, and brought a formation flight of 48 airplanes down here — that’s the largest formation we’ve ever had to date — to do an air show for the local Chamber of Commerce. In 1982, when

the World’s Fair was in Knoxville, we had a fly-in here at McMinn County Airport, and it’s been here ever since.” (In recent years, the national convention has been held in rotating locations.) “We have, through the efforts of many people over many years, been able to build a museum for a classic aircraft that is perhaps second only to the Beechcraft Heritage Museum in Tullahoma,” said Scott. “We have a strong membership base with around 600 members and new members are joining regularly. Last year we added more than 40 new members, which tells me the future of the Swift Museum Foundation is alive and healthy.” Fly or drive, but either way, be sure to put the Swift Museum on your list of “go to” places. The Swift Museum is open from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday through Friday for tours and by special request on weekends. Due to limited staffing, visitors should call 423-745-9547 to ascertain tour guides will be available. SwiftMuseumFoundation.org

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ASRS Reports These are excerpts from reports made to the Aviation Safety Reporting System (ASRS.ARC.NASA.gov). The narratives are written by pilots, rather than FAA or NTSB officials. To maintain anonymity, many of the details, such as aircraft model or airport, are often scrubbed from the reports. Aircraft: Experimental Primary Problem: Human Factors While flying back to the airport from a wonderful aerobatic flight, I was approaching from a direction that I rarely approach from; I was approximately 1,000’ AGL slowing the aircraft in preparation to join crosswind for landing. As I neared the center line of the runway, I made a decision that I immediately regretted. I lowered my nose and dived towards the runway. At approximately 250’ AGL I conducted a low approach down the runway. At the end of the runway I did a barrel roll, entering and exiting the maneuver at approximately 500’ AGL. Maybe five seconds passed between the thought occurring and me completing the maneuver. I then departed the pattern and reentered for landing. This was an impulsive and completely stupid decision, and while it resulted in no incident, and was in a very remote area posing no danger to anyone, it was a deviation from my regular flying practices that I can only conclude was ego and impulse driven. I greatly regret my actions. And I greatly regret my lack of restraint and professionalism. I have decided, in an attempt to retrain myself, to consult with regulation and aerobatic professionals. Learn and retain as much regulation associated with aerobatic and low level flight as possible, and not conduct any further solo aerobatics until I have completed a refresher course specifically for safe aerobatic maneuvers. I am also taking time to refresh my mindset, and acknowledge and stop impulsive and unsafe thought from entering my cockpit in any stage of flight. Aircraft: GA Aircraft Primary Problem: Environment I conducted a recreational sightseeing flight over Jordan Lake. During this flight I noted that the presence of waterfowl and other birds had increased in the area. Prior to and again during the flight I noted that no wildlife/waterfowl preservation zones were noted in this area. Due to what may be a seasonal or migration change in the wildlife population, a notation on the sectional charts or a NOTAM may be beneficial to both other pilots and the migrating wildlife.

Aircraft: Cessna 172 Primary Problem: Environment My student and I were on short final for Runway 10 at ZZZ when we each observed an unmanned aircraft operating directly above the airport at what appeared to be pattern altitude or possibly lower. It was difficult to gauge the size of the drone from our perspective, but I would say at least 6’ from wingtip to wingtip. We landed normally. We had been planning to fly the closed traffic pattern for a few circuits at ZZZ but quickly decided after seeing the drone to depart the area for the day, which we did without seeing the drone again. We had been monitoring the CTAF since 15 miles out and had communicated our position and intentions for a straightin approach several times, starting at eight miles away. No one else had made radio transmissions at ZZZ the whole time. After landing back at our home airport and concluding the flight, we spoke on the phone to someone at an FBO at ZZZ. He said “the drone people had been asking him earlier that morning if he could hear them on the frequency,” and he said he hadn’t been able to hear them. Obviously we could not either. He suggested we file this report. Aircraft: Drone Primary Problem: Human Factors An unmanned aircraft was operating in the vicinity of ZZZ under an FAA 333 exemption authority. The aircraft was positioned about 1,000’ north of the runway flying parallel to the runway at 400’. At this time, a manned aircraft made a radio call that they were on “short final for runway ...” No prior radio call was made by the manned aircraft as they approached the area. The first radio call was made while the manned aircraft was approximately one mile from the approach end of runway. The UAS operator immediately commanded the aircraft to return to the south of the airfield where the ground control station was located to avoid the landing traffic. A radio call was also made by the UAS operator identifying the position of the unmanned aircraft, but no reply was heard from the manned aircraft. As the manned aircraft crossed the threshold of the runway, the UAS was south of the runway by approximately 500’ and maintaining 400’. The manned aircraft did not take any evasive maneuvers to avoid the unmanned aircraft and proceeded to do a touch and go. Several radio calls were made by the UAS operator but no replies were heard. While the unmanned aircraft was established in an

orbit south of the runway, the manned aircraft made left traffic and climbed above pattern altitude and departed the area to the west. The manned aircraft made a final radio call indicating they had seen the UAS but did not acknowledge any radio calls by the UAS. Aircraft: GA Aircraft Primary Problem: Human Factors A safety of flight and potential collision hazard for a very high obstacle that is depicted against the surrounding obstacles exists on the VFR chart 29 miles southeast of FAR. A GPS Direct route from ZZZ to FAR places a 1,100’ tower 29 miles southeast of FAR directly in my flight path. Ceilings were reported at 1,600 and 4 miles visibility. I established an altitude of 2,100 for VFR cloud clearance. I called Fargo approach at 32 miles and prior to the TRSA boundary, even though I was below the TRSA altitude of 6,000’. I received a squawk code from Fargo Approach and told I had radar contact. Fargo Approach then asked me if I had the tower in sight directly in front of me. I turned left to avoid the tower and told Fargo Approach that I did not see the tower nor did I recognize the obstruction on the VFR chart since it blended into the other obstacles on my VFR chart. Fargo Approach did a fabulous job of alerting me to the obstacle. It turned out that an IFR clearance and approach would have been a better option. I highly recommend making sure the greatest obstacle threat be made to stand out against the lower obstacle threat for the antenna tower at 2,556’. The flashing tower light symbol on the VFR chart is not apparent. The obstacle height is not apparent. The last digit of the altitude for the tower also blends into the TRSA boundary ring. This combination of VFR chart dependence and GPS direct flight path and lack of familiarity with the local obstacles created a hazardous situation that was compounded by low visibility and low altitude VFR flight conditions. An accident chain was set up, but averted by the Fargo Approach controller. Aircraft: Low Wing, Single Engine Primary Problem: Airport TSP Runway 11 straight-in approach crosses a 4,251’ elevation ridge about 6,400’ from runway threshold (4,000 MSL). The ridge has a single steady red obstruction beacon that is located on the ridge crest at the intersection with the extended runway centerline. TSP had a PAPI installation for the runway that

was deactivated after local pilots flew the PAPI in daylight and noted that the approach angle barely cleared the ridge by about 25’. This night approach was flown with that awareness. The runway lighting was turned to maximum, which includes REIL. As part of the visual approach method, the approach area west of the REIL was kept in constant sight. Touchdown point objective was about 20’ past the numbers. During the approach the red obstruction beacon was difficult to see with low contrast to other lights in the area. Approach planning was flawed. Basically the PAPI angle approach (noted above) was flown, uneventfully, but terrain was visible in the beacon flash to the left and above the aircraft and the ridge was visible for about .25 sec as the landing light swept across. The sudden very close proximity to the terrain was not anticipated. With higher winds, a significant downdraft and turbulence develop on the lee side of the ridge, potentially increasing the CFIT hazard for a low performance aircraft or an inadequately responsive pilot. Facility recommendations: The beacon is dim and needs to be replaced with a brighter light, and an additional light needs to be placed at the higher ridge top to the north. PAPI needs to be re-activated with an approach angle that provides at least 100’ of vertical clearance. From an approach planning perspective: A right pattern staying inside of the hill would reduce the risk. But the straight-in risk would remain for the pilot with some operational requirement for a more immediate landing, or a pilot unfamiliar with the area. Aircraft: Cessna 150 Primary Problem: Human Factors Flight was on a VFR flight plan westbound across Cascade Range at 8,500’ MSL CAVU (Clear and Visibility Unlimited). As I neared the flat terrain on the western side of the Cascade Range, I could see the tops of the typical low level clouds which were forecast to be dissipating at around this time. CLS AWOS was reporting ceiling 1,500’ and visibility 9. I could see the edge of the cloudy area and decided to descend in a river valley to below the ceiling for the remaining 25 miles to my destination. Soon after entering below the ceiling, I could not maintain the required cloud clearance/terrain obstruction clearance. To avoid further descent, and assessing that a 180 turn was not possible due to


March 21, 2019

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March 21, 2019

ASRS Reports terrain, I began a climb in the direction of the river valley. I entered IMC and broke out about 500’ higher. This situation reflects poor judgment on my part and arose because of an incorrect assumption I had about what was under the cloud layer. My home base is in this area and I expected to see the usual, well-defined ceiling with good visibility underneath. This was not the case in this circumstance. I am well aware that continued VFR into IMC is a leading cause of fatal GA accidents. Yet I relied on my belief that I could continue VFR under the cloud layer. Had I not quickly initiated the climb, the result could very well have been a CFIT accident. I will no longer consider a duck under option in the future. Aircraft: GA Aircraft Primary Problem: Chart Was flying a Garmin G3X Touch system showing the map screen. Displayed on the screen was SAV with extended runway centerlines. Runways 10 and 28 were correctly identified, Runways 1 and 19 had the labels interchanged. I believe this constitutes hazardous, misleading information. Aircraft 1: Cessna 182 Aircraft 2: Piper Archer Primary Problem: Human Factors During a practice IFR flight with an instructor to ZZZ, ZZZ Center advised of a radar outage beginning roughly halfway to ZZZ and that they would lose radar contact with us. We requested the Runway XX RNAV approach and were told to expect that, but to be ready for holding instructions as there were one or two aircraft ahead of us. We were issued instructions to fly the published hold at ZZZZZ and expect further in 10 minutes.

We did the entry to the hold and then went twice around before being cleared for the approach and advised that there was VFR traffic inbound also, then handed off to ZZZ Tower. We checked in with Tower and were advised that he had an Archer holding over ZZZZZ1 (FAF on our approach) at 3,500’, and another aircraft that was VFR who would remain west of the extended centerline to keep clear of our approach. I told him we were looking, but did not see either at that point. I went head down to hand-fly the approach while my instructor watched outside and kept looking for the two aircraft. As we were nearing ZZZZZ1 and about 100’ above the minimum crossing altitude of 2,800’, my instructor said “OK there’s an airplane, we’re descending” and pushed on the yoke swiftly, but not aggressively, to avoid collision. I radioed to Tower that we were deviating for traffic. He called back, asking who called and what happened, and I advised him that we had nearly hit the Archer as it crossed left to right in front of us. We estimated we were around 200’ below it when paths crossed. The Archer then radioed and said he’d had us in sight. We resumed the approach, flew the missed and returned to our departure airport. It is my belief that the Archer was holding at 3,000’ instead of 3,500’ as the Tower had instructed. I don’t recall hearing him issue the holding instructions after I switched to Tower frequency. The radar outage added to the issue, however, I am not sure to what degree it would have helped in this case as I do not know if ZZZ is a radar Class D. I felt it necessary to submit this report just to put down thoughts and have on record, but to also highlight that in that situation the Tower is relying on pilot reports (I assume) and the chance still exists that an aircraft is not doing as expected or as he thinks he is. Also I wanted to point out

the importance of having a Safety Pilot (or instructor in this case during training) when flying IFR in VMC. Aircraft 1: Piper PA-28 Cherokee Aircraft 2: Cessna 172 Primary Problem: Human Factors Pleasure flight with three souls on board. I was PIC. I announced my 10 mile and then five mile location for approach once in proximity to ZZZ. The airport was busy with multiple departing and arriving targets using Runway XX. A Skyhawk was also inbound and announced its position, which was about 200’ above my indicated altitude, same distance and approximate location from airport (two miles north of the field). I transmitted “entering the left 45 for XX and looking for that inbound traffic” as I was entering the 45. As a precaution, I entered the downwind lower than pattern altitude to avoid potential conflict, by 300’-500’. I called my left downwind for Runway XX and about five to 10 seconds later the Skyhawk also called “left downwind for XX”. About that same time, I had him in sight, approximately 200’ horizontal/ slightly ahead and about 300’ above my location near midfield on downwind. I announced, “Skyhawk I have you in sight.” He replied, “Cherokee I don’t have you in sight yet.” I responded with, “Skyhawk, you are on my 3 o’clock just above me.” The Skyhawk responded with “Cherokee I have you in sight now.” I then requested, “Skyhawk if you could extend your downwind, I’ll turn my base here shortly.” I do not recall if there was a reply from the Skyhawk at that point. Landing was uneventful and I cleared the active as the Skyhawk pilot was on short final. My low pattern entry evasion had prevented a potential incident. The Skyhawk

essentially overtook me on the downwind, appearing out of sequence (as I had announced my traffic position reports prior to his and was also at a lower altitude). The owner of the local flight school approached me when I was leaving and mentioned “I came in pretty low” on the pattern. I responded with “did you see the airplane right above me?” I don’t recall his response after that, although he didn’t return a friendly wave as I was leaving. Aircraft: Cessna 182 Primary Problem: Human Factors While taxiing from my hangar to the runway, I was distracted by programming my GNS 530W, and veered off the taxiway (a very dumb mistake). I then came in contact with a temporary sign used to advise non-pilots. The prop made contact with the sign at idle speed and sliced it into four strips. The prop will be overhauled to ensure safety. The prop RPM did not change when hitting the sign. This is clearly pilot error. My biggest takeaway is this: Any time the aircraft is moving, eyes are out the window. No excuses. Contributing factors include possible fatigue: This was my fifth flight of the day after waking up early in the morning. Also contributing factors: Distraction in the cockpit by trying to program GPS while taxiing and pilot complacency by being overly confident in knowing the taxiway since I’ve done it hundreds of times. This will not happen again if I keep my eyes out of the window during taxi. Aircraft: Experimental Primary Problem: Airport I had to land on the taxiway because a plane just landed in front of me with gear up. I did not have enough fuel to go anywhere else. I had minimum fuel because this was a test flight.

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New Products

March 21, 2019

Send press releases to: Press@GeneralAviationNews.com

Digital autopilots STC’d for Cessna 190s, 195s

New replacement exhaust systems for Cessna T206, T207, and T210 Aerospace Welding Minneapolis, Inc. (AWI) has received a PMA allowing the company to sell complete exhaust system replacements for the standard and modified turbo-charged models of the Cessna 206, 207, and 210. Any A&P mechanic can replace an original exhaust system with new, FAA certified AWI components, according to company officials. Check out the company’s website for aircraft models that are covered by the new PMA. AWI-AMI.com

Garmin autopilots approved for Bonanzas and Barons

Garmin has received Supplemental Type Certification (STC) in the Beechcraft Bonanza and Baron for its GFC 500 and GFC 600 autopilots. The GFC 500 autopilot has been approved for the Bonanza F33A, while the GFC 600 has been approved for the Baron 58P, 58PA, 58TC, and 58TCA (1983 model year or earlier only). The GFC 500 autopilot integrates with the G5 electronic flight instrument or a combination of both the G5 electronic flight in-

Protective panels for Cirrus introduced

Jet Shades, which manufactures removable sun protecting panels, has introduced a set of shades for Cirrus aircraft. The Jet Shades are lightweight push-in-place panels made from optical-quality polycarbonate treated through a proprietary process to block infrared waves, ultraviolet waves, visible light, and solar energy, company officials explain. With a patent pending design, the panels push into place into the window trim and are secured by friction tabs for a snug fit, even in severe turbulence. Since no clips or other fasteners are needed, the panels can be quickly and easily installed and removed, even during flight when the autopilot is engaged, company officials note. In addition to Cirrus, Jet Shades are available for almost any aircraft, including jets, turbo props, props, experimental/homebuilt planes, helicopters, and more. Pricing ranges from $399 to $1,999. JetShades.com

strument and the G500 TXi or G500 flight displays. The GFC 600 is designed as a standalone autopilot and can be paired with the G500 TXi/G600 TXi or G500/G600 glass flight displays, Garmin navigators, as well as a variety of third-party flight displays, instruments and navigation sources, company officials noted. For customers who already have a G5 electronic flight instrument, the GFC 500 starts at a suggested retail price of $6,995 for a two-axis autopilot. The GFC 600 starts at a suggested retail price of $19,995 for a two-axis autopilot with electric pitch trim. Garmin.com/Aviation

Motivate, Inspire, and Mentor New Instructors

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The STC Group has received an STC for the installation kit for the non-TSO’d Trio Pro Pilot digital autopilot into Cessna 190, 195, LC-126A, and LC-126B. STCs have already been approved for all variants of the Cessna 172, 175, 177, 180, 182, 185, Grumman AA-5 models, and Piper PA28 models. STCs are in the works for the Cessna 210, Navion, Piper Comanche, Beech Bonanza, and other types, company officials noted. TheSTCGroupLLC.com

Snap-On introduces cordless ratchet kit Snap-On Industrial has introduced a new 14.4-volt Hex Drive Micro-Lithium Cordless Ratchet Kit. The tapered-head design gives the ratchet accessibility to fit into tight spaces, according to company officials. The kit comes with the ratchet, two batteries, and a charger. Price: $446.95. SnapOn.com/Industrial2


March 21, 2019

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March 21, 2019

Calendar of Events

POWERED BY

WEEK OF APRIL 1, 2013

Western United States

Mar. 24, 2019, Davis-Monthan AFB, AZ. Thunder and Lighting Over Arizona, 520-228-3406 Mar. 24, 2019, Salinas, CA. California International Air Show, 844-647-7499 Mar. 24, 2019, Sacramento, CA. Fly the Ford Trimotor, 877-952-5395 Mar. 24, 2019, Los Angeles, CA. ForeFlight 202: The Newest Updates,The Next Step Toward Raising The Bar, 818-636-1021 Mar. 25, 2019, Fullerton, CA. CFI Open Forum, 562-234-8423 Mar. 26, 2019, Los Gatos, CA. Los Gatos Hangar Flyers Weekly Coffee, 408-209-3067 Mar. 26, 2019, Chandler, AZ. Chandler Tower Visit, 480-284-0062 Mar. 26, 2019, Reno, NV. Reno Area IMC Club Meeting, 775-393-9403 Mar. 26, 2019, Cheyenne, WY. FAASTeam Flight Instructor Open Forum, 303-342-1156 Mar. 27, 2019, Camarillo, CA. ForeFlight and iPad Basics with Judy Phelps, 805-312-9299 Mar. 27, 2019, Fallbrook, CA. Fallbrook CAP Squadron 87 Safety Meeting, 760-644-3486 Mar. 27, 2019, Van Nuys, CA. SKEW T WX Forecasting Intro Made Easy, 818-636-1021 Mar. 29, 2019, Las Vegas, NV. Las Vegas Regional Helicopter Safety Stand-Down, 573-270-1113 Mar. 30-31, 2019, Travis AFB, CA. Thunder Over the Bay Mar. 30, 2019, Van Nuys, CA. Mountain Flying and Your Best Bets for Safety, 818-636-1021 Mar. 30, 2019, Camarillo, CA. Fatal Pilot Errors and How to Avoid Them with Brian and Barry Schiff, 805-312-9299 Mar. 30, 2019, Livermore, CA. Vintage Aircraft Display Days, 925-915-0120 Mar. 30, 2019, Lewiston, ID. AOPA Rusty Pilots hosted by Stout Flying Service Inc, 301-695-2000 Mar. 31, 2019, Livermore, CA. Vintage Aircraft Display Days, 925-915-0120 Apr. 01, 2019, Groveland, CA. PML Aviation Association Meeting Apr. 02, 2019, Irvine, CA. VMC Club, VFR Flight Scenarios Discussion with Jay Steffenhagen, 714-538-4990 Apr. 02, 2019, Torrance, CA. ForeFlight 101: Learn How and Prosper, 310-344-1653 Apr. 02, 2019, Cottonwood, AZ. EAA Chapter 952 Monthly Meeting, 928-239-4101 Apr. 03, 2019, Truckee, CA. Tahoe Flying Club Monthly Meeting, 530-378-4832 Apr. 03, 2019, Camarillo, CA. Flying VFR Through and Around LAX and SAN Class Bravo Airspace with Michael Phillips, 805-312-9299 Apr. 04, 2019, La Verne, CA. Brackett Airmen Association, 909-227-7614 Apr. 04, 2019, Mesa, AZ. 19th Annual Mesa Police Aviation Safety Fly-In and FAA Helicopter Safety Seminar, 480-284-7434 Apr. 04, 2019, Reno, NV. EAA Chapter 1361 General Meeting, 775-393-9403 Apr. 05, 2019, Santa Maria, CA. Mooney Aircraft Pilots Association Safety Foundation, 210-525-8008 Apr. 05, 2019, Provo, UT. EAA Chapter 753 Planning Meeting, 801-609-5665 Apr. 06, 2019, Hillsboro, OR. EAA Chapter 105 Pancake Breakfast Apr. 06, 2019, Lincoln, CA.

Pancakes and a Movie Apr. 06, 2019, Groveland, CA. Vintage Aircraft Display at Pine Mountain Lake Apr. 06, 2019, Perris, CA. Ultralight & Sportpilots of America Monthly Meeting/ Competition, 714-913-0215 Apr. 06, 2019, Concord, CA. Monthly MDPA Safety Meeting, Breakfast and Fly-Out Apr. 06, 2019, Watsonville, CA. EAA Chapter 119 Young Eagles Rally, 831-531-8440 Apr. 06, 2019, Missoula, MT. EAA Chapter 517 Breakfast at the Airport, 406-549-2933 Apr. 06, 2019, San Diego, CA. Plus One Flyers Club New Member Safety Briefing, 619-925-4100 Apr. 06, 2019, Carlsbad, CA. EAA Chapter 286 Meeting, 760-207-2770 Apr. 06, 2019, Redding, CA. PIC Seminars hosted by IASCO Flight Training & The Grand Flying Club Apr. 06, 2019, Hollister, CA. Antique Aircraft Display And Fly-In Apr. 06, 2019, Hollister, CA. Frazier Lake Airpark Display Day, 831 634 0855 Apr. 06, 2019, Bremerton, WA. EAA VMC Club, 360-620-8921 Apr. 06, 2019, Sacramento, CA. CAF Sacramento Delta Squadron Monthly Meeting, 916-531-9397 Apr. 06, 2019, Groveland, CA. EAA Chapter 1337 Meeting, 209-9625061 Apr. 06, 2019, Groveland, CA. Pine Mountain Lake Aviation Association Monthly Meeting Apr. 07, 2019, Groveland, CA. PML Display Day

South Central United States

Mar. 28, 2019, Salina, KS. Making Confident Go/No-Go Decisions Based on RealWorld NTSB Reports, 785-826-2970 Mar. 30, 2019, Cleburne, TX. Fifth Saturday Fly-In & Pancake Breakfast, 817-641-5456 Mar. 30, 2019, Cibolo, TX. Inspection Authorization Refresher Training, 210-854-8105 Mar. 30, 2019, Fort Worth, TX. Fort Worth Meacham Operation Raincheck/ Ask an ATC, 682-990-0125 Apr. 01, 2019, Little Rock, AR. Information Meeting on ADS-B, 501-918-4400 Apr. 04, 2019, Olathe, KS. AOPA Peaks to Pavement: Applying Lessons from the Backcountry, 800-638-3101 Apr. 06-08, 2019, Waco, TX. Heart of Texas Air Show Apr. 06, 2019, Ponca City, OK. Ponca City Fly-In/Drive-In Breakfast, 580-762-3794 Apr. 06, 2019, Gardner, KS. First Saturday Of The Month Breakfast, 913-963-2829

North Central United States

Mar. 25, 2019, Carroll, IA. Carroll Area Pilots Safety Meeting with Soup, 515-289-4821 Mar. 26, 2019, Waterford, MI. EMI FSDO Safety Seminar, 734-487-7455 Mar. 26, 2019, Eden Prairie, MN. KFCM IMC Club Meeting, 952-210-8600 Mar. 26, 2019, Detroit, MI. Civil Air Patrol-Willow Run Composite Squadron Meeting, 734-674-3239 Mar. 27, 2019, Wheeling, IL. IMC Club at PWK, 630-781-8890 Mar. 28, 2019, Peoria, IL. Thursday Morning Coffee in EAA Chapter 563 Hangar, 309-696-1428 Mar. 28, 2019, East Saint Louis, IL. Preparing

Your Aircraft For Spring. Pizza Sponsored by Ideal Aviation and GSLFIA, 314-809-8600 Mar. 28, 2019, Chicago/West Ch, IL. DuPage Pilots Association General Safety Meeting & Pizza Night Mar. 28, 2019, Bolingbrook, IL. Getting Back Into General Aviation Flying, 630-267-1323 Mar. 30, 2019, South Saint Paul, MN. Commemorative Air Force Annual Training for North American SNJ, 651-428-0339 Mar. 30, 2019, Minneapolis, MN. Snowflakes on Approach Plates and Ice Crystals on Runways, 952-210-8600 Mar. 30, 2019, Rensselaer, IN. Angle of Attack Awareness, 574-999-0483 Mar. 30, 2019, Stillwater, MN. Identifying, Managing, Mitigating Risk, 715-557-0395 Mar. 31, 2019, South Saint Paul, MN. Commemorative Air Force Annual Training for Vultee BT-13 Warbird Operations, 651-428-0339 Apr. 01, 2019, Cedar Rapids, IA. AOPA Peaks to Pavement: Applying Lessons from the Backcountry, 800-638-3101 Apr. 02, 2019, Detroit, MI. Civil Air PatrolWillow Run Composite Squadron Meeting, 734-674-3239 Apr. 02, 2019, West Des Moines, IA. AOPA Peaks to Pavement: Applying Lessons from the Backcountry, 800-638-3101 Apr. 02, 2019, Minneapolis, MN. AOPA Peaks to Pavement: Applying Lessons from the Backcountry, 800-638-3101 Apr. 02, 2019, Watertown, WI. EAA Chapter 320 Monthly Gathering, 612-799-5717 Apr. 03, 2019, Green Bay, WI. WINGS: The General Aviation Training Program, 920-415-2359 Apr. 03, 2019, Bellevue, NE. AOPA Peaks to Pavement: Applying Lessons from the Backcountry, 800-638-3101 Apr. 03, 2019, Dodge Center, MN. AOPA Peaks to Pavement: Applying Lessons from the Backcountry, 800-638-3101 Apr. 04, 2019, Peoria, IL. Thursday Morning Coffee in EAA Chapter 563 Hangar, 309-696-1428 Apr. 04, 2019, Oshkosh, WI. 2019 EAA Aviation Museum Movie Night, 920-426-4800 Apr. 04, 2019, Grand Rapids, MN. EAA Grand Rapids Chapter Meeting Apr. 04, 2019, Chicago/West Ch, IL. Fox Flying Club Board Meeting, 630-447-9369 Apr. 04, 2019, Ray, MI. EAA Chapter 13 Monthly Meeting, 586-918-3838 Apr. 06, 2019, Oshkosh, WI. S.J. Wittman Birthday Fly-In Breakfast, 920-810-1046 Apr. 06, 2019, York, NE. York Hangar Breakfast Apr. 06, 2019, Peoria, IL. EAA Chapter 563 Pancake Breakfast, 309-696-1428 Apr. 06, 2019, Eden Prairie, MN. Flight Testing the Cirrus Airframe Parachute System and Cirrus Vision Jet, 952-210-8600 Apr. 06, 2019, Sterling/Rockfa, IL. Sauk Valley Pilots Association Meeting, 815-213-7939 Apr. 07, 2019, Peoria, IL. VMC Club in EAA 563's Hangar at Mt Hawley Airport (3MY), 309-691-3613 Apr. 08, 2019, Green Bay, WI. Sharing the Skies: Drones and Manned Aviation, 920-819-4774 Apr. 09, 2019, Detroit, MI. Civil Air PatrolWillow Run Composite Squadron Meeting, 734-674-3239

SocialFlight is the most comprehensive tool ever created for finding aviationrelated events! Aircraft Fly-in's, Airshows, Pancake Breakfasts, Conventions, FAA Safety Seminars... they're all here! With SocialFlight, you can also chat with other attendees and even upload & view photos of the events! Whether you love flying, watching airplanes, ultralights, balloons or anything else airborne, this is the place for you. Keep exploring to discover all the features that SocialFlight has to offer.

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North Eastern United States

Mar. 25, 2019, Wadsworth, OH. Double Header: GAJSC Topic of the Month and IMC Club, 330-334-9861 Mar. 26, 2019, Tannersville, PA. The Normalization of Deviance and the Skew T, 610-264-2888 Mar. 27, 2019, Teterboro, NJ. Torque for AMTs, 201-543 1554 Mar. 27, 2019, Cincinnati, OH. ADS-B, 513-842-9621 Mar. 27, 2019, Crownsville, MD. CFI/ DPE Forum, 443-852-9375 Mar. 28, 2019, Weyers Cave, VA. IA Seminar at Blue Ridge Community College, 540-453-2306 Mar. 28, 2019, Ronkonkoma, NY. FAA IA Renewal Workshop (ISP), 914479-8999/516-857-8758 Mar. 28, 2019, Louisville, KY. Louisville IMC Club, 502-396-2880 Mar. 28, 2019, Wilmington, OH. Drone Pilot Updates, 937-382-2889 Mar. 29, 2019, Cleveland, OH. Dinner With a Slice of History: Wally Funk of the Mercury 13 Will Present, 216-623-1111 Mar. 30, 2019, Buffalo, NY. Rusty Pilots presented by AOPA Ambassador Norm Isler and hosted by Prior Aviation Service, 301-695-2000 Mar. 31, 2019, Lumberton, NJ. All You Can Eat Pancake Breakfast At The Patti Wagon Cafe at N14, 609-265-2233 Apr. 01, 2019, Columbus, OH. Civil Air Patrol Columbus Senior Squadron Meeting, 740-990-9169 Apr. 01, 2019, Toughkenamon, PA. Summer

For more events and to stay up-to-date, go to www.socialflight.com


March 21, 2019

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For more events and to stay up-to-date, go to www.socialflight.com Fly-In, 610-595-1500 ext. 240 Apr. 02, 2019, Lincoln Park, NJ. IMC Club Meeting, 973-872-6213 Apr. 02, 2019, Chesapeake, VA. EAA Chapter 339 Monthly Meeting, 757-617-6300 Apr. 03, 2019, Richmond, VA. Chesterfield Pilots Association Monthly Meeting and Safety Seminar, 804-855-3811 Apr. 03, 2019, Waltham, MA. AOPA Peaks to Pavement: Applying Lessons from the Backcountry, 800-638-3101 Apr. 04, 2019, Morehead, KY. EAA Chapter 1525 Meeting, 606-356-1941 Apr. 04, 2019, Portland, ME. Hangar Flying/Burger Night, 207-619-0236 Apr. 04, 2019, Londonderry, NH. AOPA Peaks to Pavement: Applying Lessons from the Backcountry, 800-638-3101 Apr. 04, 2019, Wilmington, OH. Human Factors: Applying Lessons from the Unites States Air Force to General Aviation, 937-382-2889 Apr. 06, 2019, Stow, MA. Hangar Talk, 978-897-3933 Apr. 06, 2019, Stow, MA. Meet the Manager, 978-897-3933 Apr. 06, 2019, Williamsburg, VA. Stabilized Approaches And Go-Arounds Plus Transition Training, 973-668-0168

South Eastern United States

Mar. 24, 2019, Sarasota/Braden, FL. Poker Run Hosted by the SRQ 99s Mar. 24, 2019, Columbus, GA. American Bonanza Society Service Clinic at Columbus Aero Service Mar. 27-30, 2019, Wauchula, FL. Bensen Days Gyroplane Fly-In, 407-461-1852 Mar. 27, 2019, Vero Beach, FL. Vero Beach Regional Airport ATCT Runway Safety Action Team Meeting, 772-812-1861 Mar. 29-30, 2019, Defuniak Spring, FL. Marvel of Flight, 850-892-2000 Mar. 29-30, 2019, Live Oak, FL. Wings Over Suwannee, 817-308-9752 Mar. 29, 2019, Fort Myers, FL. Fly-in Fridays Hot Dog Social, 239-590-6600 Mar. 30-31, 2019, Melbourne, FL. Melbourne Air and Space Show, 321-395-3110 Mar. 30-31, 2019, NAS Key West, FL. NAS Key West Southern Most Air Show, 305-293-2503 Mar. 30, 2019, Tavares, FL. SeaplaneA-Palooza, 352-742-6176 Mar. 30, 2019, Lebanon, TN. Fifth Saturday Breakfast, 615-480-6471 Mar. 30, 2019, Spartanburg, SC. March

Topic of the Month: Pilot Proficiency Training, 864-525 3727 Mar. 30, 2019, Leesburg, FL. EAA Chapter 534 Monthly Meeting, 352-988-3180 Mar. 30, 2019, Live Oak, FL. Rusty Pilots presented by AOPA Ambassador Jamie Beckett and hosted by EAA Chapter 797, 301-695-2000 Mar. 30, 2019, Charlotte, NC. National Vietnam War Veterans Day at Museum, 704-997-3770 Mar. 30, 2019, Aberdeen/Amory, MS. Wings & Wheels 2019 Mar. 31, 2019, Bishopville, SC. South Carolina Breakfast Club at 52J, 803-446-0214 Apr. 02-07, 2019, Lakeland, FL. SUN ’n FUN International Fly-In and Expo, 863-644-2431 Apr. 03, 2019, Lakeland, FL. ABS Member Dinner at SUN ’n FUN Apr. 05, 2019, Fort Myers, FL. Fly-in Fridays Hot Dog Social, 239-590-6600 Apr. 05, 2019, Charleston, SC. UAS Outreach, 843-810-4768 Apr. 06, 2019, Burgaw, NC. EAA Chapter 297 Chapter Meeting, 910-880-5669 Apr. 06, 2019, Winchester, TN. EAA Chapter 699 Fly-In Breakfast, 931-967-0143

Apr. 06, 2019, Shaw AFB, SC. Shaw AFB Wing Event Apr. 06, 2019, Titusville, FL. FlyIn and Pancake Breakfast Apr. 06, 2019, Rome, GA. EAA Chapter 709 Breakfast Fly-In, 678-362-3123 Apr. 06, 2019, Brooksville, FL. EAA Chapter Monthly Meeting, 813-758-4196 Apr. 06, 2019, Columbia, SC. Celebrate Freedom Foundation Childrens Cancer Partners Open House Fly-In, 803-338-9071 Apr. 06, 2019, Salisbury, NC. EAA Chapter 1083 First Saturday Lunch Apr. 08, 2019, Orlando, FL. AOPA Peaks to Pavement: Applying Lessons from the Backcountry, 800-638-3101

International

Mar. 24, 2019, Echura VIC, Australia. AAAA National Fly-In Mar. 24, 2019, Lacombe, AB. Sunday Donuts, Coffee and Sometimes Homemade Baking Apr. 03, 2019, Pitt Meadows, BC. Aero Club General Meeting, 604-465-0446 Apr. 05, 2019, Cambridge, ON. Gyro Information Night, 519-497-9828 Apr. 06-07, 2019, Cessnock NSW, Australia. Hunter Valley Airshow 2019

NOTHING EXCEPT THE MINT CAN MAKE MONEY WITHOUT ADVERTISING.

– Thomas Babington Maaulay

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General Aviation News —  Buyer’s Guide Marketplace — 800.426.8538

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Aviation Abbreviations

All your favorite writers in one place

6950 - Engines

6990 - Equipment

Custom Engine Overhaul 2-YEAR 500-HOUR WARRANTY “THE Top Rated Shop” Aviation Consumer Survey March 2018

Call LJ at 800-204-0735 FAA Approved Repair Station # VI4R597M

KAWASAKI PACKAGE - SAVE 50% Engine, reduction drive, carburetor, and tuned exhaust. 0-time, 64 lbs, 40hp. J-Bird, 262-6262611, call for free catalog. 6955 - Engine Parts PARTING OUT Lycoming & Continental engines, all parts, large & small! Cores & overhauled parts available. Jerry Meyers Aviation. meyersaviation@gmail.com 888-893-3301.

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For PORTABLE OXYGEN SYSTEMS Or WINDSOCKS

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3310 - Luscombe Parts FREE 400-PG UNIVAIR CATALOG w/hundreds of FAA-PMA’d parts. info@univair.com or www.univair.com Order toll-free 888-4335433. Foreign orders pay postage. 4455 - Stinson FREE 400-PG UNIVAIR CATALOG w/hundreds of FAA-PMA’d parts. info@univair.com or www.univair.com Order toll-free 888-4335433. Foreign orders pay postage. 4600 - Taylorcraft 1940 Taylorcraft BC65/75. Always Hangared. 2400-TT, 1030-SMOH. LSA. Arizona Plane. $15,000 OBO. 503-630-7547. Leave Message. March 2019 Annual. 4605 - Taylorcraft Parts FREE 400-PG UNIVAIR CATALOG w/hundreds of FAA-PMA’d parts. info@univair.com or www.univair.com Order toll-free 888-4335433. Foreign orders pay postage. 5300 - Experimentals Europa XS Monowheel fast build kit. No major layups. Everything firewall aft. Located western Oregon. 503-341-1968. 6950 - Engines O-360-F1A6, 180-HP, “0” SMOH, New Superior Cylinders, Roller Cam, Mags & Harness, Carb. $26K Reduced to $22K Outright. One Stop Aviation, CA 760-721-1389. CASH: WE BUY Continental & Lycoming engines & parts. Used, new, damaged. Jerry Meyers Aviation. meyersaviation@gmail.com 888-893-3301. O-360-A1P, 180-HP, Front GOV. DR.; “0” SMOH, 750 SNEW. Mags, Harness, Carb, $26K Outright, Reduced to $20K. One Stop Aviation, CA 760-721-1389. IO-360-A1A, Narrow Deck, 200hp, 250 SMOH, Fuel System, Mags & Harness. $20K Reduced to $17K Outright. One Stop Aviation, CA 760-721-1389. O-360-J2A. 1241 SNEW, “0” Since Rotor Strike Inspection & Cylinder Overhaul. Mags & Harness, Carb. $25K Reduced to $20K Outright. One Stop Aviation, CA 760-721-1389.

SFRM .......... Since Factory Remanufacture SHS ..............................Since Hot Section SMOH......................Since Major Overhaul SOH.................................. Since Overhaul S/N ....................................Serial Number SPOH ....................... Since Prop Overhaul STOH .......................... Since Top Overhaul STOL........................Short Takeoff/Landing TBO ......................Time Between Overhaul TT ............................................ Total Time TTAE ................ Total Time Airframe/Engine TTAF ........................... Total Time Airframe TTSN .......................Total Time Since New XPDR .................................... Transponder VLF ............................ Very Low Frequency VOR ............................... VHF Omni Range

N

050 - Aeronca FREE 400-PG UNIVAIR CATALOG w/hundreds of FAA-PMA’d parts. info@univair.com or www.univair.com Order toll-free 888-4335433. Foreign orders pay postage. 1900 - Cessna 150 BUYING OR FLYING A CESSNA 150/152? Read the complete, authoritative guide! Third Printing! Officially endorsed by the 150/152 Club! Fly safer, save thousands. You’ll love it! www.cessna150book.com 1912 - Cessna 200 Series Turbo Centurion T210L. 6640-TT, 35-hours Since New Factory TSIO-520-R9B. 35-hours Since New Hartzell 3-blade Scimitar prop HC-J3YF. New and overhauled parts. King Line, Garmin 155 XL TSO GPS, TKM MX-300 NavCom, BF Goodrich WX10A Stormscope, JPI engine monitor, new fuel caps, 6-pt oxygen, sun visors, 4-way intercom, excellent paint, good interior. New tail, Robertson R/Stol kit. Asking $130,000, Contact 360-378-8800. 2030 - Cessna Parts FREE 400-PG UNIVAIR CATALOG w/hundreds of FAA-PMA’d parts. info@univair.com or www.univair.com Order toll-free 888-4335433. Foreign orders pay postage. SELKIRK AVIATION Inc. has FAA approval on composite cowlings for all Cessna 180, 185 & years 1956-1961 Cessna 182 planes. Also interior panels, extended bag kits, glare shields & nose bowl for most C-170 to U206 models. www.selkirk-aviation.com or 208-6649589. 2055 - Champion Parts FREE 400-PG UNIVAIR CATALOG w/hundreds of FAA-PMA’d parts. info@univair.com or www.univair.com Order toll-free 888-4335433. Foreign orders pay postage. 2155 - Citabria Parts FREE 400-PG UNIVAIR CATALOG w/hundreds of FAA-PMA’d parts. info@univair.com or www.univair.com Order toll-free 888-4335433. Foreign orders pay postage. 2550 - Ercoupe Parts FREE 400-PG UNIVAIR CATALOG w/hundreds of FAA-PMA’d parts. info@univair.com or www.univair.com Order toll-free 888-4335433. Foreign orders pay postage.

MB ...................................Marker Beacon MDH .......................Major Damage History MP ...............................Manifold Pressure NDH ...........................No Damage History NM .................................... Nautical Miles Nav................................ Navigation Radio NavCom .................................Navigation/ CommunicationRadio OAT...................... Outside Air Temperature OH ............................................. Overhaul RB ..................................Rotating Beacon RDF ........................Radio Direction Finder RE ........................................Right Engine RG ................................. Retractable Gear RMI ....................Radio Magnetic Indicator RNAV ............................... Area Navigation SBs ................................Service Bulletins SCMOH .......Since Chrome Major Overhaul

E

ELT ............ Emergency Locator Transmitter FD ......................................Flight Director FWF .................................Firewall Forward GPS .................. Global Positioning System GS ...................................... Groundspeed G/S ........................................ Glide Slope GSP ...........................Ground Service Plug HF ................................... High Frequency hp.......................................... horsepower HSI ............... Horizontal Situation Indicator IFR ....................... Instrument Flight Rules ILS.................. Instrument Landing System LE ...........................................Left Engine LMB..........................Light Marker Beacon LOC ........................................... Localizer Loran............. Long Range Area Navigation LR..........................................Long Range LRT ...............................Long Range Tanks

AV

A/C .................................. Air Conditioning ADs ......................Airworthiness Directives ADF ................. Automatic Direction Finder AH ...................................Artificial Horizon A&P ........................Airframe & Powerplant AP .........................................Audio Panel A/P ............................................Autopilot CDI ...................Course Deviation Indicator CHT ................. Cylinder Heat Temperature Com .......................Communication Radio C/R ................................ Counter Rotating CT ........................ Carburetor Temperature DF ...................................Direction Finder DG ...................................Directional Gyro DME ..........Distance Measuring Equipment EFIS ................................Electronic Flight Instrument System EGT.................... Exhaust Gas Temperature

TI O N

I

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Ever feel like something’s just missing in your life? The Pulse of Aviation delivers a daily dose of aviation news every weekday free to your email inbox.

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Your ad could have been RIGHT HERE, RIGHT NOW! catching people’s attention. Call Ben Sclair at (800) 426-8538 to reserve your space in our next issue. Smart Birds advertise in General Aviation News because it makes dollars and sense.


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9000 - Survival

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Cessna 120 to 210F Champ Scout Citabria Decalathon 9650 - Arizona PRESCOTT, ARIZONA. 14+ acres with 2200 ft Airstrip 20 minutes from downtown Prescott. County Approved & FAA Registered. AZ46. Daryl Austermiller. 928-379-3080. 9650 - North Carolina We Sell Airpark & Airstrip Properties in North & South Carolina. Call or email us to find or sell your aviation real estate in these states. 704-798-5214 or geneva@nc-airparks.com.

9650 - Real Estate Publisher’s Notice: All real estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to the Fair Housing Act which makes it illegal to advertise “any preference, limitation or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status or national origin, or an intention, to make any such preference, limited or discrimination.” Familial status includes children under the age of 18 living w/parents or legal custodian, pregnant women & people securing custody of children under 18. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate which is in violation of the law. Our readers are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available on an equal opportunity basis. To complain of discrimination call HUD toll-free 800-6699777. Toll-free for the hearing impaired: 800927-9277.

Discovery Trail Farm Airpark Sequim, Washington

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Put GAN in your hand! Please allow 4-6 weeks for delivery of first issue. Canada - add $10 additional postage per year. First Class postage (U.S.) - $78 per year. The subscription rate is $85 per year for countries outside of Canada and Mexico. All payments in U.S. dollars.

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DOING BUSINESS WITHOUT ADVERTISING IS LIKE WINKING AT A GIRL IN THE DARK. YOU KNOW WHAT YOU’RE DOING BUT NOBODY ELSE DOES. – Stuart Britt

Get your advertising package together today. Call Ben Sclair at (800) 426-8538 or www.GAN.aero

March 21, 2019

9650 - Texas

9650 - Washington

LOCATION! LOCATION! LOCATION! West Houston Airport: 10,000 sqft lots--you design your perfect hangar home. 4000’ runway, AWOS, full service amenities. Jet A/100LL fuel will be delivered to your hangar door. Full service Maintenance & Avionics Shops located on field. www.aerovillas.com to see what AeroVillas has to offer, woody@westhoustonairport.com 281-492-2130. 9650 - Washington Build dream home/hangar. Wooded half-acre lot in Sunshine Acres, Diamond Point in Sequim, WA. Ocean view. Taxi plane to airport. 714-615-8062 or 858-472-3320.

SAN JUAN AVIATION ESTATES: BLAKELY ISLAND WA. The San Juan‚Äôs Premier Airpark. Paved Lighted Runway. Exceptional Marina. “Owner Access Only” to 3000ac private protected forestland w/2 ‚Äì 70ac Lakes - “No tourists”. Runway Luxury Cottage w/Superb Marine View $595K. Build Hangar/Home, already has Guest Cabin: $450K. Judy, Flying Island Realty, 360-375-6302 or cell 360420-4346. judy@flyingislandrealty.com www. flyingislandrealty.com PILOTS! Home and hangar, 2.6ac, county AP(KTDO) thru-the-fence, GPS approach, fuel, midway between SEA and PDX. $850K, 360-864-8076.

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of products advertised in General Aviation News have a better chance of being sold because they get delivered to customer mailboxes twice a month along with a load of great content that keeps our readers coming back for more. PLUS, your ad will appear in our digital edition published twice a month to www.GeneralAviationNews.com for even more exposure.

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